* Posts by Richard 12

2728 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Ditching your call centre for an app? Be careful not to get SAP-slapped

Richard 12
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All ERP is terrible

Every single one is awful, some are worse than useless. SAP for example has been responsible for huge losses (Levi), and I don't know anybody at all who likes it.

Yet the others are no better, ans sone are worse.

Several large organisations use in-house ERP, however I don't think they are likely to open source it because it's a huge commercial advantage to have really good ERP.

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Richard 12
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Re: Maybe...

It sounds like Diageo bought the PI licence and believed that it allowed them to do PI.

As it doesn't, presumably sales of PI licences will now cease.

One also wonders if Diageo will now sue for breach of contract, on the basis of being sold a useless product. Perhaps £55 million in damages would be about right, then no money changes hands and everybody is equally unhappy.

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Richard 12
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Re: This behaviour

Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM/Oracle/SAP/Microsoft, etc.

I think somebody just got fired for buying SAP.

£54 million pounds... more than doubling their budgeted licence cost? Yep, somebody just got fired for buying SAP.

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Florida Man jailed for 4 years after raking in a million bucks from spam

Richard 12
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He used other people's computers without permission

Depending on how that was done, it may be fraud in the truthiest sense.

One could also argue that taking money for bulk-emailing services that were done by stealing computing time and resources from 3rd parties is defrauding the customer buying those services.

Thiugh that is rather hard to justify as a concept when payment is by conversion rate, rather than per email per recipient.

That implies a knowledge on the part of the customer that said bulk emailer is not entirely legitimate...

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Nokia's 3310 revival – what's NEXT? Vote now

Richard 12
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Re: MiniDisc

MiniDisc was wonderful. Reliable players that also recorded, edited and set in and out points.

They've been replaced by PC and smartphone based players that are far more complex, much harder to use and far less reliable.

Much cheaper than MiniDisc though, so there is that.

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Richard 12
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Re: Psion FTW

Touchscreens have killed them.

A touchscreen is far cheaper to manufacture, and "5 inch screen" is easier to market than "3 inch screen and keyboard"

Especially as most people spend most of their smartphone time consuming content, not typing.

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Installing disks is basically LEGO, right? This admin failed LEGO

Richard 12
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Re: "...making firewall changes that cut off all their traffic..."

I beleive that's much more difficult to do now, as rm itaelf knows this is a bad idea...

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Richard 12
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Re: HTFU? - people have taken saws to PCI-e cards

I thought all 1x PCIe slots were already open-ended these days.

The ones for desktops are, anyway.

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Roses are red, bugs make you blue, Patch Tuesday is late, because Microsoft loves you

Richard 12
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All-or-nothing means that you often get nothing.

MS used to issue several patches each Patch Tuesday.

Each of those patches corrected one issue, or a group of closely-related issues.

So if one of those turned out to be bad, they'd ship all the others and only delay the bad one. (And nobody would ever know.)

And when an IT dept discovered that one of the patches caused problems on their particular setups, they'd hold that one back (until MS fixed it) and push the rest.

MS now put everything into one massive tangled messy ball.

If there is a problem with any one patch, nobody gets anything at all.

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Crack in black: Matte iPhones losing paint at alarming rate, gripe fans

Richard 12
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Re: "I just open the casing once a week to wipe the dust off from the phone."

You mean you don't check your indicator fluid?

(Blinker cor our USian friends)

Preventative maintenance is wonderful - regularly abrade the phone surface by removing and replacing the cover...

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Richard 12
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Re: I refuse to believe this story...

Perhaps they've given up asking?

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Get orf the air over moi land Irish farmer roars at drones

Richard 12
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The economics still work

A shotgun cartridge is much cheaper than a drone, even the really tiny ones.

Also, losing it to a firearm also dissuades them from robbing you. The crims will go somewhere else instead.

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Grumpy Trump trumped, now he's got the hump: Muslim ban beaten back by appeals court

Richard 12
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Re: Although ...

The Western press do lambast those states. Quite often in fact, but you do have to listen/read foreign affairs programmes to hear it.

And our ambassadors to those states - where they haven't been withdrawn due to same - also privately encourage those states to improve.

Until they get ejected for saying so, anyway.

As to why you haven't noticed it:

US behaviour has a much larger impact on Western citizens, because many of us live there or travel there very often. It's not just foreign affairs and you'll see it on other programmes/articles as well.

