* Posts by Richard 12

2382 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Aaarrgh, zombie! Dead Apple iOS monopoly lawsuit is reanimated

Richard 12
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Re: No rocket science is necessary for the understanding of this story.

They don't allow them at all. IIRC it's even in the developer T&Cs.

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Richard 12
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Re: Grab the popcorn!

You can code in any language you like when targetting Android - yes, including Cobol.

http://www.veryant.com/products/cobol-mobile.html

The same is not true when targetting iOS, where Apple have strict rules about the languages you can use - for example, you cannot run an interpreter at all.

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Nintendo pulls the Switch, fires Joy-con at Microsoft and Sony

Richard 12
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VR will still be touted as the next big thing

When the next two next big things are getting old...

Perhaps current technology is just about good enough, but nobody has actually come up with a form factor and killer application.

Plus, if you wear glasses, you're out. Seems that nobody is making a headset that fits over glasses or offers any vision correction options. I'm not going to buy contact lenses just to play a game, unless that game is supremely awesome.

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Drone biz Lily Robotics takes $34m in pre-orders, ships nothing, shuts down, gets sued by San Francisco DA

Richard 12
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Re: How does my credit card issuer fit into this story?

Depends where you live.

In the EU they are jointly and severally liable, so as a consumer you get your money back from the credit card company - and they can go ahead and do whatever they deem appropriate to recover their loss from the vendor.

In many other parts of the world it's not as clear cut.

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Microsoft sued by staff traumatized by child sex abuse vids stashed on OneDrive accounts

Richard 12
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Re: What <i>the hell</i> are Microsoft doing going through our files?

Rudderless, consider this:

You take a few photos of your kids playing in the bath.

Or on the beach or whatever. They're having fun, you want to remember that moment and it's wonderful.

You back those photos up onto OneDrive.

Some time later the Feds turn up on your doorstep, grab you and bundle you into a black car.

After months of pre-trial incarceration, you discover that somebody at Microsoft misread the context of your photos and reported them as being child porn.

Fortunately you have an expensive lawyer and manage to convince the judge/jury that they're normal innocent photos of the type a proud parent might take.

In the meantime, your kids have been taken into care, you've loat your job, had your reputation ruined and your life destroyed.

If you can't afford said expensive lawyer, well...

Still want Microsoft to proactively search your OneDrive?

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Crumbs. Exceedingly good cakes, meat dressing price hike in wake of the Brexit

Richard 12
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Re: Mathematical inexactitude

They mean 5%

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Richard 12
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WTF?

Lots of people put those cakes on supermarket shelves.

Lots of people work in the warehousing and lorries that get the cakes from the factory to the supermarket.

Lots of people work in the factories making cakes.

Lots of people work in the factories making ingredients and packaging for those cakes.

Lots of people work in the farms, forests etc growing and harvesting the raw materials for those cakes.

Lots of people work in the ports loading and unloading the ships of materials for those cakes.

Lots of people work in the warehousing, ships and lorries storing and transporting the materials for those cakes.

Lots of other people do jobs that are necessary for those cakes to end up in my kitchen, yet I don't even realise those jobs exist.

Do you really think that none of those people are worthy of a decent wage?

Think very carefully before you answer.

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Richard 12
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Re: Clickbait

* Inflation is going up

* Well-paid jobs will be lost

* Underemployment will increase

* Companies will close (esp. importers)

* Cost of Government borrowing rises

* Tax revenue will fall.

Note the London is roughly 30% of all the UK tax revenue. Close down "The City" and total UK tax revenue falls by 10-20%.

You think "X" is underfunded now? Try cutting 10% of the budget.

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Richard 12
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Yes, but it's worth it to regain our sovereignty create Lady High Emperor May.

Fixed it for you.

She doesn't want Parliamentary sovereignty. Her representative even argued that she has unlimited power to decide our future in the Supreme Court.

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Richard 12
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Plus you cab use it to park your bike!

Chocolate Oranges also got significantly smaller as well.

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Asteroid nearly gave Earth a new feature, two days after its discovery

Richard 12
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Re: No El Reg SI units in this article?

One to three doubledecker buses.

As to how far away, I'd say "just far enough"

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Richard 12
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Re: What if it had hit?

