* Posts by strum

495 posts • joined 17 Jun 2009

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Jimbo announces Team Wikipedia: 'Global News Police'

strum
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Setting aside Orlowski's kneejerk response to anything Wiki - I'd say, wait and see.

There can be little doubt that 'professional' journalism is approaching its lowest point (it was never a respectable profession at the best of times). Any efforts to to counteract this decline should be given a fair chance.

But there are two factors which need consideration; one is that the most egregious bias is shown in what is not reported at all, rather than the way in which the subjects which are reported are covered. 'Professional' outlets select their items according to the picture they wish to paint. I can't see anything in Wales' approach which will address this.

The second factor is the overwhelming laziness of most journalists. They hate writing a new story, when they can re-write an old one. Never write their own story if they can steal someone else's. Run away from stories where they can't rely on a pre-digested view of good v. bad.

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Would you believe it? The Museum of Failure contains quite a few pieces of technology

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Re: Betamax - Betamax quality wasn't actually that much better.

>Really the success of VHS was down to more suppliers of VHS players

Precisely.

Sony wouldn't licence Betamax (it was far too complex to farm out) and Philips (the early leader in home tape tech) couldn't even manufacture them themselves, let alone licence it to other companies.

JVC's licencing meant that you would go into Rumblelows and find one (expensive) Betamax, one Philips VideoCassette (not currently working) and several VHS machines, with well-known local brands. The varieties of VHS also offered different form-factors - including front-feed (most of the original video machines were top-feed).

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Ofcom chisels away at BT Openreach's cold, dead hands

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Re: BT's infrastructure?

>you will also need to account for the additional taxes BT paid since privatisation

BT were pretty damned profitable before privatisation (profitable enough to pay for the development and installation of System X - out of profits alone).

SInce privatisation (on the cheap), the Exchequer has been deprived of those profits.

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Why Firefox? Because not everybody is a web designer, silly

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Re: Designers..

>"The web is never going to look the same everywhere,"

Indeed. And it isn't just down to the browser, or its engine.

Someone who views their websites full-screen, on a big, wide screen, is going to see something different from someone (like me) who tends to reduce the browser window to be just big enough to read the text I want (I never see Register ads, not because of an ad blocker, but because they're way over there, somewhere).

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Oh snap! UK Prime Minister Theresa May calls June election

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Re: She should have sought this mandate months ago

>Now the timing could bite her on her leather trizers.

Not just the timing - the act itself is dumb. She's doing this to free herself from her own backbenchers - but the only thing keeping them in check now is their narrow majority.

If she's returned with a landslide, all those fractures in the Tory party (which have not been resolved by Brexit*), will explode on her. Her enemies aren't across the dispatch box; they're behind her.

[*There's a myth that the divisions in the Tory party were all about the EU - but the EU was just a proxy, for a much deeper divide, going much further back.]

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Re: This goes to show one thing

>It's about the brexit mandate.

Nah. Nothing to do with it. TM never had any realistic opposition to her Brexit plan (such as it was).

This is intended to enable TM to ignore her own back-benchers, like she ignores the rest of us.

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Printer blown to bits by compressed air

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Re: Dangerous

>I can't help thinking just how easy it would be to get too near my eyes, or even more scary, my ears.

Even using it on bare skin can be dangerous - injecting air into the bloodstream.

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Democrats draft laws in futile attempt to protect US internet privacy

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Re: The usual

>Remind me again why they lost the election.

Crooked electoral system?

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Outsourcers blamed for cocking up programmes at one in three big firms

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>Deloitte estimates that most large organisations take between two to three years to develop a framework for better managing risk

...by which time, the trained staff take jobs with the consultancies.

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

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unemployable because he has a genetic defect

Thing is - most 'genetic defects' are only _potential_ diseases. Someone with a genetic 'defect' may live out a full & healthy life. It usually requires some other epi-genetic arrangement (or environmental circumstance) to turn that genetic code into an illness.

