* Posts by Lusty

1492 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

Wearable hybrids prove the bloated smartwatch is one of Silly Valley's biggest mistakes

Lusty
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Re: Er, seemsd to have missed....

"It's actually £600 which is quite a way off ~£1000 "

The Ti one is nearly £1000. The point was that people are happily paying this over and above an Apple watch because the Garmin is a useful device that has a purpose. Garmin have sold Fenix watches in the millions, and many other models in large numbers too. That's not a failed category of device.

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Lusty
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Re: Still need that "killer app" ?

"Unless - or until - a wearable device provides a unique feature"

For instance tracking activities while not carrying a phone? Or mapping without a phone? or music while running...without a phone. Scuba Diving (Garmin Descent) without a phone.

Your phone isn't a part of you, you will survive leaving it at home. Without it, many activities become considerably more pleasant, especially given the bulk of modern phones.

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Lusty
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Re: Smart watches should be simple

That would be a Garmin. Ticks all your boxes.

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Lusty
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Re: Er, seemsd to have missed....

+1 Garmin have just released a Fenix 5 Plus costing ~£1000 and even that is selling well. After Apple Garmin is probably the largest install base of smart watches, and they aren't dumbed down smart watches either so clearly there is a market here or the little guy couldn't be charging 3x what Apple are. Also my Fenix 5 battery lasts for weeks!

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AWS launches on-premises EC2 instances for reverse hybrid cloud

Lusty
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You probably would if you wanted to run an equivalent number of VMs. Also, Stack isn't the only way MS does hybrid. Also that's not the minimum spend on Stack.

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People hate hot-desking. Google thinks they’ll love hot-Chromebooking

Lusty
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@Blockchain Commentard you make a good point in a legacy network. In cloud world though, ports don't need to be locked down since they only access a public network anyway. Services are secured at the service so all this cloak and dagger security becomes unnecessary. If your main security requires keeping people off of the subnet you're probably already compromised. Proper authentication, encryption etc. is more than enough for normal use-cases, and for abnormal use-cases port locking is laughably innefective so doesn't really contribute. Most devices have their MAC printed on them, and most NICs can spoof a MAC address - can you see the problem here? Even if the MAC isn't printed on, all you'd need to do would be to power up the device and plug it into your own switch - you're on the network with a spoofed MAC in seconds!

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Cisco's made DNA Center open enough to out-run Amazon

Lusty
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Compete with AWS

The problem they may face is that the question isn't whether they can do the same as AWS it's why someone may choose to also implement Cisco in an AWS environment. If they achieve the same or similar things then why pay another vendor and complicate support operations? AWS or Azure will be a given once cloud adoption begins to build, but traditional network and security vendors are very much optional. Cisco has a large and loyal following from people who got their CCNA and made a career from it, but will that loyalty continue in a world moving much faster than Cisco have ever managed? My feeling is that we'll see one generation (refresh cycle) where loyalty wins and the very next cycle will see everyone realise they are paying for something they already have. We're already seeing this with firewall vendors in the cloud where people realise they can block ports natively and weren't using the "advanced security features" they'd been paying for. I like Cisco, but I'm not sure they'll win against a cloud giant.

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Azure Dev Spaces has hit public preview, so El Reg took it for a spin

Lusty
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Re: Docker for Windows - bit of a fail

You paid £2k for a laptop and your LAPTOP VENDOR chose to put an innapropriate OS on which limits your use? How is that Microsoft's problem? My £1k Surface Laptop has Pro included so maybe you need to rethink your laptop vendor of choice next time.

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Lusty
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@AC

@AC I must have missed the part of the article where they said Visual Studio no longer supports writing and compiling code!

This doesn't hide things behind the scenes, it automates things for you. You still write and debug code, all it does is place some components in a Docker container for debugging and then strips them out when you set it to Release.

It's really not scary at all, and having seen a demo at developerdeveloperdeveloper recently I'm surprised at the issues el Reg had, but as mentioned it's all preview so subject to troubles occasionally.

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Xen 4.11 debuts new ‘PVH’ guest type, for the sake of security

Lusty
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Are people still using Xen? I only saw the AWS thing today and they were one of the main backers. Just interested to see a quick poll of Reg readers using it in the enterprise, I'm not saying don't use it :)

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Dudes. Blockchain. In a phone. It's gonna smash the 'commoditization of humanity' or something

Lusty
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Paris Hilton

I can't tell if this is marketing for a phone or a series of Silicon Valley. This was the plot last series and they seem to be trying to make it into a product?

