* Posts by Mike 16

591 posts • joined 17 Jun 2009

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What’s the real point of being a dev? It's saving management from themselves

Mike 16
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Re: Nice One...

The difference can boil down to the sort of case where a developer, on their own time, noodles around with a "Plan B", because mgmt's Plan A is clearly bollocks, and when the wail "The sky is falling and we have two weeks to get this right or we shut the doors" goes out, a diving catch with the "hobbiest" Plan B saves the day. The alternative, when I thought that the architecture astronauts must clearly have a handle on what looked like a risky practice, because mahogany row had so much faith in them, so I stuck to my assigned tasks, did in fact result in closing the doors.

You're not being insolent when you do what you are paid to do while being paid to do it, but build an emergency exit on your own. Several companies I have worked at actually encouraged employee exploration, often with company materials and even some portion of the work week.

BTW, in Re 4GLs. I just ran across an FARGO manual on bitsavers. For those not already spending their pension, this grew up into RPG. Designed to allow folks with extensive experience on plugboard-programmed electro-mechanical accounting machines, but none with those new-fangled computers, to use the IBM1401. The "You don't need to be a programmer" notion has been a thing for some time. So has the "You don't need any domain knowledge, just a C.S. degree" notion, to be fair.

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YouTube sin-bins account of KRACK WPA2 researcher

Mike 16
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In Range

AFAICT, one does not have to be "in range" personally. One only need by in _control_ of a device with WiFi, that is in range. There are _many_ WiFi access points "in range" as I type this, and probably significantly more phones/computers/IoT-thingies. The odds that _one_ of them is under the control of some miscreants halfway around the world may be non-negligible.

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Didn't install a safety-critical driverless car patch? Bye, insurance!

Mike 16
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Re: Separate safety updates from everything else.

That was my first concern. If the manufacturers are like those of phones or computers, one can bet that a "critical Security update" will also include some "feature" whose purpose is to either force an upgrade (i.e. replacement) or otherwise monetize the user. Maybe pause in front of every fast-food outlet that has a co-branding agreement and suggest that "Now would be a great time for a Whopper(tm)". Or more subtly, make music streaming services that have not paid up mysteriously unreliable.

And of course, once cars are chatting among each other, you'll be offered the ability to bid against all others in the vicinity to not be the target in the event of a "Trolley-car problem" occurring.

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FCC Commissioner blasts new TV standard as a 'household tax'

Mike 16
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Re: OTA TV

The new (since ATSC switchover) definition of "fringe area" is apparently "50 km from city center". Yes, I can get OTA from over 200km, often, but only in some directions, and lost quite a few local stations at the switchover. Who could have guessed that hills could attenuate signal?

I also have to wonder if the new-new standard will fix the often horrendous skew between video and audio. I first noticed it on an analog TV, during the dual-standard period. Figured out that while the local-transmitter -> TV path was analog, the networks had taken to digital transmission from network to local station. I am still baffled why, 90(?) years after Western Electric introduced sound-on-film, the boffins at Digital R' Us can't keep sound within a few seconds of picture. Some films seem to have been badly dubbed from English to English (Both cable-QAM and OTA, BTW, so it's presumably a problem in constructing the stream)

"Better Compression" will also presumably mean more situations where a line across the screen and a tick of sound (analog) gets turned into muted audio and a picture in the witness protection progam for several seconds (at a crucial plot-point, of course) .

Yeah, I'm old. Old enough to remember when CATV was becoming a thing, and political battles about actual communities versus private industry featured arguments about how the private path would lead to vast amounts of quality programming and no commercials, at a nominal fee. How's that working out?

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Night out in London tonight: Beer, Reg and platform wars

Mike 16
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Groups and strife

(Religious division) I'll just leave this here:

https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2005/sep/29/comedy.religion

(is it OK here to admit to reading the Grauniad? Honest, I only look at the articles)

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They've only gone and made a chemical-threat-detecting ring

Mike 16
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Probably illegal to wear

In any parts of the U.S. that have outlawed photography of environmental hazards on private property and reporting to environmental authorities.

Now that the EPA is being re-purposed, this can only spread. What you don't know, you can't talk about, and what you don't talk about, you can't get arrested and beaten for.

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It's 2017... And Windows PCs can be pwned via DNS, webpages, Office docs, fonts – and some TPM keys are fscked too

Mike 16
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VN Blaming.

