* Posts by Stuart 22

772 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

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Repairable-by-design Fairphone runs out of spare parts

Stuart 22

Re: Printers?

"I bought a cheap laser printer instead. It's black and white, cost a few times more than one of those disposable inkjets, and has saved me quite a bit so far. As I understand, the toner in these guys doesn't go bad... it can settle in time, but if I take the toner cart out and shake it a bit, it's back to working again."

HP even lie about the toner. My LaserJet Pro 200 Color started complaining about low toner last year. I bought a new cartridge but decided to sit out installing it until something happened.

Well every so often it flashes the orange light with ever increasing cries of starvation. Bit of a nuisance having to push the <OK> key not once but twice to continue - especially if I'm printing from a remote location. I supposed that's HP's way of trying to bully me into givin' them dough.

No way! The copies continue to be printed perfectly from an 'empty' cartridge.

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Australia releases MH370 sea floor data but search is still off

Stuart 22

Re: It is a salvage mission in international waters, China should take over the search

"It took 5 years, and serious effort to find the Air France crash in the South Atlantic. And that yielded really useful information about how modern fly-by-wire systems create some problems."

I fully agree with you there.

The difference is that AFAIR we suspected that the pilot or the aircraft encountered some unexpected issue which we could learn from. And we did. Neither do I rule out completely that their isn't some useful knowledge lying at the bottom of the Indian Ocean. But there are not infinite resources available so a decision on whether to continue the search has to be made in advance on the balance of probabilities - since AF447 recovery cost a small fortune. Which of those would you have funded the most?

Similarly the (lesser) expense on MH17 where no problem with the airframe/engines/pilots was suspected was almost entirely justified on attempting to point the finger at who fired the missile. Again a useful result (even if it is never going to be accepted by the guilty).

The drive to find AF447 & and what hit MH17 was forensic. The drive to re-open the search appears to be coming solely for the emotional relief of know where the bodies are. That adds nothing to future aircraft safety or crimes against humanity. Only to human happiness.

Or more precisely lessen unhappiness. If that's what you want to lessen in China or Malaysia there should be more effective ways of doing that - though it sadly may be that it would be another group of unhappy/starving/sick people that would benefit. And not be reported on worldwide.

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Stuart 22

Re: It is a salvage mission in international waters, China should take over the search

"Or the USA, the aircraft manufacturer being based in the USA gives the USA technical reasons to want the salvage."

Or the UK where Rolls Royce manufactured the powerplants? Except no problem with the airframe or engines is suspected so what's the point?

And while I can understand the personal anguish of the familes and friends of the lost - should any nation consider the vast expense concerned whose only possible albeit remote result is to pinpoint a point of impact and which of the pilots 'did it' - when that same money could be sent saving or enhancing the lives of the living in more positive ways?

Sometimes being cold and clinical may avoid even more anguish elsewhere. But its hard to explain that to those who, rightfully, are still suffering.

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Google hit with record antitrust fine of €2.4bn by Europe

Stuart 22

Re: Pesky Euros

No, we'll be too busy giving Google sweetheart tax breaks and other big business friendly "advantages"

Are you seriously suggesting 'Ard Man David Davis is going to settle for anything less than a 30 bob note?

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Stuart 22
Trollface

Pesky Euros

'But in two years time when we have made 'Britain Great Again' won't we be able to levy even much bigger, faster proper sterling fines to be paid in used threepenny bits to the BoE in person?

Or possibly not? Discuss.

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Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

Stuart 22
Trollface

Re: A luddite writes...

"Who will use a supersonic airliner? I suspect the same people as used Concorde - a small number of very rich people, and business people spending someone else's money. Who really, really needs to travel at 1500 mph, half way round the world?"

Wouldn't it be cheaper to give'em a free F-35 in place of their annual tax deduction? A bonus if they can land it on a moving deck. I'd put my money on Elon winning but at a cost of a good few very damp billionaires. Win-win?

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Blighty's first aircraft carrier in six years is set to take to the seas

Stuart 22

In correct Naval tradition that should be "left hand down a bit!"

Only after going "back a bit sideways"

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Software dev bombshell: Programmers who use spaces earn MORE than those who use tabs

Stuart 22
Trollface

Re: A question

What is this thing called 'indented code'? Is it for those who can't do machine code? And why should we pay them more?

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Samsung releases 49-inch desktop monitor with 32:9 aspect ratio

Stuart 22

Re: Only 1080 high?

