* Posts by djack

288 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

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Sainsbury's IT glitch spoils bank holiday food orders

djack

Re: Round these parts ...

Neither, we blame the weather.

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Dell to patch AMT-vulnerable systems

djack

Re: Poweredge T20?

Hmm.

Mine is still well within its warranty period, so there's absolutely no way it should be unsupported.

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Red alert! Intel patches remote execution hole that's been hidden in chips since 2010

djack

Re: PANIC!!!!!!!!!! :-)

That test looks flawed to me.

AMT sits between the physical ethernet controller and the os.

127.0.0.1 only represents the visual lo loop back device and therefore goes nowhere near the network hardware. Even doing that to the ip address assigned to your nic wouldn't work as the kernel would know that it doesn't need to send across the network.

Try it from another host on your network towards your i7 and you will get more accurate results.

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Linux kernel security gurus Grsecurity oust freeloaders from castle

djack

Re: WindRiver?

There is no licensing issue. GrSecurity's kernel are license under GPLv2 which specifically allows the recipient to re-distribute.

However, you are not obliged to re-distribute and nor are grSecurity obliged to do business with you, so if they find that you have distributed the kernel they are entirely within their right to refuse to give you their next version.

The use of the grSecurity trademark is a different matter and I suppose the usage of it depends on what they are claiming in the associated documentation.

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Hutch's Three UK users ripping through over 6GB a month

djack

Re: fortunately 3 do reasonable all you can eat data packages

It actually seems to be done via the SIM or network.

For whatever reason, they used to be unable to differentiate between my tethered and non-tethered traffic. I changed phone (direct from manufacturer, not from three) and realised I needed a nano SIM. Not having one of those hoe-punch style things to hand, I went to the local store where a helpful chap swapped my SIM out for free.

Result : my tethered traffic is now registering as being tethered - on the new phone and the old - no special firmware required. I can only guess that my previous SIM wasn't provisioned correctly.

As a long-term customer who doesn't (often) take the mick with the unlimited data, I enjoy a very significant discount on the unlimited service. they've bumped me off my old plan the other month but as it was the first price increase in about five or six years for me I'm not too aggrieved.

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Solarwinds sends customers each others' complete client lists

djack

Re: @GingerOne

I would be very angry if any customer I looked after had had their details leaked knowing what could be on the way after such a breach of information.

if I were a Solarwinds customer in this case, I'd be worried what level of legal liability I would have to my customers if their data was involved in this.

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djack

Re: The Cloud...

That's a case in point. It was a dedicated NHS system so the 'damage' was contained with in the NHS.

Aside from a deliberate act, there's no conceivable way that, say, everyone's data can be sent to BUPA. However if they both used a shared third-party cloud platform, you cannot make such an assertion.

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Tablets become feebleslabs as sales spiral down

djack

Re: Everybody who wants one, got one

For example, I am typing this on my Nexus 10, which is getting to be close to 5 years old. However, it still works fine, and anything mid-range I could get to replace it won't be an improvement in terms of the screen quality, which is the crifical requirement for me.

I also have a nexus10 though sadly the battery is on it's way out, after a couple of hours usage the thing just dies with very little warning ((battery monitor would be 60-70% not long beforehand). It has also started to feel a bit sluggish.

Totally agree that there seems to be nothing at a reasonable price that comes close to the screen quality - I almost wish I hadn't got used to the Nexus as then what's available now would seem like an upgrade.

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Furby Rickroll demo: What fresh hell is this?

djack
Black Helicopters

Spy Furby

Wasn't there some hysteria years ago that furbys might record voice and could be used as a spy device? This got them totally barred from many establishments even though the recording and playback was pretty much uncontrollable.

If you can change it's programming then this one could definitely be used in that way.

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Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers

djack

Of course releases are slow..

They are feature complete, do the job well and aren't chasing constantly changing standards or dealing with complex data in a changing security landscape.

That said, I agree that there's a lot to be said for stability, there should be different streams for browsers, one with feature updates and another concentrating with just bug and security fixes. I think that Mozilla have tried this with their esr(?) releases.

