* Posts by Peter2

1356 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Tech bribes: What's the WORST one you've ever been offered?

Peter2
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Re: My company bought this hardware and all I got

I remember getting an incredibly cheap and tacky toolkit from somewhere as a freebie.

I used the hammer once. The very, very thin metal tubing bent immediately at a 45 degree angle after two blows.

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Peter2
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The best bribe i've been offered was from an overpriced vendor, with one of those salesdroids you take an instant dislike to. Sensing that bullshitting me about how wonderful they were and being overly "best matey" with me was annoying me they fell back upon the killer strategy.

I was offered amazon vouchers at a percentage value (something like 10-15% from memory, it was a long time ago) of whatever I spent with this vendor. We were spending several thousand a month.

The vouchers would have been in my name, not the companies who were paying for the goods. After clarifying this point, I thanked them for the offer and kicked them out and reported the offer to management. This was before the bribary act came in, so I don't think it was explicitly illegal at the time, just massively immoral.

Bribes I have taken include innumerable pens, keyrings and other tat (including a set of Sophos socks) for chatting to sales people for a few minutes at industry events. But that's sort of pretty routine, everybody expects to collect a decent goody bag at industry events in exchange for feigning interest in the stallholders products for a few minutes.

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Here's another headline where NASA is dragged through the mud for cheap Mars wise cracks

Peter2
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Is that why we have a relatively large number of articles (for a nominally IT specific publication) about planets, stars, black holes etc?

The IT field has a lot of sci-fi geeks, myself included. And including people like the inventor of the mobile phone, etc.

http://www.destination-innovation.com/how-startrek-inspired-an-innovation-your-cell-phone/

The final frontier is of as much interest to us as celeb gossip apparently is to "normal" users.

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BOFH: We know where the bodies are buried

Peter2
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Of course, the next thing is going to be the competitor company trying to use this information against their company to get them closed down, only to discover it's somewhat misleading. ;)

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Nominet drains mug of tea, leans back, calmly explains how to make Whois GDPR-compliant

Peter2
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Re: Registered Business Address is now private?

Without access to the WhoIS information in this case, the businesses could have lost the domain name and had to re-brand.

Why? This could be easily dealt with through the Nominet dispute resolution service?

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Machines learned to assemble IKEA’s semi-disposable furniture

Peter2
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Re: Not the real world

Real men™ don't need to prove it.

Especially not by being told (by some salesdroids in marketing) that you have to have their overpriced and underperforming products in order to qualify as a Real man™.

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Mad Leo tried to sack me over Autonomy, says top HP Inc beancounter

Peter2
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So, HP's accountant opposed the buyout because she thought (correctly as it would turn out) that Autonomy was overpriced. Management then told her she was fired in response in a stellar example of mature consideration of the pros and cons of the issue by senior management, who after all are employed to do nothing other than consider these points.

One suspects that the correct person to sue might actually be an incompetent ex CEO, or the board for not providing effective oversight.

But if HP is able to sue the Autonomy CFO for making out that the business was more valuable than it was, could we then sue salesdroids who indicate that their products are more valuable than they actually are should we later buy them on the basis of the information they provide on the basis of the precedent?

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BT pushes ahead with plans to switch off telephone network

Peter2
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Re: Oh well

So, in case of a powercut (ie, the local transformer not getting any power due to something taking the incoming line out) the backup power will be sourced off of another circuit on the local transformer?

Makes sense I guess, assuming it's a roundabout way of delivering a reduction (to zero) of the call waiting times for the call centre that takes calls about powercuts.

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What Israel's crack majority-women Unit 8200 hackers can teach tech about diversity

Peter2
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Re: Military operation

That is one fact.

Another fact is that Hamas are prefectly clear in their charter (article 13) that "There is no solution for the Palestinian question except through Jihad. Initiatives, proposals and international conferences are all a waste of time and vain endeavors."