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Revealed: 'Suicide bomber Barbie' and other TSA quack science that cost $1.5 billion

Richard 12
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Re: Unusual behaviour

Talking to a stranger is a well-known pickpocketing technique.

So of course any sensible individual will immediately go on high alert when someone they don't know tries to talk to them in a crowded area.

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Intel's Atom C2000 chips are bricking products – and it's not just Cisco hit

Richard 12
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Re: So when do I short CSCO/INTC stock??

Semiconductors of all types wear out over time, as the doping drifts - mostly due to thermal effects, so hotter parts fail faster.

Package pins are connected to the silicon by really tiny wires that can snap, eg under the stress of warming up or cooling down.

There's other failure modes such as insulation breakdown, overvoltages and many more.

It only takes a small miscalculation or manufacturing error to turn a chip with a theoretical 50-year MTBF into chip with an 18-month MTBF.

It sounds like this failure may only matter at boot, if true then a device left running will keep going even after the failure - it just won't boot again.

It is a shame that Intel is saying nothing about the failure rate. Could be 1%, or even 90%. Given the lack of info, it's probably quite high.

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Microsoft's DRM can expose Windows-on-Tor users' IP address

Richard 12
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So MS lost the keys already

What they've seen in the wild is someone managing to generate signed content, apparently without paying that toll.

If true, that means the MS DRM system is now broken and useless.

In fact, worse than useless because of the large quantity of money and effort needed to use it.

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HMS Queen Elizabeth is delayed, Ministry of Defence confesses

Richard 12
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Re: Whilst MPs bluster and the MOD drags it's heels

Also, have you built a ship before?

Yes. Part of the fitting-out team of some ships that were rather bigger than this one, and of similar complexity. Cruise liners are huge and most new ships have a few unique features.

On time - to the day for sea trials - and near budget. One of them did go a little over for the first in class.

Civilian shipyards generally manage this, because they have these things called "penalty clauses" if they are notably late.

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GitLab.com melts down after wrong directory deleted, backups fail

Richard 12
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At least it's git

That means there shouldn't be much real data loss at the final count, as the important things pushed there will have a backup in the place that pushed the last commit.

Pain in the proverbial for all the project leads to push up all the lost branch tips again, but at least it's only mostly dead and not dead-dead.

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Police pull up van man engaged in dual carriageway sex act

Richard 12
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Re: Distracted and not in proper control?

As it was a van, smoking in it is quite probably illegal.

It is illegal to smoke in the workplace.

A company owned or hired van being driven to or from a job is a workplace - plenty of case law.

And yes, that does mean that it's illegal for a self-employed person to smoke in their own van.

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Doomsday Clock moves to 150 seconds before midnight. Thanks, Trump

Richard 12
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@Destroy All Monsters

Trump is the one claiming voter fraud.

There's only one reason why he would say that, and it's very simple:

His ego cannot stand the concept of merely winning. He has to win overwhelmingly and crush his opponent like a bug.

Simply winning is not enough for him.

And yet, if his claim of "millions of fraudulent votes" were true then the election would be null and void. The whole thing would have to be run again, because it is an order of magnitude above the margin by which he won the EC.

His claim is however blatant bollocks, so that isn't necessary - and neither is wasting millions of USD investigating something that has no evidence.

Recounts have already been done in several places where there was evidence of fraud. Some fraud was found - that gave Trump an unfair advantage. They were corrected.

Trump still won, yet he does not accept the result?

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Naughty sysadmins use dark magic to fix PCs for clueless users

Richard 12
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USB is terrible for EMC

And a plasma ball is basically impossible to make compliant with EU EMC.

A lot of (cheaper and USian) kit is right on the borderline for immunity, so combining all three is really asking for trouble.

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HP Inc recalls 101,000 laptop batteries before they halt and catch fire

Richard 12
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Re: At least they can swap the battery

Most large companies should survive the full recall and cancellation of any one product.

Make it two or three products, and even the largest company will be in serious trouble. The division that screwed up will post a massive loss and the shareholders will be screaming.

That one recall cost Samsung something like 3% of their total group revenue. The reputation hit is unknown, but it's not zero.

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Richard 12
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At least they can swap the battery

As battery capacities rise, devices get thinner (for no reason) and manufacturing costs are squeezed, we're going to see far more recalls like this.

The next time this happens to something with an irreplaceable battery, will the company survive?

