* Posts by Stuart 22

846 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

Page:

Opportunity knocked? Rover survives Martian winter, may not survive budget cuts

Stuart 22
Silver badge
Trollface

"I truly hope that Americans are ashamed of their President. This is just another reason to be so."

How dare you say that! Right now the greatest dealmaker ever is doing the deal of the century flogging a clapped out second hand Rover Discovery to his 'friend' Vlad for more dosh/votes than Barack could dream of. The p&p is the only sticking point.

But I await the crowing tweet with [almost] complete confidence.

26
7

Yes, Assange, we'll still nick you for skipping bail, rules court

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Schrödinger's Embassy

Its not the Trump administration Julian has to worry about - it's Robert Meuller. Which would be a worry for Trump if Jules is willing to do a deal ...

1
0

Blackbird shot down, patent nuked by judge in Cloudflare legal battle

Stuart 22
Silver badge

And will Fastly get their money back?

5
0

Meltdown's Linux patches alone add big load to CPUs, and that's just one of four fixes

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Farmer's Lament

It does effect many people's computing is done in the cloud or within each organisation's server farm.

Those large scale operations will have been sized to operate at optimum utilisations - the highest achievable before unacceptable degradation sets in. Or just after for some providers! Otherwise they can be undercut by competitors.

To take an an analogy - the NHS is running its hospitals on a 96% bed occupancy than 'only' a 2% extra is pretty catastrophic. And processors as they saturate can really start flapping. How much depends on the nature of the load. Degradation may be steep, very steep or cliff edge. Of course AWS & Netflix can sort their situation by 'only' increasing the servers farms by adding 2 racks for every existing 100. That's still an awful lot of kit to be ordered, manufactured, installed and tested on top of planned growth.

Right now their contingency farms are probably taking the extra load so we may not notice. That's fine until the contingency is needed. Then it could be blackout time.

But then I'm assured here my PC will still be working fine. So it'll be a good test of my 'what happens when the cloud disappears' backup procedure. A lesson on dependency many of us never really learn.

5
1

TalkTalk to splash £1.5bn laying full fibre on 3 million doorsteps

Stuart 22
Silver badge
Pint

Re: Good Idea.. but..

Oh no. Please Mods just cut'n'paste the comments from the last TalkTalk fiasco report and close this so we can froth at the mouth down the pub instead. Saves time, bitter tastes better.

While you are about can you cut out the stock image on the frontpage with some vague connection to a tedious story and replace it with a loop of Thunderbirds 1 & 2 landing simultaneously on Cape Canaveral obviously filched from the discarded film stock bin at Shepperton and pretending its really real - a bit like TalkTalk's broadbind.

Just kiddin'. Elon you are magic. With knobs on.

9
2

Lauri Love judgment: Extradition would be 'oppressive' and breach forum bar

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Sympathy

To follow your arguement - if imprisonment in the United States (or elsewhere) were to create a significant or probable risk of death [whether through suicide or physical cause] then extradition should be denied whatever the charge? That seems not unreasonable.

I do not have your experience so can you explain to me why the risks would be significantly higher than being committed to, say Liverpool Goal? TIA for your insights.

I have no question on the forum bar. The alleged offence was committed by a UK national on UK soil so clearly UK jurisdiction should take precedence. However, given that he has not been prosecuted here then in these globally connected times - the US surely has a call on Mr Love because of the alleged damage directed to and incurred on their soil but only if he hasn't had a fair trial here. No double jeapordy (or quadruple in this case). Only if their law in question is incompatible with the UK view of justice/civil rights should we deny it on that test. Is it?

6
5

Lloyds Bank bans Bitcoin purchases by credit card customers

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: "banks telling their customers what they can and cannot buy?

I'm guessing this is a problem in the Mastercard/Visa community that they cannot handle and hence some banks are dumping it on their customers.

I've had money back from CC payments traders that have gone bust. That's part of the comfortable guarantee you get on many payments that could go wrong and why many of us choose to use a CC rather than a Debit card without protection.

That leaves the CC company exposed when they are guaranteeing an unstable and wobbly set of cryptocurrency exchanges who are taking money for something that doesn't exist and whose belief it does exist and have value could disappear overnight. Its not like Ladbrokes or BetFred who are always the winners in the betting world because their 'book' is all too real. So ideally it should have been Mastercard/Visa refusing to deal with exchanges - in which case the customer is not offered the opportunity to buy rather than deny.

