* Posts by Stuart 22

795 posts • joined 16 Jun 2009

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No, the FCC can't shut down TV stations just because Donald Trump is mad at the news

Stuart 22

Re: Actually

"You are seriously going to use Wikipedia, the "encyclopedia" that anyone with an axe can grind can edit, as a source on anything political or controversial?"

Only as a source of sources to question the assertion that birtherism originated from the Clinton campaign. Check those sources - the NYT (lDemocrat leaning) & FreeRepublic (Conservative leaning) and the dates of their archive.

They could be forged of course. But the onus is surely on the person who makes the claim to source it. If they cannot do that then the probability of which is fake swings one way. Which way do think that is?

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Stuart 22

Re: Actually

"Ah yes, the birth certificate meme that was started by Hillary's campaign before it was swallowed by the right."

Do you have a source for this to counteract the Wikipedia claim it originated before then in 2004 by this Illinois Republican: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Martin

Which is fake?

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Sniffing substations will solve 'leccy car charging woes, reckons upstart

Stuart 22

Re: Brave New World

"That's for a pansy e-bicycle ... not for a car that ... goes a lot faster, so at least an order of magnitude more propulsion power required, moron!"

Not faster in most cities my friend. Oh and the pansy non-electric version is good for touring Europe. Yep, Mt Ventoux would have been a little challenging but now with a little assistance?

Hope you keep your day job Rex ;-)

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Stuart 22
Trollface

Re: Brave New World

Some more realistic charging times for city commuting without rewiring or damaging your leccy bill:

Standard charger (included) 2A charger (80% charge in 3-3.5 hours, 100% in 4-5 hours)

Fast charger (optional accessory) 4A charger (80% charge in 1.5-2 hours, 100% in 2.5-3 hours) - additional £115

Reservable now for delivery in 2018 (which is faster than a Tesla Model 3):

https://www.brompton.com/brompton-gbr/uk-store/bikes/Brompton-Electric-Reservation-Deposit/c-24/c-77/p-2897

50 mile range and you can still get you home even if the battery goes flat :-)

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Why Uber isn't the poster child for capitalism you wanted

Stuart 22

Money isn't everything

My one beef with the analysis is that Uber's fate is it isn't going to be the lowest cost provider and is hence doomed. While low cost is important and it should not be difficult to undercut black cabs profitably using a app peer to peer model even ethically.

No the success depends on being the BIGGEST. The operator with the most drivers in an area should be able to deliver the fastest pick-up time. That is a considerable competitive advantage only beaten by the minicab operator who has an office outside your station.

Hence an alternative worldview is that the operators may coalesce into three groups:

1) Premium taxi-cabs

2) Network operators (to be battled out by Uber, Lyft et al)

3) Local minicab firms

With eventually the charges also being in that order. Given Uber is curently the biggest by far it is in far the best position to monopolise the middle sector unless it shoots itself in the foot. A real risk as last Friday's episode played out. The real argument is just how much of the market is in the middle. I still see them squeezing the other two but not eliminating them. Its also positioning in advance of the autonomous vehicle revolution.

But then I never use taxis so its merely a spectator sport for me.

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iPhone 8: Apple has CPU cycles to burn

Stuart 22

Re: Next step.

"The next step is to make a base for it that cools it and prepare the sw for the mobile phone to be the laptop brain."

Or hold it under the cold tap if it's IP68 rated.

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Driverless cars will make more traffic, say transport boffins

Stuart 22

Re: Asking people if they're willing to share

"There are several reason I won't share a car but with relatives. Hygiene is one reason, probably the main one, but not the only one

...

waiting ten minutes for one to arrive would be too much - especially if there's an emergency."

Wow to the first point. Looking at cars parked in streets around here - you are in a special class, a small class.

Second point. Waiting 10 mins for car - you mean not walking 10 minutes to the spot you took another 10 minutes to find? The success of Uber despite all its downsides is sharing is attractive to a large proportion of the population of a large city. Uber just found a new and more efficient mechanism for enabling that rather than the minicab market before.

Being able to call up a minicab without an undesirable driver looks to be an even more attractive and more efficient (ie cheaper) option.

Will that expand the market? Moot point. Paying the real cost of every journey as opposed to just jumping in the car without thinking about it might make the choice of other methods (walk/bike/bus/train) more realistic.

Plus congestion around here is caused more by parked cars than moving traffic. The easiest/cheapest way of increasing traffic flow is to not having parked vehicles obstructing it for 23 hours a day.

