* Posts by Richard 12

2518 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Splunk: Why we dumped Perforce for Atlassian's Bitbucket of Gits

Richard 12
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Facepalm

Re: Of course it's not just Perforce

Sourcesafe?

Do they hate your code and just want it to die? We've had several occasions where the database got corrupted somehow and had to be rolled back to an earlier state.

The second time I had a local git-based backup (intended for branching and merging) so pushed up the lost changes again.

It never seemed all that stable either, though that was probably really caused by poor Internet connectivity.

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Richard 12
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Re: A Brief Response from the Referenced Author

Thanks.

When will Perforce properly deal with line endings?

When will it be capable of showing the labels in the history of a file or workspace?

- Or even handling large numbers of labels without falling over. "Lightweight" changelist labels are a start, but I can't see those in the GUI at all from a workspace!

When will it be capable of showing the *full* commit history of the *project* - see the "railtrack" git demo screenshots for what I mean.

When will it be able to show the history of stream "imports" in any way, shape or form?

- It does seem to be tracked but I have no idea what point that actually gets stored, and neither do your support.

These are necessary tools for multi-developer, multi-platform projects, that are either horribly naive or sadly lacking in Perforce.

That's before considering refactoring when files are split up. Git tracks that - while Perforce barely manages a rename!

Perforce/Helix is radically behind - DVCS is not just about local versioning.

- Unfortunately yes, I am rather bitter. Perforce/Helix has burned out at least one of our good guys, and cost me personally over a hundred hours of work in a few months, fixing depots and working around its shortcomings. We finally do have a workflow that mostly works, but it works despite the tool, not because of it.

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Richard 12
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Re: Smerforce

I kept on pressing them.

For line endings, it took a week to get them to actually consider the problem at all, and about another month before they admitted that there was a serious bug - but even then they said the bug was the documentation and that they way it actually working how it should. Which is a stupid way that no real user would ever want...

For the other big issues, about four months of back-and-forth before they finally suggested an undocumented hidden function - simply to list the commit text.

At that point we gave up. It still doesn't quite work, and it was clear by then that Perforce just cannot tell you your history.

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Richard 12
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Re: Saucy!

If the only choice is ClearCase v Perforce, then yes, Perforce.

But that says more about ClearCase than Perforce...

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Richard 12
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There's a lot of thing Perforce just Won't Do

Like "Give me the full list of commit descriptions between labels X (new) and Y (old)"

You know, a core function of any source control system.

It's simple to get that for the current branch/stream, but actually impossible to get it to reliable include all merged branches/streams - you often get bits from before Y, and sometimes everything that has ever happened ever.

After four months of trying I finally got something that almost works, but not quite.

It means the automated build reports are rarely correct - and that is very scary.

In short, Perforce is a very poor tool for management of code history.

On top of that, it can't deal with line endings in a sane way, it can't show you the history of what got imported from other projects (it's apparently there but impossible to see in any way)... the list goes on.

In short, Perforce is a very poor tool.

I would say that git is at least a decade ahead, and that Perforce will never catch up.

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Robo-supercar hype biz Faraday Future has invented something – a new word for 'disrupt'

Richard 12
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Re: Will it.....

Indeed.

Most petrol and diesel cars will do 500-600 miles on a single 50-60 litre tank (at low altitude, mountains are different). Even people carriers.

Driven carefully, 700 miles is doable for many diesels.

Rather shows up the SUV class, but not really surprising when they have the aerodynamics of a brick.

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Hackers could turn your smart meter into a bomb and blow your family to smithereens – new claim

Richard 12
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Re: UK encryption

Not to mention rubber-hose decryption.

If the target is sufficiently valuable to an attacker - for example, the ability to completely destroy the National Grid on demand - then some actors will go ahead and apply the hose.

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Richard 12
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That was the entire point

Everything else they've mentioned is known to be utterly false - tripe of the smelliest order.

The remote kill switch is the only feature of these devices that might actually work.

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Xmas software update knackered US Customs computer systems

Richard 12
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The terminals are supposed to be Immigration

Then the person is supposed to be Customs.

Except that several brands of those the terminals have a 90-99% failure-to-decide rate.

This isn't surprising.

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Barcodes stamped on breast implants and medical equipment

Richard 12
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Re: It will stop boobs ...

You mean like the 2D bar codes marked on most high-value integrated circuits?

This will be Datamatrix or Code 1.

Datamatrix was designed for this purpose, it is easy to print extremely small - ICs generally use this when they are too small to be labelled with legible text.

Code 1 is ancient, not very good, hard to print small - and widely used in healthcare.

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US cops seek Amazon Echo data for murder inquiry

Richard 12
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Re: Not their call

Amazon is appealing it in court. That's what the article is about!