Von Neumann gets both too much credit ("accidentally" circulating a group report with only his name) and too much blame. For two reasons:

1) The machine described in the (in)famous paper was to an extent "tagged". That is, each word had a bit (the setting of which was left as an exercise to the reader, but was part of the program loading process) to distinguish instructions from data. Not some modern sort of "throw an exception far enough up that the code that finally catches it knows sod-all about the context", but "If you store to an instruction, only allow the address part to be modified" and "If you execute data, treat it as a 'load immediate'". Instruction modification was needed because B-Boxes had not yet been invented in the UK, nor (as index registers) patented by IBM in the US.

2) Even doing a stronger separation of code and data (e.g. the NX bit fixing the elision of segment-based control on the way to pages) gets you only so far. Your JVM may be immutable code, but it will be interpreting "data" (byte-codes) from who knows where, manipulating other data, probably all in one bit-soup "for efficiency".

If you want _real_ separation, look into the Fairchild Symbol Computer. Even the compiler was "hardware".

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Blade Runner 2049 review: Scott's vision versus Villeneuve's skill

Mike 16
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A bit of a rebirth?

You mean like that experienced by Abbie Normal in Young Frankenstein?

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FCC gives Google's broadband balloons 'experimental license' in Puerto Rico

Mike 16
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Re: Uh oh

-- the outfit that told the world it should get over not having any privacy --

IIRC, that was Sun (well, McNealy). But hey, if the web isn't good for revisionism, what is it good for?

Probably several tech leaders have said similar, or at least had it attributed to them. Still waiting for Palantir to speak up, but suspect they won't. Just like the guys boasting most about their conquests are not really getting it, and vice versa.

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Dumb bug of the week: Apple's macOS reveals your encrypted drive's password in the hint box

Mike 16
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Upgrade?

I think you have a typo there. It's possibly an upDATE, but I haven't gotten an upGRADE from Apple in years. Sideways occasionally,. Downwards way too often. But _UP_? Not so much.

(Not to be ungrateful for the bug-fixes, but I really wish they wouldn't bundle them with even more bugs)

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There's a way to dodge Fasthosts' up-to-160% domain renewal hike but you're not gonna like it

Mike 16
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Re: Fasthosts.. meh.

Pestering for card details years after you left? Sounds like GoDaddy's behavior toward me. I wonder who copied who. As for "Just Move", I have never used Fasthosts, but experience with other registrars and hosting companies leads me to expect you should block out some time on your calendar and be prepared to be reminded of the Petshop sketch (The admin server is currently pining for the fjords...)

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Dome, sweet dome: UAE mulls Martian city here on Earth ahead of Red Planet colonization

Mike 16
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Re: 600,000 in 100 years

First off, I'd suggest that any such enthusiastic male volunteers first watch

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072730/

Also a "fan out" of 10 may be both impractical and illegal (depending on jurisdiction)

http://loweringthebar.net/2008/09/man-with-86-wiv.html

But above all, human nature and emotions are unlikely to continue this for long, and while the sponsors might be paying your way outbound, the return ticket is your problem.

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Power meltdown 'fries' SourceForge, knocks site's servers titsup

Mike 16
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Re: Same everywhere

And for years, apparently. I recall reading a similar "fuel pump not on the right side of UPS" story in Lessons Learned (or not) from the (1965) Great Northeast (US) Blackout. Also similarly about a sump-pump in one hospital being considered "not critical", at least until seepage from the nearby river rose to the level needed to short out the generator in the basement.

OTOH, there were rumors of a surge of births nine months later, although it's hard to imagine losing access to SourceForge and /. would have that effect.

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So. Should I upgrade to macOS High Sierra?

Mike 16
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Re: 1 nanosecond?

1 nanosecond precision does not imply 1 nanosecond accuracy, as those of us who got marked down for having unjustifiably more significant digits in out lab results knew. See also: laughing at Spock's reporting of probabilities.

IIRC IBM's System 360 (1965) specified a higher resolution than the clock speed of any model at the announcement. Each model added the appropriate number of "ticks" for each actual timer update.

As previously mentioned, "make" really wants precise time-stamps. Also accurate ones. A build cluster with large NetApp storage array was the bane of my existence some years back. I always wonder if some of the problem being that NetApp were the only folks I knew to keep "Spread Spectrum Clock" enabled in the BIOS after passing RFI tests.

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Want to keep in contact with friends and family without having to sell your personal data?

Mike 16
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Photo Frame Redux?