Not only is this measure immeasurably evil, it's also futile.

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Anti-TV Licensing petition gets May date for Parliament debate

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Re: Good going cobber

> Which leads to ordinary sensible people perceiving the speed limits as being set too low.

<Guffaw>

You do know that traffic has other effects, apart from impact-at-speed? Poluttion, yes - but also noise and inaccessible neighbourhoods (at the other side of fast, busy roads)

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Re: Good going cobber

>Yeah, they throw the money into the sea don't they.

How else are they going to pay for scraping your victims off the road?

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RadioShack bankruptcy savior to file for, you guessed it, bankruptcy

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Re: Solder Repellant

I used to go to Edgware Road, just to drool at the projects I _could_ undertake.

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MP brands 1,600 CSC layoffs as the 'worst excesses of capitalism'

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Re: The 'worst excesses of capitalism'

>government fondness for exorbitant PFI contacts

More to do with Public Sector Borrowing Requirement figures - regarded, by the money markets, as the signal for down-rating the pound. Even though borrowing would be much cheaper than PFI.

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YouTube TV will be huge. Apple must respond

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Re: UK based so not affecting us yet but....

>Or, the individual teams themselves.

Fine for hardened fans - but some of us aren't wedded to any one club - we want to see a title race/relegation fight unfold, regardless of the participants.

And most hardened fans also have a second or third fave.

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America halts fast processing of H-1B skilled worker visas

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Re: why was this called 'discrimination'

>No, a good policy is to say "We will treat your citizens exactly the same way you treat ours - if you are nice and play fair, we will be nice and play fair. If you screw ours over, we will screw yours over".

No. This ignores the central point; the UK is leaving the EU, the EU isn't leaving the UK. The first move is ours.

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Re: why was this called 'discrimination'

> But fundamentally, citizens of other EU countries are as much Visitors as UK citizens in the EU are.

Yes. Both are legally entitled to remain where they are (until some demagogue wants to make a name for him/herself).

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Pence v Clinton: Both used private email for work, one hacked, one accused of hypocrisy

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Re: Veti Fail on El Reg's part.

>Son, you need to dig a bit deeper because the whole Clinton thing has been going on for over a year.

A year!?!?!

FFS, Republicans have been gunning for Hillary for decades.

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Google, what the hell? Search giant wrongly said shop closed down, refused to list the truth

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Kafka

When we apply the term 'kafkaesque', we usually assume we're talking about some faceless state organ. But this shows that the impersonal mega-corporation can be ten times worse than any government.

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Two-thirds of TV Licensing prosecutions at one London court targeted women

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Re: Big opportunity missed

>Freeview was deliberately designed so as to not support smartcards,

Twaddle. 'Freeview' wasn't designed by the Beeb. They took over an already-existing system (OnDigital), which expressly _did_ support smart cards. My first Humax had a card slot.

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Re: Whiskey-Tango-Foxtrot!!??

>under the threat of violence

Bullshit.

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>have it set in law

You can't 'set' anything in law, that a future government can't unset. And they would.

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>There is no other source than the Mail itself.

Wouldn't touch it with a barge pole.

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Re: the Campaign to end the BBC Licence Fee

>Fewer ads on on British telly has got nothing to do with the licence fee.

That's a bit questionable. Don't forget that ITV have always supported the licence fee, because they know that without the Beeb, commercial TV would be driven to the bottom, and existing limits on advertising would last about as long as an ad break.

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Re: Equality...

> a quick sob and a quivering lip means the old duffers on the bench take pity on the miscreant and she gets let off

It's not just the old duffers on the bench. I was a juror in a drugs'n'guns case at the Bailey. The male perps were quickly banged up (and thoroughly deserved to be), but the 21-y-o, tasty totty was 'interviewed' in the detective's back seat for three-quarters of an hour, before going free.

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China proposes new world order for cyberspace regulation

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Point, missed

The point that the Chinese are missing is that the Internet is increasingly making 'countries' obsolete, (notwithstanding the current global fad for nationalism).

