* Posts by Mike 16

720 posts • joined 17 Jun 2009

Page:

GCHQ asks tech firms to pretty please make IoT devices secure

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Mandatory Standards

One must presume that any mandatory standards promulgated by GCHQ (or other five-eyes "security" agencies) will contain NOBUS (Nobody But Us) provisions. Secure from everybody but GCHQ and friends, where some friends are such bastions of freedom and decency as [redacted per security spec]

4
0

Scanning an Exchange server for a virus that spreads via email? What could go wrong?

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Sweet memories...

@steviebuck

While I agree that a lot of conscientious people worked a lot of hours in the run-up to Y2K, IIRC a patch for Windows believing 2000 would be a leap year came out in something like November 1999. This despite earlier complaints from fin-tech people that computations of future value or the like were odd. The thing is,, sometimes you don't just need to know what day today is, but what day 60 or 180 days from now will be.

2
0

Facebook's new always-listening home appliance kit Portal doesn't do Facebook

Mike 16
Bronze badge

eVilla?

Is that Cruella's sister?

4
0

Intel's commitment to making its stuff secure is called into question

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Jumpers

Here's the thing. While I agree that in an ideal world where computers are managed by knowledgeable technicians with both the skill and the attitude to "do stuff right", any firmware mods (let alone JTAG access) would be controlled by a hardware jumper, preferably one that is either:

A) Verified to be disconnected before the "special mode" it was needed for can be exited back to "normal mode" BIOS/UEFI)

or

B) In such a position in the case that the vulnerable system cannot be buttoned up and slid back into the rack.

That just "doesn't scale". When Spectre/Meltdown or similar are discovered and (at least partially) mitigated, the small business with under 10 servers can do the trudge from one to the next with a "crash cart", and probably has one person who, because they need to be a jack-of-all-trades, has all the needed skills. Now consider even a medium-size outfit (like one of my former employers) who has three or four rows of a dozen or more racks with at least a dozen servers per rack. How many crash-carts do they have? How many adequately skilled IT techs can you cram into each aisle, if you even have them?

One might argue that hardware designers should be more about reliability and security than the current mania for speed and cost, or that software developers should dial back the "Ship it and deal with any problems in the next release, or maybe never, Does never work for you?"

That argument is unlikely to get much consideration from folks who need to keep the lights on in the face of financial and schedule demands. In this universe anyway. "Damage to reputation" doesn't seem to actually happen much anymore. Pretty much all the "victim companies" of massive data breaches are still in business, and no corporate officers are in jail.

Everybody wants quality, damn few want to pay for it.

1
0

What could be more embarrassing for a Russian spy: Their info splashed online – or that they drive a Lada?

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: @mark i 2

-- They were better made than the Ural a friend rather foolishly bought which kept losing compression till he discovered the cylinder studs were made of mild steel and kept stretching. --

Should have bought a Marusho, if he definitely wanted a not-BMW. :-)

2
0
Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Or

--- It's like a "get out of jail" card when driving in Russia but could be a "get arrested and deported" card elsewhere. ---

What spy, or spy-wannabe, has only one set of ID?

5
0

Curiosity's computer silent on science, baffling boffins

Mike 16
Bronze badge

To be fair

It would be difficult to have the human operator touch "OK" on Curiosity's screen, so "Always accept all updates" was their only possible choice, although I might quibble with the "don't bother even notifying the user" bit.

Or maybe the decline in c ( http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/c-decay.html ) has messed with the comms gear, but only for "fake science" results like "Mars is definitely over 6000 years old"

2
0

No, the Mirai botnet masters aren't going to jail. Why? 'Cos they help Feds nab cyber-crims

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Two minds

I agree that incarceration is probably a lose/lose for society, but I can't help wondering if there is more to it.

I can't shake the notion that they will be employed mainly in creating malware for the FBI rather than on chasing other outlaws.

The Abagnale reference is taken, yet you don't typically hire a ninja to trim your topiary, no matter how good he is with a sword. But if you are darn tired of that pesky neighbor, it might make sense.