If you don't believe that a given demand is valid, you never comply with the demand and then appeal afterwards - that would mean the end of any privacy rights whatsoever.

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How Rogue One's Imperial stormtroopers SAVED Star Wars and restored order

Richard 12
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Re: Critique

Also, there is no love interest.

They come to respect each other, as friends and war veterans.

They don't kiss at the end - and it's a better film because of it.

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Richard 12
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Re: stormtroopers being fodder

Can't see a thing in that helmet.

Not even your own feet!

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'Upset' Linus Torvalds gets sweary and gets results

Richard 12
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Re: Wouldn't YOU be fucking pissed off ...

Many patches are originally submitted by volunteers - however they do not directly send anything to Linus, their work is always routed via the appropriate paid team.

Those teams are supposed to bring all that together, test it and then send their completed module to Linus for final review.

They are paid to do that by various organisations - some charitable, some commercial - so this is their day job.

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Could a robot vacuum cleaner monitor your data centre?

Richard 12
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Re: Security considerations

Not necessarily.

The other approach is for the device and your phone to connect to a known remote server.

That connection could, in theory be very secure.

Or trivially cracked, you just don't know.

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NASA – get this – just launched 8 satellites from a rocket dropped from a plane at 40,000ft

Richard 12
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Re: Thats nothing.....Named meat costs extra...

They are. Verra nice.

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Richard 12
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Re: Thats nothing.....

Named meat costs extra

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Poor software design led to second £1m Army spy drone crash

Richard 12
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Or for thinking of a switch at all

As has been mentioned above several times - strain gauges are both damn near indestructible and incredibly cheap.

Plus you get a "How hard did the wheel hit the deck" for free.

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Blue sky basic income thinking is b****cks

Richard 12
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It does

Though most of it comes from taxing people from the future.

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Richard 12
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Re: UBI has issues, but there's a better solution.

That's a true pyramid scheme.

Where does the equity come from? New users.

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Richard 12
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Re: System efficiency

Disability allowances?

Housing benefit?

This argument is simply wrong!

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Richard 12
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That's what he meant by "being compensated for it".

If nobody will compensate you "enough" to do X, you will not do X. You'll do Y instead, that someone will pay you "enough" to do.

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Richard 12
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Re: He missed the point

So go somewhere that (almost) doesn't tax.

There are a few countries where the Government owns a few monopoly businesses and so has no income taxes.

In the better ones, you are ok if you are well-off. But lose your job and you are completely and utterly screwed.

In the others, you're ok if you can hire your own private militia to protect you.

Otherwise, you're screwed.

That's the "Social Contract" - paying taxes creates a country that can radically reduce your chance of early grisly death.

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Richard 12
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"Radically simplify taxation and benefits"

This is the part that's simply not true in any way, shape or form.

A Basic Income scheme would have roughly the same complexity as the current benefits system, while having far more claimants. Administering it would cost far more, even ignoring the increased actual payout.

The complexity in the current benefits system comes from many places.

The cost of living (esp. housing and transport) varies across the country. Disability. Children. Single or has a partner. Top-up of salary (working tax credit etc).

Almost all of that is still required under Basic Income - unless you want to hang those groups out to dry?

Taxation is complex because of the array of exemptions and adjustments - encouraging business and individuals to do certain things, like R&D, save for a pension etc, preventing businesses from paying directors and employees "in kind" (car, house, private jet...)

All of that is still there, in fact worse!

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Reschedule the holiday party, Patch Tuesday is here and it's a big one

Richard 12
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About a decade ago

It was a pretty good music player application.

Now it is horrific, and holds your music to ransom. Many people are terrified of what it might do should they try to uninstall it...

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ESA to try tank-to-tank fuel switch on sat that wasn't designed to do it

Richard 12
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What were the other tanks for?

The ESA page doesn't say, does anyone know and have a link?

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Japanese robot space maid will incinerate Earth's dead satellites

Richard 12
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Re: Eddies in the wire

Prising them off the table, or dropping the kids down a copper tube?

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Richard 12
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Eddies in the wire

Moving a conductive item through a magnetic field creates eddy currents that directly resist the motion.

I did a short investigation of the effect at school, more years ago than I care to mention. The force is small, but measurable with schoolkid-level kit.

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Samsung, the Angel of Death: Exploding Note 7 phones will be bricked

Richard 12
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Re: the precedent this sets if a manufacturer can

It sounds like that's pretty much what they're doing - disabling the charge function.

So I guess they'll probably continue to work when plugged into a suitable PSU.

As to "update bricking it in a dangerous situation" - don't be silly. Phone firmware updates only get applied automatically when on WiFi and plugged into power, overnight (phone time)

You can only get an update to happen up a rockface if you deliberately started it!