How can you say that the likes of vim and emacs are so much better than modern software that "feels like reinventing the wheel for the sake of it" when just in the previous paragraph you lauded Emacs' ability to render HTML.

Finally, yes if you have something written in a language or environment that can only be learned about by trawling through archive.org it should be re-written. The application is pretty much un-maintainable and the underlying infrastructure is obsolete and will therefore be crumbling. What happens if the execution environment has security issues or does not function in the next version of $OS?

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The top doc, the FBI, the Geek Squad informant – and the child porn pic that technically wasn't

djack

Re: For the sake of argument...

If it was a legitimate medical image, why is it taken on his personal phone, not on a hospital/surgical system?

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djack

Re: My 2p worth

<quote>I am not sure which of the two makes me sicker, some of the peodos are mentally ill, so some small sympathy, but the lawyer is scum.</quote>

Nope, the defence lawyer must and should do everything in their ability. The accused should get absolutely the best defence. that way any eventual conviction is rock-solid and beyond all doubt.

The laws against unwarranted searches etc.are there for very good reasons to protect society as a whole and the way of life you are accustomed to. They were put in place by people much cleverer in such things than you or I. Law enforcement should absolutely follow the spirit and intent law. By the sounds of it, the guy should absolutely be put away but he should have been caught in some other manner.

However, quite how a 'borderline' still from a known child sex abuse video would not be sufficient to get a warrant (wether the still was indecent or not) is beyond me.

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Itchy-fingered OnePlus presses refresh, out pops value champ 3T

djack

Re: 'The capacitive buttons ... make it vastly easier to operate the phone in the car'

That has always been the case, the law has not changed. Anything that distracts you enough so that you are not paying enough attention to driving - whether that be a phone call, fiddling with the radio or talking to the person in the passenger seat - is dangerous and can lead to a charge of driving without due care and attention. The hand-held mobile law is different as it is illegal even if it isn't obviously affecting yur driving at the time. I think that the penalties have changed recently though.

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Murdoch's 21st Century Fox agrees £18.5bn Sky takeover deal

djack

Re: 168 year old paper

I'm sorry, but I can't agree with any sentiment for people to die.

If you'd said to send the money grabbing human turd-nozzle to jail then I'd be in total agreement.

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It's now illegal in the US to punish customers for posting bad web reviews

djack

Re: Trump might want to repeal that, especially because he said this about journalists:

I was just thinking of this tweet

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Uber to Cali DMV: Back off, pal, our 'self-driving cars' aren't self driving

djack

Typical Uber

Their drivers don't work for them.

Their self driving cars aren't self driving (unless you want to claim that the driver is working for them).

Next week : their app isn't an app and the money you're paying them isn't paying them.

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Work ends on Open Virtualisation Format

djack

OVF doesn't work

.. At least with vmware.

It's a great idea to allow interoperability between hypervisors. As the article says, the knowledge needed to convert between formats is well known and ovf was intended to be the standard to enable that. However, when the best known play only pays lip service then you have to ask what's the point...

Create a vm in virtual box and export as an ovf. Now try and import into esx or (shudder) vcloud. Even though all the required information is present in the ovf, vmware refuses to register the vm. You need to read the hardware details from the ovf, manually convert the virtual disk and manually create the vm. Btw, the import tool can clearly parse the ovf configuration and the disk conversion tool is part of esxi.

I hope that people have it better in the hyper v and xen space but from my experience ovf has failed.

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Amazon's Netflix-gnasher to hit top gear In December

djack

Re: Yarrgh

@Buzzword

Not on the Amazon app on my Samsung TV, alas.

There is on mine, but it's not immediately obvious (and resets to 'everything' at any opportunity). Try pressing the Green (B) button on the remote.

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Lenovo intros monster disk box

djack
Paris Hilton

Is maths broken??

1.5x the capacity of the 5U HPE D6000, which holds 70 3.5-inch drives

OK, 70 x 1.5 .. so it can hold 105 drives? Impressive.

Hang on..

the D3284 JBOD, a 5U enclosure holding up to 84 3.5-inch disk and/or solid-state drives.

Hmm .. my brain hurts.

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UK's 'FBI' hit by DDoS barrage

djack

Re: Haven't they just been given oodles of cash to protect us agains this kind of thing?