"> Only 1080 high?

Buy three, mount vertically."

Alternatively with a decent Linux GUI you just rotate the screen 90 degrees. Fix stand to nearest wall.

Voila: 1080x3840

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Ofcom fines Three £1.9m over vulnerability in emergency call handling

Stuart 22

Re: Not breach of OFCOM rules?

"However in the process of investigating that incident, they found that Three only had one Datacentre handling all emergency traffic, with no failover, which is a breach of OFCOM requirements."

And hence of Three's licence which is worth rather more than £1.9 million.

Good to know emergency handling are taken so seriously by OFCOM (which is not usually one of my favoured organisations) in light of this week's disaster which must have taken out a load of base stations on the roof while placing an enormous load on the emergency networks of all operators.

The fact we heard so many harrowing stories of the final moments of people owes to the resilience of many of the systems. At a time when the emergency services would be also be overloading the networks. Do they share bandwidth/base stations?

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Huawei Honor 8 Pro: Makes iPhone 7 Plus look a bit crap

Stuart 22

Middle Ground?

"No mention of the most critical issue in these modern times - how long do Huawei promise to support the phone with security updates"

This is precisely why I won't spend serious money on an Android phone. Two years if you are lucky makes it a disposal item. That was £150/year if you took the Nexus route. Now a ridiculous amount with the Pixel line and only to a slightly lesser extent this product. It makes Apple look a better investment if you can stand their control freakery.

In my mind <£100 purchase price means something likely to have serious shortcomings. £100-200 includes good budget phones which will do the job for 2 years. £200-300 richer feature faster if you like a bit of class and perfectly adequate for most of us. That's what I call the middle ground. Not phones that trade status names for a couple of hundred and still cost £500. Its still upper ground performance wise. Do I really need 6Gb when 2Gb has been just fine? I mean I'd like to try 3Gb first.

I really can't bring myself to spend over £300 although I could afford it if it was an investment instead of a fast decaying status symbol. Other people have other standards but I wonder whether the real middle ground (£200-300) is now becoming a neglected market.

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Man sues date for cinema texting fiasco, demands $17.31

Stuart 22
Facepalm

Re: First Date...

I guess it saves you worrying about where to go for a second date ...

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Dell kills botched BIOS update that murdered punters' PCs

Stuart 22

Dell Orange is the new Blag

Only this isn't new. I used to have a range of Optiplex's. At around 5 or 6 years many of them refused to boot with that orange light.

I'm pretty sure when I checked the manual it said "Thank you for choosing Dell. Its now time to choose a new one". I didn't.

Sorry.

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Blighty's buying another 17 F-35s, confirms the American government

Stuart 22

Handcarved?

“low rate initial production”

I presume this means carved by hand - hence everyone just a little bit different which makes modification, maintenance & parts a nightmare? Like what we happened with the ill-fated Nimrod MRA4.

Not easy when they are supposed to work flawlessly for months on a wobbly boat thousands of hostile miles from a replenishment facility.

Proven product tends to beat glossy brochure dreams. You know it works and someone else has shouldered most of the development cost.

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London City airport swaps control tower for digital cameras

Stuart 22

Eyeballing?

Sounds great when everything is working to plan. But can you beat an eyeball when it ain't going to plan? I mean a plane turning left instead of right. Looking out on City Airport in 180 degree 3D reality colour the anomaly should register. But will it register if it isn't on the screen the remote controller is currently looking at?

But then does anybody look out of the windows these days? I've never seen anyone cleanin'em

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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

Stuart 22

Re: But but but.......

"The alternate reality is that he was set-up by the Feds/CBI/NSA (whoever) for screwing 2 chicks"

If this was true it was done under a previous administration. Now, whatever you think of Assange, it ain't going to be that he is not a smart technical cookie. If he hasn't got the drop on who hacked and leaked the DNC then he ain't half the man I thought he was.

So in these days of Special Counsels and vultures circulating the White House spiralling into a chasm - extraditing Julian to a US Courthouse to testify might not be the smartest move. But then, perhaps, we don't have the smartest guy making the decision. If it is his decision.

On the other hand the intelligence community might just want Julian to spill the beans to help remove or neutralise their chief headache. I guess it comes down to who is really running the Dept of Justice.

Time to order more popcorn ...