But I guess the exchanges will always find some CC company willing to give them an account. After all they will make money unless the bubble bursts. And if only 1% believe it won't - its enough.

Somehow I'm not uncomfortable with Lloyd's decision. Nor do I think their shareholders. Or anyone seeking to protect the taxpayer - as we are there not to profit but to pay up when the financial world drops a bollock.

5
0

Spectre shenanigans, Nork hackers upgrade, bad WD drives and more

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Flash in the pan

We retired our last Flash dependent legacy application this week. Our (very) small contribution to making windows a little less unsafe.

More importantly being used to justify an extra beer all round.

11
0

Capita contract probed after thousands of clinical letters stuffed in a drawer somewhere

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: How? Why!!!

"If you outsource, you get what [their better paid lawyers decided] you asked for and pay for."

FTFY. And of course if the penalties are less than the cost of doing the job, why do it? If they really screw up then Chris Grayling may be their answer ... just sayin'

11
1

Forget cyber crims, it's time to start worrying about GPS jammers – UK.gov report

Stuart 22
Silver badge

A GPS free day?

If I could lower the level of this conversation - I'm a cyclist. These days ride leaders are invariably led by a GPS enabled Garmin. Brilliant until something happens, we are delayed, the battery goes flat, it falls out of its holder or (whisper) the code crashes.

I'm the the one with an OS in my back pocket so disaster is adverted. OK for now but an increasing number of leaders can't properly read a map. Because they never had to. This unknowing dependence on a fragile radio signal goes right up the life endangering scale.

Plan all you want. But imho the only way to safeguard the planet is for the US/Russia/EU to turn their systems off for a day so to concentrate minds so we should know the backup will really work. Signalled well in advance 'cos I'm not taking a flight that day ...

13
0

Just can't catch a break, can ya, Capita? Shares tumble 40% amid yet another profit warning

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: A company that will never learn

"There seems to be a conveyer belt of ‘senior management’ types that come along to put there stamp on the business and give some jobs to the boys along the way."

Absolutely! Of the six executive Directors only one is a woman (Company Secretary and I doubt she is on £440k/year). Can't even close their gender gap yet this socially irresponsible company can police how the disadvantaged lead their lives. I guess if they are missing out on half the talent the result is hardly a surprise.

They need a big PIP up the backside.

2
0

F-35 flight tests are being delayed by onboard software snafus

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Blockchain will fix everything

"Surely everything could be fixed if they just used a blockchain"

Great idea. Drop a bomb here and it replicates everywhere ... frankly right now a standoff between a F35 and a Tiger Moth (so STOL its almost VTOL) might have an embarrasing result. For the heavy stuff there's always a Swordfish or two

Just don't let on to the Ruskies where Duxford is ... or we are doomed, I say, doomed.

6
0

NASA finds satellite, realises it has lost the software and kit that talk to it

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Need help, NASA?

"Plus a Hayes modem and comms software."

Aha - I do have a couple of cable extenders but I'm not sure they will reach that far ...

2
0
Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: When the Orange One is slashing anything

"So once again, Trump's fault? Don't you feel just a little bit silly?"

I said the financial problem was probably due to no budget for this project and the existing budgets being cut. The latter is the president's responsibility and that is indeed what he has done unless you consider this 'fake news':

http://spacenews.com/white-house-proposes-19-1-billion-nasa-budget-cuts-earth-science-and-education/

Can we stick to facts rather than abuse?

21
9
Stuart 22
Silver badge

I suspect the real problem is not technical but is NASA has no budget for this long dead project. It isn't a part of the success objectives for 2018. When the Orange One is slashing anything that looks like a federal budget that doesn't personally service him - its going to take a tough/stupid manager to divert resources to this one.

I assume they will just post the challenge in the rest rooms and hope some team wants to moonlight for glory - good luck guys & guyesses!

32
9

Google takes $1.1bn chomp out of HTC, smacks lips, burps

Stuart 22
Silver badge

A lesson learnt?

"However, the deal does have echoes of Google's ill-fated $12.5bn (£8.8bn) acquisition of Motorola Mobility in 2012, which it later offloaded to Lenovo for a mere $2.91bn (£2bn). Not to mention Microsoft's disastrous purchase of Nokia's phone biz for $7.2bn (£5.1bn) in 2013. ®"

Well no. This time Google bought the bits they really need, people and patents. Not a manufacturer. They will presumably, like Apple, continue to outsource the clog iron bit.