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As far as the gender pay gap in Britain goes, IBM could do much worse

Lusty
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Re: At the risk of being branded misogynst...

“My experience allows me to solve problems in minutes that take my millennial colleagues all day. ”

Agreed, but you solve it in the same ways you always have so realistically we could automate that. Inexperience brings fresh ideas which are at least as valuable as experience if not more so now we’re architecting for cloud which when done properly is completely different to standard architectures.

The number of experienced network people I see “solving” the network design by making one huge network on Azure is astonishing. Not one of them considers individual networks with public endpoints for each service, yet the inexperienced often consider that first.

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Lusty
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Re: What gender gap though? @Lusty.

I think it’s a useful thread as a lot of people misunderstand the pay gap stuff and this is often the cause. Kudos for owning up though :)

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Lusty
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Re: What gender gap though?

"The median woman's salary is (naturally) £25,000, the median men's salary is £35,000 (20,000+50,000)/2."

@Peter I'm afraid we'll have to give you an F for this comment. The median (the middle value) in your example for the mens salary is, in fact, £20,000 . This is entirely the point of the exercise - to show that more women are in lower paid jobs. To look at it another way, the jobs women traditionally do have been assigned lower wages by the people in the jobs men traditionally do.

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Lusty
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Re: At the risk of being branded misogynst...

"In my time at the coal-face of IBM, I saw maternity leave have an effect quite a few times"

Because at IBM those were legacy skills where experience did make a difference. Elsewhere in 2018 people are doing new and interesting things where experience counts for very little. In fact, I see more poor architecture from people with infrastructure experience in the cloud than those with none. This is because those with no experience aren't trying to use the wrong tools for the job at hand.

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Lusty
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Re: At the risk of being branded misogynst...

"@lusty Am I wrong or are you saying that seniority, loyalty and experience shouldn't be rewarded in companies"

It's not just me saying it, some of it is the law! Also, most people think this way when they actually think about it and stop assuming that the old system is right. And yes, I do believe that being somewhere for a long time doesn't make you automatically better than someone else. Seniority is about position, and that position should be awarded on merit. Loyalty is earned by the company, and rewarding it (aka bribing to stay) is ridiculous because it necessarily means that if your job doesn't change that they used to underpay you for your talents! As I said, if a 22 year old is doing the same job, at the same or better level as a 45 year old then why wouldn't you pay them the same money? There are a lot of technologies around right now that NOBODY has experience in...

Next you'll be telling us older people need the money because they have families! lol

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Lusty
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Re: At the risk of being branded misogynst...

@Peter Gathercole your assumption that higher pay should come with time served is nonsense. EQUAL PAY FOR EQUAL WORK. Age discrimination is just as bad as sex discrimination or gender discrimination or even racial discrimination.

As you say, it's a fast moving industry. As a result, the required skills are the ability to update skills, not the skills themselves. This means I could miss a year and still be better than colleagues who aren't as good at upskilling. I've also seen 22 year olds who run circles around 45 year olds - this is in fact becoming more common given the rapid change in skill-sets and a reluctance to move with the times. The phrase "I've been doing this for 20 years!" isn't usually a good thing any more, especially in IT. It's not specifically bad, but if the thing you're doing is server installs and you've not learned cloud then it's certainly not good.

You're also assuming that she would need to "relearn". Also nonsense as any woman in a sufficiently senior position for this to matter would likely keep themselves up to date throughout maternity leave. I manage it while on holiday so I'm quite certain the girls can do it too for as long as needed.

Why do you think the climb to the board takes 20-30 years? Tech in particular has extremely young exec level staff. Bill gates certainly hadn't been at it 30 years when he became CEO of Microsoft!

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While you were basking in the sun, the relentless march of the Windows-maker continued

Lusty
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Re: South Paw?

My Wheelmouse Optical 1.1A also still works, and is old enough to have the old MS logo on the back and the button texture has worn down to shiny and smooth.

Got to say my Surface Arc Mouse is a thing of beauty though, and lives in my laptop bag for work.

