* Posts by Stuart 22

817 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

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Car rental firms told: Tell your customers about in-car data slurps

Stuart 22

Wotta about the manual?

Ahem, my problem is attaching my phone to a random rental car's bluetooth. The combination of minimalist number of knobs, maximum functions, designed by somebody who reads down and backwards and NO FLIPPIN' MANUAL to give you a clue.

I mean the 2" manual you get with your own car is 10% car and 90% in car entertainment. Of course, those of us spent the best part of 50 years decoding undocumented progs do have a better than evens chance of a result, eventually - oh and kudos of helping friends and relatives to pipe their own music through the speakers.

But really? Is sticking a quick-start guide on the back of the glovebox door so difficult?

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Damian Green: Not only my workstation – mystery pr0n all over Parliamentary PCs

Stuart 22

Protecting their own

How heartwarming to see Damien's friends rushing to their favourite newspaper proprietors over the weekend to defend him and rubbishing the rozzers.

I haven't a clue whether Damien is guilty or not. But how can THEY tell it wasn't him but an office worker or a Putin inspired hacker? They don't have the objectivity and distance as you or I. I doubt they have more evidence.

And while Quick's initial statements appear to be over the top (illegal v legal porn) the statements made by those closer to the evidence is rather more forensic - not proof as was made clear but certainly a case to answer.

It would seem the response is not Damien answering but his friends trying to deflect the questions raised. And I have a hunch they will be successful.

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Guilty: NSA bloke who took home exploits at the heart of Kaspersky antivirus slurp row

Stuart 22

"Well, all I can say is: I never had problems like these when I was working with FORTRAN77 and punchcards."

My professor always sent me notes on the back of a used punch card. Now if I had collected them altogether, in order ... what are the chances would have generated some of this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII_porn

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Stuart 22

Re: 67?

"No wonder the NSA can't seem to get their act together - they are employing the Gentrified Squad. You know, the people that are literally past the retirement age."

Ahem, I think you meant to write Geriatric Squad. I know, as you get older, word retention goes a bit loopy.

As maybe your knowledge of how fast retirement age is receding into the future. If you are under 57 start worrying your coding skills won't last that long.

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Voyager 1 fires thrusters last used in 1980 – and they worked!

Stuart 22

Re: A little bit faster

"Makes you wonder where they found the manual."

Here? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosetta_Stone#/media/File:Rosetta_Stone.JPG

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Stuart 22

Re: Intercepting Voyager?

"Surely the chances are that we'll go and hunt it down for posterity once we've sussed proper interstellar travel?"

I can see it now. Hanging from the ceiling of the Smithsonian [Dubai Edition].

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Royal Bank of Scotland culls 1 in 4 branches, blames the interwebz

Stuart 22

Re: last bank visit

"With ATMs and online banking, more or less the only thing you need to go to a branch for is to pay in cheques (they do still exist) and do more one-off things like mortgage and loan applications."

I'm finding their most essential use is when some goes wrong/non-standard and it isn't on the call centre script.

Most cashiers still retain a knowledge of how things really work and how to work the system when they don't. Face to face eyeball contact means you get attention and even compassion sometimes. Plus the truth (because it isn't being recorded for training purposes)

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Night before Xmas and all through American Airlines, not a pilot was flying, thanks to this bug

Stuart 22
Devil

Re: AI / Automation

Yep, Ryanair really do offer the cheapest Pilot Scheduling software money can buy. But I guess AA selected the random allocation feature. Great if the flight isn't cancelled. But do you really want the pilot and first officer sitting behind you in 16E and 26B?

Longer arms an advantage.

[Only recent Ryanair afficiandos may fully appreciate the spirit of customer satisfaction involved]

6
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What's that fresh, zesty fragrance? Oh, Linux Mint 18.3 has landed

Stuart 22

"I think there are some reasons for Mint dropping KDE, and there are other Ubuntu-based KDE distros. I'll be waiting for the xfce release.