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Bye bye MP3: You sucked the life out of music. But vinyl is just as warped

Stuart 22

Re: Listening to Vinyl is a bit like eating at a posh restaurant

"[screaming] just fucking play the fucking thing you fucking fucker"

Aha, yes - the magic words if repeated sufficient times and remembering not to stamp one's feet too hard actually proved the sentience of my Shure M75E. It would eventually obey - ONCE, AND ONCE ONLY before making a jump for freedom.

But at least we had albums worth trying to play ;-)

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Guess who's getting fat off DRAM shortages? Yep, the DRAM makers

Stuart 22

History may not repeat itself ...

Three manufactures with 95% of the market. That's not good. You don't have to have a formal cartel to see what's in their best interests. A glut isn't one of them.

The world has changed. Cheap storage may be history. Time to start making code compact again and sharpen up those compression codecs.

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Ransomware scum have already unleashed kill-switch-free WannaCry‬pt‪ variant

Stuart 22

Is it just me?

Its surely incredible that a lone pizza stuffed actor could get immediate access to the worm and spend a night before he spotted the 'call home' vector? Is that really that hard? And beat the best resourced detection agencies worldwide?

Surely every IT detective agency including GCHQ would have sandboxed it on first sight, thrown their best at it if only to beat their friends across the pond, to save Jeremy Hunt & Mother Theresa's bacon just ahead of a new funding opportunity (aka new government).

It all smells not only of pizza but planted news. And if it is genuine what on earth are we paying this organisation and every anti-virus firm for?

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Uber may face criminal charges over alleged stolen self-driving tech

Stuart 22

Re: re Bestiality

"Wouldn't it be wonderful if, upon conviction, the whole executive board were sentenced to 230 years prison, each."

You may think that. I may think that. But its irrelevant.

The problem with Uber (and lots of other corporations & politicians) is that proven misbehaviour, immorality and even criminality appears now to be an attraction to its customers instead of a deterrence. If no one hailed Uber then they are history. It isn't as if there are no alternatives.

Until nearly all of us demand honesty and ethical companies than it ain't going to be profitable for many to flourish. A cheat can undercut them (till they have driven them out of the market) and then cream the profit. It used to be called extortion. Its now called 'breaking the mould'.

No, its customers are as guilty as its directors. While 48% will vote for a certain person we have a problem - if only that he will protect the extortionists and declare evidenced investigatory revelations fake - with no evidence.

Wake me up when this dystopia has crumbled ...

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Alert: Using a web ad blocker may identify you – to advertisers

Stuart 22

Blow 'em a Raspberry!

As it hasn't been mentioned and almost everybody here will have an old redundant 1st generation RaspberryPi gathering dust in their drawer - You can give it a great second life using https://pi-hole.net/ on it to replace your network DNS. Works a treat for all connected devices. No need for browser add-ons and works within your smartphone apps (when using wi-fi).

I've found it the most effective way of blocking all ads - and if any ad does show up it will be the most obvious product/service to avoid purely on being so subversive.

The only issue so far was the TfL website would omit tube/trains from its journey planner. But by checking the easily view-able blocking log, whitelisting solved that problem immediately.

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'Tech troll' sues EFF to silence 'Stupid Patent of the Month' blog. Now the EFF sues back

Stuart 22

Re: EFF Lawyers are EFF'n Stupid

Let's look at just one of the 39 claims for this GUI:

27. A graphic user interface as in claim 18, further comprising a timer window for graphically illustrating a countdown from a modifiable pre-specified number to “0”

Ignoring the obvious and prior art should alone destroy it - most countdowns don't actually end with "0" but at "1" or "1%" or whatever - the zero event instead initiating the closure of the box or whatever so easily avoidable (do I have a future careerr as a IT Patent Laywer? ;-)

The most obvious counter example to counting down and including zero, is of course, is rocket launch displays. Hence are our Australian cousins suggesting the Apollo programme was a myth created less than 20 years ago and we really didn't get to the moon?

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Homes raided in North West over data thefts from car body repair shops

Stuart 22

Re: oh great.

But this article doesn't explain how the scammers got the details of the accident that never happened >:-(

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Boeing 737 turns 50

Stuart 22

Is aviation progress grinding to a halt?