Or post-dialup Audrey?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3Com_Audrey

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Sputnik-1 replica used to test the real thing goes under the hammer

Mike 16
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reentry

The reentry problem can be mitigated by not re-entering, or by "doing your thing" before the heat builds up too much. I have seen speculation that the happy-talk about NK: "They may have rockets and warheads but they haven't solved reentry" is too optimistic, ignoring the altitudes where EMP can be effective. Why turn Silicon Valley into a glassy plain when you can just hobble all the electronics on the west coast? (I'm guessing that Rocketman has the same attitude about that area that POTUS does, so that's my assumed target)

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Sysadmin tells user CSI-style password guessing never w– wait WTF?! It's 'PASSWORD1'!

Mike 16
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So many memories

1) An employer had pretty much every Windows machine in one (literally globe-spanning) domain, with a password consisting of the company name and some numbers in an easily recognized sequence (because best practices require changing it periodically...) "network neighborhood" took several minutes to populate.

2) Another employer had a handy feature for any Windows user who occasionally had to log into the Unix systems. Complete with a drop-down menu of all the usernames, and no password needed (Because SSH is secure, right?). "Who do you want to be today?"

3) Offices with windows (The real sort)? Not me. At yet another employer, those went to the folks who made the concept drawings (literally, on paper) for presentations of upcoming products. On the ground floor, next to public parking, drawing boards facing out for the best natural light.

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Mike 16
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password is secret

Happened to me. Bought some surplus industrial-control systems (Idris. Ask grandpa). Had to call the vendor to get the root password. yep.

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FCC taps the brakes on fudging US broadband speed amid senator fury

Mike 16
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Re: 600 baud down, 200 up.

Now that's crazy talk.

Very few serial ports (or USB serial adapters) made in the last decade or so will go down to 200. Something about using 16-bit clock dividers instead of the 20 (24?) on the original IBM PC, and making it sorta work with a (usually fixed) pre-scaler.

Or are you envisioning a special WiFi box from your ISP that just throttles the crap out of connections?

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Dear rioters: Hiding your face with scarves, hats can't fool this AI system

Mike 16
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Accuracy is not needed.

As implied a few comments up, the mission of the police has for years not been "Find the perpetrator", but "find someone we can arrest, preferably not sympathetic or able to pay a lawyer, so we can mark this case successfully closed".

Yes, I am aware that there are many fine, honest police officers, but it chaps my hide every time I hear the phrase "a few bad apples' used as an excuse, as if the whole sentence didn't continue "will spoil the barrel". As the Wells Fargo case showed, management need not _order_ illegal/unethical behavior. They just need to lay out "proper incentives". Promotion for the team that closes most cases, traffic duty for nit-pickers who insist on solving crimes.

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US cops can't keep license plate data scans secret without reason

Mike 16
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Requests?

I suspect that requests from "Friends of the PD Widows and Orphans Fund" will be handled the same way they have been for several hundred years, probably more expeditiously than "going through channels". The thing about laws, and court decisions, is that they are only effective when obeyed. In some other universe, perhaps.

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Minnesota Senator calls out US watchdogs: Why so cozy with Amazon?

Mike 16
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What I want to know

Is whether AmaFoods will adopt its parent's casual attitude toward counterfeit and other dodgy goods. Getting a fake pair of headphones is not usually the sort of life-threatening event as getting fake kale, or meat past it's "Sell or Freeze by" date.

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NSA ramps up PR campaign to keep its mass spying powers

Mike 16
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Re: A click is just a click

If you have ever clicked on a bit.ly or youtu.be link, that'll be good enough

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Is it possible to control Amazon Alexa, Google Now using inaudible commands? Absolutely

Mike 16
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People who read this

have also looked for:

"how to make sure the auto-playing videos embedded on my site cannot be blocked."

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DreamHost smashed in DDoS attack: Who's to blame? Take a guess...

Mike 16
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And nobody has yet mentioned

the very real possibility that antifa and similar are the same sort that I recall from anti-war rallies in the 1970s, infiltrators from the very groups they are claiming to be opposing. You know, that somewhat suspiciously well-groomed young man who throws the first bottle and is grabbed by the police, but somehow never turns up in jail with the rest of you.