Plus flexibility. A autonomous car for two for a nice night out, a Winnebago for a nice week out. You don't have to buy both. You can do other things than stare at the road ;-)

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The award for worst ISP goes to... it starts with Talk and ends with Talk

Stuart 22

Re: "We strive to give customers the best possible experience...

And here's the full list to rub in the difference between the best and worst. Posted (smirk) through Zen ;-)

1. Zen Internet 85% (86%)

2. Utility Warehouse 76% (81%)

3. SSE 68% (66%)

4. John Lewis Broadband 66% (68%)

5. Plusnet 63% (65%)

6. Virgin Media 54% (52%)

7. EE 53% (48%)

8. Vodafone 49% (50%)

9. Post Office 47% (48%)

10. BT 46% (45%)

11. Sky Broadband 45% (49%)

12. TalkTalk 40% (38%)

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Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence

Stuart 22

"It's what the GMB union wants. The GMB union funded Kahn."

It wasn't Sadiq's decision. He merely agrees with it. Who's funding you?

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UK Prime Minister calls on internet big beasts to 'auto-takedown' terror pages within 2 HOURS

Stuart 22

Re: Why not fuck off and sort out Brexit instead

Funny how it must be done immediately or even earlier - if it someone else's responsibility.

But when it comes to doing something herself (like set up the child abuse enquiry) - it takes years.

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Veritas considers 'restructuring' another two offices, with 350+ pink slips possible

Stuart 22

Re: Offshoring

Veritas - I thought you meant the people who left UKIP 'cos it was a bit soft on immigration? They did get 'pink slipped' by the electorate. Those were the days: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veritas_(political_party)

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.UK domains left at risk of theft in Enom blunder

Stuart 22

Re: "extremely hard or impossible” to recover

But you can still go back to Nominet - one of the few internet organisations with a usually helpful support desk. If the registrant name/organisation has not been changed then you can, as long as you can verify yourself.

Remember if they try to change registrant - its probably going to fail on verification. We often have issue with perfectly legitimate ones. if anything their controls are too tight. Which is good here.

This is probably the one great advantage of .uk - there is a lifeboat of local organisation rather more dedicated to serving the legitimate internet community than shareholders. Though this dedication is fading a little as subservience to government and the whims of expansionist CEOs take precedence.

Bottom line give 'em a call. They will want to help,

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'Driverless' lorry platoons will soon be on a motorway near you

Stuart 22

Re: Theory, meet reality

"I'm sure platooning could have a significant effect on fuel consumption/emissions - in countries whose motorways have junctions 20+ miles apart."

I would have thought a major justification of this experiment is measure the practical - as opposed to theoretical savings. The latter should be substantial in the mind of any cyclist who has draughted the cyclist in front. Its not just wind resistance - but the braking/acceleration and distance should be perfectly matched to the vehicle in front instead of the driver's tendency to overbrake when he suddenly notices the lorry in front getting close - and having to over-accelerate to catch up again.

That's substantial when you rapidly and continually changing the inertia of upwards of 40 tons!

Everybody on the radio is quoting potential hazards - but not taking into account how tailgating (the manual method) relies on quick thinking time to avoid pile-ups. Removing that lost time should mean a reduction in shunts from the rear.

The point is - until you test it - you ain't really going to know. But theoretically it should be a win and worth a try.

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Reality strikes Dixons Carphone's profits after laughing off Brexit threat

Stuart 22
Facepalm

Re: No surprise there

Aren't these the people who brought us the business brilliance of TalkTalk and the unforgettable Baroness Dido?

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Airbus issues patch to prevent A350 airliner fuel tanks exploding

Stuart 22

Re: Do you drive a car?

"You're actually arguing against yourself - if you cycle, you actually take on orders of magnitude more risk than even driving a car,"

Actually its the same order of risk as a pedestrian. The car stats are distorted because they are usually done by miles rather than time (as are flying stats). And, of course, if you drive a car you are a considerable risk to cyclists and pedestrians. So not getting behind a wheel reduces the risk to all other road users.

Its the good thing to do. It also reduces the probably larger risk of killing/shortening lives by pumping out pollution. And, of course the exercise you get walking/cycling enhances life expectancy rather more than any increased risk of being killed in a collision.

Pretending that using a car makes the planet safer or your life longer is an illusion I'm afraid.

