* Posts by Richard 12

3089 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

London's Gatwick Airport flies back to the future as screens fail

Richard 12
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Re: Cost

The cost is far higher than that.

Gatwick want to expand, but this (and many other) events will be used to prove that they simply could not cope with any expansion whatsoever, as they are already having trouble keeping track of the flights they currently have.

Doesn't matter whether it's true of course, but it's another self-administered nail in their coffin.

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Et tu, Brute? Then fail, Caesars: When it's hotel staff, not the hackers, invading folks' privacy

Richard 12
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Caesars have proven themselves incompetent

I'll be kind and assume that firearms are banned by policy, so an innocent guest isn't likely to open fire on an intruder.

What if there actually had been someone in that hotel who genuinely did intend harm via gunfire?

What exactly is going to happen when someone barges in on them unannounced?

It seems to me that's an effective way to get your employees shot dead. Along with a few innocent bystanders.

And what are the thousands of normal paying guests going to think when a couple of burly someones bursts into their room unannounced with no ID?

That's a ****ing terrifying experience.

Are they ever going to want to stay there again?

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I wish I could quit you, but cookies find a way: How to sidestep browser tracking protections

Richard 12
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Re: "Must Is Not A Word To Be Used To Princes, Little Man"

Yes.

Nice straw man though. That's only true in monopoly markets, and there aren't many of those.

Mostly phone operating systems, computer operating systems and search.

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Richard 12
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Re: Third-party cookies and El Reg

That's because advertisers are idiots.

Eventually they'll realise that advertising a product that someone has already purchased is stupid.

Some are already starting to realise that following someone around the internet with the same advert is creepy and people will actively avoid buying it when they so that.

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Richard 12
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I am and I do.

I get very little junk mail.

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Richard 12
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Going a bit too far

Session cookies are necessary for a lot of purposes.

Otherwise you can't log into anything as the server can't identify you.

Cookies that last longer than a session are of very limited utility to an end user. I had my browser set to barf all cookies when closing for a long time, and it worked really well.

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Facebook flat-out 'lies' about how many people can see its ads – lawsuit

Richard 12
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Re: And, of course....

I've not run into that yet.

I guess that's what private browsing mode is for.

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Richard 12
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Re: And, of course....

When I hit those walls, I just give up on the site.

If they are that reliant on forcing ad revenue, they're a squatter or clickbait and I'm not interested anyway.

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Richard 12
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Re: I have often wondered

Miners aren't doing that.

But you can be certain that billions of bots are.

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Richard 12
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Re: This is another easy win for Facebook

It will be very interesting to see how FB defend claiming that their adverts reach more users in Chicago than there are people in Chicago.

That's a rather strange statistic.

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DeepMind AI bots tell Google to literally chill out: Software takes control of server cooling

Richard 12
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Presumably they have multiple sources of cooling

And are allowing unloaded parts of the datacenter to run without cooling for a while, or similar.

I can see value in being able to automatically switch between cooling systems, and to reroute cooling away from unloaded segments.

Otherwise this would be nothing that a decently tuned PID controller wouldn't do cheaper and better.

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Nvidia shrugs off crypto-mining crash, touts live ray-tracing GPUs, etc

Richard 12
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Re: 'Could - while they’re Sleeping'

I've set that "active hours" at work and at home.

Windows 10 ignores both.

It might work better if I left my machines running 24x7, but I pay the electricity bill so I don't do that.

Extremely pissed off that it doesn't even warn that it's going to install updates when shutting down anymore. Not even on a laptop. Not even when on a laptop on an empty battery.

One wonders how many installs have been bricked by depleting the battery during updates.

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What happens to your online accounts when you die?

Richard 12
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But do you know it exists?

As an executor, how do you discover that a Paypal account exists?

It's only tied to an email account, and you have no way of accessing said email account because.

You might not even know the email account exists, but assume that you do. How do you work out whether there is a Paypal account?

Do Paypal even have a procedure for it at all?

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SentinelOne makes YouTube delete Bsides vid 'cuz it didn't like the way bugs were reported

Richard 12
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Trademark?

Hah. A video like that cannot possibly breach trademark, because it's not claiming to be from anyone it isn't.

Nor copyright for that matter.

But YouTube don't care about copyright law.

It'll be back up and Streisanded pretty soon. Idiots.

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US voting systems: Full of holes, loaded with pop music, and 'hacked' by an 11-year-old

Richard 12
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Re: Voting needs to be Convenient, Accurate, and Fast ...

Sure, you can hack the scanners.

The point is that the ballots themselves physically exist and can be counted.

If a result is very close, the candidates demand a physical recount.