Just sayin

(Yeah, fun times. A housemate, a bit of a dick but not a violent sort, was commanded by an officer to drop a water-balloon he was holding. When he did, he was arrested for assaulting an officer with a deadly weapon and destruction of evidence - the balloon. Meanwhile, those guys who just showed up in the neighborhood and were urging all and sundry to join their rock-throwing were, as I said, suspiciously absent from any punishment)

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What code is running on Apple's Secure Enclave security chip? Now we have a decryption key...

Mike 16
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Demanding your PIN

Has the UK stopped making it illegal to refuse to hand over "passwords'? Or do PINs not count as passwords?

As for the US it may not be legal to demand your PIN, but if the friendly officer merely politely asks, while swinging his baton ever closer to your head, well, nothing wrong with that, right?

Also, the "no effect on security" is not quite true. When a black-hat examines that code and discovers a vulnerability either hoarded by the TLAs, or planted by their moles, you can bet that security will be affected.

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Strip club selfie bloke's accidental discharge gets him 6 years in clink

Mike 16
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I'd have to guess

He was holding it wrong.

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Hey America! Your internet is going to be so much better this January

Mike 16
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In related news

The Bureau of Standards has declared that it will peg the definition of the standard "inch" to the International Plot unit of "centimeter". This will allow POTUS to claim his hands are 12 inches long (YUGE!) and incidentally make them feet.

In re "Broadband": My first non-dialup internet was over Cable, at 1.5Mbps. But it really _was_ 1.5Mbps, reliably, measured frequently (and a static routable IP address) . Nowadays I have "up to 20", which I can't recall ever having caught above 6. So it looks like redefinition is "in the air".

YMMV TTFN

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New Amiga to go on sale in late 2017

Mike 16
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Re: Just remember... @Mike 16

Minor nit-pick: PaperBoy was, IIRC, PDP-11-based. I recently managed to get a T-11 chip as was used on the "System II" games. If my memory is not further addled, the "System II" games were also mostly programmed in BLISS-16, cross-compiled on a VMS Vax-11/780. _L_o_n_g_ time ago...

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Mike 16
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Re: Just remember...

A few slight corrections to a generally accurate post:

The Amiga chipset was in development before Atari got involved (other than their involvement of pissing off anough 2600/400/800 designers to make them available to Amiga). Atari did not "commision" them, and I don't recall there being any intent of using the chipset in coin-op. Atari came in with financing they needed, in exchange for rights to produce a game-console with the chipset, and a PC after a specified "head start" for the Amiga-branded one. This was a safe bet because Amiga was unlikely to have a saleable product much before the date that Atari could compete. (Source: I interviewed with Amiga, knowing some folks there, before any Atari connection. My life was not in a state where I could take the risk right then, but I stayed, and remain, in contact with a few)

The ST design already existed (was in progress) when TTL got Atari Consumer. It was designed by some C64 folks who had left with JT when he was ousted at Commodore. (Source, folks who were at Atari under both regimes, at least for a while. The rumor was that JT essentially bought the Atari logo to slap on the designated heir)

JT knew of the Amiga folks, and possibly their connection to Atari, before the sale, and his intention was to strangle the Amiga in its cradle, not to leverage it for his own future product (which was already in progress, see above). He was really pissed that it had escaped, and how it had escaped. (Source, some of the same as above, and few ex-commodore folks with more access to Mahogany row. This is the most tenuous of what I "know" via such rumors.)

The Amiga guys were pretty scrupulous about avoiding 2600/400/800 I.P. in designing the chipset. So there are philosophical "bloodlines, but nothing that could expose them to patent lawsuits if the Atari/Warner deal soured. They were not stupid. (Source: again, my personal connections with them).

(OTOH, Warner/Atari had a record of "winning" lawsuits and as a result sending money to the "losers". there was a joke at the time that to get rich in the games industry, just get Atari to sue you, and lose :-)

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She's back! Jessica Rosenworcel returns to FCC as America's net neutrality row heats up

Mike 16
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Re: Who's to say we will have to wait until 2020?

Winning a Senate seat is about state-level politics. Believe it or not some residents of "Red" states like Kale and don't want to queue up for DNA testing before peeing, so it is _possible_ for a senate seat to flip. In the house, most districts are so ruthlessly gerrymandered that unseating the incumbent would require and act of congress, if not an act of God. Oh, and the gerrymandering preserves the majority in the state legislature too, so will continue, as most states leave redistricting to to those already in power.

As Fred Brooks says: "There is no Silver Bullet".

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Sun's core in a real spin, but you wouldn't know just by looking at it

Mike 16
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Misleading?

I came here for another Oracle rant.