A more interesting question, to me, is whether the rump of HTC without its top flight developers will just wither and die - or is there any agreement for Google's IP & design to trickle down giving HTC an advantage in the Pixel-Lite market.

You know, the only one most of us can afford or are prepared to invest in a device with less than a 24 month horizon.

7
1

Take a bow, TalkTalk, Post Office, Vodafone! You win most-whinged-about telcos award

Stuart 22
Silver badge

"Is there anyone that isn't shite and doesn't cost a fortune?"

Well providing both knowledgeable customer service and a product that works to spec ALL THE TIME has a cost. Maybe, unlike the competition they also deserve a profit. So if you are used to BT/TalkTalk's silly giveaways of a few bob for next to nowt - real reliable broadband is going to come as a bit of a shock in both mind and pocket.

Its worth it just to see how both A&A and Zen can even make OpenBreach's cables whizz.

4
0

Have three WINEs this weekend, because WINE 3.0 has landed

Stuart 22
Silver badge

End of the Road

The definition of a successful migration to Linux is when you discard WINE. So thanks for the fish developers it was a great if a little bumpy ride. With the bumps speeding the transition rather than hindering it. Took us 5 years but now in a happy place*

* Ahem, I do confess having VirtualBox running Win2000 for old time's sake. The best damn OS MS ever produced and even nicer and snappier than some of today's leaner Linux distros.

15
1

.UK overseer Nominet abandons its own charitable foundation – and why this matters

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: What I want to know is

"What can we, the citizens, do about it?"

Dunno. And I'm a member and registrar. We are being screwed too. Having said that there is still a remnant of the old public service ethic left in the organisation doing the actual work and excluded from 'policy'. Hopefully they won't be found out before they take retirement (voluntary or otherwise).

I have exactly the same situation in my leisure activity. CTC followed their name supporting touring cyclists with great routes, lists of good value cafes and pubs, insurance and stuff like that. Then someone comes in from outside, drops touring, stuffs up the subs to finance his activities elsewhere - even rebranding (at what cost) to Cycling UK without a by-your leave to the membership.

We have littlr choice - needing that insurance for ourselves and our clubs. Its the modern asset striipping/exploitation ethic for personal greed.

21
1

How many Routemaster bus seats would it take to fill Wembley Stadium?

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Seeing Red!

The capacity of a Routemaster was much greater than 72 especially during 'rush' hour with a nelsonian conductor. Seats were for wimps.

Even the 'proper' Wembley didn't bother with them much at that time ...

4
0

UK taxman has domain typo-squatter stripped of HMRC web addresses

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Press here to get your VAT refund

I wonder if the blighters reclaimed the the domain fee vat as a non-uk trading company albeit trading on uk names?

This squatting is getting rather more dangerous these days as many phone/tablet browsers effectively hide the address bar after typing so you can't spot your typos or the certificate but may get a page that looks familiar and reassuring with a nice fat button bigger than even the Orange One's.

8
0

Amazon: Intel Meltdown patch will slow down your AWS EC2 server

Stuart 22
Silver badge

My brain is hurting ...

Despite over 50 years in the trade starting with Deuce machine code - getting my head round and combatting the issues is kinda hard. To be honest - I'm lost.

Perhaps those that are not could comment on whether the fixes applied so far are characterised at 'plugging the hole' at all costs and as quickly as possible, oh and perhaps being ultra careful.

In other words down the road may there may be room to optimise the fixes to restore some of the lost performance?

And any speculation on the time it may take for the chippies to come up with the necessary redesign? and who might be lightest on their feet?

The irony is the winners in this catastrophe will be the worst offending chippies as a consequence of the increased demand for more computer power to fill the performance gap!

1
0

UK.gov admits porn age checks could harm small ISPs and encourage risky online behaviour

Stuart 22
Silver badge

On a more positive note ...

This could be the next great leap forward in making the nation more IT literate in the footsteps of the BBC Micro and RPI.

Instantly 8.8.8.8 painted onto walls in Turkey will become the 'nick of many a graffiti artist. When that hole is blocked then the RPI with Pi-hole (reversed to not filter) will popup on every LAN. Then, of course, the Top-10 VPN list will be a way to draw custom to your website. And so on.

The difference with China is when all this gets so silly an opposition wishing to get 54% of the vote will, like identity cards, boot this idea into history.