Could still seriously damage a small town.

Most likely to hit the sea of course.

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Bank robber reveals identity – by using his debit card during crime

Richard 12
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There's practically no mental health support

So instead of taking his guns away and getting him the mental health services he needed, they let him keep all his guns and stopped watching him.

This blood is on the US Government and the NRA's hands.

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Richard 12
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Re: @ Eddy Ito

Court records are public, and almost everyone convicted of a sexual offence is named in the court records, along with the sentencing.

It trivially simple for any tabloid to create their own database of "sex offenders" - or indeed any other offence.

The only question is whether they think making it public is good commercial sense.

Worse still, because suspects are named, they can even maintain a database of innocent people who have been accused of same.

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Splunk: Why we dumped Perforce for Atlassian's Bitbucket of Gits

Richard 12
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Re: Of course it's not just Perforce

Sourcesafe?

Do they hate your code and just want it to die? We've had several occasions where the database got corrupted somehow and had to be rolled back to an earlier state.

The second time I had a local git-based backup (intended for branching and merging) so pushed up the lost changes again.

It never seemed all that stable either, though that was probably really caused by poor Internet connectivity.

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Richard 12
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Re: A Brief Response from the Referenced Author

Thanks.

When will Perforce properly deal with line endings?

When will it be capable of showing the labels in the history of a file or workspace?

- Or even handling large numbers of labels without falling over. "Lightweight" changelist labels are a start, but I can't see those in the GUI at all from a workspace!

When will it be capable of showing the *full* commit history of the *project* - see the "railtrack" git demo screenshots for what I mean.

When will it be able to show the history of stream "imports" in any way, shape or form?

- It does seem to be tracked but I have no idea what point that actually gets stored, and neither do your support.

These are necessary tools for multi-developer, multi-platform projects, that are either horribly naive or sadly lacking in Perforce.

That's before considering refactoring when files are split up. Git tracks that - while Perforce barely manages a rename!

Perforce/Helix is radically behind - DVCS is not just about local versioning.

- Unfortunately yes, I am rather bitter. Perforce/Helix has burned out at least one of our good guys, and cost me personally over a hundred hours of work in a few months, fixing depots and working around its shortcomings. We finally do have a workflow that mostly works, but it works despite the tool, not because of it.

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Richard 12
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Re: Smerforce

I kept on pressing them.

For line endings, it took a week to get them to actually consider the problem at all, and about another month before they admitted that there was a serious bug - but even then they said the bug was the documentation and that they way it actually working how it should. Which is a stupid way that no real user would ever want...

For the other big issues, about four months of back-and-forth before they finally suggested an undocumented hidden function - simply to list the commit text.

At that point we gave up. It still doesn't quite work, and it was clear by then that Perforce just cannot tell you your history.

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Richard 12
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Re: Saucy!

If the only choice is ClearCase v Perforce, then yes, Perforce.

But that says more about ClearCase than Perforce...

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Richard 12
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There's a lot of thing Perforce just Won't Do

Like "Give me the full list of commit descriptions between labels X (new) and Y (old)"

You know, a core function of any source control system.

It's simple to get that for the current branch/stream, but actually impossible to get it to reliable include all merged branches/streams - you often get bits from before Y, and sometimes everything that has ever happened ever.

After four months of trying I finally got something that almost works, but not quite.

It means the automated build reports are rarely correct - and that is very scary.

In short, Perforce is a very poor tool for management of code history.

On top of that, it can't deal with line endings in a sane way, it can't show you the history of what got imported from other projects (it's apparently there but impossible to see in any way)... the list goes on.

In short, Perforce is a very poor tool.

I would say that git is at least a decade ahead, and that Perforce will never catch up.

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Robo-supercar hype biz Faraday Future has invented something – a new word for 'disrupt'

Richard 12
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Re: Will it.....

Indeed.

Most petrol and diesel cars will do 500-600 miles on a single 50-60 litre tank (at low altitude, mountains are different). Even people carriers.

Driven carefully, 700 miles is doable for many diesels.

Rather shows up the SUV class, but not really surprising when they have the aerodynamics of a brick.

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Hackers could turn your smart meter into a bomb and blow your family to smithereens – new claim

Richard 12
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Re: UK encryption

Not to mention rubber-hose decryption.