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Prisoners' 'innovative' anti-IMSI catcher defence was ... er, tinfoil

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Re: A cheaper option in the long run?

>But it keeps them off the streets

Where they are replaced by lieutenants.

Prison doesn't work. It doesn't deter. It doesn't reform. It doesn't protect society.

It's sad that most commentards are focussing on ways to make life harder for people who already find life hard enough.

Prison is supposed to prepare criminals for return to society - a society in which phones play a major role. But prisoners' only access to a phone is an expensive, un-private, inconvenient dumb payphone.

For every gangster who (supposedly) runs his empire with a contraband smartphone, there are a thousand who just want to talk to their kids.

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UK Snoopers' Charter gagging order drafted for London Internet Exchange directors

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Re: Cheers Tory voters - United kingdom = worst kingdom

>You already need one to work legally.

Yes. My work record goes back nearly 50 years. Now, my employers (for 10 years) are harrassing me for sight of my passport.

What a nasty little country we have become. I hardly recognise it (I certainly feel no loyalty to it).

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Why I had to sue the FCC – VoIP granddaddy Dan Berninger

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Re: less gummint regulation is nearly always a good thing

We don't want public policy ruled by ideology (like "less gummint regulation is nearly always a good thing").

Less 'gummint' regulation often equates to greater corporate regulation (the fat cats make the rules, instead). Power (like wealth) never trickles down; it is soaked up, by the powerful and rich.

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Re: less gummint regulation is nearly always a good thing

> there's such a thing as intelligent, enlightened regulation. There's not. There never has been, and there never will be.

That's just plain dumb. Thousands of years of history contradict it.

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Bruce Schneier: The US government is coming for YOUR code, techies

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Re: Well, maybe we should not put software in everything

>You think there is something unique about the US government that makes it a threat to liberty beyond all others?

Er, yes. You mention it yourself - power. As we know, power tends to corrupt, and the USA is the most powerful nation the world has ever seen. How could we imagine that it could be other than the most corrupt?

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Re: Compare and contrast

>It was regulation that made what the bankers did the most rational choice

Utter twaddle. Regulation didn't force mortgagers to write duff mortgages. Greed did (abetted by a system designed to protect mortgagers from their errors).

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No crypto backdoors, more immigration ... says Republican head of House Committee on Homeland Security

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Re: These aren't the Republicans you're looking for

>Abraham Lincoln was a Republican.

who'd be shunned by the modern Republicans

The Dixiecrats turned into Republicans after Nixon.

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Re: Knock, Knock. American here.

>The US is no longer a largely agrarian country, but the notion that the 70% (your figure) who are city dwellers should should have largely unrestricted power over the remaining 30% is utter rubbish, and one of the reasons the designers of the government chose not to establish a democracy.

That is utter twaddle. The Founders didn't (couldn't) have a clue that, one day, most Americans would live in cities, that non-property-holding men, women and black men would be able to vote.

Why the hell should country-dwellers' votes count more than urban-dwellers?

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The Mail vs Wikipedia: They're more alike than they'd ever admit

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Re: Looks bad for Wikipedia

>a handful of examples of factual errors on the part of the Mail

There may only have been a handful in that discussion, but there are many more to be found elsewhere:-

"In the files of the Press Complaints Commission, you will find records of 687 complaints against the Mail which led either to a PCC adjudication or to a resolution negotiated, at least partially, after the PCC’s intervention. The number far exceeds that for any other British newspaper: the files show 394 complaints against the Sun, 221 against the Daily Telegraph, 115 against the Guardian. The complaints will serve as a charge sheet against the Mail and its editor."

http://boingboing.net/2014/01/03/lies-of-the-daily-mail.html

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Brexit could further harm woeful rural payments system

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UK had a system of subsidising farmers since the 2nd world war

Indeed so - and it was considerably more authoritarian than the CAP ever was. There were regular announcements on the Home Service instructing farmers to apply a particular pesticide on a particular day. (The Archers was devised to give these instructions a more homely setting.)