6
0

Linux Mint 18.3: A breath of fresh air? Well, it's a step into the unGNOME

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Mint here, too.

two aging 32-bit netbooks (remember those?) from around 2009. All running Mint. All "just work"

Yep got two ex-XP running Mint XFCE and upgraded to 120GB SSD. Go better than ever at age 8 or more.

4
0

Wannabe W1 DOW-er faked car crash to track down reg plate's owner

Stuart 22
Silver badge

"I doubt it being a director of an ambulance chasing business. Do they even feel anything?"

Wallets ...

30
0

Proposed Brit law to ban b**tards brandishing bots to bulk-buy tickets

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Prioritising the priorites

Social mobility and the fair distribution of wealth going down the pan, NHS in meltdown, Brexit in chaos with the economic impact written on the back of a fag packet that can't be found - bu**er sorting that, let's get serious about ticket touts!

I guess someone in the Cabinet Office paid too much for Wimbledon last year ....

16
8

Virgin Hyperloop pulls up the biggest chair for Branson, bags $50m, new speed record

Stuart 22
Silver badge
Unhappy

"Advice : If you are at work at the mo, dont search for DP World. Big mistake....."

Ahem, you must be using a more interesting search engine than mine.

5
0
Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: So, when is he going to build Space Cannon One?

Coming to the Bakerloo(p) line soon? Its renewal plan has it going south past New Cross and then overground. Get up enough speed and it could then go ballistic to Hayes (Kent). Or would it be the good burgers of Hayes who would go ballistic?

5
0

Former ZX Spectrum reboot project man departs

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Arrghh.. OPD!

I was working at ICL as a ICL PC product manager (a re-engineered Rair Blackbox on steroids). Perhaps steroids was a bit pushy but humour me. We were at war with the OPD people who thought their baby would sweep all those IBM PCs and Apricots off the desk.

Ever trying to be helpful I cabled up four to the PC so they could actually do something useful other than run a phonebook. Or at least more useful. But yes, their microdrives were reliable. But that wasn't the point. Connecting to the PC meant they could access all the data on its massive 5Mb (later 10Mb) drives and proper 5.25" floppies.

I shall be counting the downvotes as a measure of how many of the OPD team are still able to punch a keyboard ;-)

3
1

Car rental firms told: Tell your customers about in-car data slurps

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Wotta about the manual?

Ahem, my problem is attaching my phone to a random rental car's bluetooth. The combination of minimalist number of knobs, maximum functions, designed by somebody who reads down and backwards and NO FLIPPIN' MANUAL to give you a clue.

I mean the 2" manual you get with your own car is 10% car and 90% in car entertainment. Of course, those of us spent the best part of 50 years decoding undocumented progs do have a better than evens chance of a result, eventually - oh and kudos of helping friends and relatives to pipe their own music through the speakers.

But really? Is sticking a quick-start guide on the back of the glovebox door so difficult?

6
0

Damian Green: Not only my workstation – mystery pr0n all over Parliamentary PCs

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Protecting their own

How heartwarming to see Damien's friends rushing to their favourite newspaper proprietors over the weekend to defend him and rubbishing the rozzers.

I haven't a clue whether Damien is guilty or not. But how can THEY tell it wasn't him but an office worker or a Putin inspired hacker? They don't have the objectivity and distance as you or I. I doubt they have more evidence.

And while Quick's initial statements appear to be over the top (illegal v legal porn) the statements made by those closer to the evidence is rather more forensic - not proof as was made clear but certainly a case to answer.

It would seem the response is not Damien answering but his friends trying to deflect the questions raised. And I have a hunch they will be successful.

8
6

Guilty: NSA bloke who took home exploits at the heart of Kaspersky antivirus slurp row

Stuart 22
Silver badge

"Well, all I can say is: I never had problems like these when I was working with FORTRAN77 and punchcards."

My professor always sent me notes on the back of a used punch card. Now if I had collected them altogether, in order ... what are the chances would have generated some of this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII_porn

0
0
Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: 67?

"No wonder the NSA can't seem to get their act together - they are employing the Gentrified Squad. You know, the people that are literally past the retirement age."

Ahem, I think you meant to write Geriatric Squad. I know, as you get older, word retention goes a bit loopy.

As maybe your knowledge of how fast retirement age is receding into the future. If you are under 57 start worrying your coding skills won't last that long.

1
0

Voyager 1 fires thrusters last used in 1980 – and they worked!

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: A little bit faster

"Makes you wonder where they found the manual."