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No vulns. No hardwired passwords. Patchable. Congress dreams of IoT: Impossible Online Tech

Mike 16
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Re: "must not have any known security vulnerabilities, must have the ability to be patched"

--- Presumably, no known vulnerabilities when you buy the thing and needs to be patched if/when new bugs are found later. ---

Or, you know, new vulnerabilities are introduced by patching. Wouldn't be the first time.

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It’s 2017 and Hayes AT modem commands can hack luxury cars

Mike 16
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EOL

While I have "fun" using computers from the last millenium, the vendors (of both software and hardware) do seem to be hell-bent to make the "Clean Cup, move down" moment at 5 years or less. Yes, you _can_ run _a_ browser on _a_ laptop from 2009, but good luck using any of the "modern" websites if you do. And then there's the "You can connect to your new iPhone, _or_ run Adobe Creative Suite" aspect of OS updates from a certain vendor.

But the reason I came here is that I just read, on another site which will not be named, that the patents on the 80486 have expired, and the Pentium patents are doomed soon. I recalled that (cough) some major OS suppliers are dropping 486 support. Can it be that they don't want to deal with a flurry of "almost a 486" CPUs, each with their own quirks?

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It took DEF CON hackers minutes to pwn these US voting machines

Mike 16
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Timeline

---

The US survived using non-internet voting for over two hundred years.

---

Not sure where you are counting from. The literal "Voting Machines" (mechanical devices with levers) were quite famous in the day for their behavior on behalf of the figurative "Voting Machines" that controlled several major cities. This was early 20th century IIRC, so a good bit less than 200 years of successful non-internet voting.

Meanwhile, hacking a voting machine (or a whole county's worth) only gets you so far. The real action is in hacking the central tabulating systems, as allegedly happened in Diebold's home state of Ohio a few elections back. It's another form of leverage :-)

And we have a lot less than three years. Gerrymandering is (typically) under the control of state legislatures, so those boring state elections make a big difference.

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Virgin Media's profanity warning triggered by chief exec's name

Mike 16
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Pink

Was that the filter that blocked the website of a pig farm (mentioned in ElReg some years back)?

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The Italian Jobs: Bloke thrown in the cooler for touting Apple knockoffs

Mike 16
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Counterfeit?

Or "Ghost Shift"? (Where a factory "accidentally" makes more of a product than the customer ordered, and "disposes" of them via trash haulers who for some reason have a landfill in another country).

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US Homeland Sec boss has snazzy new laptop bomb scanning tech – but admits he doesn't know what it's called

Mike 16
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Re: Flashbacks (Petaluma)

You got something against Wrist Wrestling? Or is it the poultry and dairy farms? They at least have an old-school Radio Shack, with components, not just phone-plans.

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Mike 16
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Undetectable Timer

Can't they just use a Casio F91-W ("Terrorist Watches" that,combined with certain physical characteristics, could win you a very unpleasant time at the airport, and maybe a free ride to Cuba)?

More seriously, the TRS80 Model 100 had provision for the laptop's own real-time clock to bring it out of sleep and run a program at any designated time. 1980s tech, so I'm sure not everyone has forgotten how to do it.

As for not understanding the tech, I suspect this is just his way of (not) saying: "Well, it's a CAT-scan machine like you find in many hospitals, but these will be a special version that we cannot discuss until we have all the shell corporations in place to prevent a recurrence of the kerfuffle about the last Scanner binge, where due to certain traitors, it somehow appeared that members of Homeland Security had a financial interest in the one approved vendor"

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Reg reader turns Geek's Guides to Britain into Geek's Map of Britain

Mike 16
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I'd have to skip the Hovercraft Museum

Wife has a bad reaction to eels.

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Burglary, robbery, kidnapping and a shoot-out over… a domain name?!

Mike 16
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Confirmation?

Did Hopkins plan to wait until the transfer was confirmed? by GoDaddy? Eventually everybody has to sleep, or tend to other bodily functions, giving Deyo the opportunity to escape

Confession: I used GoDaddy back in the day when I was young and foolish. No longer young. But they still keep sending me notice that the credit card I registered for automatic payments for services I did have, but not for a decade or more, has expired, so "My account has been frozen"

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Europe's 'one patent court to rule them all' vision may be destroyed by EPO shenanigans

Mike 16
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Why the surprise

at what has gone on? Don't any commenters here have any experience in corporate or non-profit organizations (we expect it in clearly labeled politics)? The only rare thing is how long it has gone on, but I doubt he is more the one sigma above median for "entrenched petty dictator of allegedly noble group".

