* Posts by Richard 12

2649 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Dirty diesel backups will make Hinkley Point C look like a bargain

Richard 12
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Brownouts don't really work anymore

Much of the domestic and industrial load is now constant-power, so just draws more current if the voltage drops.

Disconnectable contracts - and "rolling blackouts" - work better and the last National Grid report I read said that they expect to use them considerably more often in the coming years.

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Richard 12
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Re: do you work for VW by any chance?

Stationary engines under continous load can be stupendously efficient and have incredibly low emissions.

Mobile engines, small engines and those under wildly varying load are generally inefficient and dirty.

Guess which type is in a car and which is in a generator set?

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Richard 12
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Re: Ignore the externalities, as usual

Ignore reality, as usual.

If the lights don't stay on then there won't be many children anyway, because the poor will die.

Although it's generally the elderly poor who die first, which I suppose would reduce the load on the NHS.

This is why it matters.

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Richard 12
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Re: Greens just don't understand numbers

Several thousand years of uranium-based nuclear fission is effectively forever.

Because it is long enough to be completely replaced by some technology whose physics we currently barely understand.

Or large-scale fusion, whichever comes first!

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Rosetta's last comet pic

Richard 12
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Re: Sad in many ways...

67P is now forever the last resting place of Rosetta and Philae, and will remain so until it finally disintegrates.

It may even slowly subsume them, we don't really know.

That seems a fitting burial to me.

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Complaints against cops down 93% thanks to bodycams – study

Richard 12
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Studying police officers improves their behaviour

This same study found the same drop in complaints regarding the officers who weren't using the bodycams.

When both the control group and the active group have the same result, that doesn't indicate that the active group had any effect.

It shows that the act of studying has an effect.

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USB-C is now wired for sound, just like Sir Cliff Richard

Richard 12
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Re: I wonder how does electrocution through your ears feel like

I have a 13A to headphone socket adapter. I use it to listen to and record the mains.

People do seem to freak out when I use it though.

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Ordinary punters will get squat from smart meters, reckons report

Richard 12
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Re: Can you switcj on/off via the keypad?

Isolate and LOCK OFF.

It's not off until it's got a padlocked off and the only key is in my pocket.

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Ever longed to be naked in Paris? City council votes TODAY

Richard 12
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Clothing optional (like the subject), as opposed to clothing mandatory (like the post).

So you wander into the area, remove your clothing - or not. Just remember to put it back on before leaving, as you'll probably need your wallet and keys.

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Heathrow airport and stock exchange throw mystery BSODs

Richard 12
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Re: Ancient coin counter

Yes, the default XPE boot logo includes the word Embedded.

Like almost everything else, it can be changed but rarely is.

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Yahoo! joins! Adobe! Flash! flush! mob!

Richard 12
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No Flash here

So does that mean I can't watch anything, or that the ads don't play?

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SpaceX: Breach in liquid oxygen tank caused Falcon 9 fireball ... probably

Richard 12
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Re: "...one tenth of a second..."

And very fast sample intervals!

Most of the data stored in an aircraft "black box" is measured at 1, 10 or even 30 second intervals.

It's only really the voice recorder that goes fast enough to have any data at all from an event like this.

I wouldn't be surprised if most of their usable data was actually sound recordings.

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Sad reality: It's cheaper to get hacked than build strong IT defenses

Richard 12
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Re: What about externalised costs?

They might fast-track it.

Always good to get an early bit of case law, even better if there's no time for any appeal.

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Richard 12
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Re: Sadly very true

Only unless and until the insurance company "recovers" the loss from the bank for failing to meet the terms of insurance.

Or the regulatory authority and/or court awards punitive fines and/or damages.

Clearly, insurance companies will be the main driver for good security for the foreseeable future.

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British unis mull offshore EU campuses in post-Brexit vote panic

Richard 12
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Re: Off-shoring, can they afford it?

The one caused the other.

If practically everyone has a "degree", then every job will ask for a degree.

If very few people have a degree, then employers will stop asking for it and instead ask for relevant experience.

HR are like everyone else - they'll take a shortcut (ask for a degree) if they can.

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Richard 12
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Re: Degrees are worth less now everyone has one

He's using the term "more" to mean "a higher percentage of people".

Relative as opposed to absolute.

English is wonderfully vague sometimes.

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Naughty Zuck: Facebook fudged its video ad numbers

Richard 12
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Re: 84 per cent of advertising revenue now comes from mobile devices,

And the app default is to burn as much of your expensive data as possible by auto-playing all videos, whether adverts or not.

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'Everyone' is buying Twitter

Richard 12
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Re: $18bn?

...and could theoretically make a profit...

Thanks for the correction.

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Richard 12
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Re: $18bn?

Uber and AirBnB have a revenue stream and actually make a profit.

So they are far more valuable in real terms.

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Pull the plug! PowerPoint may kill my conference audience

Richard 12
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This is why you leave the laptop at the back

Never use your own machine on stage. It will try to get you fired.

Give the PP file to the technical crew.