Which of course has no bearing on why any peace talks with Hamas involved fail miserably. But despite knowing this being important to understand the problem, the news systematically fails to mention this. And also generally seems to fail to mention the Hamas habit of storing and firing weapons from places of worship, schools and hospitals in the hope that return fire will blow the place up, giving them a propoganda coup.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/07/31/why-hamas-stores-its-weapons-inside-hospitals-mosques-and-schools/

Frankly, i'm more inclined to back Israel than Hamas. One side wants peace and tries to avoid civilian casualties and the other declares that "There is no solution for the Palestinian question except through Jihad" and tries to kill as many of it's own citizens as possible just for the PR value.

And then let's look at what they teach their kids. Watch Hamas TV and weep.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3OYjKZ2Cu8

Or maybe their version of mickey mouse:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gi-c6lbFGC4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTK5PRtHjlk

Personally, I think the conduct displayed by Hamas is utterly indefensible on many levels that I barely know where to start. I am certainly not too inclined to criticise Israel knowing what they are facing; would we do any better a job faced with the same circumstances?

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More than 87m Facebook profiles farmed, says second ex-Cambridge Analytica witness

Peter2
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Whichever side of the political divide you happen to fall on, if - and only if - it was a free and fair election would your comment stand up to muster.

If, on the other hand, it turns out that people were being manipulated wholesale in illegal manners then that's something else entirely and by all standards of common sense the vote should be nullified.

If you'll excuse me pointing it out, it's rather obvious which side of the political divide you happen to fall on, and that's the "proudly supporting Dīvide et imperā" side.

I would go so far as to say that all standards of common sense dictates that under pretty much no circumstances should the democratic process be "nullified" because the losers don't like the result. There is a good reason for pretty much everything in our political system, it's a series of reactions to fix problems that have occoured previously. Reading any significant amount of history shows that we are given democratic choices because making peaceful democratic change impossible does not mean that change will not happen. It simply means that when the change happens it will be neither peaceful nor democratic.

Hence why we get the vote. As soon as you make it impossible to implement peaceful democratic change that people vote for, change goes back to being made unpeacefully and undemocratically and this is generally considered undesirable by everybody but the frankly scary card carrying members of the extreme left and extreme right who are quite happy to kill in the name of their cause.

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Wow, braking news: Overworked, tired ride-sharing drivers declared a public health risk

Peter2
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Re: Exploitation

The problem is supply and demand. When there are too many workers available, then the price drops. When the price reaches rock bottom, then working conditions suffer instead. The gig economy is a result of deep digging into employment protections and working conditions.

If we had a moderately health labour market, then there would be competition on working conditions and people wouldn't work for the worst employers, and employers at the extreme low end of the labour market would have to either increase working conditions, or go bust as a result of losing all of their staff to the competition.

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Net neutrality advocates freak out as lobbyists pull rug from California's draft net neutrality law

Peter2
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Re: I'll make you an offer

On the topic of Left v. Right name calling, I agree, and wish it would stop - Not just in Comments, but in general (in person, in the "news", in the houses of government, etc.).

Dīvide et imperā.

Split the proles up into smaller groups, play those off against each other to create division and argument and then keep feeding the flames if they start dying down. Meanwhile, get away with murder doing what you actually wanted to do under the cover of the arguments you started between other groups over some ultimately irrelevant point.

It's worked for at least the last two thousand years at keeping those in power powerful.

It's also caused huge hatred and division where none need exist between countless numbers of people. It will continue, because "divide and conquer" is easier than "unite and lead" and too many people take part in the division part.

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Facebook admits it does track non-users, for their own good

Peter2
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Who's going to cause a fuss about this if the people who understand the issues just use a plug in and leave everyone else to be spyed on?

The people who understand the issues generally don't particually want to be hassle and timedrain of creating a political movement to protest against a company doing something that can be blocked by configuring your own software.

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Intel's security light bulb moment: Chips to recruit GPUs to scan memory for software nasties

Peter2
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Re: Threat detection enhancement algorithms

Only until they design a computer that can tell the difference between data and executable code and don't execute code downloaded through a browsing session.

You can do that at the moment through group policy, the out of the box settings for windows are pure insanity from a security point of view. Simply set a software restriction policy blocking any executable file from running outside of %program files% or %AuthorisedNetworkShare% and about 90% of threats vanish immediately.