2
0

Judge: Georgia's e-vote machines are awful – but go ahead and use them

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Queues and competence.

The queues are typically produced deliberately, in districts that do not typically align with the party controlling the elections board. Those people on the elections board are quite competent at assuring that only the "right" people are elected.

Think Occam once in a while, not just Hanlon.

5
0
Mike 16
Bronze badge

hostile foreign powers

Who needs hostile foreign powers when we have plenty of hostile domestic (and trans-national) powers to subvert our elections?

5
0

Guys, geez... finally 5Gs: AT&T grows super-fast mobile net city rollout

Mike 16
Bronze badge

So how many seconds

of 1080p low-latency gaming does it take to hit the "don't call it a cap" on your "unlimited data" plan and get throttled to 200kbps?

Also, how long before some buffoon walks in front of a bus while using an augmented reality headset that displays it as a coach and four unicorns?

(and as other have mentioned, how long does it take to walk out of your coverage area?)

0
0

Volkswagen faces fresh Dieselgate lawsuit in Germany – report

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Meanwhile BMW

is recalling some of their diesel autos:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-bmw-recall/bmw-recalls-324000-cars-in-europe-after-korean-engine-fires-faz-idUSKBN1KS1ST

I don't know about you, but spontaneous combustion seems a more immediate issue than emissions cheating.

Of course, BMW could always ask this comment to be removed as a "Right to be forgotten".

5
0

Dear America: Want secure elections? Stick to pen and paper for ballots, experts urge

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Since the US is aware that their last election was rigged

So, another "less rigged" election, run by the folks elected in the previous, rigged, election(s)?

How's that supposed to work?

Note the undercurrent in the various discussions. Dems generally favor methods that require a lot of "foot troops" to subvert, while GOP generally favor methods that require a few select points to be subverted, often at substantial monetary cost.

3
0

Roskosmos admits that Soyuz 'meteorite' hole had more earthly origins

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Not only Russians

Back in the 1960s I read a book from the 50s or earlier about the U.S. Navy's submarine program, including a disturbing story from the early days. A naval inspector noticed a small pit on the pressure hull of a sub under construction. As a bureaucrat, he of course had a paperclip handy, and was astonished to find that the "pit" was a hole, all the way through. Rushing to the shipyard management to report it, he was confidently assured that since the hole was "above the waterline" and would be covered by paint, there was no problem.

Pressure differentials work either way, but construction by the lowest (or best connected) bidder is a constant.

24
2

Lyon for speed, San Francisco for money, Amsterdam for fun: the best cities to be a techie

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Maybe RS should move

To a city so tech-friendly that they can find a web-designer who doesn't make a hash of the images, or doesn't rely on images rather than text. I can see how some people would consider their "Gender Equality" (or possibly "hook-up sex") icon appropriate for "Quality of life" (at least in Firefox 61.0.2, MacOS Sierra), but I have to believe there is more to quality of life. Little intangibles like not having to cope with inept web-designers.

5
0

You can buy Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins' mansion for a cool $13m

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Have to move to California?

Why? Are there some low bridges or narrow tunnels on the route from Lost Gators to Whereverville?

Or did you mean selling the house _and_ the land?

0
0

ABBYY woes: Doc-reading software firm leaves thousands of scans blowing in wind

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: No data was lost to an unknown party during the exposure.

You need to parse that in the lawyerese sense. Maybe data was lost, but they know who nicked it, so it was not lost to an unknown party. As to whether that "knowledge" is more detailed that "User A. Nony. Mouse at an IP address 'somewhere in China'", We'll never know. And more importantly, as others have noted, neither will the customers whose data went walkies.

1
0

Salesforce boss Marc Benioff objects to US immigration policy so much, he makes millions from, er, US immigration

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Help from a broad

Note that all of the president's wives (so far) have been "from abroad". There are some jobs U.S. citizens won't take.

14
4

Muslim American woman sues US border cops: Gimme back my seized iPhone's data!

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: There are zero rights at the border...

