* Posts by Lusty

1413 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Someone tell Thorpe Lane in Suffolk their internet sucks – they're still loading the page

Lusty
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Re: Would be interested to see...

Yes, local buffers will do that. Nothing to do with the connection, of course, but you knew that because you're a proper techie using proper techie tools...

Half your latency is probably happening before the packet hits the wire while it sits in a fifo queue.

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Get ready for laptop-tab-smartphone threesomes from Microsoft, Lenovo, HP, Asus, Qualcomm

Lusty
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Re: "binge watch TV shows for 12 hours straight"

"Apparently you've never flown over an ocean"

Apparently it's a while since you have. Modern planes have entertainment systems with similar content to Netflix or Prime so you can watch what you want when you want and won't run out of movies or shows unless you're delayed by a month or so. Why would I want to drag my own screen on board, and why would I want to subject my seat-neighbor to a screen without a privacy shield and keep them awake? Seriously, try a modern plane, they really are quite good.

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Yahoo! Groups! Go! TITSUP! for! Days!

Lusty
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Freetards

How much have these poor users spent on support over the years only to be abandoned?

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Royal Navy destroyer leaves Middle East due to propeller problems

Lusty
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"Royal Navy go from one balls up to another"

She's still under command and not aground, it's not a "balls up" situation. In fact, I see no reason for any day shapes to be displayed on her return journey ;)

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Wizarding World of Harry Potter awaits Microsoft Office exam winners

Lusty
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Re: Woah

You must have learned on very early versions. It hasn't really changed in over 20 years other than moving buttons to more accessible places.

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For goodness sake, stop the plod using facial recog, London mayor told

Lusty
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Re: Well,

No, the Met are one of the many bodies listed as excluded from privacy and data protection laws so they are violating nothing but ethics.

The problem here is that we keep excluding all of the worst offenders from our most important laws.

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Connected and self-driving cars are being sent to Coventry

Lusty
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Re: Coventry just as good...

Liability has been sorted on this side of the pond actually. Driverless cars were heavily debated in parliament this year.

Also, there's no such thing as an unavoidable accident between two cars. It's that kind of thinking that makes me want these sooner rather than later so we can get human drivers off the road. Humans always ignore the third option when considering whether the driver or pedestrian should die. Option 3 = drive slower! Machines don't consider "late for work" in their calculations...

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Rejecting Sonos' private data slurp basically bricks bloke's boombox

Lusty
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Re: Crap like this...

"The big advantage with Sonos WAS the multiroom synchronised sound. "

There, fixed that for you. That's not been a USP for years, and frankly the way Sonos abuse your wifi network is archaic. They don't even support devices on differing SSIDs on the same network!

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Sonos will deny updates to those who snub rewritten privacy terms

Lusty
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"If you choose not to provide the functional data, you won't be able to receive software updates," the Sonos spokesperson explained. "It's not like if you don't accept it, we'd be shutting down your device or intentionally bricking it."

Uurm, why has my Sonos system just stopped working then? Can't get past the update screen!

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Big iron storage supplier Infinidat blags more o' that sweet VC cash

Lusty
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What's this all got to do with Big Iron?

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Azure fell over for 7 hours in Europe because someone accidentally set off the fire extinguishers

Lusty
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Re: > hear about ... problem ... didn't affect anyone

Yep, here you go. Full list of all Azure issues. Nothing to do with publicity or cover ups, its responsibility and trust.

https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/status/history/

https://status.aws.amazon.com/

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Nokia updates classic comeback mobe 3310

Lusty
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Re: If only it had...

"I can see a model were people have a good, well made dumb phone for voice and a phablet/tablet for everything else."

Not going to happen. People just don't use voice enough to justify a second device these days.

Also, all the people wanging on about battery life - the iPhone 7 has a 14 hour talk time and the S8 20 hours compared to the 6.5 quoted here. It only has a long battery life IF YOU DON'T USE IT FOR VOICE! and voice is its only feature...

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Compsci grads get the fattest pay cheques six months after uni – report

Lusty
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Re: Value for Money?

maybe those children know what median means so don't read pointless articles lacking information on the web so much and can therefore spend time working :)

for all we know all of them could earn this, or some may be earning £200k

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Kill animals and destroy property before hurting humans, Germany tells future self-driving cars

Lusty
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Re: Who

Not sure I see a scenario for an inevitable crash with autonomous vehicles. A human would probably have to go out of their way to make that happen. Generally the computer will slow to suit conditions and then stop if anything approaching a bad situation occurs.