If a result seems odd, the candidates demand a physical recount.

Random samples of ballots should also be counted by hand, and if the optical scanner gave a notably different result, the CEO of the scanner manufacturer is executed and the ballots are all recounted by hand.

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Richard 12
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Re: Voting needs to be Convenient, Accurate, and Fast ...

You can have all three.

Paper ballots, optically scanned.

Job done, now pay me my beellion dollar consulting fee.

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Foreshadow and Intel SGX software attestation: 'The whole trust model collapses'

Richard 12
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DRM was dead a hundred years ago

If I can physically see and hear the video, I can copy it bit-for-bit.

The visual data gets to the screen pixels and the audio data gets to the DAC. Both of those can be easily cloned.

Publishers, just stop wasting your money on this stuff that physically cannot ever possibly work.

Spend it on making and advertising good content so I can buy it.

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Clap, damn you, clap! Samsung's Bixby 2.0 AI reveal is met with apathy

Richard 12
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Re: Samsung has not been satisfied with making the best Android phones

The reason for large numbers of complaints is really extremely large numbers of users.

If 0.1% of users have a problem and you sell 1,000,000 then thats 1,000 complaints.

If 10% of users have a problem but you only sell 50, that's just 5 complaints.

Also, most people only review an app in the iOS and Play stores when they have a problem.

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Richard 12
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Honestly, yes, I do want the torch on a button. I use it pretty often because I always have my phone with me, and it's charged.

I'm sure that other people would rather have something else.

It seems really likely that fewer than 1% of users want that button to be dedicated to a voice assistant.

And that fewer than 10% would agree on what the button should do. So make it configurable.

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Phased out: IT architect plugs hole in clean-freak admin's wiring design

Richard 12
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That's a myth. It was a requirement added in the 14th ed of the UK wiring regulations, and removed in the 15th edition for being pointless - before BS7671 existed.

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Richard 12
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Re: Plot twist? What plot twist?

That makes no sense. Blacking out a single phase in a TPNE system increases the load on the neutral and means you either need a much bigger wire or you destroy equipment. Up to and including the entire building.

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Brit comms providers told: You must tell people when their cheap contract's about to end

Richard 12
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Re: Alternatively....

Have you ever genuinely read and understood an entire commercial EULA?

Unless you're a lawyer specialising in such things, the answer will be no.

And probably not even then.

Unless the law requires otherwise, contracts are always deliberately worded to be unclear and difficult to understand, because lawyers make money that way.

Thus the law does need to protect consumers from unfair contract terms, if only because as a consumer, you are never in a situation where you can both demand wording changes and enforce the new wording on an entity like BT.

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The internet's very own Muslim ban continues: DNS overlord insists it can freeze dot-words

Richard 12
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Too late

They already gave out .bible, .catholic and .church - despite objections.

Strange how there don't appear to be any non-christian gtlds.

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Richard 12
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ICANN created the problem

To line their own pockets.

They can damn well fix it, at the personal expense of the Board.

If they keep messing about like this then it won't be too long before the Internet routes around ICANN.

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You want to know which is the best smartphone this season? Tbh, it's tricky to tell 'em apart

Richard 12
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Re: Updates? Removable battery? Rootable?

The screen seems to be the weakest link now.

They either smash or burn badly within two to three years, while the battery is often still "ok" for more than four.

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Rights group launches legal challenge over London cops' use of facial recognition tech

Richard 12
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Re: Articles 8, 10 and 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights

The ECHR is not the EU.

It's two decades older than that - signed in 1950, straight after the Second World War as part of the attempt to make sure things like the Holocaust don't happen again.

The UK is a founder member, and there are now 47 countries signed up to it.

It's pretty terrifying how many totally unrelated things the Brexiteers want us to pull out of. What is it that they want to be allowed to do?

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Prof claims Lyft did a hit-and-run on his ride-sharing tech patent

Richard 12
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Re: The stupidity of "business method" patents

The USPTO don't get paid to reject patents though.

Their mode of operation has been to accept almost everything, and let the courts decide whether or not the claims are valid if and when someone is sued over it.

This has been going on since the mid 90s or so. They don't have the resources and they get paid by the application.

For example, there was a patent issued in 1997 for colour mixing LEDs using PWM dimming. Something so obvious that I did it as a child before the patent was filed.

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Brit spending watchdog brands GP Primary Support Care a 'complete mess'

Richard 12
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So why are Capita still an approved supplier?

They have never, ever, managed to deliver anything on time or on budget.

And yes, much of the blame lies with the client, because they still haven't learned that you cannot believe anything Capita tell you about time, capabilities or money.