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Remember that amazing video of the whale leaping out the gym floor and splashing down? Yeah, it was BS

Richard 12
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Not quite

There is a difference between marketing a product or service that (mostly) exists and that can ship (pretty soon), and marketing a product that does not exist and the set of things you don't know about building it is several times the size of the set of things you do know.

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Sysadmin told to spend 20+ hours changing user names, for no reason

Richard 12
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Re: I for once, love Skype.

You have to get in early.

Which then causes annoyance anyway, as firstname.lastname@gmail.com gets a huge amount if email intended for firstname.lastname1@gmail.com

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Busted Windows 8, 10 update blamed for breaking Brits' DHCP

Richard 12
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Re: Why is Windows to blame?

DHCP is the usual way to set up your computer (and other things) to connect to the local network, and thus to the Internet.

Your computer sends out a request "Please tell me how to connect to the network" and a list of information about itself.

Your router then replies to the request with "Yes of course, this is how..." and a list of settings to use.

Your computer then replies with "Thankyou, I will use these settings..." and a list of the settings it will use.

If any of those lists are wrong (or misunderstood), it won't work.

If either side doesn't send the question or response in a timely fashion, it won't work.

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Information on smart meters? Yep. They're great. That works, right? – UK.gov

Richard 12
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Re: Dear Mrs May

They say that, yet the very expensive 100A contactor is inside nearly all of them.

One wonders why. Well, one wonders which reason they'll use.

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Richard 12
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Re: Dear Mrs May

Right now there are only two physically possible methods to remove power from a house:

A) Gain physical access to the mains supply supply tails at the meter (inside the property) at the tap (underground or pole-mounted), and cut them while live. Makes a big bang if done quickly, very expensive to repair.

B) Open the substation contactor, removing power from a street or more. Safer, hard to reverse as they aren't designed to do this often.

So, the police and GCHQ simply do not have the physical capability to disconnect power from a given house without significant cost, danger to themselves, lots of preparation and very large side effects.

Smart meters give them the ability to cut any specific supply at little notice, at very low cost, with no danger and very few side effects.

They also give miscreants that same ability.

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Local TV presenter shouted 'f*cking hell' to open news bulletin

Richard 12
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Re: Watershed or not?

It's supposed to be a gentle ride into profanities, rather than an instant drop.

Much more classy.

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Citizens Advice slams 'unfair' broadband compensation scheme

Richard 12
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Re: If Only OfCom Did What They Were Paid For...

The ASA are a worse joke though.

The heaviest sanction they ever apply is "Don't run that advert again", issued a few months after the advertiser stoppes running the adverts.

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Icelandic Pirate Party asked to form government

Richard 12
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I still love the Icelandic Parliament

It's called "A Thingy".

I wonder if there is a "Wossname" somewhere.

(That character is a 'thorn', pronounced 'th', used to be common in early written English as well. Often rendered similar to 'y', hence 'ye old coffee shop'. Then it vanished from these shores.)

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Take that, creationists: Boffins witness birth of new species in the lab

Richard 12
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I love a good virus painting

Pretty colours. Could look at them all day.

Or are these bacteriophage eating the bacteria?

Palette and palate, what is difference?

(PS: There doesn't appear to be a "Report errors/corrections" link on the mobile site.)

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Brit upstart releases free air traffic app for drone operators

Richard 12
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Re: drones at 000s of feet

The height is plausible, but the regularity is not.

Only high-power remote-camera drones would be pilotable at that height, and not the wifi ones. So the majority of these would have to be uncontrolled or accidental.

A multirotor 'copter has a battery longevity of about 20 minutes. It'll fly for that long, then it will crash.

It is plausible that some owners have lost control and had their copter fly away and 'jam the throttle' (bad failsafe), and as they are self-balanced it could keep climbing rapidly until it reaches a very high altitude ceiling.

It'll stay until the battery goes flat, then it will fall straight down.

A fixed-wing R/C aircraft is also inherently stable, however they generally can't climb quickly and are much harder to fly.

However, there do not seem to be any reports of any drones falling out of the sky, or any drone wreckage being found near where the near-misses are claimed to have occurred.

As nobody has produced that evidence, and it would be very stupid for the CAA etc not to go looking, one assumes that in most cases there was no evidence to find.

So while there probably have been a small number of genuine near-misses with planes and drones, the vast majority of these reports must have other explanations.

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UK cops spot webcam 'sextortion' plots: How vics can hit stop

Richard 12
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Re: Try stopping making people feel ashamed of sex and their bodies.

No, they are still among us.

Look around, you might see the hidden signs...

Or rather blatant ones waved happily from the walls of Westminster.