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Sonos will deny updates to those who snub rewritten privacy terms

Stuart 22

Re: Old Skool

Yep - my 40 year old kit has largely given up the ghost. Circuitry and knobs have got noisy. But my 30 year old (Quad + B&W speakers) is as good as ever and better than most new stuff. Like with cars I expect large consumer products lightly used to perform perfectly for at least 10 years, preferably 20. Anything after that is a bonus.

Unlike computers - sound doesn't get faster. Wheels don'r get rounder. If the required functionality hasn't changed then either the engineering was/is wrong or it is deliberate product obsolescence which in an era where consimer waste/landfill is a real and growing environmental. Just not socially acceptable.

But how do we convince the less old fashioned of this?

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Daily Stormer booted off internet again, this time by Namecheap

Stuart 22

Re: Never give a Nazi a break.

"Where do you draw the line?"

Good question. But irrelevant here. Wherever it is drawn Andrew Anglin is pleased to be the other side of it.

I'm a registrar (well the company I own is) and I passionately believe in free speech. I even support his right to hold his ideology and to speak or print his own leaflets (in an un-inciteful manner). But I'm never going to be a party to publishing, printing or distributing it. That just makes me his tool and betrays our responsibility to his targets who are our fellow human beings. Not bits, bytes or even ideas.

Good decision.

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Voyager antenna operator: 'I was the first human to see images from Neptune'

Stuart 22

Re: Wow - that's fast!

El Reg needs to sort its units again. What on earth (or your chosen planetary object) does -168db mean?

How does that equate to the distance a 40 year old NASA designed fondleslab could see my wifi?

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Stuart 22
Pint

Wow - that's fast!

"Even Voyager 1 can beat that, regulalry hitting 160 bits per second and reaching 1,200 bits per second when emptying its memory."

Around that time (40 years ago) I remember the step up from 110 bps on a teleprinter to 300 bps on a termprinter was like amazing. And doing on an acoustic modem was absolute magic. I remember the thrill of communicating as far as a BBS in Hull ...

Whereas these guys and guyesses were building something that can do that from beyond the solar system to a receiver only 20 minutes from where everybody and a dog is leaking emr across the spectrum.

More than a pint is deserved!

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Samsung drops 128TB SSD and kinetic-type flash drive bombshells

Stuart 22
Pint

Re: 128TB ?

Nothing to see here for many of us just dreaming of the return of £25 128GB drives. Transformed many an aged slow XP laptop into sharp new (Linux) machine. That's real value for money. 128GB was quite enough for OS & Apps and basic data. A USB stick for anything else.

Size isn't everything. Speed & enough dosh left for the pub is.

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Mediocre Britain: UK broadband ranked 31st in world for speed

Stuart 22

"The correct context for this discussion is 30 years ago when data was the new kid on the block and no-one was really sure how popular it was going to be."

Don't be daft. The waiting list 45 years ago for a GPO modem was so long ... oh and the line to connect it to ... might have been a small clue. 35 years ago our company relied on BT Gold for email. 30 years ago my home banking went online ...

You'll be telling me the millennials invented sex next (wrung - coz it wus us!)

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HMS Queen Liz will arrive in Portsmouth soon, says MoD

Stuart 22
Coat

Shouldn't is be "Betty's Boat" - or when in Balmoral/Faslane "Betty's McBoat ..."

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Hacked Chrome web dev plugin maker: How those phishers tricked me

Stuart 22

Re: The other big lesson

"When you hijack someone else's account, change the password promptly."

Nope - that will be sure to generate an automated email to the owner which will alert them to the compromise. Bad boys will do the worst very quickly and just disappear.

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Repairable-by-design Fairphone runs out of spare parts

Stuart 22

Re: Printers?

"I bought a cheap laser printer instead. It's black and white, cost a few times more than one of those disposable inkjets, and has saved me quite a bit so far. As I understand, the toner in these guys doesn't go bad... it can settle in time, but if I take the toner cart out and shake it a bit, it's back to working again."

HP even lie about the toner. My LaserJet Pro 200 Color started complaining about low toner last year. I bought a new cartridge but decided to sit out installing it until something happened.

Well every so often it flashes the orange light with ever increasing cries of starvation. Bit of a nuisance having to push the <OK> key not once but twice to continue - especially if I'm printing from a remote location. I supposed that's HP's way of trying to bully me into givin' them dough.

No way! The copies continue to be printed perfectly from an 'empty' cartridge.

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Australia releases MH370 sea floor data but search is still off

Stuart 22

Re: It is a salvage mission in international waters, China should take over the search

"It took 5 years, and serious effort to find the Air France crash in the South Atlantic. And that yielded really useful information about how modern fly-by-wire systems create some problems."