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Grumpy Trump trumped, now he's got the hump: Muslim ban beaten back by appeals court

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by ABusing the legal system.

I see - so, enforcing the law is abusing the legal system. I think we can all see where you are coming from (and going).

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Honeypots: Free psy-ops weapons that can protect your network before defences fail

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Re: "a great experiment to analyze the adversary's moral limits"

>Just take a glance at the news

...and remember that it's in the news because it's unusual, not because it's common.

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Big Tech files anti-Trump brief: Immigration ban illegal and damaging to business

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Re: @FuzzyWuzzys: BREXIT...

Speaks for me, too.

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@ WIll Code

>Iraq was to depose a dictator that was thought to have weapons of mass destruction rather than fight terrorists.

It was inescapable that many Americans thought that Afghanistan & Iraq were payback for 911 - even though Iraq had nothing whatsoever to do with it.

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Trump's immigration clampdown has Silicon Valley techies fearing for their house prices

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Re: Well, first, the order has been rescinded by the courts...

>It's just a SINGLE SOLITARY ACTIVIST JUDGE

...who was appointed by GW Bush. You are a prat sometimes, Bob.

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Brexit White Paper published: Broad strokes, light on detail

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Re: Business must be delighted

>30% smaller than it was in 2008

Perhaps because something rather dramatic happened then?

We keep forgetting that we had a major financial catastrophe back then - comparable in many respects with the Great Depression of the 30s. That produced some unfortunate political developments, too.

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Re: Business must be delighted

>Our political/legal culture is rooted in English Common Law

Not Scotland or Northern Ireland. Perhaps that's why they voted to stay.

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Re: A BRexit human shield writes...

>the EU is run by about a billion civil servants

The EU bureaucracy is smaller than most English County Councils.

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Re: TL:DR We want it all but we want to keep the same prices as now from the EU.

>An unelected politburo, accounts that have never passes audit, government by diktat

Three lies in a row. Is this a record? Probably not.

Arguably, the EU is more democratic than Westminster/Whitehall. (And the EU accounts have passed audit, every year since (I think) 2004.

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Re: Words fail me

>We couldn't actually know what we voted for staying in either. With qualified majority voting, anything can happen.

That's another piece of nonsense, Spart. QMV only applies to a narrow range of mainly-unimportant decisions. None of the things that the Leave campaign insisted were just around the corner (77M Turks, an EU Army) could happen under QMV.

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Re: Words fail me

>they should at least represent the views of their constituents.

They are hired to represent their constituents. They are not hired to parrot their views.

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Re: Words fail me

>The Referendum was a sign that democracy worked.

Sorry, no. I've agreed with most of your comments, notSpart, but this one is nonsense.

I am old enough to remember when most of the world was ruled by one form of dictator or another - and every one of them used referendums to give their tyranny some spurious justification.

A referendum =/= democracy. It reduces a complex issue to a single question ( a single question which isn't democratically posed). It allows press barons and demagogues to lie in favour of their wishes (loudest arsehole wins). It binds future legislators against resolving any of the many problems that arise. Worst of all, it gives succour to the lowest, meanest denizens of our community - who would otherwise be too ashamed to speak.

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> It would be like going into a poker game

I'm getting really tired of people who think this is some sort of card game.

Our EU partners probably have a better idea of our 'hand' than we do. It's childish to pretend we can somehow conceal our position, until the last moment, and then spring a surprise on them.

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Mozilla wants infosec activism to be the next green movement

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> but where does AGW (aka 'climate change') come into it?

Oh dear. I suggest you study some history.

Surman is alluding to The Whole Earth Catalog - an enterprise which triggered much of US creativity, from the late '60s onwards. And that included environmental awareness which, in turn, informed the fact of Anthropogenic Global Warming - (which nutjob denial can never undo).

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