There are a couple of programs I use which don't have Linux versions, but I have found WINE to be a good answer"

The Linux Mint website says that the XFCE/KDE versions are coming later this year.

I have used WINE but I find using a Windows VirtualBox VM easier, safer and more reliable. Any issues and a quick restore of a snapshot and you are fixed plus you have a nice rich 'proper' windows environment for your apps. Whereas using WINE - if your registry gets screwed (not difficult) its a purge/re-install. Awkward if you are running multiple legacy apps.

In fact my favourite legacy environment is a Windows 2000 VM which runs like s**t off a hot shovel using minimal resources and much faster than the original with controllable protection from external infection.

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Huawei's Honor 9: The only mobe of its spec asking 'why blow £500?'

Stuart 22

Size matters

I remember thinking the original Apple 6 incher a joke. But my own phones have grown from 4.9 (Nexus 4) to 5.2 (Nexus 5X) and now 5.5 (Lenovo P2).

Looking forward I may go the full 6 incher but no way will I be going smaller. This phone, beautiful as it is, would be going backwards for me. Am I alone in this gentle inflation of normality?

2
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Tom Baker returns to finish shelved Doctor Who episodes penned by Douglas Adams

Stuart 22

Re: And for those lost episodes.

"* Really really fast."

No problem if you order one of Elon's new Teslas today. Provided he can get one made before the heat death of the universe. May be a close call ...

6
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Tesla reveals a less-long-legged truck, but a bigger reservation price

Stuart 22

Free Lunch while you Charge?

"We can also use free charging that is available in some places."

You mean free to you but paid for by people who are not rich enough to be given a £5,000 grant by the government.

There is an arguement, with which I have some sympathy, that in order to expedite the benefits of electric drive they should be cross subsidised from the most polluting ICE vehicles. But the chancellor didn't do that. He kept fuel duty constant as he has for many years which, because of inflation, is really a reduction in real terms. And what is the plan to recover lost taxation if and when people switch to electric?

Transport policy (and the Chancellor was a former DfT SoS) is as confused now as it was when it said 'buy diesel'. As long as the rich and the motor industry benefit most then all is OK. Another example they are not taking congestion and pollution seriously. And, of course, after Brexit there will be no European Court to hold them to account.

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Forget Sesame Street, scientists pretty much watched Big Bird evolve on Galápagos island

Stuart 22
Coat

Re: Pfffffttt!

"By current science standards it ought to be a law, but too many people would object strongly, so it isn't technically referred to that way, to keep the peace."

Or we could hold a binding referendum to decide once and for all ...

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New UK aircraft carrier to be commissioned on Pearl Harbor anniversary

Stuart 22

Re: err... no

"In fact theres quite a lot of stuff the Japanese missed.... but then that was supposed to be hit by the third attack wave...... which the Japanese admiral cancelled after reading the reports of the first 2 waves...."

My memory was that the third wave was if the first two didn't achieve their objectives (which they had). The problem was also the third wave would have to try and land in the dark and the Japanese were yet to get into the kamikaze business.

The lesson that wars are won not on the battlefields but on the logistical backup was also ill remembered from WW1.

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Shamed TLS/SSL cert authority StartCom to shut up shop

Stuart 22

RIP and a big thank you from me.

Great while they lasted. At least the laid the path that led to Letsencrypt. Except I sometimes miss the hassle of navigating their authentication system.

I wonder if it was mere coincidence that Google et al laid off them until free Letsencrypt was up and running. Otherwise many of us with SSL sites would have been held hostage by the rapacious CAs if it had been killed off earlier.

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Prosecute driverless car devs for software snafus, say Brit cyclists

Stuart 22

Re: Fair enough, but...

"We also need legislation to make the (small number) of nutter cyclist legally accountable when they cause an accident (though a significant number are unable to be questioned after-the-fact).