I fully agree with you there.

The difference is that AFAIR we suspected that the pilot or the aircraft encountered some unexpected issue which we could learn from. And we did. Neither do I rule out completely that their isn't some useful knowledge lying at the bottom of the Indian Ocean. But there are not infinite resources available so a decision on whether to continue the search has to be made in advance on the balance of probabilities - since AF447 recovery cost a small fortune. Which of those would you have funded the most?

Similarly the (lesser) expense on MH17 where no problem with the airframe/engines/pilots was suspected was almost entirely justified on attempting to point the finger at who fired the missile. Again a useful result (even if it is never going to be accepted by the guilty).

The drive to find AF447 & and what hit MH17 was forensic. The drive to re-open the search appears to be coming solely for the emotional relief of know where the bodies are. That adds nothing to future aircraft safety or crimes against humanity. Only to human happiness.

Or more precisely lessen unhappiness. If that's what you want to lessen in China or Malaysia there should be more effective ways of doing that - though it sadly may be that it would be another group of unhappy/starving/sick people that would benefit. And not be reported on worldwide.

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Stuart 22

Re: It is a salvage mission in international waters, China should take over the search

"Or the USA, the aircraft manufacturer being based in the USA gives the USA technical reasons to want the salvage."

Or the UK where Rolls Royce manufactured the powerplants? Except no problem with the airframe or engines is suspected so what's the point?

And while I can understand the personal anguish of the familes and friends of the lost - should any nation consider the vast expense concerned whose only possible albeit remote result is to pinpoint a point of impact and which of the pilots 'did it' - when that same money could be sent saving or enhancing the lives of the living in more positive ways?

Sometimes being cold and clinical may avoid even more anguish elsewhere. But its hard to explain that to those who, rightfully, are still suffering.

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Google hit with record antitrust fine of €2.4bn by Europe

Stuart 22

Re: Pesky Euros

No, we'll be too busy giving Google sweetheart tax breaks and other big business friendly "advantages"

Are you seriously suggesting 'Ard Man David Davis is going to settle for anything less than a 30 bob note?

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Stuart 22
Trollface

Pesky Euros

'But in two years time when we have made 'Britain Great Again' won't we be able to levy even much bigger, faster proper sterling fines to be paid in used threepenny bits to the BoE in person?

Or possibly not? Discuss.

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Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

Stuart 22
Trollface

Re: A luddite writes...

"Who will use a supersonic airliner? I suspect the same people as used Concorde - a small number of very rich people, and business people spending someone else's money. Who really, really needs to travel at 1500 mph, half way round the world?"

Wouldn't it be cheaper to give'em a free F-35 in place of their annual tax deduction? A bonus if they can land it on a moving deck. I'd put my money on Elon winning but at a cost of a good few very damp billionaires. Win-win?

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Blighty's first aircraft carrier in six years is set to take to the seas

Stuart 22

In correct Naval tradition that should be "left hand down a bit!"

Only after going "back a bit sideways"

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Software dev bombshell: Programmers who use spaces earn MORE than those who use tabs

Stuart 22
Trollface

Re: A question

What is this thing called 'indented code'? Is it for those who can't do machine code? And why should we pay them more?

3
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Samsung releases 49-inch desktop monitor with 32:9 aspect ratio

Stuart 22

Re: Only 1080 high?

"> Only 1080 high?

Buy three, mount vertically."

Alternatively with a decent Linux GUI you just rotate the screen 90 degrees. Fix stand to nearest wall.

Voila: 1080x3840

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Ofcom fines Three £1.9m over vulnerability in emergency call handling

Stuart 22

Re: Not breach of OFCOM rules?

"However in the process of investigating that incident, they found that Three only had one Datacentre handling all emergency traffic, with no failover, which is a breach of OFCOM requirements."

And hence of Three's licence which is worth rather more than £1.9 million.

Good to know emergency handling are taken so seriously by OFCOM (which is not usually one of my favoured organisations) in light of this week's disaster which must have taken out a load of base stations on the roof while placing an enormous load on the emergency networks of all operators.

The fact we heard so many harrowing stories of the final moments of people owes to the resilience of many of the systems. At a time when the emergency services would be also be overloading the networks. Do they share bandwidth/base stations?

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Huawei Honor 8 Pro: Makes iPhone 7 Plus look a bit crap

Stuart 22

Middle Ground?