Yes over 50 years Boeing has refined the design - as they have for the still in production(?) 747. But 50 years before its first flight - this was cutting edge design with what appears to be winglets, asymetrically profiled engines and unpaved runway capability ... plus non-stop transatlantic range capability. Yes I admit the 737 and its predecessors were amazing progress but even its proposed replacements today use a very similar configuration.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Vimy#/media/File:Vickers_Vimy.jpg

Oh and I'm not going to draw parallels with how music moved on to peak in the late 60's too ;-)

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Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

Stuart 22

Re: I wonder

"How quickly he will be thrown out of court, and if there will be associated laughter."

Or is he just a bit desperate to get his $88 back?

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Boeing and Airbus fly new planes for first time

Stuart 22

Re: So a 5 meter increase in lengths delivers 38 more passenger slots?

"Good thing is that airlines are not allowed to issue standing room tickets (yet)"

Oh yes they do: http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/02/pakistan-pia-probes-standing-passengers-incident-170225201715193.html

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Ubuntu 17.04 beta FACT: It's what's on the inside that matters, not looks

Stuart 22

*ubuntu

Spare a word for the other variants. I found Ubuntu interface awful but Kubuntu much more tailorable and with the benefit of some great KDE apps. Not as pretty looking as Linux Mint but more useful.

Paging Lubuntu & Xubuntu users ...

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BDSM sex rocks Drupal world: Top dev banished for sci-fi hanky-panky

Stuart 22

Good code is good code

We all have a problem with Hitler. But if hey, had he come up with a good algorithm it would have been bonkers not to adopt it,

Good is good, Bad is bad. No one, even him, is exclusive to either. Use what is good, destroy what is evil was the obviois path to me. But for Drupal management?

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As a shock to absolutely no one, Uber is mostly pasty, male at the top

Stuart 22

Re: This R-type Evolutionary (Left) Psychology is poisonous in a competitive environment!

Sorry Infernoz about the downvote for forgetting the Joke icon.

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The evolution of ransomware: How a nuisance turned into a business menace

Stuart 22

Or use Linux?

I'm presuming I haven't been targetted ... yet! Yesterday's attempt was using an encrypted MS Office template (.dot) file - doh

How do I know when to start panicking?

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Brit ISP TalkTalk blocks control tool TeamViewer

Stuart 22

Re: @FlamingDeath

Indeed - the ironic point being that Zen, A&A and any other decent ISP appears to be able to consistently extract and deliver a far superior service from the BT network than BT themselves has ever achieved.

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AWS's S3 outage was so bad Amazon couldn't get into its own dashboard to warn the world

Stuart 22

"Why do we need internet connected light bulbs?

Most commonly to be 'in when you're out'"

Yea, well, I use time controllers. Do the job perfectly barring power failure when you won't have a light anyway. Their only issue is re-setting the time (and finding the unintuitive instructions), I find more intellectually challenging then setting up a new cloud instance ... but then I'm a born masochist.

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Fitbit hit on Pebble kit cost just 20 million quid? Oh s**t!

Stuart 22
Pint

"I'll be holding onto my pebble steel for a long, long time."

Same here (for el cheapo plastic variant). Surprised this morning to find a firmware update (v3.12.3) waiting. I thought plugs had been pulled on updates or did I just miss it when it came out?

The beer is for the best recommendation for replacement when it finally bites the dust.

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BBC admits iPlayer downloads are broken

Stuart 22
Pint

Re: Thank god get_iplayer still works fine, and is not limited to the "approved" platforms

The BBC know all about get_iplayer - if only because I'm guessing some of their IT people prefer it. Hence rather a Nelsonian eye is aimed at its 'tender' enforcement of certain things.

The biggest danger to get_iplayer is we tell too many people about it. Its the paradox - if it becomes too popular and a real threat to the BBC third party licensing deals - it will simple be defeated by a cunning change of download specs. The BBC have done that many times already by accident which the author had to reverse engineer.

The beer is for the get_iplayer developer. Wish I could award another for the iPlayer devs. Its still the best from the mainstream broadcasters though C4 & ITV are beginning to catch up on picture quality.

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Booming Android ad revenue shows it’s no longer the poor cousin

Stuart 22

Blockheads

Perhaps this just suggests Android's ad-blockers ain't working so well these days as ad slingers switch from the browsed content to the actual app.

But then I've never clicked on one except by accident which gets easier by the day. So that was dosh (sorry valued ad revenue) down the drain for someone.

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Beeps, roots and leaves: Car-controlling Android apps create theft risk

Stuart 22

Re: People wonder why I don't get a new car

I agree with you. Except that from Oct 2019 I won't be able to use it in London without having to pay another £2000pa.