They will play it on their machine which is known to work, and you get a button to press that does nothing more than BEEP in the technician's headset.

And if you actually give it to the tech more half an hour before, they will have gone through it and made sure everything actually works.

And never, ever embed a video clip. The DRM will ensure that it does not work when you need it.

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She cannae take it, Captain Kirk! USS Zumwalt breaks down

Richard 12
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Re: Boat vs. ship

So what about ship shipping ships?

The Blue Marlin would define practically everything else as a boat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ba7eOMhtu9I

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Zuckerberg to spend $3bn+ to rid world of all disease by 2100 (Starting with Facebook, right?)

Richard 12
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Zika isn't "don't spray"

It's "do spray".

The way to prevent the spread of Zika is the same as the way to prevent the spread of malaria.

Kill the mosquitos. Remove their breeding grounds.

Oh yes, and don't arrange for a massive congregation of international visitors in the middle of an outbreak. That's probably how it got to Brazil in the first place!

Zika spreads faster because the mozzies that spread it are active during the day, so mosquito nets don't work.

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Latest F-35 bang seat* mods will stop them breaking pilots' necks, beams US

Richard 12
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Re: @Wommit

All fighter jets shot down in the last couple of decades were brought down by drones.

You see, by any reasomable definition, guided missiles are a type of drone.

One that can't land and doesn't fly for very long, but still a drone.

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Microsoft snubs alert over Exchange hole

Richard 12
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Re: it only takes only four lines of code and a local config file

It's like keeping the house keys in the car.

So if a miscreant can break into your car they have the keys to your house.

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EU ends anonymity and rules open Wi-Fi hotspots need passwords

Richard 12
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Re: Can anyone explain AOs conclusion?

Napoleonic law starts from the principle that everything is forbidden.

So you're not far wrong.

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Richard 12
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Re: Even EU supporters hate these sort of rules.

No he isn't evil.

He's just a fool. A fool with high aspirations and a wonderful view of the world, that sadly doesn't match reality.

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Did you know iOS 10, macOS Sierra has a problem with crappy VPNs? You do now

Richard 12
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Re: WEEKS

It is effectively impossible to do roll back any iOS update whatsoever.

Android can be rolled back at will if rooted, however I understand it to be very difficult (perhaps now impossible) otherwise.

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Australia Post says use blockchain for voting. Expert: you're kidding

Richard 12
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Re: Reminds of a famous quote

Ballot stuffing is relatively difficult these days, because there are so many voters.

Each box doesn't contain very many ballots relative to the margin of votes, which means a lot of boxes have to be compromised.

Stuffing is only really feasible in the rare cases where the margin is in the hundreds of votes.

Unless you can swap out an entire vanload, which would need the collusion of a large number of people.

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Great British Block-Off: GCHQ floats plan to share its DNS filters

Richard 12
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Re: How long?

It was the plebs up North that voted for this, for the most part.

I presume this was mostly because Londoner plebs have seen unbridled Westminster.

Throw off the yoke of the EU! Hand unlimited POWER to your Westminster overlords!

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Jeff Bezos' thrusting cylinder makes Elon Musk's look minuscule

Richard 12
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Re: Paper rocket

Excel...

I once directly controlled the lights in the building from Excel.

I had to take a shower afterwards.

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Brit spies and chums slurped 750k+ bits of info on you last year

Richard 12
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I'll use your maths then

So they snooped on a communication from or to 4.3% of UK households.

Additionally, every single communication has two ends, and thus they snoopped on both ends - 8.6%

That's 1 in 12 households. How many households on your street?

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Seagate sued by its own staff for leaking personal info to identity thieves

Richard 12
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The data wasn't stolen

It was given away.

- At least, that's the allegation.

HR handed over the private data to an unknown party. There was no break-in, they simply said "We want it" and HR handed it over.

Therefore Seagate are 100% completely liable for this. No ifs, buts or maybes.

It's no different to someone crashing their parked car because they forgot to put on the handbrake. They screwed up by making a pretty stupid mistake, and they are liable.

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Florida Man's prized jeep cremated by exploding Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Richard 12
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I believe that mine supplies power (until it decides the battery might be a bit low) if the vehicle is unlocked but the key is not in the vehicle.

It shuts it down when locked.

So perhaps the key was not in the ignition but the vehicle was unlocked?

And the phablet on display...

Something about that seems foolish. Can't quite put my finger on it.

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Richard 12
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Re: The windscreen glass melted

Plastic scratches easily and UV degrades quite quickly.

The glass has coatings to reflect any the UV and is very hard to avoid scratches.

The plastic then provides the extreme toughness to prevent easy cracking and ensure that the pane breaks "safely" in the event of a collision.

Mixed materials are very often far better than any one material.

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You should install smart meters even if they're dumb, says flack

Richard 12
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Re: Previous DCC Employee

Probably because they can already track down power theft pretty accurately.

All the substations have accurate metering, and they know the expected load given what's attached to it. It's not rocket science to spot a substation that's supplying more than the expected load.