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Trump lieutenants 'use private email' for govt work... but who'd make a big deal out of that?

Richard 12
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Re: Wow this article is really reaching

Speaking the truth.

That's one of the actual laws that they decided not to follow within a few hours of the inauguration.

While they can of course refuse to answer, it is illegal for the Executive to lie to the US public.

As their first press statement contained multiple obvious lies, we cannot believe any other they will ever make during the rest of the Trimp Presidency.

This private email server may be entirely innocent, mostly innocent with several significant mistakes (like Clinton's), very suspicious with uknown mistakes because it's illegally wiped (like Bush's) or may be a complete and total disaster waiting to happen.

Given the known behaviour of Trump's team, which one would you bet on?

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Trump's FBI boss, Attorney General picks reckon your encryption's getting backdoored

Richard 12
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Simple solution

Tell Comey yes, he can have his backdoor - on one condition.

If anyone outside of the FBI ever demonstrates that they can decrypt any of these backdoored encryption techniques, Comey and all his successors will be immediately executed for treason.

No waiting in Death Row, and no defence possible at trial. Instant death.

Such a demo would prove he or a successor must have leaked his key and personally made the bank accounts of all Amercians insecure.

Comey, do you bet your life on nobody ever finding that extra key? Eg by torturing one of your staff?

Because that's what this suggestion does. It bets the data security of your entire nation on your personal ability to make sure the backdoor key is never found.

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The rise, fall, and rise (again) of Microsoft's killer People feature

Richard 12
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Re: [sigh] @Richaard 12

And that would be why Android will always be superior.

That said, it is also a minor problem because I have no idea how to find a good Home screen app.

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Richard 12
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Re: [sigh]

True, I strongly disloke the iOS interfaces. It makes for a good poster but a poor UX - and it gets worse as the screen size increases.

Android is much better, but it's still got some annoying things. My main one is that it's too easy to rearrange things on the Home screen - I really would like a lock-items function.

The other Android annoyance being that carriers can change it. That is one thing Apple got right.

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Richard 12
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That doesn't make any sense though

At work, I am interested in conversations on a subject. Never conversations with a specific individual.

I'll have many conversations on the same subject with several different people. Often groups, not always the same groups.

I'll also talk to the same person about several different subjects.

Over in Sales they are usually more interested in people than subjects, however they also talk to hundreds of people - that is not going to fit in the taskbar!

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Samsung set a fire under battery-makers to make the Galaxy Note 7 flaming brilliant

Richard 12
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The problem is very clear - Tolerances

The phone design demanded a set of battery manufacturing tolerances that were quite simply unachievable in bulk manufacture.

Zero tolerance is something that only politicians and idiot managers believe to be possible.

Thus the cause is also very clear...

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Richard 12
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Not quite

What their top management thinks customers want, not what they actually want.

Almost everything about the Note 7 was, by all accounts, extremely good. By far the best phablet to date.

If it had been 1mm thicker, it would still have been brilliant, and the best phablet by far.

The only notable difference with the slightly thicker one? It would still be for sale as the tolerances would have been wide enough for them not to do the "venting with flame" thing.

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All the cool kids are doing it – BT hikes broadband and TV bills

Richard 12
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Re: Whither internet fantland?

South Korea, by a long way.

Within Western culture, Sweden is probably your best bet.

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350,000 Twitter bot sleeper cell betrayed by love of Star Wars and Windows Phone

Richard 12
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Re: One mindless Twitterbot just assumed office...

It'd certainly fail a Voight-Kampff test. Not sure if that makes it a bot.

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Assange reverse-ferrets on promise to fly to US post-Manning clemency

Richard 12
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Re: I called it to all my friends

The US don't want him and never did. They have enough tosspots of their own.

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Meet 'Moz://a', AKA Mozilla after it picked a new logo

Richard 12
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Now I know why I spent the night throwing up

... oh hell, coming through....

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Britain collects new naval tanker a mere 18 months late

Richard 12
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Re: @MakingBacon

And a spare field to do the test in?

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College fires IT admin, loses access to Google email, successfully sues IT admin for $250,000

Richard 12
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Re: Bah!

Just start using numbers, then it's easy.

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Why Theresa May’s hard Brexit might be softer than you think

Richard 12
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Re: Article 50 puts a two year limit after the notification

Rubbish. 6 months isn't long enough to even start.

