* Posts by Richard 12

2726 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

Richard 12
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Re: I just love these people whose minds were already made up 5 years ago

And I really dislike people who refuse to read the court records and so continue to believe falsehoods.

He ran from an active rape investigation, and when the EAW was upheld, he ran from that as well. He's still running.

He's a fugitive suspected rapist. No more, no less.

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Richard 12
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So he should have fled to France

Also irrelevant, because this is just the European arrest warrant that's been dropped, not the case.

He has another two years* during which Sweden can reissue the warrant, followed by one year when Sweden can issue an extradition requst, and then the case itself has to be dropped.

Most countries would not allow this - to escape rape, simply hide for 10 years?

* I assume May wants us to withdraw from the EAW system along with everything else.

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Richard 12
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Re: Does anybody else find it strange...

They haven't.

They have shelved the case and dropped the arrest warrant because it's not going anywhere, and Swedish law says they can't keep the warrant open.

It is possible that the timings are related because JA said he'd come out if Manning was released. She has been and he's not come out - so his word is bollocks.

The case can be taken back off the shelf and a new warrant issued until some time in 2020, as it seems Swedish law allows some rape cases to "time out".

The only real change is that now the UK get to try him first, instead of Sweden.

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Richard 12
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@AC - No country can EVER give that guarantee.

The law does not permit it.

The most any prosecutor could say is that they haven't yet received such a request.

He was demanding that Swedish prosecutors break their own law, international law and their treaties with the US.

That gets a flat "No".

Sweden are legally obliged to properly consider all extradition warrants on their individual merits. They cannot give a private individual arbitrary immunity from everything they might or might not have done in another country's jurisdiction.

And frankly, his actions have made it far more likely that he end up rendered somewhere.

If he'd gone to Sweden in the first place then he would be a free man by now, and would have been able to continue his work unhindered.

Instead he is a wanted fugitive. Jumping Court bail has no limitation. He will be pursued for that forever, and will receive and serve the maximum sentence.

At that point, if the US wants him, they will get him.

Under Obama the US did not give a damn about Assange. Under Trump however...

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Proposed PATCH Act forces US snoops to quit hoarding code exploits

Richard 12
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Without law there's nothing

There has been precious little enforcement of the law with regards to the NSA, but it does occasionally happen.

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Richard 12
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Re: Gee

Yes.

But the only reason spies exist is to protect the people of their country.

In this case, the spies caused massive damage to their own side.

Why should we ignore that?

The NSA have done it several times before, they will do it again - and every time they are breaching their purpose.

There is a very simple solution: They can only keep a vulnerability secret for a short time, then are legally obliged to tell the developers and cannot prevent it from being patched.

Otherwise they will hoard them, and only let them be patched after a massive attack has already happened.

The side effect of this is that the NSA would then also be searching for vulnerabilities on a regular basis, which will then be fixed (after a delay for their use), thus protecting the people of their country.

If they are not willing to do this, they are not fulfilling their purpose.

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Richard 12
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Re: Is what we might learn about the terrorists worth risking people's lives for?

I dont think they even considered it at all.

I bet they simply thought "excellent, we now have a way inti these targets" and never considered whether any "non-state actors" might also find the vulnerability.

Then they locked it away in a cupboard and forgot how it worked, only remembering what it does.

This SMBv1 vulnerability is very, very old. I bet neither the NSA nor GCHQ even remember finding it, and never even considered whether it could destroy the NHS.

Oh yes, and then somebody got into the NSA's cupboard and nicked it.

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US court decision will destroy the internet, roar Google, Facebook et al

Richard 12
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No reasonable person can ever know if I have permission

I take a photo and hand it to Person A and tell them "You may post this on Facebook, but not anywhere else"

They post it on Facebook. This is ok.

They post it in LiveJournal. This is not ok and I can take legal action.

How can either of these places know what I told A?