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USB-C for Surface owners arrives in form of a massive dongle

Lusty
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Re: GRRRR!

We’re talking about laptops, mostly. What are you talking about?

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Lusty
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Re: Eh?

"A mouse? A keyboard? A headset?"

Uh, it's a LAPTOP. It has a keyboard and mouse, and there's one USB port if you need a headset. The dock has 4 USB ports so for desk use you can leave a keyboard, mouse, two monitors, a webcam and speakers set up permanently. The power supply also has USB built in so you don't even need the dock if you don't want it.

I realise that the Reg tries to look cool by bashing MS, but this is trying a bit too hard.

And external USB hard drives in 2018? It's 2018! At least get a NAS if you're not ready for cloud yet. Although I assume given your legacy requirements you also store local VMs. Sigh.

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Lusty
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Eh?

So reviewers complain when laptops only have USB-C because there are no actual accessories, and complain when only USB3 (the exact same speed but a universally compatible port)?

I have a Surface Book and a Surface Laptop. They are the best laptops I've ever owned including my Macbook Pro. I use Bluetooth and wireless to connect accessories these days. The only thing I even own that needs a USB port is a storage stick, and that's old USB. I'm curious what it is that you're all plugging in in 2018 that's worth getting so upset about?

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GitLab's move off Azure to Google cloud totally unrelated to Microsoft's GitHub acquisition. Yep

Lusty
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Re: Next Month's Le Reg Story

Is "Le Reg" the French subsidiary of El Reg?

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Lusty
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@AC "Remember getting downvoted for explaining the pitfalls of Kubernetes on Azure in the past"

ACS and AKS are different services so it's not surprising you'd get downvoted for talking about Kubernetes on a thread about container services. I didn't bother going and looking at your comment as the one I'm replying to suggests you don't put much thought into the content...

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'No questions asked' Windows code cert slingers 'fuel trade' in digitally signed malware

Lusty
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Facepalm

@KarlKarl

@KarlKarl you don't seem to understand certificates. SSH and HTTPS (SSL) are the same from this perspective. Both can use self-signed certificates. Your browser may not like a self signed cert, but that's not a good thing and neither is it a good thing in PuTTY etc.

You have no way of knowing that the server you connect to is the real one the first time unless that cert is trusted by a trusted authority already. If you don't install your own specific cert on your SSH service then you've missed an important security step in configuration.

The general principal is that MS (for example) pre-trust some known good authorities. Organisations buy certs from them which are therefore "trustworthy" in so much as you know who issues them. Alternatively you set up your own cert service and set your systems to trust that (in Windows land this is a domain policy). You then issue certificates for all your systems which your systems will then trust because they trust the root.

In your version, each system gets a random and self signed cert with no heirarchy so all I have to do to defeat you is set up a system with the same name and get your machine to connect to it instead of the machine you wanted. This is trivial DNS/hosts stuff. You will then trust that machine forever and not the real one?

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IBM loses mainframe docs down the back of the web, customers cry 'sabotage'

Lusty
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Test systems better

Perhaps they should refund TSB for the "do more testing" conclusion. Apparently knowing that you should test is not the entire answer ;)

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Dixons Carphone 'fesses to mega-breach: Probes 'attempt to compromise' 5.9m payment cards

Lusty
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Re: There's another weasel clause right there

"So which is relevant, when the breach occurred, or when they detected it, or when they reported it?"

If only there were some kind of document we could consult to find such answers...Oh yes, they wrote the GDPR down so we don't have to guess.

It's only 88 pages long including <intentionally blank> bits, just read it!!

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Computer Misuse Act charge against British judge thrown out

Lusty
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Re: The same law for everyone ...

She did receive the same punishment as non-judges. She was found not guilty of breaking any laws and so no punishment was given. The judge making that decision knows the law rather better than you do, but if you can suggest a law that she broke go for it. She did something bad, for sure, but she didn't break a law.

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Lusty
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Re: Try again

Having recently sat on a jury I'm inclined to agree with the judge here. I'm not judging whether she should or shouldn't have done what she did; clearly she shouldn't have and the warning he gave covers that. When the law is clearly explained to you in court as a juror it's very different to a snap decision after reading an article. The reality is that she probably didn't break a law as it's written and so no conviction would have happened. What the result would have been is over a dozen members of the public wasting a week of their lives and careers listening to the case.