You can trim down another ~9.9% of threats by doing some additional hardening by downloading the gpo addins for flash etc, and configure those not to allow flash files to upload information, download information or access the file system. And force it to always run in protected mode. And then get the office GPO's, and set each application to refuse to run unsigned macros, disable file downloads and scripting etc.

A decently paranoid job with GPO's can make it virtually impossible to run trojans either accidentially or deliberately, essentially reducing your attack surface to local exploits launched against you by machines on the network that you don't control. And you can actually control that threat by locking things down what's on your network to MAC addresses.

Which just leaves the 0.1% of attacks that might come out of the blue from somewhere that you don't expect. But you can deal with most predictable attack methods with tools that are provided out of the box on a standard installation, free of charge.

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Google accidentally reveals new swipe-happy Android UI

Peter2
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Re: ..amazingly, one-quarter ... continues to run a version... released in 2014.

FTFY.

I've not kept up to date with Android Mobile, but the last few years have been littered with places where some researcher somewhere finds out that if he overinflates the tyres to 200psi to overload the anti-burst sensors, he can tap morse code onto the command line of the car's OS with the door handle; or that if he triggers the alarm at EXACTLY 01:03 then the car will listen for instructions from the Lincolnshire Poacher numbers station.

Wasn't there one a while back where you could override the braking system using the CD player because the CD Player was connected to the CANBUS?

It's installed in a 19 year old car that doesn't have a tyre pressure monitoring system.

The door handles are physical linkages, so feel free to try and signal to the car with them in morse.

The car OS (such as a car from 1999 has, ECU etc) is not connected to the stereo.

The stereo is a standalone unit sharing only power from the alternator with the CANBUS.

The only connection to the ECU is via ODBII, and for that matter it's only writable when the ignition is set to position II, ie battery on and engine off. With a key that not only turns the lock, but has a transponder on the access list. (which apparently is a bit of a bugger if you lose both of your keys, plus the reprogramming key that you can't otherwise use)

The alarm unit is a series of seperate modules, with the alarm, immobiliser being different units.

Wasn't there one a while back where you could override the braking system using the CD player because the CD Player was connected to the CANBUS?

Probably, but not on my car. The designers on mine were commendably paranoid.

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Peter2
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Re: ..amazingly, one-quarter ... continues to run a version... released in 2014.

I think that the android touchscreen radio/mp3/gps/younameit device in my car runs Lollipop. I could probably update the software, but why bother?

The only contact it has with the outside world is:-

1) GPS signals

2) FM/shortwave radio signals

3) The USB slot

I consider the first two things to be adequately secure, and gaining access to the 3rd would require my car keys and knowing which panel to prise off of the dashboard to gain access to the USB slot. Plenty secure enough, so i'm happy to ignore security updates, and i'm perfectly happy with the existing functionality, which was something of an improvement on the cassette tape player that it replaced.

So why bother doing updates?

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France wants you to put lights and beacons on your drone

Peter2
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Prominent drone industry firms, including Altitude Angel, have told The Register that, in their view, blanketing air traffic controllers' screens with hundreds of low-level drone flights would achieve little in terms of aviation safety. ®

Even if it was detectable by ATC (which is far from clear given the transmission frequency is not an existing ATC one ASFAIK) if they are trying to deconflict airliners from other traffic then surely they'd just squelsh all signals under ten thousand feet at any point other than around airports etc. (where IIRC your not allowed to fly a drone at the moment anyway)

The real thing there is being able to track the owner down so that if they end up hitting something then the owner can be tracked down.

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Cisco backs test to help classical crypto outlive quantum computers

Peter2
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Re: Encryption is complicated enough already

For having dabbled my toes in the waters of encryption, I couldn't for the life of me even begin to envision a way of not only creating a robust cipher scheme, but one that can resist being analyzed by a quantum process.

I can come up with an encryption scheme proof against any possible cracking, at least between fixed points such as my branch offices to HQ. It's really quite simple when you think about it. One time keys stored on Multi terrabyte removable media.