Because their website has zero operational impact and pretty much zero value to them.

Unlike most businesses, no-one is going to use their website in an attempt to use their services. The site is totally distant from their operational networks, it is pretty much a place to put out press releases and PR material.

Given that an outage has no impact, there is no ROI on spending thousands on DDos protection - money that could be far better used doing what they are meant to be doing.

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Stickers emerge as EU's weapon against dud IoT security

djack

Other Warnings

There should be other (ralated) mandatory stickers in bright red on white in inch high text like

WARNING : This product sends your information to other people

WARNING : This product will be an expensive paper-weight when <company> closes or decides it does not want to continue running it or wants you to upgrade.

Anything requiring those stickers don't go near my home.

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CloudFlare shows Tor users the way out of CAPTCHA hell

djack

Re: nonce field - unfortunate choice of name

I never fail to giggle at it, but 'nonce' is a long established term in the fields of crypto based authentication. It is just a random blob of data that is generated on demand. basically it is unique and unpredictable so it can be used to establish a challenge for proof of possession of a key and a differentiator between different transactions.

As the actual value is irrelevant I guess that the name comes from a contraction of nonsense.

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Crypto guru Matt Green asks courts for DMCA force field so he can safely write a textbook

djack

Little Comfort

There is a huge difference between 'unlikely to be prosecuted' and 'cannot be prosecuted'. Any potential for jail time has to be seriously considered by the individual.

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Matt LeBlanc handed £1.5m to front next two series of Top Gear

djack

Re: Still Undecided

In partial defence of C4 as I totally agree with your thoughts about that other show (which was a totally different set of circumstances) ..

The BBC clearly didn't want F1 and were trying to do so in as quick a way as possible. So C4 picking it up has been a very good thing indeed. Whilst they haven't done quite as well as the BBC did in previous years, their coverage hasn't been too bad and also their live race sessions are broadcast advert-free (which wouldn't happen if a more commercial terrestrial channel picked it up).

With regards to EJ, he is essential viewing in the F1, his knowledge and insight is second to none (I don't believe any rumour until he has repeated it) but in TG he was totally wasted - not that I suppose he minded being paid to travel 1st class on the orient express.

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What says Internet of Things better than a Bluetooth-controlled smart candle?

djack

I can see a point

The automatic extinguisher is a useful safety feature for people who are a little forgetful or have pets (that might knock over a normal candle).

Even though I fit in both groups, I'm still not buying one. I have functioning light bulbs that illuminate the room.

7
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YouTube breaks Sony Bravias

djack

One of my big annoyances is the way that Samsung do updates.

Each update is mandatory and takes an age to install. The annoying thing is that it doesn't check and apply updates while it's in standby, oh no. Clearly the absolute best time to do so is when the user says that they actually want to use it.

Yeah, can have video on deman... Just as long as you give half an hour's notice first.

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djack

Re: Who uses the internal TV smarts?

Me. It means that you can have a neatly wall mounted tv and not have to juggle with remotes etc.

A device that is a hdmi stick and uses the hdmi ethernet channel and integrates with the tv remote viahdmi-cec would be an ideal solution. Unfortunately it seems that no one wants to make one.

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UK IT consultant subject to insane sex ban order mounts legal challenge

djack

Re: So,

What you've said is what is happening to him now.

I think you were meaning to say 'innocent unless proven guilty'

It also scares me the number of people who say 'until' - that imples it is an inevitability.

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Email proves UK boffins axed from EU research in Brexit aftermath

djack

Re: Article 50

That has been the poison-drip from the Murdoch press

Successive governments have been to blame for this and they've allowed the press to fan the flames. Over many years, the blame for anything that could be seen as unpopular (regardless of the issue) has been placed with the EU., "It's not us, guv.. those forriners are making us pass these laws"

A case in point (one of many) is in food hygiene. At some point in the past, the UK gov passed laws forcing butchers to store cooked and fresh meat in separate coolers. This cost businesses a fair amount of money to implemented and caused a fair amount of wailing and gnashing of teeth. The presence of the law was blamed firmly on the EU. As France hadn't yet enacted such laws, some butchers were up in arms about how unfair and unbalanced the EU clearly was.