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You can take off the shades, squinting Outlook.com users. It has gone dark. Very dark

Richard 12
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Re: All the hate for dark

It's more that I'd really prefer them to make it work properly in the first place.

Skins are great, but assuming they don't have infinite resources I would rather they fix the bugs. Like the way it randomly freezes up and refuses to send emails.

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Richard 12
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Re: Here we go again

Why would I want it to use less memory?

I bought that RAM to use it, not to make the "unused RAM" number bigger.

I want my applications to use all the RAM they can, and to give it up immediately when no longer in the foreground.

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Google Chrome: HTTPS or bust. Insecure HTTP D-Day is tomorrow, folks

Richard 12
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Re: More to the point

Oh, and how do you do that without also making it trivial for a miscreant who gains some access to your network to man-in-the-middle attack everyone on that network?

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Richard 12
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Re: More to the point

So how does one install a trusted CA on an iPhone, Mac, Android, Windows Phone, Windows XP/7/8/8.1/10 and Windows CE?

Without asking the CEO to go into any of the scary setup menus.

And have that happen for every BYOD anybody might ever use?

Of course you can't because that would be a terrible security hole.

It is not feasible to ask normal to install root certificates.

As far as I'm aware, it's only possible for Windows machines logged onto the domain.

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Richard 12
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More to the point

It is technically impossible to have a valid cert for 10.0.0.0/8, 192.168.0.0/16 or 172.16.0.0/12 IP addresses, and the same with *.local.

Or rather, any CA that issued one would be quickly blacklisted.

So Intranet sites and dynamic hosts on private networks simply cannot be TLS without raising the "Its dangerous to go here" warning, unless they buy a public domain purely for internal use - and risk accidentally spilling it outside their walls.

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If only 3D desktop printers could 3D print sales! Units crash in Q1

Richard 12
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I find I only have to re-level the bed after a week "idle", when I bash the bed removing a print or when I've changed the nozzle.

This is a really cheap one that doesn't have an automatic levelling/tramming sensor.

There are a lot of multi-colour 3D printers, I've been looking at upgrading mine but haven't decided between chimera or hydra style.

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Alien sun has smashing time sucking up planets

Richard 12
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Re: I'm confused again

When initially observed, the star used to dim for a short time, then be bright for a decade or so.

Since 1937 it's been dim for about a month, then bright again every 10-20 years or so.

In 2011 it was dim for about six months.

In mid-2014 it was dim for a little over two years.

In Jan 2017 it dimmed again, and hasn't brightened yet.

So the length of time spent "dim" is getting longer, while the period between dimming events is becoming shorter.

- The press release is a bit vague on the events between 1937 and 2011 though.

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Either my name, my password or my soul is invalid – but which?

Richard 12
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Re: Plus sign in email addresses is often fun

No. Just no.

You should never, ever attempt to "validate" an email address.

Ok, it's worthing checking that it's got at least one "@" followed by at least one printable character, but beyond that?

Not worth the cycles.

Just send an email to it - after all, you don't actually care whether it's RFC compliant, you care whether there's a mailbox at the end of it.

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Windows 10 IoT Core Services unleashed to public preview

Richard 12
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Re: Wow, that's appealing

Ah. What's missing is the ability to run any useful applications.

This edition can only run one UWP app, it doesn't have the Win32 susbsystem.

So it's not Windows. It's a Windows Phone, and can barely do kiosk work.

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Richard 12
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Re: Wow, that's appealing

So $36 for a 10 year update licence. That's similar to what the Windows XP POS licence used to cost.

I actually wonder what the catch is. What's missing from this version?

I mean, what's missing that users care about?

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Richard 12
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Re: tried and tested windows update

MSI is poorly documented and there aren't any decent ways of configuring it.

There is a very simple one that comes with Visual Studio, but it's only sufficient for trivial applications.

The two might be related.

That's why pretty much everyone uses InstallShield or NSIS. Even though InstallShield is expensive and rubbish.

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Fork it! Google fined €4.34bn over Android, has 90 days to behave

Richard 12
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Google make roughly 1/3 of their revenue in the EU.

The EU is a far bigger market than the USA. Something that many US people tend to forget.

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Skype Classic headed for the chopping block on September 1

Richard 12
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Goodbye Skype

It was nice knowing you.

Shame you has to go murder yourself repeatedly.

Shame there's nothing to replace it.

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Samsung touts bonkers-fast 8 Gbit DRAM for phones, AIs

Richard 12
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Re: Overwriting cells with zeroes

I read that as being "If it's already zero, don't bother zero'ing it again"

Which makes sense. Charge leakage tends to drift a memory bit to zero so you want to "top it up" during refresh, but if it's already zero there's no need to switch the gate to empty it.