Here? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosetta_Stone#/media/File:Rosetta_Stone.JPG

4
0
Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Intercepting Voyager?

"Surely the chances are that we'll go and hunt it down for posterity once we've sussed proper interstellar travel?"

I can see it now. Hanging from the ceiling of the Smithsonian [Dubai Edition].

10
0

Royal Bank of Scotland culls 1 in 4 branches, blames the interwebz

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: last bank visit

"With ATMs and online banking, more or less the only thing you need to go to a branch for is to pay in cheques (they do still exist) and do more one-off things like mortgage and loan applications."

I'm finding their most essential use is when some goes wrong/non-standard and it isn't on the call centre script.

Most cashiers still retain a knowledge of how things really work and how to work the system when they don't. Face to face eyeball contact means you get attention and even compassion sometimes. Plus the truth (because it isn't being recorded for training purposes)

19
0

Night before Xmas and all through American Airlines, not a pilot was flying, thanks to this bug

Stuart 22
Silver badge
Devil

Re: AI / Automation

Yep, Ryanair really do offer the cheapest Pilot Scheduling software money can buy. But I guess AA selected the random allocation feature. Great if the flight isn't cancelled. But do you really want the pilot and first officer sitting behind you in 16E and 26B?

Longer arms an advantage.

[Only recent Ryanair afficiandos may fully appreciate the spirit of customer satisfaction involved]

6
0

What's that fresh, zesty fragrance? Oh, Linux Mint 18.3 has landed

Stuart 22
Silver badge

"I think there are some reasons for Mint dropping KDE, and there are other Ubuntu-based KDE distros. I'll be waiting for the xfce release.

There are a couple of programs I use which don't have Linux versions, but I have found WINE to be a good answer"

The Linux Mint website says that the XFCE/KDE versions are coming later this year.

I have used WINE but I find using a Windows VirtualBox VM easier, safer and more reliable. Any issues and a quick restore of a snapshot and you are fixed plus you have a nice rich 'proper' windows environment for your apps. Whereas using WINE - if your registry gets screwed (not difficult) its a purge/re-install. Awkward if you are running multiple legacy apps.

In fact my favourite legacy environment is a Windows 2000 VM which runs like s**t off a hot shovel using minimal resources and much faster than the original with controllable protection from external infection.

2
0

Huawei's Honor 9: The only mobe of its spec asking 'why blow £500?'

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Size matters

I remember thinking the original Apple 6 incher a joke. But my own phones have grown from 4.9 (Nexus 4) to 5.2 (Nexus 5X) and now 5.5 (Lenovo P2).

Looking forward I may go the full 6 incher but no way will I be going smaller. This phone, beautiful as it is, would be going backwards for me. Am I alone in this gentle inflation of normality?

2
0

Tom Baker returns to finish shelved Doctor Who episodes penned by Douglas Adams

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: And for those lost episodes.

"* Really really fast."

No problem if you order one of Elon's new Teslas today. Provided he can get one made before the heat death of the universe. May be a close call ...

6
2

Tesla reveals a less-long-legged truck, but a bigger reservation price

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Free Lunch while you Charge?

"We can also use free charging that is available in some places."

You mean free to you but paid for by people who are not rich enough to be given a £5,000 grant by the government.

There is an arguement, with which I have some sympathy, that in order to expedite the benefits of electric drive they should be cross subsidised from the most polluting ICE vehicles. But the chancellor didn't do that. He kept fuel duty constant as he has for many years which, because of inflation, is really a reduction in real terms. And what is the plan to recover lost taxation if and when people switch to electric?

Transport policy (and the Chancellor was a former DfT SoS) is as confused now as it was when it said 'buy diesel'. As long as the rich and the motor industry benefit most then all is OK. Another example they are not taking congestion and pollution seriously. And, of course, after Brexit there will be no European Court to hold them to account.

10
1

Forget Sesame Street, scientists pretty much watched Big Bird evolve on Galápagos island

Stuart 22
Silver badge
Coat

Re: Pfffffttt!

"By current science standards it ought to be a law, but too many people would object strongly, so it isn't technically referred to that way, to keep the peace."

Or we could hold a binding referendum to decide once and for all ...

6
2

New UK aircraft carrier to be commissioned on Pearl Harbor anniversary

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: err... no

"In fact theres quite a lot of stuff the Japanese missed.... but then that was supposed to be hit by the third attack wave...... which the Japanese admiral cancelled after reading the reports of the first 2 waves...."