While in theory more accurate metering might help, it'd take extremely high penetration >90% or more before it could begin to offer anything they don't already have.

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Internet of Sins: Million more devices sharing known private keys for HTTPS, SSH admin

Richard 12
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Re: Doesn't even require complex solution

Generating the keys requires a decent source of entropy - otherwise it's not a key.

Most microcontrollers don't have those unless the IoT designer adds one in hardware.

Some of the new ARM do have this built-in, but it adds cost.

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Richard 12
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Not an option in 99.9% of IoT

These are custom hardware.

They aren't PCs, or even well-known chipsets.

There isn't any free software for them, flashing new firmware onto it is difficult - often needing a custom programming dongle - and the huge variety means that every one is different.

Without the original source and toolchain it's basically impossible for a well-resourced developer to create a firmware pack, let alone a hobbyist.

Welcome to the real world of hardware.

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Linus Torvalds won't apply 'sh*t-for-brains stupid patch'

Richard 12
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No means no

And when you've said no fifteen different times in fifteen different ways, what's the final escalation?

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Richard 12
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Re: Linus does good work.

These posts happen after a series of "bad idea because..." posts.

It's the final "Seriously, go away right now, you've pushed this way too far."

Unfortunately volunteer-run organisations have very little else they can do - if the volunteer won't accept a polite "no", then the only remaining choices are an impolite "no" or ejection.

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HSBC: How will we verify business banking customers? Selfies!

Richard 12
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Re: Security eh?

HSBC will of course gladly pay for their customers to change their faces in the event of a breach.

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HDMI hooks up with USB-C in cables that reverse, one way

Richard 12
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Will they cut their licence fees?

It costs a bleedin' fortune to put an HDMI connector on anything, whether device or cable.

That's one of the main reasons DisplayPort is doing well.

The other being that DisplayPort is objectively better, though that's never really mattered too much in this industry.

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Brave idea: Ex Mozilla man punts Bitcoin adblocking browser

Richard 12
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Re: Opt in rather than creep out

Some of that happens because the advertisers do not know if conversion has happened - maybe you're still looking.

Oddly, even the one you actually bought %product% from still pays to advertise it to you.

Some of it is just stupid, like Amazon's "Since you recently bought a satnav, perhaps you'd like a satnav?".

The properly foolish part of it is the timeouts seem to be really long. Many advertisers seem to keep banging on about some you looked at weeks ago, and it's pretty obvious that anything you haven't searched for in a few days is something that you either decided against or have already bought.

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A plumber with a blowtorch is the enemy of the data centre

Richard 12
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In the US it varies by city

And sometimes by street.

In the EU the unions don't have the same kind of stranglehold, however for the most part the primary contractor hires subcontractors who actually know a little bit about the data cabling.

I encounter a lot of aluminium "Cat 6", however for the most part the subbies do a reasonable job because they don't get paid otherwise.

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Corbyn lied, Virgin Trains lied, Harambe died

Richard 12
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This would be a civil case, not criminal.

As it's potentially libel or slander. I forget the exact definition.

By publishing, they remove the need for a civil case, so it is crime prevention.

Or at least it can be argued such, which is good enough for the ICO.

Aside from that there is a clear public interest in publishing information that allows the public to check what politicians are lying about each day.

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Richard 12
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Because he's damaging their specific business by claiming something that's not true.

A couple of other franchises are, to put it mildly, unacceptably terrible, but Virgin are very good - considerably better than BR ever was - as they've actually invested rather a lot in things like rolling stock and the like.

On top of that, he did it to claim that their business should not exist at all.

Would you let it lie if any politician said "JackHassle'so business is terrible and the Government should throw them out and take it over"?

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Richard 12
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Probably didn't happen.

The claim that a family moved has only been made by Corbyn's aides, with nothing to back it up.

So far the only entities claiming that there weren't any seats are Corbyn and his aides.

And the (only?) reason it matters because his entire schtick is honesty - without that he's nothing.

Which is of course why this was a bloody stupid stunt and he should damn well have known better - do it on a Southern train for example.

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NIST spins atomic gyroscope to allow navigation without GPS

Richard 12
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"While falling under gravity" implies that it's a one-shot measurement.

And the kit to do this is huge.

This is not a portable device, even in theory. Sounds like a possible massive scientific instrument like the tanks down mines or current gravity wave sensors.

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NSA's Cisco PIX exploit leaks

Richard 12
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Re: "Whose" interests?

In the case of the NSA, either of those would do.

Companies don't want the NSA snooping around their stuff either.

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Das ist empörend: Microsoft slams umlaut for email depth charge

Richard 12
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Re: What was Unicode for again?

Unicode is very hard to do correctly, yet many programmer insist on trying.

There's a library. Just use ICU (or one of the many wrappers) and have done with it FFS.

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ISS astronauts begin spacewalk to install new docking adapter

Richard 12
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Robot valets

Though you'll be expected to watch them very closely, and forgive then if they accidentally crash the spacecraft as long as they make the sad face.

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