Perhaps it's also time they were required to carry insurance?"

Can we focus this on the small group of nutters who have taken over the venerable Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC), sacked the people who knew about Touring and rebranded themselves as 'Cycling UK' without even consulting and getting approval from their members in order to set themselves up as the spokes-people of all cyclists.

Well, not this one - although I'm a still a member - but only for the insurance! Oh, and I pay the same amount of Road Tax as a Toyota Pius driver ...

Roll on autonomous vehicles. They have got to be an improvement on most of the 80% of motorists who consider themselves 'above average'.

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The Quantum of Firefox: Why is this one unlike any other Firefox?

Stuart 22

"Off topic, but I'm not sure why Firefox has lost so much ground to Chrome in recent years."

For a lot of us who used netbooks (remember?) with 600px height - the slim minimal toolbars of Chrome gave us a lot more visible webpage. Plus the original unbloated Chrome went like a rocket. It was a no-brainer.

Then FF minimised its toolbars and was lambasted for copying Chrome and became a me-too. Not worth switching back. Hopefully Quantum will get some of us to re-validate. The greater the browser choice the better.

My current browser of choice is Vivaldi. Except there is a bug somewhere that causes it to fail to complete a very few credit card validations leaving you in an uncomfortable "have I been debited/not debited state".

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Paradise Papers were not an inside job, says leaky offshore law firm

Stuart 22
Happy

Re: Live by the sword, die by the sword

"Putting aside the fact that the leaked financial details appear to include information about the murky world of offshore finance, for the victims, this leak could have life-altering or, at the very least, hugely distressing effects."

I'm almost tempted to say - "if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to be distressed about". But I won't as I'm not a Home Secretary.

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Frowns all round as Smile and Co-op online banking goes down

Stuart 22

Customer focussed or Bonus focussed?

Been with the Co-op Bank for 50 years. I've had accounts with most other UK banks. It was always the best. Then they got stuffed with Britannia's bad debts - we never found out why the auditor's due diligence failed and why the customers and the co-op had to pick up the bill and not them. This forced the firesale to the hedge funds who, I agree have royally shafted us on the IT front. And I'm not just talking of outages.

It really is tear making that nearly all our 'mutual' finance industry (always the best for savers and borrowers) is now in the hands of commercial bankers who appear to see us as fodder for their bonuses.

We should have a choice. Its almost gone.

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Fresh bit o' Linux to spruce up that ancient Windows Vista box? Why not, we say...

Stuart 22

"Hmm this reminds me of 2003. I installed Mint 18 mate edition on 4 XP Era machines this week, and it runs fine. Not sure what the point of this distribution is."

My latest install of Linux Mint 18 XFCE took 6.2Gb. Not much good for an early 2008 4Gb SSD on the next PC to be resucitated or the 8Gb on the one after that. Great machines retired because of restricted disk space with no easy upgrade as early SSDs were proprietary or no longer available with a compatible interface for sensible money.

Bloatware is not just restricted to Windows. Small, mean distros are welcome. Very welcome.

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Stuart 22

On a far away beach, many years ago ...

Something to try on my long forgotten, cobweb hungry 4Gb eeePC 701? You remember when Vulture porn looked like this: https://regmedia.co.uk/2008/05/21/eee_girl_1.jpg

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UK.gov joins Microsoft in fingering North Korea for WannaCry

Stuart 22

Downgrade to XP

"Windows XP machines crashed rather than becoming infected when subjected to WannaCry. Unpatched Windows 7 machines were a far more important factor, it transpired"

I had never thought of BSOD as malware protection before ... maybe they should re-brand it as DefenderPlus.

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No, the FCC can't shut down TV stations just because Donald Trump is mad at the news

Stuart 22

Re: Actually

"You are seriously going to use Wikipedia, the "encyclopedia" that anyone with an axe can grind can edit, as a source on anything political or controversial?"