Filling a 4TB drive would let you shove ~200GB worth of traffic a (working) day down the link to base and still give you a months worth before needing to securely put a new drive in place with new codes at both offices. Administration would be a pain, but it would be completely uncrackable, even by an evil AI running on a quantum computer.

It is probably the most inelegant solution ever, and it does have a (long) list of problems, but it would have the virtue of being secure against pretty much anything conceivable.

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Total WIPOut: IT chief finds his own job advertised

Peter2
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Re: It's so very hard ...

Outside of (parts of) Europe, the British Commonwealth and the USA corruption is a way of life. Is it any surprise that the UN has a corruption problem?

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India completes its GPS alternative, for the second time

Peter2
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That's definately the case of the American ones, where the designers assumed that in case of nuclear war things might not work properly, so the missiles take star fixes while in orbit to ensure that they land "near enough".

Ultimately, maybe a handful of people know if competing missile systems have comparable functionality and the only way the general public would find out is practical demonstration, so let's hope that we remain in the dark. ;/

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British government to ink deal for yet another immigration database

Peter2
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Re: Continuing to waste public money

I recall seeing one of the police TV shows where they asked for a fingerprint using a biometric scanner having stopped a vehicle driving without tax and insurance. That was apparently cross referenced against the immigration database where it was found that he'd been deported once already. (which shows how wonderfully effective out border controls are!)

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Skype for Business has nasty habit of closing down… for business

Peter2
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Re: End of Life

There will be no fix because SfB is being retired / replaced with Teams.

If they didn't want the problem to occour so much, they could stop forcibly installing Skype for Business with office 365 installations. And they could stop running it as soon as the computer loads by defualt.

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Apple store besieged by protesters in Paris 'die-in' over tax avoidance

Peter2
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Re: Isn't this a consequence of being in the EU?

Oh, you can. It's just that it's done by sticking an extra bit on the costs of the handsets that you sell.

It's not done by classifying all of your profit as revenue to escape taxation.

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Peter2
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Re: Isn't this a consequence of being in the EU?

You mean some sort of Tax harmonisation as proposed by the French and Germans?

I don't think you understand corporation tax. It's the tax on declared profits and fails to address the existing problem which is that a multinational company makes £10 billion profit and then pays a £9.9 billion license fee to another country followed by doing the same thing repeatedly until no tax is paid anywhere.

Solution linked to above: set the taxes on the 0.1 billion left at the EU level. Opposed by the government just before the referendum vote, where the message to the EU was probably "WTF guys? Are you deliberately trying to hand ammunition to the leave campaign?!"

More rational solution: stop the £9.9 billion in profits being vanished or tax the firms pulling this shit on revenue instead.

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UK.gov expected to quit controversial harvesting of schoolchildren's nationality data

Peter2
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I don't think you understand the severity of this information being available in the public record. It's a useful statistic for the opposition, not the government. It's therefore politically inconvenient and must be made to vanish, especially if you think that the number might be higher than generally expected by the population at large.

It's only a useful statistic for the government if they have reasonable expectation that the number is considerably smaller than that expected by the Daily Mail.

Given that you aren't required to fill it out correctly (ie, no meaningful fact checking) and people here illegally would realistically be expected to lie about that on an offical form it's not like the details are realistically usable for immigration control.

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Accenture, Capgemini, Deloitte creating app to register 3m EU nationals living in Brexit Britain

Peter2
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Re: Reduce the overcrowding

While i'm not for throwing people out of the UK who are here legally this is absurd nonsense:-

- Chaos in the already pretty well screwed up housing market as prices sky-rocket in some places (such as seaside towns where all the oldies repatriate themselves to) and crash in others (where the EU workers are forced out). This will create both increased homelessness in some areas, where the housing stock is insufficient, and increased crime in areas where large numbers of properties are left vacant.

There are 3.7 million EU citizens in the UK and 1.2 million UK citizens in the EU. There is no way that could create increased homelessness, basic market forces would ensure that the price houses would fall with a surplus of 2.5 million properties on the market and multiple millions of people dropping out of the labour market would increase wages for the people left.

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Peter2
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For the sake of just 3 million people it would seem easier, cheaper and less problematic to just say they can have de facto British citizenship status

I think that this is more or less the plan.