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Calm down, internet. Elon's Musk-see SpaceX spacesuit is a bit generic

Lusty
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Thanks to the Internet US English is the global standard now so we'll have to get used to it. Until Chinese kills off English of course following the revolution.

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Lusty
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Re: Double vacuum

"I'm trying to think of a situation where the pressure increases inside a space suit."

fffffaaaaarrrtttts iiiinnnn sssspppppaaaaaaaaaaaacccceee!!!!

seriously though, the regulator could freeze and freeflow, that could be an issue of more than "double vacuum" proportions

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Lusty
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Re: Double vacuum

How do you know you know what he means, he's talking gibberish! My best guess is he means 2 bar pressure but he could mean he tested with a Hoover and a Dyson for all we know! If the astronauts used pure Oxygen it might only need testing to 1 bar for "double vacuum" although I think pure O2 is frowned upon nowadays.

Or perhaps it's like a double rainbow and there's a Youtube clip...

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Sorry, but those huge walls of terms and conditions you never read are legally binding

Lusty
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Re: Proof of click?

On your own mobile device? You did. It's your responsibility to control access to your device and it's reasonable to assume you do that from a legal point of view. There are many ways to control access including passwords, PINs, fingerprints etc. not to mention the fact that you'd need to have accessed the app store with your personal account to get to this stage...

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Lusty
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Re: Alternately

"Well you seem to have AN electronic version, but unless you have some sort of physical proof that it was the one I agreed to, then I don't see how it can be valid."

You clicked on a certain date. They have the code for the page on that given day in their backup and archival system. Not hard to prove what you saw electronically at all. The web server would even be able to show what files you were served and when.

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NetApp, you went all-flash, never go all-fla... Hey, wait. It's working

Lusty
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"None of these guys have a clear coherent hybrid cloud storage"

Unless you count Azure Stack. They have that. Sorry NetApp you were great for a while but I've no idea how you'll survive this next bit!

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Ancient IETF 'teapot' gag preserved for posterity as a standard

Lusty
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Re: As mentioned elsewhere

Surely the commit for that change had a user associated? Let's revoke that joyless persons access to the Internet! Also, undo the code change and start a joy war in open source :)

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Place your bets: How long will 1TFLOPS HPE box last in space without proper rad hardening

Lusty
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"Perhaps eventually involving having two less-than-reliable conventional processors operating in lock-step"

Can't vote with two systems, you'd never know which had an error because you wouldn't know the right answer. Use three and the two matching answers can be used. It's different to a normal cluster where you're only detecting failure since here you're also detecting subtle errors.

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Big question of the day: Is it time to lock down .localhost?

Lusty
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Re: Is localhost even needed?

"localhost as a name, and it's associated IP addresses, is not just an understood convention, it's built-in to implementations"

built in to SOME implementations, yes. That's the problem.

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Lusty
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Re: Is localhost even needed?

" resolution before external networking is even up"

You have no reliable way to determine that localhost is pointing at your local machine so that's not a valid use-case actually. You should be asking the machine what addresses it has available and using one of those, not assuming that some magical keyword has been implemented. Sometimes it hasn't, sometimes a different one is used. The number of people who assume (wrongly) that 127.0.0.1 will be available is evidence to this!

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Lusty
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Re: Is localhost even needed?

"OK, for starters, how about where the machine doesn't have a properly configured name"

LOL that's kind of the point I was making. You're basing things on an assumption that localhost is configured properly rather than JUST CHECKING THE FACTS. Lazy lazy lazy and it will lead you into trouble sooner or later.

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Lusty
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Is localhost even needed?

I can't think of a single use-case where we wouldn't be better off using the machines real name or IP. Making a special exception for "localhost" promotes various bad practices in software which generally end up as security issues down the line. Surely using a call to ask the name (or IP) of the host you're running on, and then using that name (or IP) is more reliable in every use-case than hoping that "localhost" is configured to resolve properly. Sure, we could set localhost to always resolve to 127.0.0.1, but the loopback address may not always be 127.0.0.1, it might be 127.3.4.11!

Assumptions are never a good thing in computing, and localhost always breeds assumption about the world around you. I notice the article was also assuming localhost was the tld, but more often than not localdomain is also appended. Then we have the issue of 30 machines all being called localhost on the local network so if we use a DNS server to resolve, we have no idea which machine will be connected to - we can't assume the hosts file is correctly configured either, that's just asking for trouble!