Only as a source of sources to question the assertion that birtherism originated from the Clinton campaign. Check those sources - the NYT (lDemocrat leaning) & FreeRepublic (Conservative leaning) and the dates of their archive.

They could be forged of course. But the onus is surely on the person who makes the claim to source it. If they cannot do that then the probability of which is fake swings one way. Which way do think that is?

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Stuart 22

Re: Actually

"Ah yes, the birth certificate meme that was started by Hillary's campaign before it was swallowed by the right."

Do you have a source for this to counteract the Wikipedia claim it originated before then in 2004 by this Illinois Republican: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Martin

Which is fake?

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Sniffing substations will solve 'leccy car charging woes, reckons upstart

Stuart 22

Re: Brave New World

"That's for a pansy e-bicycle ... not for a car that ... goes a lot faster, so at least an order of magnitude more propulsion power required, moron!"

Not faster in most cities my friend. Oh and the pansy non-electric version is good for touring Europe. Yep, Mt Ventoux would have been a little challenging but now with a little assistance?

Hope you keep your day job Rex ;-)

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Stuart 22
Trollface

Re: Brave New World

Some more realistic charging times for city commuting without rewiring or damaging your leccy bill:

Standard charger (included) 2A charger (80% charge in 3-3.5 hours, 100% in 4-5 hours)

Fast charger (optional accessory) 4A charger (80% charge in 1.5-2 hours, 100% in 2.5-3 hours) - additional £115

Reservable now for delivery in 2018 (which is faster than a Tesla Model 3):

https://www.brompton.com/brompton-gbr/uk-store/bikes/Brompton-Electric-Reservation-Deposit/c-24/c-77/p-2897

50 mile range and you can still get you home even if the battery goes flat :-)

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Why Uber isn't the poster child for capitalism you wanted

Stuart 22

Money isn't everything

My one beef with the analysis is that Uber's fate is it isn't going to be the lowest cost provider and is hence doomed. While low cost is important and it should not be difficult to undercut black cabs profitably using a app peer to peer model even ethically.

No the success depends on being the BIGGEST. The operator with the most drivers in an area should be able to deliver the fastest pick-up time. That is a considerable competitive advantage only beaten by the minicab operator who has an office outside your station.

Hence an alternative worldview is that the operators may coalesce into three groups:

1) Premium taxi-cabs

2) Network operators (to be battled out by Uber, Lyft et al)

3) Local minicab firms

With eventually the charges also being in that order. Given Uber is curently the biggest by far it is in far the best position to monopolise the middle sector unless it shoots itself in the foot. A real risk as last Friday's episode played out. The real argument is just how much of the market is in the middle. I still see them squeezing the other two but not eliminating them. Its also positioning in advance of the autonomous vehicle revolution.

But then I never use taxis so its merely a spectator sport for me.

0
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iPhone 8: Apple has CPU cycles to burn

Stuart 22

Re: Next step.

"The next step is to make a base for it that cools it and prepare the sw for the mobile phone to be the laptop brain."

Or hold it under the cold tap if it's IP68 rated.

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Driverless cars will make more traffic, say transport boffins

Stuart 22

Re: Asking people if they're willing to share

"There are several reason I won't share a car but with relatives. Hygiene is one reason, probably the main one, but not the only one

...

waiting ten minutes for one to arrive would be too much - especially if there's an emergency."

Wow to the first point. Looking at cars parked in streets around here - you are in a special class, a small class.

Second point. Waiting 10 mins for car - you mean not walking 10 minutes to the spot you took another 10 minutes to find? The success of Uber despite all its downsides is sharing is attractive to a large proportion of the population of a large city. Uber just found a new and more efficient mechanism for enabling that rather than the minicab market before.

Being able to call up a minicab without an undesirable driver looks to be an even more attractive and more efficient (ie cheaper) option.

Will that expand the market? Moot point. Paying the real cost of every journey as opposed to just jumping in the car without thinking about it might make the choice of other methods (walk/bike/bus/train) more realistic.