Note that "inland" is a bit of a misnomer. The "border" (and Constitution Exclusion Zone) surrounds any airport with at least one international flight. I don't know how frequent that flight has to be. Maybe they just have to launch a yearly weather balloon headed in the general direction of Canada or Mexico?

All your rights are belong to U.S.!

49
1

You want how much?! Israel opts not to renew its Office 365 vows

Mike 16
Bronze badge

3 days in advance is plenty of time ...

@Alan Brown

3 days in advance is plenty of time to discover problems.

What I see is far too many people showing up hopelessly underprepared and then expecting the local IT folk to drop everything to make it work.

True Dat! Working backstage for a fairly well-known conference (Well, El Reg covers it :-), I lost track of how many times the speakers, who were asked to come "on deck" backstage 5-10 minutes before their talk, showed up with "just a few changes to my slides". Yeah, we developed a process for doing these "diving catches", but it was never smooth, or justified.

An then there's the folks who used snazzy custom fonts in the PPT decks, but did not bring the fonts along... (almost as good as the "file:" URLs for images you'd occasionally see on websites. "Hey, it worked on my machine!")

3
0
Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Libreoffice is free and just fine.

@}{amis}{ Unfortunately, sending a CV as something other than a Word .doc may get it immediately round-filed. I discovered this when applying for a Hardware debug and kernel developer, and asked why that requirement. It boiled down to "our buzzword scanner only understands .doc", and that said buzzword scanner was a common bit of software for many HR departments.

YMMV, and maybe being rejected by a company with an insane HR dept. is not the worst outcome.

OTOH, I snuck my CV in the side door directly to the manager who had the open position, and was hired. OTOOH, HR was not the only part of the company suffering from the transition from "founders who know what they are doing" to "Adult supervision all around", and they went under after 3 years. I was acqui-hired by a well known firm that did not have that particular mental illness. They had plenty of their own, home grown insanity, but paid well.

20
2

Now you can tell someone to literally go f--k themselves over the internet: Remote-control mock-cock patent dies

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Ridiculous

@frank ly

Yeah, lots of prior art. A friend provided a pager set to vibrate to his girlfriend (back when pagers were still thing) to be worn in her knickers, so he could remind her of his thinking of her when both were at work. Their kids are in college now, so I suspect this would be prior art to a sane patent office.

Problems:

1) The USPTO only considers things it can find in its list of filed patents to be "prior art".

2) Apparently this eliminates quite a few things that are obvious to those reasonably skilled in the art.

3) Like you mention. take anything, no matter how common for centuries and add "with a computer" or "over the Internet"

9
1

May the May update be with you: OpenSSL key sniffed from radio signal

Mike 16
Bronze badge

A few Years prior

Yup. There's a reason that an AM radio was hidden in the 1403 printer, to be found by Group Captain Mandrake, in the 1964 film Dr. Strangelove.

Besides "play almost recognizable music via a transistor radio", we had a more practical use:

"Recognize the distinctive tone of the idle loop, to know when it was time to put on the parka and go into the machine room to start the next job"

6
0

Faxploit: Retro hacking of fax machines can spread malware

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Fax still with us

As several commenters have noted, an organization that uses a simple Fax machine, or that does not hook up their All-In-One to their network (and why have such a machine?), is relatively safe from this. At least as safe as they are from the scum that spam any known fax machine. Well, as long as that all-in-one honors the user option to _not_ enable WiFi. But again, if you need Fax, get a fax machine, not an all-signing-all-dancing-all-compromised thing that incidentally does Fax.

As for popularity.. My proposal (in 1982) to my then employer to include (at least as an option) a Fax modem in our laptop product was shot down. My argument "for" was simply that pretty much any hotel had a fax machine, and would usually allow customers to use it, so rather than having to pack a printer along with the laptop, small amounts of printing could be done by fax. The argument against was from an in house "expert" on two grounds:

1) He printed a document on a cheap dot-matrix printer and then faxed it. This of course was under sampled in away that looked truly horrible, but that was his goal, and manglement had never heard of Nyquist.

2) "Fax is a niche technology and will never be common"

1
0

FreeBSD has its own TCP-queue-of-death bug, easier to hose than Linux's SegmentSmack

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Speak not its name.