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Capita strikes again: Bug in UK-wide school info management system risks huge data breach

Richard 12
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Re: Some interesting questions, this raises.

I really, really hope they do.

I fear that the ICO won't.

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Richard 12
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Some interesting questions, this raises.

The data controller is liable under the GDPR. However Capita are not the data controller.

What legal recourse does the data controller have against a supplier who wilfully or by gross misconduct causes the controller to breach the law?

Futhermore, as the data controller is not able to control the SIMS in any way - they cannot choose not to use Capita and SIMS - how can they ensure compliance?

Then there's the sanction. What is a school's revenue? Or is it the LEA?

Simpler and better to just fine Capita 4% of their annual revenue 21000 times.

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It walks, it talks, it falls over a bit. Windows 10 is three years old

Richard 12
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Re: "time to step into the wonderful of world of Linux"

Yes, you're not a Mac user. Apple change macOS every year, and horrifically break things every time.

Eg El Capitan broke half the USB devices in the world because Apple rewrote the USB stack and interpreted the standard in a different way to everyone else on the planet, most updates have introduced massive security holes (get root by pressing Enter?)

The OS software APIs are poorly documented, and are often deprecated and removed without notice or even a suitable replacement. Even core ones - eg they've decided to deprecate the audio and video APIs used by almost all of the professional audio and video applications. On an OS that's primarily used by audio and video people.

Apple are directly and indirectly killing the professional applications. They killed several directly - Final Cut Pro is no longer even vaguely usable as everything "Pro" about it is gone.

No touchscreen support. At all. Sure, you can install 3rd party drivers but you could do that in Windows 98 for $deity's sake.

macOS can only legally be run on Apple hardware. Which is ancient, almost impossible to repair and so fragile that the keyboards actually physically break if you sneeze.

The keyboards have horrific ergonomics and they keep removing keys. It's now basically impossible to use (eg) Avid on Mac without buying a 3rd party keyboard.

The mouses have horrific ergonomics.

I could go on.

Some of this is driven by a desire for form at the expense of function and usability, but it's clear that much of it is that they simply don't care - presumably because macOS doesn't make them much money directly.

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Richard 12
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Re: Windows Update on 10

Almost all Linux drivers can be updated without restarting the machine.

The only exceptions are ones you (or your distro) chose to compile into the kernel - which can be anything from everything right down to nothing (depending on whether you consider CPU microcode to be a driver).

Embedded Linux systems tend to compile everything into the kernel because that boots faster. Server tend to have everything as a module, desktop somewhere in between.

In fact, most Windows drivers can also be updated without restarting.

It only seems to be MacOS that can't do that.

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Richard 12
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Re: "time to step into the wonderful of world of Linux"

Apple's current trajectory is to have no desktops at all in two years, and to kill the laptops in five.

They haven't cared about macOS for at least five years.

They keep saying that they do, but there's no actual sign of it to date.

On the bright side, Apple have enough cash to fail totally for two or three years and still resurface with a new product. Maybe they'll go into cider production or something.

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No, seriously, why are you holding your phone like that?

Richard 12
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@kanpreacher

Yes, that's what I said.

Next year the "smart" meter will be useless, as it'll be worse than the existing dumb meters.

The effect of having one installed would be:

1) Increase my actual energy consumption by a mean of 5 Watts - 35kWh/year, or £5.60

(1W for gas, 4W for electric)

2) Make it much harder for me to take readings, as the UI on "smart" meters is universally horrific.

3) Overcharge me for the energy I'm using, as these meters are far less accurate for discontinuous loads like SMPS, VFDs and LED lighting - about 70% of my electric load.

4) More landfill, as the SMETS1 meters will "probably" need to be replaced before the end of their lifetime.

5) More landfill, as these meters do not physically last as long.

That's all assuming they actually work to spec.

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Richard 12
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Smart Meters are a tempting target

Because if you can get control, you can take down a country.

Imagine what would happen if an evil actor turned off all the power to 10,000 homes and businesses simultaneously.

Then back on a few minutes later.

And yes, this is one of the features of both SMETS1 and SMETS2.

Aside from that, I change energy supplier almost every year.

SMETS1 meters cannot change supplier, so if I had one of those it'd be useless the next year.

And none of the companies publish whether they would fit SMETS1 or SMETS2.

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Heatwave shmeatwave: Brit IT departments cool their racks – explicit pics

Richard 12
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Re: I've done this too

A canister full of film with 36 photographs!?

You youngsters with your new-fangled "film" cameras don't know you're born!

One glass sheet is all you used to get.

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