Plus congestion around here is caused more by parked cars than moving traffic. The easiest/cheapest way of increasing traffic flow is to not having parked vehicles obstructing it for 23 hours a day.

Plus flexibility. A autonomous car for two for a nice night out, a Winnebago for a nice week out. You don't have to buy both. You can do other things than stare at the road ;-)

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The award for worst ISP goes to... it starts with Talk and ends with Talk

Stuart 22

Re: "We strive to give customers the best possible experience...

And here's the full list to rub in the difference between the best and worst. Posted (smirk) through Zen ;-)

1. Zen Internet 85% (86%)

2. Utility Warehouse 76% (81%)

3. SSE 68% (66%)

4. John Lewis Broadband 66% (68%)

5. Plusnet 63% (65%)

6. Virgin Media 54% (52%)

7. EE 53% (48%)

8. Vodafone 49% (50%)

9. Post Office 47% (48%)

10. BT 46% (45%)

11. Sky Broadband 45% (49%)

12. TalkTalk 40% (38%)

16
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Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

Stuart 22

"It's what the GMB union wants. The GMB union funded Kahn."

It wasn't Sadiq's decision. He merely agrees with it. Who's funding you?

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UK Prime Minister calls on internet big beasts to 'auto-takedown' terror pages within 2 HOURS

Stuart 22

Re: Why not fuck off and sort out Brexit instead

Funny how it must be done immediately or even earlier - if it someone else's responsibility.

But when it comes to doing something herself (like set up the child abuse enquiry) - it takes years.

89
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Veritas considers 'restructuring' another two offices, with 350+ pink slips possible

Stuart 22

Re: Offshoring

Veritas - I thought you meant the people who left UKIP 'cos it was a bit soft on immigration? They did get 'pink slipped' by the electorate. Those were the days: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veritas_(political_party)

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.UK domains left at risk of theft in Enom blunder

Stuart 22

Re: "extremely hard or impossible” to recover

But you can still go back to Nominet - one of the few internet organisations with a usually helpful support desk. If the registrant name/organisation has not been changed then you can, as long as you can verify yourself.

Remember if they try to change registrant - its probably going to fail on verification. We often have issue with perfectly legitimate ones. if anything their controls are too tight. Which is good here.

This is probably the one great advantage of .uk - there is a lifeboat of local organisation rather more dedicated to serving the legitimate internet community than shareholders. Though this dedication is fading a little as subservience to government and the whims of expansionist CEOs take precedence.

Bottom line give 'em a call. They will want to help,

3
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'Driverless' lorry platoons will soon be on a motorway near you

Stuart 22

Re: Theory, meet reality

"I'm sure platooning could have a significant effect on fuel consumption/emissions - in countries whose motorways have junctions 20+ miles apart."

I would have thought a major justification of this experiment is measure the practical - as opposed to theoretical savings. The latter should be substantial in the mind of any cyclist who has draughted the cyclist in front. Its not just wind resistance - but the braking/acceleration and distance should be perfectly matched to the vehicle in front instead of the driver's tendency to overbrake when he suddenly notices the lorry in front getting close - and having to over-accelerate to catch up again.

That's substantial when you rapidly and continually changing the inertia of upwards of 40 tons!

Everybody on the radio is quoting potential hazards - but not taking into account how tailgating (the manual method) relies on quick thinking time to avoid pile-ups. Removing that lost time should mean a reduction in shunts from the rear.

The point is - until you test it - you ain't really going to know. But theoretically it should be a win and worth a try.

0
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Reality strikes Dixons Carphone's profits after laughing off Brexit threat

Stuart 22
Facepalm

Re: No surprise there

Aren't these the people who brought us the business brilliance of TalkTalk and the unforgettable Baroness Dido?

4
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Airbus issues patch to prevent A350 airliner fuel tanks exploding

Stuart 22

Re: Do you drive a car?