But in order to do that, you need to know whom those 3 million people are to grant them de facto British citizenship status- hence this project.

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Hookup classifieds ad sheet Backpage.com seized in Feds shutdown

Peter2
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Re: "Something *must* be done about this <insert heinous crime here>"

Not quite all. You missed bribary, and regulation written by the competition to shut out new entrants to the market.

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Don't want to alarm you, but defence bods think North Korea could nuke UK 'within a few years'

Peter2
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Re: Christ almighty...

After 8000'ish years of civilisation building, can't we all just "down weapons" and start to get along with each other for a change :-(

Historically, it's actually been done plenty of times by plenty of civilisations. These civilisations are all notable by being extinct. My favourite example was two Polynesian civilisations that completely disarmed and destroyed all of their weapons (knowing/thinking that they were the only two civilisations in the world) only to be invaded by a tribe of cannibals. Oops.

Essentially, as you give up violence you become increasingly vulnerable internally to increasingly smaller groups of nuts, like ISIS/Daesh, or externally from another civilisation deciding that they'll demolish your police force and take over your country/territory.

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Peter2
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Re: Even if it's True...

Anyone who says we need to worry is admitting that deterrents don't deter.

Even if you assume that North Korea has nuclear weapons that can hit the UK & US then as you note they would have to accept that their using those weapons against us could (and probably would) result in North Korea being reduced to a series of glowing and somewhat radioactive craters.

If you accept that the people holding the "nuclear button" are sane responsible adults then one assumes that they won't push the button. Then you look at Trump on the one hand, and Kim (missile boy) on the other.

But I don't know about you, I did worry somewhat that during the cold war that we were within a dozen miles of something that could conceivably have been on the Kremlins target list.

So yes, nuclear weapons are scary. But not as scary as a world without them unless you've never noticed that rulers have a very well documented record of being rather loose with the lives of their people when sending them off to war and that dates back to pre-history. Our Glorious Leaders do worry somewhat about sending people off to war against a country that might retaliate by landing a nuke on them personally which has resulted in the peace that we have enjoyed in our lifetimes.

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Peter2
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We were also told that, beyond doubt, Porton Down said the Skirpal poisoning originated from Russia. Turns out that's not exactly true either.

No, they identified it chemically as being the Russian Novichok agent. They can't say that it came from Russia because the chemical composition is just that, and it does not include transit logs. However, that the Russians are the only people to have manufactured it which rather narrows it down, doesn't it?

If you can come up with a plausible explanation for:-

1) Who else has access to the Russian stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction. (which one hopes/assumes to be better secured than business networks that we run)

and;

2) Who else had the method, motive and opportunity to assassinate an ex Russian spy who provided SIS with the names and details of Russian spies so they could be deported.

Then I'm sure everybody would be interested.

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Mind the gap: Men paid 18.6% more than women in Blighty tech sector

Peter2
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This is the first phase in the push for that old chestnut: equal pay for 'equal value' work.

Which nobody has a problem with, assuming that it means that two people employed in the same job with equivalent training, experience, productivity etc get paid the same hourly rate regardless of sex, colour, religion, politics etc. Pretty much everybody is perfectly happy to back this.

However, equally most people would consider it fair when person A who works 60 hours a week gets paid 50% more than person B working 40 hours a week because most people would consider it to be taking the piss for person B to demand equal pay to person A if they are only doing half the hours.

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UK.gov: We're not regulating driverless vehicles until others do

Peter2
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Re: re: 'new laws forcing',..

Maybe just install a box with an impressive-looking nozzle with clamps clearly designed by a Hollywood SFX director for ultra-high pressure operation,with copious safety warnings. And then apologise for it being out of order when (if ever) someone tried to use it.

No need. Just design the plug so that it doesn't fit anything, and then blame the user for not having a compatible device.

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No Falcon Way: NASA to stick with SLS, SpaceX more like space ex

Peter2
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Re: It's about government control

Shuttle's problems were at root designed in by incessant cost-cutting

Incessant cost-cutting? A shuttle launch cost over ten times the cost of the Soyuz family of rockets the Russians came up with. There were 131 shuttle launches, with 2 losses and 963 Soyuz's, with 24 losses, which actually gives a pretty similar failure rate.