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The ultimate full English breakfast – have your SAY

Lusty
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Re: Proper Full English

"Only in America, perhaps. Here in Britain, it's a choice between Tetleys, PG Tips, or supermarket own brand, well boiled, and three sugars... Builder's Tea, that's what you need"

All of which are...English Breakfast Tea. It's a blend of tea, not a marketing term.

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Lusty
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"A big bone of contention was the type of cooked egg that should grace a fry-up - should it be fried or scrambled?"

Scrambled eggs aren't fried. I consider this permission to slap anyone who suggests scrambled eggs are the proper egg for a fry-up.

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Lusty
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Re: Proper Full English

"British tea"

It's called English Breakfast Tea actually. It's literally designed and named for this purpose.

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Microsoft: Get in, IT nerds, you're now using Insider builds and twice-annual Windows rollouts

Lusty
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Not all bad

Assuming the upgrades work (and they usually don't bork a machine these days) I think this is a good thing from the perspective that it forces normalisation of upgrading. This means admins will practice, finally implement proper automation, and stop falling behind. It also means the boss will have to listen.

Yes, it's a pain. But if you concentrate on the good aspects of this it's not quite as bad as it looks on first sight.

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Lusty
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Re: Has my browser broken?

Yes that's the case. I reinstalled recently and nearly choked on my tea when I saw the state of this site without an ad blocker (having forgotten to install it). Amazingly the other sites I visited looked much the same so it might just be the Reg left with such shitty adverts - perhaps as a reminder to switch on the ad blocker. I can't imagine anyone with an IQ over 4 would think people will use the site in that state.

Sorry Reg - I know you need to make money, and I'd love to help you do that, but you'll get no revenue from me that way!

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Microsoft hits new low: Threatens to axe classic Paint from Windows 10

Lusty
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Re: The end

"but often I need to paint out personal information from inside the image too "

Use snip then, it has tools specifically for this scenario. In fact, I've not seen a single example in this thread where functionality isn't already better elsewhere. Perhaps Microsoft need to run an educational campagne. Maybe this is that campagne...

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Lusty
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Pint

Re: The end

"Windows Key

"snip" <Enter>

Drag box

Copy -> Paste

Easier."

Actually snip always puts the picture in your clipboard anyway so no need to copy before pasting. You're much more correct than the other guys though, what a faff his life is!

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Watson AI panned, 5¼ years of sales decline ... Does IBM now stand for Inferior Biz Model?

Lusty
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Re: It's a pivot

"How do you differentiate between revolving round a pivot and circling the drain?"

Easy, a pivot is preceded by well documented plans shared with the shareholders, as it was in this case. Circling the drain involves random actions with no direction.

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Q. What's today's top language? A. Python... no, wait, Java... no, C

Lusty
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Meaningless jabberings

Overall popularity is meaningless as it depends on use-case. Chinese is a very popular language but it's of little use if you plan to live and work in France.

Programming language popularity is heavily skewed by web and mobile app development. If you want to work in financial services or machine learning though you'd want to research what those industries need rather than look at the overall top 10 languages.

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Azure Stack's debut ends the easy ride for AWS, VMware and hyperconverged boxen

Lusty
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Re: Scale and pricing will be the determining factors

They all offer 3 node versions for low end workloads. Three is the minimum you need for a cluster to work so that seems sensible to me.

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Lusty
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I think eventually this will be great. At launch there are just about enough services to convince people to get on board assuming that live migration is included (an issue in Azure) for maintenance. I'd certainly buy it for IaaS over VMware any day. Once all of the PaaS stack is ported, and that shouldn't be long, this will be a truly great platform and a big enabler for development.

Personally I can't see a world where AWS doesn't respond. All of their stack is based on open source and they have hundreds of genius coders working to a very effective DevOps model. The only thing holding them back is a pricing model, and they are certainly smart enough to cope with that. It's possible they could rent hardware, or resell own brand hardware, they already have snowball and snowmobile so they aren't afraid of hardware. They already have SPLA licences in place so MS licensing wouldn't concern them either.

This is all very good for consumers, and it's nice to see a proper tech fight again which pushes things forwards. That said, unless there's a good reason to be on premises such as being on a ship out to sea I'd still go with real cloud. After all, who wants to be swapping out failed drives and fans these days? Even compliance has caught up with public cloud in most sectors.