IIRC, the (original) Windows IP stack was BSD derived, so it _might_ have silently inherited the bug. OTOH, that was some time ago, and one would hope that somewhere along the path to IPV6, somebody would have at least looked at the code.

As I wrote this, I wondered why this is referred to as a TCP issue. Fragments and re-assembly also apply to UDP, so maybe either

1) The same bug may be exploitable with a big enough UDP datagram.

or

2) For some reason (cough - cut and -paste -cough) the code was duplicated, and now _one_ copy has been fixed.

0
0

Dear alt-right morons and other miscreants: Disrupt DEF CON, and the goons will 'ave you

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Westboro Business model

At least two commenters so far are apparently unaware of the actual nature of "Westboro Baptist Church".

The business model is actually quite simple:

1) Found a law firm (mostly family).

2) Declare yourself to be a church (No interaction with any recognizable Baptist congregation needed).

3) Behave as badly as you can while staying one micron inside the law. E.g. shouting offensive crap at the funerals of combat veterans. Someone is sure to have an emotional response.

4) When police break up the resulting kerfuffle, cry "Police Brutality" and sue the city where this occurs.

5) PROFIT!

13
0

The American dilemma: Competition, or fast broadband? Pick one

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Swamp -- Alligators

-- Erm, what else would be in charge of a swamp? --

Piranhas, Catfish, and leeches, of course, just as it ever was, with maybe an increase attributable to increased temperatures and storm activity, if that was actually happening, which it of course isn't, as you'd know if you just listened to the Catfish.

11
0

Relax, Amazon workers – OpenAI-trained robo hand isn't much use (well, not right now)

Mike 16
Bronze badge

In other news

Perhaps we should consider other paths to cheaper, more plaint worker, or not:

Robot Orangutan Vs Wild Orangutan Sawing Duel

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFR4a9vcri4

0
0

Crypto gripes, election security, and mandatory cybersec school: Uncle Sam's cyber task force emits todo list for govt

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Local Law Enforcement.

I agree that the local police are _usually_ less corrupt than broader agencies (Your mileage may vary if you live in a minority-resident/majority owned area). That said, the biggest LE news in a couple decades in my home town was when a couple local cops were caught tipping a burglary ring off when asked to "keep an eye on our house, we're going to be traveling for a week".

0
0

FCC caught red-handed – again – over its $225 complaint billing plan

Mike 16
Bronze badge

screw-ups and incompetence

Sufficiently advanced cluelessness is indistinguishable from malice.

See Also "By their fruits shall you know them" Mathew 7:16

4
0

Your phone may be able to clean up snaps – but our AI is much better at touching up, say boffins

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Ultimate goal?

To make the typical bad detective show "Enhance" of photos into "reality" so convincing it can fool a jury.

Like where they take 3x5 pixels from a dirty CCTV camera last serviced in the 1970s and get not just the license-plate number but an estimate of how long since the car was last washed and a list of roads it has traveled since.

Could be a real boon to "parallel construction" unless someone grows a conscience at rats out Ofissah Plod.

1
0

Leatherbound analogue password manager: For the hipster who doesn't mind losing everything

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: How to waste bad people's time.+

I'll just leave this here:

http://www.milk.com/wall-o-shame/security_clearance.html

Title:

What Not To Write On Your Security Clearance Form

A little tale of how a childhood fascination with cryptography led to later life infelicities.

Of course, only criminals and people who have access to U.S. nuclear launch codes imagine the FBI to be "bad people", right?

5
0

Cyber boffins drill into World Cup cyber honeypot used to cyber lure Israeli soldiers

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Personal devices

Sure some conscript Israeli soldiers might be careless about using personal devices for government business, but surely no high-level U.S.govt personnel would be that careless. :-)

6
0

United States, you have 2 months to sort Privacy Shield ... or data deal is for the bin – Eurocrats

Mike 16
Bronze badge

If it hits America financially

Only if it hits the Trump (extended) family, Russian Oligarchs, or some Saudi Princes. America has a variety of people, and businesses, but the ones not on the most-favored list can hold their breaths until blue (or red) in the face and their concerns will not be addressed.