"You're actually arguing against yourself - if you cycle, you actually take on orders of magnitude more risk than even driving a car,"

Actually its the same order of risk as a pedestrian. The car stats are distorted because they are usually done by miles rather than time (as are flying stats). And, of course, if you drive a car you are a considerable risk to cyclists and pedestrians. So not getting behind a wheel reduces the risk to all other road users.

Its the good thing to do. It also reduces the probably larger risk of killing/shortening lives by pumping out pollution. And, of course the exercise you get walking/cycling enhances life expectancy rather more than any increased risk of being killed in a collision.

Pretending that using a car makes the planet safer or your life longer is an illusion I'm afraid.

8
3

Sonos will deny updates to those who snub rewritten privacy terms

Stuart 22

Re: Old Skool

Yep - my 40 year old kit has largely given up the ghost. Circuitry and knobs have got noisy. But my 30 year old (Quad + B&W speakers) is as good as ever and better than most new stuff. Like with cars I expect large consumer products lightly used to perform perfectly for at least 10 years, preferably 20. Anything after that is a bonus.

Unlike computers - sound doesn't get faster. Wheels don'r get rounder. If the required functionality hasn't changed then either the engineering was/is wrong or it is deliberate product obsolescence which in an era where consimer waste/landfill is a real and growing environmental. Just not socially acceptable.

But how do we convince the less old fashioned of this?

10
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Daily Stormer booted off internet again, this time by Namecheap

Stuart 22

Re: Never give a Nazi a break.

"Where do you draw the line?"

Good question. But irrelevant here. Wherever it is drawn Andrew Anglin is pleased to be the other side of it.

I'm a registrar (well the company I own is) and I passionately believe in free speech. I even support his right to hold his ideology and to speak or print his own leaflets (in an un-inciteful manner). But I'm never going to be a party to publishing, printing or distributing it. That just makes me his tool and betrays our responsibility to his targets who are our fellow human beings. Not bits, bytes or even ideas.

Good decision.

7
1

Voyager antenna operator: 'I was the first human to see images from Neptune'

Stuart 22

Re: Wow - that's fast!

El Reg needs to sort its units again. What on earth (or your chosen planetary object) does -168db mean?

How does that equate to the distance a 40 year old NASA designed fondleslab could see my wifi?

3
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Stuart 22
Pint

Wow - that's fast!

"Even Voyager 1 can beat that, regulalry hitting 160 bits per second and reaching 1,200 bits per second when emptying its memory."

Around that time (40 years ago) I remember the step up from 110 bps on a teleprinter to 300 bps on a termprinter was like amazing. And doing on an acoustic modem was absolute magic. I remember the thrill of communicating as far as a BBS in Hull ...

Whereas these guys and guyesses were building something that can do that from beyond the solar system to a receiver only 20 minutes from where everybody and a dog is leaking emr across the spectrum.

More than a pint is deserved!

24
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Samsung drops 128TB SSD and kinetic-type flash drive bombshells

Stuart 22
Pint

Re: 128TB ?

Nothing to see here for many of us just dreaming of the return of £25 128GB drives. Transformed many an aged slow XP laptop into sharp new (Linux) machine. That's real value for money. 128GB was quite enough for OS & Apps and basic data. A USB stick for anything else.

Size isn't everything. Speed & enough dosh left for the pub is.

7
1

Mediocre Britain: UK broadband ranked 31st in world for speed

Stuart 22

"The correct context for this discussion is 30 years ago when data was the new kid on the block and no-one was really sure how popular it was going to be."

Don't be daft. The waiting list 45 years ago for a GPO modem was so long ... oh and the line to connect it to ... might have been a small clue. 35 years ago our company relied on BT Gold for email. 30 years ago my home banking went online ...

You'll be telling me the millennials invented sex next (wrung - coz it wus us!)