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While Microsoft griped about NSA exploit stockpiles, it stockpiled patches: Friday's WinXP fix was built in February

Richard 12
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Re: One lesson to be learnt frin this (was Wormable holes)

No.

The OS of the very expensive MRI machine is completely irrelevant, because only the manufacturer can ever change any of its software.

Airgap it.

No matter what it runs, airgap it, beacuse it will receive very few patches and they will always be much later than a general purpose PC, because they always come via a 3rd party who is legally required to do very extensive testing.

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Richard 12
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Re: Latent product defect??

The EULA has never been tested in court.

It is rather likely that MS would settle privately out of court to keep it that way, should an entity indicate that they were really going to go that far.

I suspect that they already have done so a few times, but obviously the point of such settlements is to keep then off the public record.

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WannaCrypt outbreak contained as hunt for masterminds kicks in

Richard 12
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Re: The root of the problem is being ignored

Bitcoin isn't anonymous.

Every transaction is in the universal ledger, which everybody has access to by design.

The hard part is matching a given bitcoin payment address to an individual legal entity, which is very easy if they ever "cash out".

It is probably quite hard if they spend the bitcoin as bitcoin, however the money trail remains and could be followed.

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Oracle crushed in defeat as Java world votes 'No' to modular overhaul

Richard 12
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Re: Sun was always a little arrogant about Java

To be fair, if latency matters then you should not be using Java (or any other garbage-collected language) in the first place.

To be fairer, converting unsigned to signed and back is a complete waste of human effort and likely to go wrong.

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Richard 12
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Re: Sun was always a little arrogant about Java

Unsigned integers are used in a wide variety of protocols and file formats.

If you need to talk to anything else at all, you need both signed and unsigned integers, or to waste a lot of memory, human effort and CPU on much larger signed versions with manual range checks and fun bit-manipulation to turn the uint16 into an int32 so you can use the file format.

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All that free music on YouTube is good for you, Google tells music biz

Richard 12
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Re: @RyokuMas ... Unexpected footnote

Google don't have a reliable way od spotting copyright violations.

That hasn't stopped them taking down or redirecting revenue of many legitimate videos due to false positives in their content id system, because at the end of the day they don't care either way.

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WannaCrypt ransomware snatches NSA exploit, fscks over Telefónica, other orgs in Spain

Richard 12
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Re: WTF ..., WT actual F ?????

We usually roll them out within a fortnight - the ones we can roll out.

MS have made it a lot harder of late by putting too much in each basket. I would not be surprised if several of these places could not apply this patch because one of the other things in the same blob broke something important.

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'Jaff' argh snakes: 5m emails/hour ransomware floods inboxes

Richard 12
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Re: Law enforcement??

Probably waiting until a national health service or a telecommunications provider gets hit.

Oh.

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T-Mobile USA sued by parents after their baby dies amid 911 meltdown

Richard 12
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It's part of the carrier requirements that they be able to roughly locate any 911 caller.

Same is true of 112 and 999.

The reason is that many callers are not able to give a good location. Legitimate callers are mostly extremely stressed and many will be in a state of panic.

Even if calm and collected, what if the assailant is in the room, they're a kidnap victim, a passer by who doesn't know the area, a child, visitor or someone recently moved who doesn't know their full address yet...

Or simply that the call is cut off before they can give the information.

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Drugs, vodka, Volvo: The Scandinavian answer to Britain's future new border

Richard 12
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Re: Very interesting...

And completely irrelevant, because both are part of the EFTA Free Trade area and so do not in fact have much in the way of customs and excise.

It's the same as Switzerland.

ANPR probably works quite well when the only thing you really care about is catching known thieves as they cross borders.

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

Richard 12
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Re: Only valid reason for checking in

They already wipe down random items and put the cloth into a "magic chemical detector".

Explosives residue is quite trivial to detect.

It is much harder to do this with hold luggage as there is far more of it, and the passengers don't helpfully open their bags for you.

So nope, not buying it.

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Richard 12
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Re: I despise the security theatre...