So... forcing you to reduce the risk of poisoning your customers is a bad thing., and of course you are going to lose business as your customer walking down the high street is going to see the price increase needed to pay for this in your shop (and all your local competition) and then therefore go over to France to get some bacon.

If past governments had grown some balls and pointed out that many of these rules (I'm not saying that this applies to every rule made over the channel) are a good idea and explain why it won't put most people at a disadvantage instead of weaselling out of it then we probably wouldn't have the strength of anti-EU feeling that has lead us to this.

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BBC will ‘retain your viewing history’

djack

Re: What if...?

No real change.

Your household TV licence has always covered you for use of wireless transmissions received by a portable, battery-powered device wherever you are. Whether delivery is via long range DVB or short range wifi is irrelevant.

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Linux letting go: 32-bit builds on the way out

djack

Re: Thinks Bubble

That is perfectly true, but no-one in their right mind* would be running Ubuntu on such an embedded system anyway. Ubuntu != Linux, the operating systems designed and suitable for that sort of role will continue functioning for a long time to come.

*OK, there may be some geek points available for using an industrial system as a desktop, but that's hardly normal.

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Parliament takes axe to 2nd EU referendum petition

djack

Re: Anti-democratic?

You can be sure that if a pudding I bought at a restaurant looks and tastes totally different from what was promised, I wouldn't be waiting till next time to order something different.

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djack

Re: Of course the original referendum is only "advisory" it is not legally backed.

Of course Cameron wasn't going to invoke, its something that he disagrees with and he's right in saying that someone who does it must actually want to do it and deal with the consequences.

Boris has found himself in the position where his chickens have come home to roost. His political maneuvering has backfired as he sees himself to be the architect of this mess.

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Linux on PS3 white flag

djack

Just a pity it's only for our friends over the pond.

1
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Outsourcery to perform ULTIMATE outsource as it enters administration

djack

Re: The Cloud...

Not just MS cloud - they do sell access to their own infrastructure (running MS software admittedly).

1
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Surveillance forestalls more 'draconian' police powers – William Hague

djack

Re: Hollywood scenarios

I fear you may be unaware of modern firewall design.

Many modern firewalls implement integrated application layer proxies with policy based filtering alongside a stateful packet filter and have done for many years. I know that Checkpoint had limited support (covering http and ftp) at least since version four (released around the millennium), Microsoft's firewall also does it and with Palo-Alto it is very well integrated into the rules-base. I am sure that there are many other examples.

You talk of Checkpoint as being a brand new firewall at the time. If you are going that far back in the day, the other firewalls you were probably dealing with would have been little more than stateless filters, which were leaky as sieves as you had to open huge holes to allow 'return' traffic back from a server (packets travelling to a 'high' numbered TCP port). Checkpoint's big contribution to firewalls is not the friendly GUI but they claim to have invented the concept of a stateful firewall. Unlike the older filters, a stateful firewall monitors the state of connections thus eliminating the need for rules opening up huge holes. The stateful design is used by pretty much all firewalls now.

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djack

Hollywood scenarios

I was recently watching a series of '24' (other similar shows are available) that featured a device that bypassed pretty much any firewall and network security. My mind rebelled against the proposition (though I persisted as otherwise the storyline and action was good) as the idea of such a device is ridiculous.

The whole 'breakable encryption' brigade is trying to lead us into a world where such a thing is not only feasible but likely inevitable.

6
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Smartwatches: I hate to say ‘I told you so’. But I told you so.

djack

Re: MS Band

If there was a 'get someone else to do the gardening' option, I'd buy one right now.

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Beleaguered 123-reg customers spot price hike

djack

"I'm in the same position, but I also recall there is now a charge levied by 123 Reg if you want to transfer your domain away from them."

Not as far as I can see, I've just gone through the whole process (up to the point in specifying the recipient registrar's IPS tag) and there is no mention of a charge.

They are running a two for one offer of some description. It may be that they are (reasonably IMO) asking you to pay for the 'free' registration before moving it away.