It's just that the EPO has a bit more visibility than the East Frogbottom Library Acquisitions Committee.

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The Atari retro games box is real… sort of

Mike 16
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Re: Atari 2600: the original and still the best?

I came here to make that point about "original", but you beat me. Thanks for the image.

Anyway, on the "attraction of nostalgia" front, when burglars took my television, back about 1982, they took the time to unhook the (heavy sixer) VCS and leave it behind.

They also left me the VT-100, so maybe just no taste for nerd-gear.

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Presto crypto: IBM releases gruntier, faster Z14 mainframe

Mike 16
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Re: typo? or my parochialism?

A co-worker used to have a news clipping tacked to his wall. It was a headline from the Vietnam War era (not that far past, at the time): "Newsmen visit 'bombed' dykes". I did have to wonder if those newsmen were visiting bars in certain parts of San Francisco, rather than farms in North Vietnam (where they would likely be more welcome).

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Pastor la vista, baby! FCC enforcers shut down church pirate radio

Mike 16
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Wimps these days...

50 years ago, a high-school friend ran a "pirate station" like so many PFYs. That's also about the time I read in a book from the 50s about somewhat more muscular FCC enforcement. Seems there was another "pastor" specializing in racist rants and Fascist propaganda, and unlike today, it was considered rude. More to the point, of course, he was interfering with licensed stations. Problem was, his transmitter, while easily visible from the U.S., was actually in Mexico, where neither the locals nor the Federales had any interest in helping end this operation. So, the story goes, one FCC field agent took things in his own hands, bought a (barely) running old truck and some explosive (need to clear them stumps somehow), and sent this sorta-guided missile through the barbed-wire border fence to take out the transmitter.

The U.S. presumably still does this sort of extra-judicial problem solving, but more quietly. You gotta say they did it with style back in the 1930s.

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€100 'typewriter' turns out to be €45,000 Enigma machine

Mike 16
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Re: €100 seems steep for an old typewriter

--- $ 50,000 for a measly Apple I. ---

Quite possibly the worst investment decision I ever made was to turn down the opportunity to buy an Apple I for $75 (or all three the seller had for $200). I occasionally comfort myself with the thought that it's a tossup for bigger fool between me and him, as I believe he sold all three eventually at about that price.

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Multics resurrected: Proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

Mike 16
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Multics Hardware security

Funny you should mention Multics on Modern Hardware. When I first got the docs on the 80286, I said to myself: "looks like they want to run Multics on this beast". Rings, real segments, etc. Then I started using it and found that the segments were not quite as lovely as they were described (loading a descriptor was slow, and no caches for them). Intel could have fixed this for the 386, but it seems that the Great Unwashed _really_ wanted a memory model just like whatever Vax or SunOs machine they had in school, so they added fairly conventional page-maps as well. The death knell was probably when the folks who thought it was the bee's knees to execute code on the stack led the march to "forget segments" and map them all to one flat (page mapped) address space.

I also recall fighting with a gcc re-target over which of the configuration stuff to control things like stack layout would actually do so, or was "more like guidelines, really". Had to wonder WTF they would do with something like the IBM360 ABI that allowed "bushy stacks" (ala Burroughs) or the Power or Natsemi16032 that supported function pointers that were more than an index of octets in the one undifferentiated memory space.

In summary, Modern Hardware (for some values of "Modern") has at least vestigial support for Multics-worthy security and isolation. Modern Software developers for the most part seem more willing to eat a live toad than accept the constraints (and re-training) that might involve.

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Crashed RadioShack flogs off its IPv4 stash

Mike 16
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8 addresses, or 6?

Or at most 7, even if we forget the "Sun Broadcast" address. Plus trying to convince your upstream to route such a small slice. We used to get grief about routing our paired class-Cs (for 512, er, 508 routable addresses).

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Tape lives! The tape archive bit bucket is becoming bottomless

Mike 16
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Re: 8" floppy

No worries, I still have 4 low-mileage 8" drives and a working controller, so I can sort you out.

What concerns me is the 10^19 bit error rate. I hope they meant 10^-19. Otherwise, you're in Commodore floppy error rates.

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Boffins' five eyes surprise: Bees correct colour for ambient light

Mike 16
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What if you are trying to get a shot of a vampire coming out of his crypt at sunset?

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