2 years is probably long enough to fall back onto our membership of the WTO. If we are very good, we might get a better then WTO deal for a couple of industries. Probably banking and financial services as if that significantly reduced we'd be utterly fucked.

- A situation that would mean the serious downsizing of all other industries. Wave goodbye to Nissan and Airbus to tive two examples.

Trade agreements are not only about tariffs. They are about mutually-agreed standards defining each widget or service that might be traded.

The customs code book that merely lists them is about an inch thick, and it's really small type.

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UK's lords want more details on adult website check plans

Richard 12
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Education

Teach them how to fact-check, and above all that anyone can put amything on the Internet - it doesn't matter whether it is real or true.

Teach them that porn is entertainment. It's not real, any more than action movies.

Sex or not sex are both normal. Liking porn is fine, as finding it boring and pointless. Same with action movies or romantic comedies.

Then they will be orders of magnitude better prepared for the real world than any politician you may find in Westminster.

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Just give up: 123456 is still the world's most popular password

Richard 12
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Re: what this tells me

Probably doesn't matter.

The deliberately wrong data is already in the database before they can try to verify a throwaway account.

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Richard 12
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Re: The source of the leaked passwords?

There is a "I don't want no stinkin' MS account" hotspot you can click.

Finding it reminds one of the old point and click adventures though.

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Richard 12
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The source of the leaked passwords?

If they include "Login to our free wifi", then of course almost all of them will be 123456.

Most of the email addresses will be for example.com as well...

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Windows 10 Anniversary Update crushed exploits without need of patches

Richard 12
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Re: Belt & braces

The problem with that is people will be advised to turn these features off for every odd thing Windows does, and for every issue anyone encounters.

If you look through past Windows forums you'll see people recommending changing practically every setting throughout the Registry and beyond to "fix" all kinds of totally unrelated issues.

And then some idiot will go and put the "turn it off" option into their (privileged) installer...

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Richard 12
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Re: Why is font rendering in the kernel in the first place?

Because speed.

And to be fair, it was almost certainly the right decision at the time.

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Aaarrgh, zombie! Dead Apple iOS monopoly lawsuit is reanimated

Richard 12
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Re: How were they not customers?

An annual subscription to Apple, and a computer bought from Apple - you're not allowed to compile iOS software on your Windows PC.

So it is impossible to legally put any software on an iOS device without paying Apple a cut.

iOS has a very large part of the mobile software market, and anyone who wishes to access that market is forced to pay Apple to do so.

That is basically the monopolistic practice.

Legally, they do not have to have the entire market, only a significant part to which they raise unreasonable barriers.

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Richard 12
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Unhappy

Re: No rocket science is necessary for the understanding of this story.

They don't allow them at all. IIRC it's even in the developer T&Cs.

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Richard 12
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Re: Grab the popcorn!

You can code in any language you like when targetting Android - yes, including Cobol.

http://www.veryant.com/products/cobol-mobile.html

The same is not true when targetting iOS, where Apple have strict rules about the languages you can use - for example, you cannot run an interpreter at all.

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Drone biz Lily Robotics takes $34m in pre-orders, ships nothing, shuts down, gets sued by San Francisco DA

Richard 12
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Re: An auto-stalker drone, sounds really legit.

Quadcopters are not exactly quiet and unobtrusive.

Plus the battery life is "up to" 20 minutes.

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Richard 12
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Re: How does my credit card issuer fit into this story?

Depends where you live.

In the EU they are jointly and severally liable, so as a consumer you get your money back from the credit card company - and they can go ahead and do whatever they deem appropriate to recover their loss from the vendor.

In many other parts of the world it's not as clear cut.

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Pirates, pirates, whatchu gonna do? Advertisers cop a visit from PIPCU

Richard 12
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Re: Get them to stop advertising with spammers

Google and Microsoft both have automated "opt me out and report as spam" features.

I'm sure other email providers have similar features.

Much better than clicking the manual link, as the spammer gets blackholed in future as well - and not only for you!

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Nintendo pulls the Switch, fires Joy-con at Microsoft and Sony

Richard 12
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VR will still be touted as the next big thing

When the next two next big things are getting old...

Perhaps current technology is just about good enough, but nobody has actually come up with a form factor and killer application.

Plus, if you wear glasses, you're out. Seems that nobody is making a headset that fits over glasses or offers any vision correction options. I'm not going to buy contact lenses just to play a game, unless that game is supremely awesome.

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