1
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HMS Queen Liz will arrive in Portsmouth soon, says MoD

Stuart 22
Coat

Shouldn't is be "Betty's Boat" - or when in Balmoral/Faslane "Betty's McBoat ..."

2
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Hacked Chrome web dev plugin maker: How those phishers tricked me

Stuart 22

Re: The other big lesson

"When you hijack someone else's account, change the password promptly."

Nope - that will be sure to generate an automated email to the owner which will alert them to the compromise. Bad boys will do the worst very quickly and just disappear.

2
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Repairable-by-design Fairphone runs out of spare parts

Stuart 22

Re: Printers?

"I bought a cheap laser printer instead. It's black and white, cost a few times more than one of those disposable inkjets, and has saved me quite a bit so far. As I understand, the toner in these guys doesn't go bad... it can settle in time, but if I take the toner cart out and shake it a bit, it's back to working again."

HP even lie about the toner. My LaserJet Pro 200 Color started complaining about low toner last year. I bought a new cartridge but decided to sit out installing it until something happened.

Well every so often it flashes the orange light with ever increasing cries of starvation. Bit of a nuisance having to push the <OK> key not once but twice to continue - especially if I'm printing from a remote location. I supposed that's HP's way of trying to bully me into givin' them dough.

No way! The copies continue to be printed perfectly from an 'empty' cartridge.

0
0

Australia releases MH370 sea floor data but search is still off

Stuart 22

Re: It is a salvage mission in international waters, China should take over the search

"It took 5 years, and serious effort to find the Air France crash in the South Atlantic. And that yielded really useful information about how modern fly-by-wire systems create some problems."

I fully agree with you there.

The difference is that AFAIR we suspected that the pilot or the aircraft encountered some unexpected issue which we could learn from. And we did. Neither do I rule out completely that their isn't some useful knowledge lying at the bottom of the Indian Ocean. But there are not infinite resources available so a decision on whether to continue the search has to be made in advance on the balance of probabilities - since AF447 recovery cost a small fortune. Which of those would you have funded the most?

Similarly the (lesser) expense on MH17 where no problem with the airframe/engines/pilots was suspected was almost entirely justified on attempting to point the finger at who fired the missile. Again a useful result (even if it is never going to be accepted by the guilty).

The drive to find AF447 & and what hit MH17 was forensic. The drive to re-open the search appears to be coming solely for the emotional relief of know where the bodies are. That adds nothing to future aircraft safety or crimes against humanity. Only to human happiness.

Or more precisely lessen unhappiness. If that's what you want to lessen in China or Malaysia there should be more effective ways of doing that - though it sadly may be that it would be another group of unhappy/starving/sick people that would benefit. And not be reported on worldwide.

6
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Stuart 22

Re: It is a salvage mission in international waters, China should take over the search

"Or the USA, the aircraft manufacturer being based in the USA gives the USA technical reasons to want the salvage."

Or the UK where Rolls Royce manufactured the powerplants? Except no problem with the airframe or engines is suspected so what's the point?

And while I can understand the personal anguish of the familes and friends of the lost - should any nation consider the vast expense concerned whose only possible albeit remote result is to pinpoint a point of impact and which of the pilots 'did it' - when that same money could be sent saving or enhancing the lives of the living in more positive ways?

Sometimes being cold and clinical may avoid even more anguish elsewhere. But its hard to explain that to those who, rightfully, are still suffering.

7
1

Google hit with record antitrust fine of €2.4bn by Europe

Stuart 22

Re: Pesky Euros

No, we'll be too busy giving Google sweetheart tax breaks and other big business friendly "advantages"

Are you seriously suggesting 'Ard Man David Davis is going to settle for anything less than a 30 bob note?

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1
Stuart 22
Trollface

Pesky Euros

'But in two years time when we have made 'Britain Great Again' won't we be able to levy even much bigger, faster proper sterling fines to be paid in used threepenny bits to the BoE in person?

Or possibly not? Discuss.

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