Remember here that court isn't about right and wrong or good and evil. It's (usually) about whether someone did something described in a law in the manner it's described.

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Da rude sand storm seizes the Opportunity, threatens to KO rover

Lusty
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Boffin

centigrade

Celsius these days, surely?

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IBM’s cloud adds availability zones

Lusty
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Re: intention to just about rebuild its entire cloud

@returnofthemus the customer doesn't need to manage those things, and so the customer doesn't need to pay for a managed service on those things. Managed services only work because IaaS (and the legacy version of IaaS IBM offers aka hosting) has so many things that break on the customer side of the deal. Real clouds like Azure and AWS manage those things for you by default and at scale, allowing it to be extremely cheap. Also, MS and Amazon don't offer the choice of not patching the OS or software stack, it's automatically updated and current all the time.

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Brit drone biz Sensat notches up 29km remote-control flight

Lusty
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We need to make it harder, not easier, for Amazon and the like to deliver low quality tat around the globe. Convenience and low cost are lovely in the short term, but all that crap has to go somewhere once the initial excitement wears off, and we've only got the one planet.

Sorry, I don't normally rant like a hippie. It's just that drones already annoy me buzzing around and fleets of them carrying plastic crap doesn't feel like a future I want to be a part of :(

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No lie-in this morning? Thank the Moon's gravitational pull

Lusty
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Re: entropy will win

"Tidal power is in the timeframe of years, and by that timeframe, tidal power is renewable"

Not as much as you'd think. The energy consumption of the planet is similar to that available from the moon, so we could easily disrupt this system within a year if we aren't careful.

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Lusty
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Mushroom

Well it's lucky then

Lucky that no lunatics are trying to suck more energy out of this system through things like tidal power stations*. Carbon emmissions are an issue, but the long term effects of tidal (and therefore gravity) power could be very terrible indeed.

Yes, I know there are people doing this. I've been warning them for years that tidal power is anything but renewable. Did they listen? They never do until it's too late :(

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Microsoft partners to fling out collabo-visual Ginormonitors this year

Lusty
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Re: The hydra

"What I really want is a single monolithic piece of equipment that I can invite to my Skype4B meeting to project whatever is being shared and act as a speakerphone."

So...a Surface Hub then? Done. A while ago. Also it's a whiteboard and can run apps :)

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Extract, transform, load? More like extremely tough to load, amirite?

Lusty
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Re: Eh?

That doesn't explain anything, you're just as confused as the article. This isn't ETL at all it's application integration. ETL is a batch process for processing data in batches. We use it for big data and analytics. App integration doesn't work for scenarios where ETL and ELT are used. Looking through the eyes of a programmer I can see why the world might look that way, but there is more to IT than coding and integration.

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Lusty
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Eh?

Can't tell if the article is about application integration or ETL? Different things for different purposes being talked about as though they are an either or option here.

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Microsoft commits: We're buying GitHub for $7.5 beeeeeeellion

Lusty
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Re: Shite

"What little I had on Github was migrated to my Bitbucket account earlier."

So, presumably just you accessing those anyway then? Not so easy to move real projects, and not so desirable to randomly change platforms for real projects which have real work to do.

The most likely outcome here is that MS will add enterprise authentication integration - the main thing that's been missing for a long time.

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Is Microsoft about to git-merge with GitHub? Rumors suggest: Yes

Lusty
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Re: Employment terms

"Hope you're not confusing "open source" with publicly visible"

I hope you're not confusing closed licence with having people rip off your publicly visible code! No sane company would use a public repo for thier closed IP.

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Lusty
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Re: Employment terms

“github has got one of the least complicated set of terms out there.”

Arguably the terms for a git repo on VSTS are simpler. Microsoft don’t force you to open source if you’re not paying, for instance.

Also, I prefer the interface in VSTS over GitHub so hopefully it won’t be killed in an acquisition!

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Boffins quietly cheering possible discovery of new fundamental particle: Sterile neutrino

Lusty
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Re: This is not making physics any easier

Or maybe our detection methods are so primitive they are all actually the same thing anyway and just look different. History is full of people explaining away the things they don't yet understand, and then other people proving them wrong. This sort of thing shows we're nudging in the right direction though.