If the target is sufficiently valuable to an attacker - for example, the ability to completely destroy the National Grid on demand - then some actors will go ahead and apply the hose.

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Richard 12
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That was the entire point

Everything else they've mentioned is known to be utterly false - tripe of the smelliest order.

The remote kill switch is the only feature of these devices that might actually work.

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Xmas software update knackered US Customs computer systems

Richard 12
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The terminals are supposed to be Immigration

Then the person is supposed to be Customs.

Except that several brands of those the terminals have a 90-99% failure-to-decide rate.

This isn't surprising.

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Barcodes stamped on breast implants and medical equipment

Richard 12
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Re: It will stop boobs ...

You mean like the 2D bar codes marked on most high-value integrated circuits?

This will be Datamatrix or Code 1.

Datamatrix was designed for this purpose, it is easy to print extremely small - ICs generally use this when they are too small to be labelled with legible text.

Code 1 is ancient, not very good, hard to print small - and widely used in healthcare.

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US cops seek Amazon Echo data for murder inquiry

Richard 12
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Re: Not their call

Amazon is appealing it in court. That's what the article is about!

If you don't believe that a given demand is valid, you never comply with the demand and then appeal afterwards - that would mean the end of any privacy rights whatsoever.

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How Rogue One's Imperial stormtroopers SAVED Star Wars and restored order

Richard 12
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Re: Critique

Also, there is no love interest.

They come to respect each other, as friends and war veterans.

They don't kiss at the end - and it's a better film because of it.

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Richard 12
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Re: stormtroopers being fodder

Can't see a thing in that helmet.

Not even your own feet!

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'Upset' Linus Torvalds gets sweary and gets results

Richard 12
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Re: Wouldn't YOU be fucking pissed off ...

Many patches are originally submitted by volunteers - however they do not directly send anything to Linus, their work is always routed via the appropriate paid team.

Those teams are supposed to bring all that together, test it and then send their completed module to Linus for final review.

They are paid to do that by various organisations - some charitable, some commercial - so this is their day job.

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Could a robot vacuum cleaner monitor your data centre?

Richard 12
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Re: Security considerations

Not necessarily.

The other approach is for the device and your phone to connect to a known remote server.

That connection could, in theory be very secure.

Or trivially cracked, you just don't know.

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NASA – get this – just launched 8 satellites from a rocket dropped from a plane at 40,000ft

Richard 12
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Re: Thats nothing.....Named meat costs extra...

They are. Verra nice.

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Richard 12
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Re: Thats nothing.....

Named meat costs extra

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Poor software design led to second £1m Army spy drone crash

Richard 12
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Or for thinking of a switch at all

As has been mentioned above several times - strain gauges are both damn near indestructible and incredibly cheap.

Plus you get a "How hard did the wheel hit the deck" for free.

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Blue sky basic income thinking is b****cks

Richard 12
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It does

Though most of it comes from taxing people from the future.

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Richard 12
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Re: UBI has issues, but there's a better solution.

That's a true pyramid scheme.

Where does the equity come from? New users.

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Richard 12
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Re: System efficiency

Disability allowances?

Housing benefit?

This argument is simply wrong!

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Richard 12
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That's what he meant by "being compensated for it".

If nobody will compensate you "enough" to do X, you will not do X. You'll do Y instead, that someone will pay you "enough" to do.

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Richard 12
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Re: He missed the point

So go somewhere that (almost) doesn't tax.

There are a few countries where the Government owns a few monopoly businesses and so has no income taxes.

In the better ones, you are ok if you are well-off. But lose your job and you are completely and utterly screwed.

In the others, you're ok if you can hire your own private militia to protect you.

Otherwise, you're screwed.

That's the "Social Contract" - paying taxes creates a country that can radically reduce your chance of early grisly death.

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Richard 12
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"Radically simplify taxation and benefits"

This is the part that's simply not true in any way, shape or form.

A Basic Income scheme would have roughly the same complexity as the current benefits system, while having far more claimants. Administering it would cost far more, even ignoring the increased actual payout.

The complexity in the current benefits system comes from many places.

The cost of living (esp. housing and transport) varies across the country. Disability. Children. Single or has a partner. Top-up of salary (working tax credit etc).