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100k+ petition: MPs must consider debating Snoopers' Charter again

Richard 12
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Re: It's the Government after all

It doesn't need to work, or be within budget.

It's carte blanche to monitor anybody at all.

So PC "Dodgy" can decide to monitor that bloke down the road who looks a bit foreign, until they find something to hang them.

As can anyone who hacks into the system.

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Richard 12
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Re: People. The person you need to write to is your MP. @John Smith 19

I hope you filled them out and psoted them back, authorising yourself to look at all your MP's stuff?

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Grand App Auto: Tesla smartphone hack can track, locate, unlock, and start cars

Richard 12
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Re: That's a lot of code

The car stereo system will run a general OS, usually either an embedded/compact edition of Windows, Linux or Android. That alone is tens of millions of lines of code.

Then there is the GUI toolkit (probably Qt these days), which is again quite large - most of that toolkit will not be actually used, but is there in the build machine.

None of the above was written by the car or stereo system manufacturer. The part they wrote will be much smaller, and far less well tested.

The ECU is a lot smaller, but was also built up over decades and probably is millions of lines - many of which will be cut out when building for a particular engine.

Then there are the multitude of sensors, each of which has some code, maybe a thousand lines or so.

So while it's not an unreasonable estimate, it is an utterly meaningless number.

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International Space Station celebrates 18th birthday in true style – by setting trash on fire

Richard 12
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Re: Fibreglass and cotton ...

It's usually smoke that kills, so smouldering is still incredibly dangerous if you don't know how to reliably put it out.

Especially in a sealed environment like a space capsule or submarine.

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Irish eyes are crying: Tens of thousands of broadband modems wide open to hijacking

Richard 12
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Re: Why does an ISP need access to your hardware

Remote access for update and support are definitely very useful for an ISP in a domestic context.

It's very valuable for the ISP support to be able to say "Your modem is working, it seems that your laptop isn't connected to it right now. Do you use Windows or Mac?"

Then talk them through the setup including the SSID to pick and the password to type, and finally see the WiFi login (attempt).

I suspect somebody in the dev team had been asking "Which IP range gets remote access?" for some time, had been ignored for months and eventually ordered "Just turn off the filter, the customer won't say"

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Why I just bought a MacBook Air instead of the new Pro

Richard 12
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Re: "If the 7S doesn't do something spectacular"

Most Android lock screens have that kind of thing as well, though the Apple implementation is definitely better than most.

However, I can't put data on the Lock screen because it's a clear security risk. I expect many people have the same consideration - OTP codes are a particular risk.

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Richard 12
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Re: The MacBook Pro has moved on from what it was.

If you expect to use the laptop on battery more than say 20% of the time, and hope to use it for more than two years, you will need to replace the battery.

It does not take long for the capacity to drop below 70%, turning your "all day" into a "half day".

A bit later it'll be 50% and getting quite annoying, and within a few months it'll only be a UPS long enough to find a wall socket.

On my laptop, I phone Dell and a new battery appears on my desk the next day.

On a modern Apple, you back it up, take it in, they take it away. A week later you go in to pick it up - and hope that it's actually the same machine with your data on it.

If you're a business then you also needed to secure-erase everything as you had sensitive data on there, and take a week holiday because you couldn't do any work.

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Richard 12
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Re: "If the 7S doesn't do something spectacular"

Widgets on the Home screen.

The iPhone Home screen has barely changed from the original array of static icons - the only new things are that the calendar icon now has the actual date and the email has a thing saying how many unread emails in the inbox.

My phone has both of those, yet also shows me the time at the international offices, the weather forecast, the alarms I have set, the subjects of recent emails, my next flight and next appointment.

When any of it becomes unimportant I can remove it, and when new info becomes important to me I can get an app that puts it right on my Home screen.

Usually in several different ways so I can pick the one I like.

- Eg when on holiday I pull work emails completely off the home screen.

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Three CEO confirms hack, 133,827 customers were exposed

Richard 12
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Re: So...

They're learning!

Perhaps they may even become sentient, given enough time.

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Microsoft's cmd.exe deposed by PowerShell in Windows 10 preview

Richard 12
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"Joe Public" doesn't care

He doesn't use cmd or powershell and never will.

Sheila Sysadmin is already using Powershell for the things it's good at, and cmd.exe for the rest.

Debbie developer relies on a large number of cmd.exe batch files and will be sorely vexed if any of them stop working!

All Windows software devs rely on a few BAT files built up over many years to automate the boring bits of a build and release. In most cases they probably have no idea how they work as they were eithwr written by a predecessor, or so long ago that the author doesn't remember anyway.

Plus there are the batch files that come with Visual Studio of course.

If any of those break in any way, there will be hell to pay - as that's rather likely to end up breaking Production.

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