I agree with the reason for that (the T charge) but finding a new or nearly new car that isn't an infotainment, body & mind replacement gizmo with four wheels attached is getting near impossible.

Guess I'll be taking the bus.

1
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Munich may dump Linux for Windows

Stuart 22

Re: @ Korev

"It's pretty straightforward : is Linux as functional at mail, calendaring, forms, rules, and tasks as a Windows/outlook/Exchange combination? If not, it doesn't matter if the calendars are delivered by e-mail or flying monkeys."

Gosh - I wouldn't know.

All I remember from the days when Munich was Redmond East is that my PSD/T? file contained my whole life that I carried around on a bunch of devices 'just in case'. Moving to Linux and Linux apps just made things a bit simpler and much more robust. Never a problem in my company and a smile when friends in other companies were having 'issues' with Outlook/Exchange.

So happy to hear Microsoft have at last caught up and overtaken Linux with open and integrated sets of software that belong to me and not held behind a proprietary paywall.

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Co-op Bank up for sale while customers still feel effects of its creaking IT

Stuart 22

Yes, I've now been with them over 50 years (when Westminster Bank cleared their cheques). My company also banks with them (no surprise there).

I've had accounts elsewhere but for nearly all that time the Co-op has consistently given me the best service. Even when it comes to speed trading I remember when I could buy shares with a simple phone call to the lovely lady in the socialist Birmingham back office while my work colleagues were trying to authenticate themselves through fax machines with the capatalistic big five.

It all started to go pear shaped when Thatcher made Building Societies game for asset snatchers. Half disappeared, the other half tried to compete by becoming snatchers themselves. And so the Co-op foolishly swallowed Brittannia only to find it was a big blackhole that ultimately consumed them.

Except that should have been apparent during 'Due Diligence'. Done by one of the big accountancy practices no doubt. So who conned who? And why as both a Co-op member and customer not been informed by them or, more importantly, the FSA or other quango supposed to be protecting us - what happened, who is responsible and why they shouldn't go to jail.

I feel so let down. Not by the lady in the Birmingham back office. Not for the Co-op Bank I knew. But those who by ommission or commission have almost destroyed community based banking in this country. Worse that it should be swallowed up by bank CEOs who have done rather worse for this country and the world than having a sniff of a couple things they shouldn't.

Yet that's the image the news media like to play this morning.

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NORKS fires missile that India reckons it could shoot down in flight

Stuart 22

Re: Good work India...

There is a view (which I don't hold) that one way of not having starving or any other children is not to have any defence against a belligerant nuclear power next door (Pakistan). I presume the mirror view might not be unknown in Pakistan.

Not defending it nor the people in this country spent our precious little post war reserves on making the UK a nuclear power while food for everyone was still rationed. Of course we now have nuclear powers telling countries feeling threatened by them to not have such weapons. Meanwhile shelving plans to scale down in favour of scaling up.

As someone might now have said "let him who has no nuclear missiles cast ..."

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Stuart 22

Its not rocket science

A subject I know little about. But I can spot a load of dorsal fins where I've seen none before (2nd stage?).

To my cynical frebile mind this might possibly point to having large steerable surfaces to compensate from uncontrollable, undirectional rocket nozzles. Fair enough but there must be a huge aerodynamic drag in the early stages. Either that or his scientists have cracked the Thunderbird code.

Anything else a real rocket scientist might deduce?

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GCHQ cyber-chief slams security outfits peddling 'medieval witchcraft'

Stuart 22

Stupid Telco

"He pointed out that a UK telco had recently been taken offline using a SQL injection flaw that was older than the hacker alleged to have used it."

Not the one who lost their CEO this week?

9
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Cerber tops Windows 10 ransomware charts

Stuart 22

Re: Thank Dog Microsoft has...

Well, I am sure that there are more than a few people here who think that MS is a Dog and should be put down to save humanity.

No way. We wouldn't want the scum looking elsewhere for easy pickings :-)

0
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Wine 2.0 lands: It's not Soylent for booze but more Windows apps on Linux and Mac OS

Stuart 22

Re: All is Strange in MS Land

If you are looking at running old applications then we found the best way is in a Virtualbox Win2k VM. It doesn't have to load (if you save in state) is lean on RAM and the old apps run faster than they ever did. Compatibility on business applications is excellent. Stuff that cheated to address real hardware (games?) may be a different story.