0
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Windows 10 build 14342: No more friendly Wi-Fi sharing

djack

Re: @djack symlink support for Linux subsystem

@sysconfig

"While that's true for Linux hard links, I am absolutely certain that NTFS Junctions work across file systems and physical drives"

I stand corrected, thanks.

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djack

Re: symlink support for Linux subsystem

You're all nearly there with mentions of junctions an mklink. However, they are the equivalent of hard links, not symlinks.

Hard links exist at the filesystem layer. Symlinks happen at a layer on top. Hard links can only ever link files within the same filesystem but symlinks can cross fs boundaries.

The closest windows equivalent to a symlink is a shirtcut. However whereas shortcuts are provided by Explorer, symlink functionality is in the core system libraries and therefore used by everything.

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RIP Prince: You were the soundtrack of my youth

djack

Re: The Mike Tyson one...

I think it's real. besides, Tyson has on many occasions been able to poke fun at himself - his appearance in 'The Hangover' is testament to that.

1
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Tweak Privacy Shield rules to make people happy? Nah – US govt

djack

"for US companies operating in the EU the solution is simply making a sincere effort to abide by the law there."

The problem is that they can't .. at least not without falling foul of US law when the feds come a-knocking. Not that I trust those companies an inch, but giving them all the benefit of the doubt that they have all the will and the right intentions, they still cannot guarantee to conform to European levels of standards.

It is a shame for those companies who are stuck between a rock and a hard place, but it is good that the EU is prepared to stand up to this erosion of privacy.

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Spinning rust fans reckon we'll have 18TB disk drives in two years

djack

Re: Still waiting....

because with 6 drives maxing out my MB ports, I've had to unplug the BD drive...

Why not get a PCI-E card with a few SATA (and maybe a couple of eSATA if you're running short on physical space) ports on it? That's what I've done ;)

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That naked picture on my PC? Not mine. The IT guy put it there

djack

Re: Another reason...

"So IT people can be petty and vindictive. Wonderful."

Umm, no. IT were just going to leave it with a quiet word so the guy can sort himself out.

Instead it was the user that was being spiteful. He was accusing the tech of deliberately planting an image on the user's machine - an offence much more serious than looking at a bit of porn. Collection and presentation of evidence is very much warranted in case the thing blows up threatening the iccocent tech's job.

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'Devastating' bug pops secure doors at airports, hospitals

djack

Re: @BebopWeBop (was: As a side note, there is that "pop" meme again.)

No need to get up-tight about it. It's just an informal expression - all over the likes of Full Disclosure and researchers' blogs.

7
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djack

Damn, that beats my favourite HIDism

I don't normally play with such things in anger, but I did spend a few minutes looking at a HID access control system a few years ago (shared office building and my client was only a tenant, so the controllers etc were inaccessible to me).

Not only was the thing using the hellishly broken Miffare Classic cards, but the system wasn't even checking the encrypted blocks of the card, everything was done on the UID that is read without authentication and sent in clear.

What took the biscuit was possibly the world's most ironic encryption key. The keys when converted to ASCII read as 'HID IS' and ' GREAT'.

11
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Tesla books over $8bn in overnight sales claims Elon Musk

djack

Re: 198,000

"it's like saying the ferrari F12 berlinetta is one hell of a car, so this fiat 500 must be great too."

Not sure what you are trying to imply there as the Fiat 500 is a great car for what it is designed to do. Whilst I wouldn't want to take one anywhere near a motorway, they probably have the Ferrari licked for a day-to-day town-center commute or shopping trip.

Whilst I agree that the quality of previous Tesla cars doesn't necessarily mean that the new one will be as amazing, they have done enough impressive stuff to deserve a little faith.

4
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US govt says it has cracked killer's iPhone, legs it from Apple fight

djack

Working on Newer Devices?

I thought that the key difference between this device and newer ones is that in this case, the encryption key handling is done in software whereas the newer phones have a dedicated hardware module that (should) securely handle the authentication, perform the encryption and prevent access to the keys.

Attacking a key handling system in the OS is far easier than one which is in hardware.

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How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

djack

Re: Copyright infringement ?

It depends on the license of the code. If it was licensed under any 'usual' open source licence then re-publishing shouldn't be a problem.

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