It's fundamentally bollocks, and makes flying more dangerous.

Crushing a lithium ion battery usually makes it catch fire - and it doesn't matter whether or not it's inside a device.

- Just ask any airline what to do if you drop your phone into the seat. There have already been a few fires from phones being crushed by seats moving. Now make the battery an order of magnitude bigger, stack a load of weights on top at random, and bounce it around.

The existing ban will cause fires. The only question is how often. Expanding it can only bring down more aircraft.

The worst part is that when a plane is diverted or brought down by a lithium ion fire in the hold, they will probably insist that it was a terrorist act and ruin the life (or reputation) of a victim, and the lives of that victim's family.

I'll be going via Canada.

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Dyson celebrates 'shock' EU Court win over flawed energy tests

Richard 12
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Re: Is this the same Dyson who has no time for the EU ?

Yes. As far as I can tell, this case is the reason.

Yes, he does appear to be that petty.

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Crooks can nick Brits' identities just by picking up the phone and lying

Richard 12
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Re: They shouldn't encourage you to give out your 'security' data so easily

I can't compute that in my head, and neither could the calls centre monkey!

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CERN ready to test an EVEN BIGGER gun

Richard 12
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Re: A little side action?

Negatively or positively charging an atom is very easy to do.

In fact, the battery in your car does this to hydrogen.

(Assuming it's lead acid, anyway.)

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Fake ruse: USA Today calls the FBI after half of its 15m Facebook Likes turn out to be bogus

Richard 12
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Re: Never quite understood the logic

It's primarily for advertising fraud.

Controlling a few million "unique visitors" can quickly get a dodgy website a lot of advertising revenue from ad-slingers.

Facebook claim that all their accounts are unique, real people, so take that money for a few million impressions from the advertisers, skim their percentage and pass it on to the websites.

Hence this being fraud. The question is who defrauded who...

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Richard 12
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Re: So 6 to 9 million fake accounts?

Good point. Statistically that probably means there aren't any real users of Facebook at all.

They're all clockwork hats.

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Richard 12
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So 6 to 9 million fake accounts?

That Facebook admitted to finding in a single trawl of two corporate pages?

I'm guessing the FBI are being asked to investigate Facebook for possibly defrauding advertisers.

According to Facebook's own figures this one set of fakes is 0.5% of all Facebook accounts worldwide.

How many other fakes?

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Agile consultant behind UK's disastrous Common Platform Programme steps down

Richard 12
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Claw back clauses?

Hah!

The Government contract teams are apparently almost universally idiots, who even allow clauses saying "If we fail to deliver anything we still get paid. If we are fired for not delivering anything, we still get paid."

As evidenced by a great many examples. *sigh*

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IBM: Customer visit costing £75 in travel? Kill it with extreme prejudice

Richard 12
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Re: I am so happy I left them

Quite likely.

I keep an eye on the various office clearance auction houses for this kind of thing.

Got some rather good kit that way.

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IBM: Remote working is great! ... For everyone except us

Richard 12
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Do they also insist on shirt, jacket and tie?

Are winged collars required, or can one use those newfangled forward point turndown ones?

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Need the toilet? Wanna watch a video ad about erectile dysfunction?

Richard 12
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Re: Actually its the Gubberment.

I note that you have not understood the regulation or my post.

The wire was in a stupid place and so was damaged by a drill when her husband drilled into the wall.

- Yes I did forget that it was her partner who had screwed into the wire. Doesn't make much difference, the cause was the same - DIYer drilled into a wire that was in a stupid place.

I explicitly avoided giving names because that feels like victim blaming - and both were victims. I'm paranoid about wires in walls, most people are not.

I do not blame her parent either. They were distraught! Of course they would demand the Something Be Done! It's the Government of the day who did the foolish thing.

Labour were in power. Labour were the ones who wrote and passed a very bad regulation as a kneejerk overreaction to a tragedy.

The lib dems were not in power, they did not pass it.