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Samsung escapes obligation to keep old phones patched

Lusty
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Re: Phone contracts

Maybe warranty is the way to approach this. The EU has a minimum warranty of 2 years so within that period the manufacturer is responsible for any faults from manufacture. If a bug is present which means the phone isn’t secure return the phone if a patch isn’t available. A few thousand full refunds later and maybe they will learn a lesson.

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International Maritime Organisation turns salty gaze on regulating robotic shipping

Lusty
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Re: more colregs

I was thinking this too, if the ships start to remove crew someone will need to pony up for rescue services in remote places like mid ocean. For at least a while, probably a few decades, other shipping would need these emergency services as well as the obvious leisure sailing and racing. If a cruise ship hits issues mid-Atlantic this could have very serious consequences. Until you're actually part of this picture it's easy to assume "they'll send a helicopter", but distance is such a big issue that right now shipping is the only emergency service able to respond other than naval vessels. This could change an awful lot of things for the worse, and all to save what must be pennies against the cost of ships and fuel.

Perhaps it would be a better solution for the IMO to start paying for the humans on board and tax any vessel carrying humans?

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You know that silly fear about Alexa recording everything and leaking it online? It just happened

Lusty
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Re: Unplugged most of the time.

This is why I fell out with Sonos over their new privacy policy and adding microphones to everything. El Reg helped give them a public spanking too. Sonos did offer full refunds for all devices though, so not totally evil.

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How Google's Smart Compose for Gmail works – and did it fake its robo-caller demo?

Lusty
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Re: Errata

This whole paragraph was utter gibberish.

"A petaflops per second per day is equivalent to performing about 1015 neural net operations per second a day."

No, a petaFLOPS is 10^15 FLOATING POINT OPERATIONS PER SECOND. Unless those neural net operations happen to be precisely ONE FLOP then it's not true.

And all this talk of FLOPS per second per day. It's FLOPS, just FLOPS, the OPS already is Ops Per Second. You may use a petaflops of compute for a day, but the wording didn't convey that information at all. If you're consistently using one petaFLOPS of compute then you've no business putting per second or per day on the end as it already tells everything you need to know.

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You've been Zucked: Facebook boss refuses to face-off with Brit MPs

Lusty
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GDPR

Yes, GDPR is trendy, but seriously?

"The move has been slammed by critics because it effectively slips 1.5 billion users out of the rights offered under the General Data Protection Regulation"

Those 1.5 billion people aren't in the EU so why would our laws apply to them? If they want a GDPR they should write one. Heck, ours is on the Internet in full text in many, many languages they could just copy it if they want. I do realise that Facebook are doing this explicitely to abuse those 1.5 billion people, but that's no reason to insist on our laws applying. That's almost as bad as insisting the whole planet goes to democracy and capitalism - some cultures have different ideas and opinions and freedom means allowing them to make their own decisions.

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VMware to finally deliver full-function HTML5 vSphere client

Lusty
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Re: Steve - *applause*

"It's point it to eliminate IT staffing (the savings)"

Not really. Cloud is about the same cost as on-premises. The main cost savings come from those staff not overprovisioning at every level as an arse covering exercise. This alone can reduce costs by orders of magnitude.

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Microsoft's most popular SQL Server product of all time runs on Linux

Lusty
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Re: Microsoft will truly endorse Linux...

"SQL Server ONLY uses Windows API calls."

No that's not the case at all. Imagination is not the same as knowledge, although I expect you thought you knew this for a fact.

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Lusty
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Re: Microsoft will truly endorse Linux...

Word and Excel can both be used on Linux through portal.office.com. It's unlikely there will be a native port of the code at this point, given the low uptake of desktop Linux. Server Linux is very popular though, hence porting SQL Server. It did help that SQL used almost no Windows API calls too :)

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MacBook Pro petition begs Apple for total recall of krap keyboards

Lusty
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Re: Apple fix it or people will move

"People won't move for that requires a change in operating system which effectively means moving to that Windos crapware. Apple may treat their customers really badly, but Microsoft.... Just plain no."

Urrrm no. Apple are literally the only people who don't play well with others now. The Surface is a standard laptop which will run any OS. Apple won't licence OSX to run on it, despite being compatible.

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Lusty
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Re: Apple fix it or people will move

The Surface Laptop manages to get a pretty great keyboard in, and that's thinner and lighter than the MBP.

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