Note that the businesses most likely to take a financial hit are on a very different list. Except maybe Palantir.

14
3

Hoping for Microsoft's mythical Andromeda in your Xmas stocking? Don't hold your breath

Mike 16
Bronze badge

MSFT Hardware

Well, MSFT has presumably long wanted to have their hardware considered on a par with the reliability and polish of Apple kit. Apple has been happy to help them achieve parity.

That said, in my mostly MSFT-free computing life, one (or three, depending how one counts) of my favorite compute-on-the-go products has been the Kyocera laptop (TRS-80 model 100, Olivetti M10, NEC 8201) that, IIRC, was spec'd by MSFT, with some software written by BillG himself. Runs for days on AA batteries that you can get even in places where clean water and reliable power are in the distant future.

1
0

DNS ad-hocracy in peril as ICANN advisors mull root server shakeup

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Trust

It amuses me that Almon Strowger invented his automatic telephone switch specifically because the telephone operator in his home town would connect calls intended for him to a competitor (both were undertakers) who just happened to be the operator's husband. His belief was that an incorruptible machine would be an improvement.

Fast forward to today, when your ISP is probably knobbling your DNS requests, possibly in addition to your OS vendor (and perhaps a few others, wearing hats of various shades of grey). Not to mention the various rank-fiddling by search engines, recommendation sites, and SEO. How's that "incorruptible machine" thing coming along?

Meanwhile, isn't "secure DNS" also subject to MITMing by a number of players, and dependent in any case on the certificate issuers also being incorruptible, not to mention invulnerable to malfeasors?

3
0

Google weeps as its home state of California passes its own GDPR

Mike 16
Bronze badge

CA leading the way?

Before you open that (CA) champagne, note that the current administration is hell bent on eliminating things like the CA emissions standards. And with the recent resignation from SCOTUS, they'll have the power to do it. Say goodbye to regulation of pollution, data-whoring, gerrymandering, purging voter rolls, etc.

7
1

Two different definitions of Edge Computing arrive in one week

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Another definition

Running all your applications in Javascript on The Browser Formerly Known as IE?

0
0

German researchers defeat printers' doc-tracking dots

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Did it really sink Reality Winner?

The printer's laser or inkjets may just print dots, but they are controlled by software in the printer. If it is capable of printing Postscript files (without the host rendering that made "Windows Only" printers such a joy), the (software) render engine in the printer could definitely add the steganography. AFAICT, one could write a "simple" PS program to play chess with the user, by sending each "move" as the full state of the board so far. May not need that for printers with local "font cache" that persists across print jobs.

And as others note, one could mess with the character rendering or kerning to obviate the need for Yellow Journalism (Ummm, Bacon!)

I do wonder which countries have made (or about to make) possession of a Brother, Samsung, or Tek printer incontrovertible evidence of Treason.

Gotta go. There are two gentlemen at the door saying they need to do scheduled maintenance on my Brother laser-printer. Something about my not yet installing the latest firmware update.

6
0

Reality Winner, liberty loser: NSA leaker faces 63 months in the cooler

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Clearance checks

A former coworker was hauled out of a US Secure Communications facility when they finally figured out that he was in fact a Canadian citizen (as he stated clearly on the forms he) months after he was given his clearance.

As for "tell us about everything you could be blackmail for", how's that working out for the thousands whose files were leaked by OPM. Any jail time for the patronage-based hacks there?

3
0

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich quits biz after fling with coworker rumbled

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Intel might be a bit skittish

because of a certain founder's propensity for this sort of thing.

Not that it doesn't happen elsewhere. My workplace affair was with someone from another department entirely, but then, I wasn't a CEO. There were plenty of folks who spent a fair bit of time on mahogany row and had no apparent responsibilities. Thus has it ever been.

1
0

The eyes have it: 'DeepFakes' bogus AI-meddled videos outed by unblinking gaze

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: it IS against the rules to lie about it....