"No mention of the most critical issue in these modern times - how long do Huawei promise to support the phone with security updates"

This is precisely why I won't spend serious money on an Android phone. Two years if you are lucky makes it a disposal item. That was £150/year if you took the Nexus route. Now a ridiculous amount with the Pixel line and only to a slightly lesser extent this product. It makes Apple look a better investment if you can stand their control freakery.

In my mind <£100 purchase price means something likely to have serious shortcomings. £100-200 includes good budget phones which will do the job for 2 years. £200-300 richer feature faster if you like a bit of class and perfectly adequate for most of us. That's what I call the middle ground. Not phones that trade status names for a couple of hundred and still cost £500. Its still upper ground performance wise. Do I really need 6Gb when 2Gb has been just fine? I mean I'd like to try 3Gb first.

I really can't bring myself to spend over £300 although I could afford it if it was an investment instead of a fast decaying status symbol. Other people have other standards but I wonder whether the real middle ground (£200-300) is now becoming a neglected market.

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Man sues date for cinema texting fiasco, demands $17.31

Stuart 22
Facepalm

Re: First Date...

I guess it saves you worrying about where to go for a second date ...

8
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Dell kills botched BIOS update that murdered punters' PCs

Stuart 22

Dell Orange is the new Blag

Only this isn't new. I used to have a range of Optiplex's. At around 5 or 6 years many of them refused to boot with that orange light.

I'm pretty sure when I checked the manual it said "Thank you for choosing Dell. Its now time to choose a new one". I didn't.

Sorry.

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Blighty's buying another 17 F-35s, confirms the American government

Stuart 22

Handcarved?

“low rate initial production”

I presume this means carved by hand - hence everyone just a little bit different which makes modification, maintenance & parts a nightmare? Like what we happened with the ill-fated Nimrod MRA4.

Not easy when they are supposed to work flawlessly for months on a wobbly boat thousands of hostile miles from a replenishment facility.

Proven product tends to beat glossy brochure dreams. You know it works and someone else has shouldered most of the development cost.

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London City airport swaps control tower for digital cameras

Stuart 22

Eyeballing?

Sounds great when everything is working to plan. But can you beat an eyeball when it ain't going to plan? I mean a plane turning left instead of right. Looking out on City Airport in 180 degree 3D reality colour the anomaly should register. But will it register if it isn't on the screen the remote controller is currently looking at?

But then does anybody look out of the windows these days? I've never seen anyone cleanin'em

3
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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

Stuart 22

Re: But but but.......

"The alternate reality is that he was set-up by the Feds/CBI/NSA (whoever) for screwing 2 chicks"

If this was true it was done under a previous administration. Now, whatever you think of Assange, it ain't going to be that he is not a smart technical cookie. If he hasn't got the drop on who hacked and leaked the DNC then he ain't half the man I thought he was.

So in these days of Special Counsels and vultures circulating the White House spiralling into a chasm - extraditing Julian to a US Courthouse to testify might not be the smartest move. But then, perhaps, we don't have the smartest guy making the decision. If it is his decision.

On the other hand the intelligence community might just want Julian to spill the beans to help remove or neutralise their chief headache. I guess it comes down to who is really running the Dept of Justice.

Time to order more popcorn ...

0
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Bye bye MP3: You sucked the life out of music. But vinyl is just as warped

Stuart 22

Re: Listening to Vinyl is a bit like eating at a posh restaurant

"[screaming] just fucking play the fucking thing you fucking fucker"

Aha, yes - the magic words if repeated sufficient times and remembering not to stamp one's feet too hard actually proved the sentience of my Shure M75E. It would eventually obey - ONCE, AND ONCE ONLY before making a jump for freedom.

But at least we had albums worth trying to play ;-)

5
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Guess who's getting fat off DRAM shortages? Yep, the DRAM makers

Stuart 22

History may not repeat itself ...

Three manufactures with 95% of the market. That's not good. You don't have to have a formal cartel to see what's in their best interests. A glut isn't one of them.

The world has changed. Cheap storage may be history. Time to start making code compact again and sharpen up those compression codecs.

4
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Ransomware scum have already unleashed kill-switch-free WannaCry‬pt‪ variant

Stuart 22

Is it just me?

Its surely incredible that a lone pizza stuffed actor could get immediate access to the worm and spend a night before he spotted the 'call home' vector? Is that really that hard? And beat the best resourced detection agencies worldwide?