Its all free and no activation issues to circumnavigate. It even networks nicely with your Linux filesystems.

More modern stuff that won't run under even real Win2k we have used Wine. The reason is they may be pushing even the Win API envelope and hence there is a good reason why some will crash under Wine which won't handle all the ambiguities that exist in native Windows. That's what we found. An application like Evernote would work but later updates would not. Wine 2.0 may fix some of those issues but we treat an application with Wine as an opportunistic and potentially unstable platform. Not really for mission critical work.

I see Wine as a transition aid to smooth the migration to Linux. To give people time to acclimatise to Linux and adopt Linux/Cross OS solutions as replacements over time.

Worked for us and thanks to the Wine team though we no longer need it. That's success.

8
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Google reveals its servers all contain custom security silicon

Stuart 22

Cheating VW

"These requirements limit the ability of an insider or adversary to make malicious modifications to source code and also provide a forensic trail from a service back to its source."

Methinks the Wolfsburg answer would be more than 2.

Which is why I would trust Google code more than the average car maker's code under my bonnet.

But then my motor is comes from the pre-code era.

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Lloyds Bank customers still flogging the online dead horse

Stuart 22

Re: No. Nope. Nada.

"Lloydsbank,com not working at 12:20 today, Thursday."

Replacing the comma might help ... it did for me ;-)

14
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Kaspersky fixing serious certificate slip

Stuart 22

Re: Browsers vs Antivirus

"I personally trust the dedicated makers of browsers over the products supplied by AV vendors"

Yes but they still screw up. I had an issue with Vivaldi which was bouncing a perfectly good certificate which was fine by every other browser I could lay my hands on. The suddenly within a day it started accepting it again.

What really annoys me is when browsers block rather than warn about certificates, If I wish to take a risk of browsing my own website with my own certificate - that is my business. Especially if it is a place Let's Encrypt can't go.

0
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Those online ads driving you bonkers are virtually 'worthless for brands'

Stuart 22

Get Rich Quick

Well not rich but making a decent income as both a Adwords & Adsense. That was years ago when Google served ads based on the content of the page not on the profile of the punter.

Which meant they could be crafted discreetly into the page with a symbiotic effect. Once they broke that it became an aberration and to have any effect it was flashy banners. Unsuprisingly our revenues dropped - but then Google had an ever growing number of websites to fling more ads so while the revenue per page was dropping, the number inflation kept their revenues growing.

On placing ads we found we were being to be outbid by the majors who just buying the market. So now we are a post-ad company. But I did get a t-shirt!

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WordPress auto-update server had flaw allowing anyone to add anything to websites worldwide

Stuart 22

Re: And in related news...

27.1% of the WWW are Wordpress sites... ???

I assume it is the percentage of websites that didn't update to 4.6.1 or equivalents on 7th September and presumably vulnerable to this attack. I would have thought that percentage would have been higher with the number of folks who resist auto-update for good or bad reasons.

0
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Tesco Bank limits online transactions after fraud hits thousands

Stuart 22

Re: Oops...

If its an inside job - then the Tesco Bank software was developed (and supported?) here: http://www.tescobengaluru.com/

1
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Brexit may not mean Brexit at all: UK.gov loses Article 50 lawsuit

Stuart 22

Re: As I understand it

Yes the Remain campaign lied. Though I think you would be stretched to match their lies against Leave's NHS claim, Turks invading the UK etc.

Thinking voters would on voting for their and their children's future would, you would have thought, taken rather more account of analysis coming from independent and disinterested people. Their forecasts had a degree of homogeneity. But then they were not seeking power.

Democracy - as this country has it - has one great purpose. To allow the peaceful transfer of power from one group who has alienated most of the country to another group who has yet to alienate most of the country. As bad as politicians are - it is clear to me they are more likely to take into account (and be held to account) for all the consequences of their decisions. This is why what they say in advance to get votes doesn't always match what they do in order to get the next lot of votes.

That's why referendums are generally a bad idea in complex situations. And nothing is as complex as the consequences of leaving the EU. One which both Remainers & Leavers are still trying to get their heads around. A final real sensible decision would be unwise until that has been bottomed out and understood.

The referendum sent a message. Taking it as an absolute instruction to plough on whatever the consequences on such a narrow margin is just foolhardy. I don't think parliament should reverse it. But I do think parliament should, if it is not satisfied with what the three musketeers come up with, put the final decision back to the people.

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