Almost all of that is still required under Basic Income - unless you want to hang those groups out to dry?

Taxation is complex because of the array of exemptions and adjustments - encouraging business and individuals to do certain things, like R&D, save for a pension etc, preventing businesses from paying directors and employees "in kind" (car, house, private jet...)

All of that is still there, in fact worse!

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Reschedule the holiday party, Patch Tuesday is here and it's a big one

Richard 12
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About a decade ago

It was a pretty good music player application.

Now it is horrific, and holds your music to ransom. Many people are terrified of what it might do should they try to uninstall it...

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ESA to try tank-to-tank fuel switch on sat that wasn't designed to do it

Richard 12
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What were the other tanks for?

The ESA page doesn't say, does anyone know and have a link?

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Japanese robot space maid will incinerate Earth's dead satellites

Richard 12
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Re: Eddies in the wire

Prising them off the table, or dropping the kids down a copper tube?

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Richard 12
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Eddies in the wire

Moving a conductive item through a magnetic field creates eddy currents that directly resist the motion.

I did a short investigation of the effect at school, more years ago than I care to mention. The force is small, but measurable with schoolkid-level kit.

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Samsung, the Angel of Death: Exploding Note 7 phones will be bricked

Richard 12
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Re: the precedent this sets if a manufacturer can

It sounds like that's pretty much what they're doing - disabling the charge function.

So I guess they'll probably continue to work when plugged into a suitable PSU.

As to "update bricking it in a dangerous situation" - don't be silly. Phone firmware updates only get applied automatically when on WiFi and plugged into power, overnight (phone time)

You can only get an update to happen up a rockface if you deliberately started it!

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Remember that amazing video of the whale leaping out the gym floor and splashing down? Yeah, it was BS

Richard 12
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Not quite

There is a difference between marketing a product or service that (mostly) exists and that can ship (pretty soon), and marketing a product that does not exist and the set of things you don't know about building it is several times the size of the set of things you do know.

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Sysadmin told to spend 20+ hours changing user names, for no reason

Richard 12
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Re: I for once, love Skype.

You have to get in early.

Which then causes annoyance anyway, as firstname.lastname@gmail.com gets a huge amount if email intended for firstname.lastname1@gmail.com

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Busted Windows 8, 10 update blamed for breaking Brits' DHCP

Richard 12
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Re: Why is Windows to blame?

DHCP is the usual way to set up your computer (and other things) to connect to the local network, and thus to the Internet.

Your computer sends out a request "Please tell me how to connect to the network" and a list of information about itself.

Your router then replies to the request with "Yes of course, this is how..." and a list of settings to use.

Your computer then replies with "Thankyou, I will use these settings..." and a list of the settings it will use.

If any of those lists are wrong (or misunderstood), it won't work.

If either side doesn't send the question or response in a timely fashion, it won't work.

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Information on smart meters? Yep. They're great. That works, right? – UK.gov

Richard 12
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Re: Dear Mrs May

They say that, yet the very expensive 100A contactor is inside nearly all of them.

One wonders why. Well, one wonders which reason they'll use.

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Richard 12
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Re: Dear Mrs May

Right now there are only two physically possible methods to remove power from a house:

A) Gain physical access to the mains supply supply tails at the meter (inside the property) at the tap (underground or pole-mounted), and cut them while live. Makes a big bang if done quickly, very expensive to repair.

B) Open the substation contactor, removing power from a street or more. Safer, hard to reverse as they aren't designed to do this often.

So, the police and GCHQ simply do not have the physical capability to disconnect power from a given house without significant cost, danger to themselves, lots of preparation and very large side effects.

Smart meters give them the ability to cut any specific supply at little notice, at very low cost, with no danger and very few side effects.

They also give miscreants that same ability.

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Local TV presenter shouted 'f*cking hell' to open news bulletin

Richard 12
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Re: Watershed or not?

It's supposed to be a gentle ride into profanities, rather than an instant drop.

Much more classy.

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Citizens Advice slams 'unfair' broadband compensation scheme

Richard 12
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Re: If Only OfCom Did What They Were Paid For...

The ASA are a worse joke though.

The heaviest sanction they ever apply is "Don't run that advert again", issued a few months after the advertiser stoppes running the adverts.

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