And if all else fails, just say "Pardon Me"

0
0

Ex-Rolls-Royce engineer nicked on suspicion of giving F-35 info to China

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Who designs these things?

Hint: Not engineers or Military types who have actually been in combat.

Pretty much all military gear (and stuff like the Space Shuttle) is "designed" by Congress, under a process of maximizing campaign contributions to members of the ruling party at the time.

This is similar to how major corporations select, e.g. a travel agency for all corporate travel based on whose brother-in-law owns it. Or a mandated car rental company based on the CEO's holdings.

I am reminded of a U.S. Civil war repeating rifle that was basically a revolver with a longer barrel and a stock. Visualize the difference between ones grip on a rifle as opposed to a pistol. Now think about "chain fire". For some reason, a large number of these rifles were "lost crossing a river".

5
0

Thought the AT&T Time-Warner tie-up was scary? Comcast says 'hold my beer'

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Last seen looking down the back of the sofa

Disney already owns ABC, which was spun out of NBC way back when as part of an anti-trust action. ABC leans left, sometimes obviously so, making for "popcorn time" when/if Fox crawls into the same tent.

As a fellow Comcast victim, I agree, Disney may occasionally do stuff like claiming to own fairy tales from before Walt's grandparents were born, and killing off Bambi's mom, but there is absolutely no comparison to the evil that is Comcast.

1
0

Microsoft sinks another data centre with Natick 2

Mike 16
Bronze badge

MSFT acquires Epiphyte

News at 11.

1
0

Mailshot meltdown as Wessex Water gets sweary about a poor chap called Tom

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Strictly speaking (Re: Rostering ...)

Well Actually... The Less/fewer thing is one of those "Zombie Rules" that tend to be trotted out by a certain sort of self-taught grammarian (OK, including myself, in younger days), while irritating folks who actually study grammar.

TL;DR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fewer_vs._less

Or follow some of the references, in particular

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/003775.html

Meanwhile, what the heck rostering have to do with a Nun's clothing?

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/001812.html

You can perhaps tell that Language Log is one of my favorite ways to avoid Getting Stuff Done (along with ElReg)

0
0

You have suffered without red-headed emoji for too long. That changes Tuesday

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Picture worth a thousand words

A common lie told with a straight face, _or_ composed by someone who confuses "value" with "price".

This was brought home to me by an author commenting on the impending release of his latest book. The file containing the image for cover art was _many_ times larger than the (SGML-ized for typesetting) text of the entire book. So I guess the publishing industry does indeed assume that people judge a book by its cover.

(well aware that this will attract down votes, but I suspect I am not the only one who would prefer to skim the text transcription of an hour-long video rather than stare at the screen for an hour with no guarantee of payoff)

9
0

Android daddy Andy Rubin's Essential axes handset, is 'actively shopping itself' – report

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Taking Sides

Should I be concerned that our Android ecosystem son is about to marry an iPhone entranced woman?

They at least managed to compromise on Alexa as their nosy-servant choice.

0
0

Facebook's democracy salvage effort tilts scale in Mississippi primary

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Freedom of the Press

is for people who can afford to own one. If you buy your printing from someone else, like FaceBook, expect to be out-bid, or simply find them "too busy" or "out of ink" if you run against their relatives.

4
0

The great wearables myth busted: Apps never, ever mattered

Mike 16
Bronze badge

Re: Almost no one

When I wear a watch (rarely, but not never) it is to tell time. More importantly, it is to be able to tell time with a glance not likely to be noted by the folks I am attempting to guide on a schedule. Pulling out a phone is bound to be more noticeable than managing to gesture as part of conversation and just _happen_ to place the watch face in my field of view.

It's not a smart watch, BTW. It's a windup soviet 24-hour watch. Never needs charging, other than being wound for under a minute for a day's "charge". Never buzzes to tell me that some marketeer has a VERY IMPORTANT OPPORTUNITY for me. Just tells time.

I will readily confess to not being most people, but long ago stopped believing I was unique or (equally improbable) universally representative of all people.

14
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018