Surely every IT detective agency including GCHQ would have sandboxed it on first sight, thrown their best at it if only to beat their friends across the pond, to save Jeremy Hunt & Mother Theresa's bacon just ahead of a new funding opportunity (aka new government).

It all smells not only of pizza but planted news. And if it is genuine what on earth are we paying this organisation and every anti-virus firm for?

5
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Uber may face criminal charges over alleged stolen self-driving tech

Stuart 22

Re: re Bestiality

"Wouldn't it be wonderful if, upon conviction, the whole executive board were sentenced to 230 years prison, each."

You may think that. I may think that. But its irrelevant.

The problem with Uber (and lots of other corporations & politicians) is that proven misbehaviour, immorality and even criminality appears now to be an attraction to its customers instead of a deterrence. If no one hailed Uber then they are history. It isn't as if there are no alternatives.

Until nearly all of us demand honesty and ethical companies than it ain't going to be profitable for many to flourish. A cheat can undercut them (till they have driven them out of the market) and then cream the profit. It used to be called extortion. Its now called 'breaking the mould'.

No, its customers are as guilty as its directors. While 48% will vote for a certain person we have a problem - if only that he will protect the extortionists and declare evidenced investigatory revelations fake - with no evidence.

Wake me up when this dystopia has crumbled ...

11
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Alert: Using a web ad blocker may identify you – to advertisers

Stuart 22

Blow 'em a Raspberry!

As it hasn't been mentioned and almost everybody here will have an old redundant 1st generation RaspberryPi gathering dust in their drawer - You can give it a great second life using https://pi-hole.net/ on it to replace your network DNS. Works a treat for all connected devices. No need for browser add-ons and works within your smartphone apps (when using wi-fi).

I've found it the most effective way of blocking all ads - and if any ad does show up it will be the most obvious product/service to avoid purely on being so subversive.

The only issue so far was the TfL website would omit tube/trains from its journey planner. But by checking the easily view-able blocking log, whitelisting solved that problem immediately.

5
0

'Tech troll' sues EFF to silence 'Stupid Patent of the Month' blog. Now the EFF sues back

Stuart 22

Re: EFF Lawyers are EFF'n Stupid

Let's look at just one of the 39 claims for this GUI:

27. A graphic user interface as in claim 18, further comprising a timer window for graphically illustrating a countdown from a modifiable pre-specified number to “0”

Ignoring the obvious and prior art should alone destroy it - most countdowns don't actually end with "0" but at "1" or "1%" or whatever - the zero event instead initiating the closure of the box or whatever so easily avoidable (do I have a future careerr as a IT Patent Laywer? ;-)

The most obvious counter example to counting down and including zero, is of course, is rocket launch displays. Hence are our Australian cousins suggesting the Apollo programme was a myth created less than 20 years ago and we really didn't get to the moon?

2
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Homes raided in North West over data thefts from car body repair shops

Stuart 22

Re: oh great.

But this article doesn't explain how the scammers got the details of the accident that never happened >:-(

9
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Boeing 737 turns 50

Stuart 22

Is aviation progress grinding to a halt?

Yes over 50 years Boeing has refined the design - as they have for the still in production(?) 747. But 50 years before its first flight - this was cutting edge design with what appears to be winglets, asymetrically profiled engines and unpaved runway capability ... plus non-stop transatlantic range capability. Yes I admit the 737 and its predecessors were amazing progress but even its proposed replacements today use a very similar configuration.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Vimy#/media/File:Vickers_Vimy.jpg

Oh and I'm not going to draw parallels with how music moved on to peak in the late 60's too ;-)

2
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Ex-IBMer sues Google for $10bn – after his web ad for 'divine honey cancer cure' was pulled

Stuart 22

Re: I wonder

"How quickly he will be thrown out of court, and if there will be associated laughter."

Or is he just a bit desperate to get his $88 back?

2
0

Boeing and Airbus fly new planes for first time

Stuart 22

Re: So a 5 meter increase in lengths delivers 38 more passenger slots?

"Good thing is that airlines are not allowed to issue standing room tickets (yet)"

Oh yes they do: http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/02/pakistan-pia-probes-standing-passengers-incident-170225201715193.html

1
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Ubuntu 17.04 beta FACT: It's what's on the inside that matters, not looks

Stuart 22

*ubuntu

Spare a word for the other variants. I found Ubuntu interface awful but Kubuntu much more tailorable and with the benefit of some great KDE apps. Not as pretty looking as Linux Mint but more useful.

Paging Lubuntu & Xubuntu users ...

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