My memory was that the third wave was if the first two didn't achieve their objectives (which they had). The problem was also the third wave would have to try and land in the dark and the Japanese were yet to get into the kamikaze business.

The lesson that wars are won not on the battlefields but on the logistical backup was also ill remembered from WW1.

7
0

Shamed TLS/SSL cert authority StartCom to shut up shop

Stuart 22
Silver badge

RIP and a big thank you from me.

Great while they lasted. At least the laid the path that led to Letsencrypt. Except I sometimes miss the hassle of navigating their authentication system.

I wonder if it was mere coincidence that Google et al laid off them until free Letsencrypt was up and running. Otherwise many of us with SSL sites would have been held hostage by the rapacious CAs if it had been killed off earlier.

13
0

Prosecute driverless car devs for software snafus, say Brit cyclists

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Re: Fair enough, but...

"We also need legislation to make the (small number) of nutter cyclist legally accountable when they cause an accident (though a significant number are unable to be questioned after-the-fact).

Perhaps it's also time they were required to carry insurance?"

Can we focus this on the small group of nutters who have taken over the venerable Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC), sacked the people who knew about Touring and rebranded themselves as 'Cycling UK' without even consulting and getting approval from their members in order to set themselves up as the spokes-people of all cyclists.

Well, not this one - although I'm a still a member - but only for the insurance! Oh, and I pay the same amount of Road Tax as a Toyota Pius driver ...

Roll on autonomous vehicles. They have got to be an improvement on most of the 80% of motorists who consider themselves 'above average'.

35
3

The Quantum of Firefox: Why is this one unlike any other Firefox?

Stuart 22
Silver badge

"Off topic, but I'm not sure why Firefox has lost so much ground to Chrome in recent years."

For a lot of us who used netbooks (remember?) with 600px height - the slim minimal toolbars of Chrome gave us a lot more visible webpage. Plus the original unbloated Chrome went like a rocket. It was a no-brainer.

Then FF minimised its toolbars and was lambasted for copying Chrome and became a me-too. Not worth switching back. Hopefully Quantum will get some of us to re-validate. The greater the browser choice the better.

My current browser of choice is Vivaldi. Except there is a bug somewhere that causes it to fail to complete a very few credit card validations leaving you in an uncomfortable "have I been debited/not debited state".

0
0

Paradise Papers were not an inside job, says leaky offshore law firm

Stuart 22
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Live by the sword, die by the sword

"Putting aside the fact that the leaked financial details appear to include information about the murky world of offshore finance, for the victims, this leak could have life-altering or, at the very least, hugely distressing effects."

I'm almost tempted to say - "if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to be distressed about". But I won't as I'm not a Home Secretary.

49
0

Frowns all round as Smile and Co-op online banking goes down

Stuart 22
Silver badge

Customer focussed or Bonus focussed?

Been with the Co-op Bank for 50 years. I've had accounts with most other UK banks. It was always the best. Then they got stuffed with Britannia's bad debts - we never found out why the auditor's due diligence failed and why the customers and the co-op had to pick up the bill and not them. This forced the firesale to the hedge funds who, I agree have royally shafted us on the IT front. And I'm not just talking of outages.

It really is tear making that nearly all our 'mutual' finance industry (always the best for savers and borrowers) is now in the hands of commercial bankers who appear to see us as fodder for their bonuses.

We should have a choice. Its almost gone.

29
0

Fresh bit o' Linux to spruce up that ancient Windows Vista box? Why not, we say...

Stuart 22
Silver badge

"Hmm this reminds me of 2003. I installed Mint 18 mate edition on 4 XP Era machines this week, and it runs fine. Not sure what the point of this distribution is."

My latest install of Linux Mint 18 XFCE took 6.2Gb. Not much good for an early 2008 4Gb SSD on the next PC to be resucitated or the 8Gb on the one after that. Great machines retired because of restricted disk space with no easy upgrade as early SSDs were proprietary or no longer available with a compatible interface for sensible money.

Bloatware is not just restricted to Windows. Small, mean distros are welcome. Very welcome.

7
0
Stuart 22
Silver badge

On a far away beach, many years ago ...

Something to try on my long forgotten, cobweb hungry 4Gb eeePC 701? You remember when Vulture porn looked like this: https://regmedia.co.uk/2008/05/21/eee_girl_1.jpg

9
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018