Part P is terrible - even by their own figures it was hoped to prevent one incident a year. It probably hasn't come close to that, though that can't be proven as it's such a low rate to begin with. UK electrical safety is and was extremely good.

It has not solved the problem because it's simply created a spate of cowboys with Part P "certification" who have no understanding of electricity, they're doing it by rote.

And worse, those who do the work anyway and either issue a fake cert. or none, leaving homeowners in real trouble several years later.

As to the idea that you can do what you like - afraid not.

If you cannot get buildings insurance, you cannot get a mortgage, and the bank can even foreclose you.

If you cannot sell or rent out a property, the property has zero value.

Thus Part P does prevent you, in the same way that very large fines do. Same as the other buildings regs in fact, most of which are very sensible - even the very prescriptive ones.

Yes, lots of people ignore it. Lots of people ignore speed limits as well, and it's rare to get caught either way - but the penalties if you are caught are very severe.

They only tend to end up in trouble when trying to sell, and suddenly have a large cost dumped on them to get it "fixed" rapidly - even though the actual installation is usually perfectly fine, just the paperwork is missing or incomplete.

Yours, a former specialist industrial electrician, who has seen rather too many shoddy installations in their time.

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Spend your paper £5 notes NOW: No longer legal tender after today

Richard 12
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Re: £5 note issued in 1957 had a strong purchasing power

Hence the term "average".

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Richard 12
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Boffin

Re: Yeah...

The Bank of England will accept them (pretty much?) forever, as that's the entity who makes the "Promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of XXX".

You walk in, hand over your ancient currency, they check that it's real and hand you a crisp new one.

However, shops don't have to take older editions of currency after a relatively short changeover period.

The reason for retiring old coins and notes is because the forgers eventually get too good at making the old designs, making it much too difficult for a normal person to spot them.

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Fake invoice scammers slurp $5bn+ from corp beancounters – FBI

Richard 12
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Order numbers tend to be guessable

And supplier details are public knowledge.

The other one to watch for is "We've changed our bank account details". That should be an immediate red flag demanding an instant out-of-band confirmation.

I rather suspect this is something where a sub-0.1% hit rate still nets the scammers a lot of money, so it doesn't take many tired account controller screwups.

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It's been two and a half years of decline – tablets aren't coming back

Richard 12
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Re: The problem with tablets isn't actually a problem...

I rather agree with both the "fad" and the "they were good enough years ago" statements.

Tablets have a very limited use case - time and places where you want a portable, medium-sized screen in a small box to display stuff, and either have the time before entering that place to put the stuff onto the tablet, or have fast enough WiFi to stream it.

That means documentation (aircraft pilots, onsite documentation, ebooks etc) and/or watching movies in places where you don't have access to anything better (travelling) and at home away from the TV.

- They're no good for streaming away from home because hotel wifi still sucks.

The tablets of five or six years ago did all that, and still have enough battery life to keep doing it today.

It's a fad because lots of people bought one thinking they'd find them useful, only to discover that they did not.

The other people who did find them genuinely useful, already have one and simply aren't going to replace this "third screen" until it doesn't do what they found useful - so they won't buy a new one until the battery life is short enough to be sufficiently annoying.

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Richard 12
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Big Brother

Re: No improvement is specs

I guess battery life isn't that important.

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Hackers emit 9GB of stolen Macron 'emails' two days before French presidential election

Richard 12
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They did invade Crimea

And won.

We're just a bit further away.

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What augmented reality was created for: An ugly drink with a balloon

Richard 12
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Re: Wetherspoons now offer table-service via a phone app...

It's very slow. Or rather, the lead time doesn't depend on what you order.

A colleague ordered a cup of tea that way.

Half an hour later, a tray was borne to them upon which was a cup of tea, milk and sugar.

History does not record whether it was still hot.

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Is Britain really worse at 4G than Peru?

Richard 12
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Re: Who has 4G in Peru

In Peru the only 4G is in the Lima metropolitan area, and Cuzco city (where the tourists go for Macchu Picchu)

There isn't any 4G anywhere else at all.