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Atlassian hikes prices for most cloudy JIRA and Confluence users

Lusty
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"VSTS is about 10x the cost"

Not a fan of looking at price lists then?

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Lusty
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That's a weird reply given I already said it's more expensive than the MS equivalent. I'd also argue that far from being better it's less well integrated and capable than VSTS.

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Lusty
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Interesting how expensive this looks when compared to Microsoft. Atlassian must be pretty confident people won't try out the competition.

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Crashed RadioShack flogs off its IPv4 stash

Lusty
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"NAT _IS_ a firewall"

No, NAT isn't a firewall. Not even close to being a firewall. Also, firewalls don't improve security of a system anyway, they address poor administrators who leave ports open. That's not to say a firewall isn't useful, they save a lot of effort in locking down systems, but the open ports are just as vulnerable whether there's a firewall or not. Either way, NAT isn't a firewall.

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Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

Lusty
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Re: Patching

Thanks I thought there must be something but holy cow that's expensive!

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Lusty
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Re: Patching

It may not be complicated but the development and testing of custom scripts costs real time and money. Every custom script adds up and at some point the cost tips in favour of buying an off the shelf solution. Since this comes free with Windows it's a definite consideration. Red Hat licences plus management adds up to more than the cost of Windows so open source isn't necessarily always cheaper at the enterprise scale.

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Lusty
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Patching

Since lack of patching was the cause of most of their issues, rather than running Windows, can someone point out how patching at large scale works in Ubuntu and derivitives?

I'm not trolling I promise, I've not used Ubuntu at scale. I know Red Hat have an enterprise grade patching and reporting solution but I've never seen one for Ubuntu (and a quick half arsed search turned up nothing just now). I realise they could script using apt or whatever, but that won't report compliance etc. centrally as far as I know. With 750,000 desktops there's a lot of complexity to deployment and maintenance and Windows has a good ecosystem for that kind of thing.

Not that it makes much difference, the NHS weren't doing maintenance anyway. I'd just like to know out of curiosity :)

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Walmart tells developers to stay away from AWS

Lusty
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Re: Here is an idea

"No technical assessment was done before deciding this"

Usually this is because the business doesn't want to wait a year for a "Don't do it" with no solid justification aside from "because I know best".

Sadly, IT departments have an image of usually saying no, delivering late, and tutting loudly at change. If our industry was a little more professional we would be invited to the table more often.

I feel sorry for you and your colleagues, but I see this happen all the time from both sides of the fence and usually forcing the issue is justified and works.

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Lusty
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Re: Here is an idea

I agree, cloud is very rarely adopted for technology reasons. Most comments on here are from technical people who rarely see or fully understand the business reasoning behind a move to public cloud.

That said, there are many good technical reasons too. One of them being that it doesn't take a year to set up the cloud platform to allow repeatable automation and accounting of build, deployment and testing in a DevOps workflow. It's all in the platform so you can just start doing actual work and adding business value from day one.

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Lusty
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Re: There are alternatives

Oracle have more of a wisp than a cloud, a little puff that they'd like their customers to fund the growth of. Gartner slammed them the other day, and Specsavers press statement can't have helped. It'll be a miracle if Oracle manage to grow in this space without strongarming existing customers onto the platform.

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'OK, everyone. Stop typing, this software is DONE,' said no one ever

Lusty
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Re: How to maintain revenue

"You don't wear out a loop by iterating through it too many times"

Never had an iPhone then?

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Amazon.com just became a 90,000-seat Azure case study

Lusty
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Azure AD

I think the author and several commenters have misunderstood what AAD premium is and does. The AWS active directory is just that, an AD. It's not the right AWS service to compare to since AAD is used to quickly and easily connect to third party SaaS (well one of its uses anyway). With the Amazon AD offering you'd need to engineer that integration yourself. I believe AWS has a directory service that has SaaS integrations but it's not the AD offering which is literally just AD as a service.

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BA passengers caught in crossfire of Heathrow baggage meltdown

Lusty
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Re: manual backup

"The days of baggage handlers chucking individual bags into the hold are, I believe, generally long gone"

I've watched my bag going on the plane every flight I've been on. theres a conveyor belt into the plane but a man at each end. Massive international flights might be different, but even then nothing stopping passengers placing their bags in a container.

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