There's barely any 2G across much of the rest of the country.

In fact, most of the country has no mobile signal at all.

Their data is based on the tiny number of people who are rich enough to not worry about the data cost of the app. That means it is simply wrong in every country where data charges are high.

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Leaked: The UK's secret blueprint with telcos for mass spying on internet, phones – and backdoors

Richard 12
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Re: Hmm, bugger off, government. I didn't elect you, and I don't respect you

The MPs voted for there not to be a general election.

Seems that didn't work.

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Microsoft Azure capacity woes hit UK customers. Yes, you read that right

Richard 12
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Re: If people stored more zeros and less ones...

No no no, other way around.

1s are much narrower than 0s. Zeros are fat bastards.

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Jeez, we'll do something about Facebook murder vids, moans Zuckerberg

Richard 12
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Re: They don't care

It is odd that I don't know anyone at all who has reported a thing to Facebook and been told that it would be taken down.

Even in cases where it contained explicit threats of violence.

Yet I do know several people who have had their photos taken down because of "nudity".

Quite clearly, Facebook love death, murder and hatred but cannot stand nudity in any form.

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Transatlantic link typo by Sweden's Telia broke Cloudflare in the US

Richard 12
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Half hour ping.

No, no, the server wasn't down for 20 minutes, the Intertubes were slow.

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Apple blocks comms-snooping malware

Richard 12
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It's hard to tell because quite a lot of genuine software from well-known firms such as "Apple" and "Microsoft" have a similar disregard for the english language, as well as ancient and hallowed UX guidelines such as "Don't stop me working" and "Always tell me when you fail"

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What's a 'good' quarter at AMD these days? Chucking $73m on a fire

Richard 12
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18% year-on-year is huge

So yes, they certainly have reason to be proud of that accomplishment.

If they hadn't then they'd be dead - Ryzen is basically their last chance. If it fails in the market then they probably don't have the reserves to make another.

If they can get another year of reasonable growth then they should survive and hopefully do great things.

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NSA pulls plug on some email spying before Congress slaps it down

Richard 12
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Re: Weasel words

They'll be deleted once we've read them and decided we don't nees them.

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Red alert! Intel patches remote execution hole that's been hidden in chips since 2010

Richard 12
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Re: See!

Very funny.

The penguins are the ones who will probably save us, as they are the people with the expertise and the time to patch the unsupported hardware.

This is a time when we learn a lot about the various high profile vendors. How far back will they publish patches?

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M6 crowned crappiest motorway for 4G signal

Richard 12
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Re: Fun fact. -The toll road is useful

About relatively wealthy drivers, anyway.

Whether that data would be applicable to the general populace is another matter.

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Well, hot-diggity-damn, BlackBerry's KEYone is one hell of a comeback

Richard 12
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My guess is because they're thick and unreliable

A flip phone is necessarily much thicker than a slabphone, simply to make the two parts both physically strong enough.

For some reason, being "very thin" is an important marketing spec point.

Moving parts are much more expensive and break far more often than non-moving parts.

So a double whammy. I am disappointed of course, because "open to answer, close to hang up" is a beautiful and intuitive UI.

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Just how screwed is IT at the Home Office?

Richard 12
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Re: Two more disasters here.

Everyone on the desktop site clicks the "report errors" link.

It obviously isn't going to get fixed until Tuesday anyway, and I presume the obvious grammatical errors are due to the rush to the pub.

I note that the mobile site still doesn't have a "report errors" link. That is a shame.

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Richard 12
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Re: Mountains out of molehills?

Most of the UK airports did the same.

It's only the terminals that have been built since that have three, and frankly that bit of logistics is trivial - just board up the entrance to the Blue Channel, job done. This also gives the customs officials some more space, which they will of course desperately need.

The ferry ports are the real logistical nightmare, as right now there are no Customs at all - with nowhere to put them, and no time for them to do the job.

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