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User fired IT support company for a 'typo' that was actually a real word

Peter2
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Re: "Mangers feature prominently in the Christmas story"

The CofE has its Evangelist and Anglo-Catholic factions who want to impose their religious dogma on civil law.

Which is actually less of a problem in the UK than in the US. I think it helps that we just give seats in the house of lords to religious leaders (25 out of 797 seats) so they can have their say directly, which eliminates the need to persuade politicans to represent the church in politics.

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Are you able to read this headline? Then you're not Julian Assange. His broadband is unplugged

Peter2
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Re: Simple solution.

According to press reports he has a mobile phone. No doubt he can use that for WiFi. This is likely Ecuador just pretending to care so as to maintain good UK relations.

From the statement from Ecuador:-

"Assange’s behavior, through his messages on social media, has put our good relations with the United Kingdom and the rest of states in the European Union at risk"

Apparently his comments about Spains somewhat anti democratic treatment of Catelonia annoyed the Spanish somewhat. Bear in mind these are the same people who sent in riot police in to beat up people voting in Catelonia; chances are they were equally unrestrained when screaming at Ecuador about the resident of their embassy criticising them.

This probably has more to do with maintaining Spanish relations than UK relations.

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Tesla crash investigation causes dip in 'leccycar firm's share price

Peter2
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in addition to visible you will hear it if you step onto the hatch at >30mph

As a British driver i'll chip in by twopence, which is that I have crossed that sort of paint once (a lorry pulled out to overtake without indicating or checking his mirrors) causing me to brake hard and then literially turn off the road to avoid getting rammed off.

At speed, the noise was an impressively loud "BBZZZZZTTTT", and the vibration from it would wake a corpse. You certainly knew you were driving somewhere you shouldn't have been!

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Privacy activists to UK plod: Wanna slurp folks' phone records? Come back with a warrant

Peter2
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Reading section 20 in the article, it basically says that the power to search computers is an extension subject to authority gained through sections 8 & 18 of the act. (https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1984/60/section/20)

Section 8 (https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1984/60/section/8) is not a problem as it specifies the lawful basis and process for getting a warrant.

Section 18 (https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1984/60/section/18) says that if you have been arrested for an indictable offense then the police can enter your property and seize property likely to be directly related to the case without a warrant.

But an indictable offense is murder, manslaughter, rape, robbery and other serious crimes according to the courts definition of the term at the third bullet point on this list:-

https://www.judiciary.gov.uk/you-and-the-judiciary/going-to-court/magistrates-court/

So by the courts claim that 90% of cases are dealt with at the magistrates court, the power to search electronic equipment without a warrant accounts for under 10% of cases. If searches are being made in other cases, then doing so is already unlawful. There is no need for further laws on this; they already exist.

Surely you just bring a private prosecution against the cheif constable in question for the common law offense of misconduct in public office?

-The defendant must be a public officer

-The defendant must have been exercising his power as a public officer

-The defendant is either exercising targeted malice or exceeding his powers

All three are present, so this would appear to be a rather open and shut case especially if the officer in question is basically saying "yeah, I know it's illegal to do this but getting a warrant is too much work".

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The case of the disappearing insect. Boffin tells Reg: We don't know why... but we must act

Peter2
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Re: All things considered...

BTW, virtually every fishery worldwide is slowly but surely collapsing.

Which is near universally agreed to be directly caused by huge overfishing by massive ships that decimate stocks in one area, and then have to move somewhere else to wreck things there.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2012/apr/02/eu-fishing-west-africa-mauritania

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Microsoft's Windows 7 Meltdown fixes from January, February made PCs MORE INSECURE

Peter2
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Re: Optional title

Well, if it'd been entered then it might be resident in memory and retreivable through meltdown. Meltdown on it's own certainly wouldn't hold photos to ransom or be part of a zombie network DDOS'ing people.

Hence my point that in a single user enviroment meltdown is only as dangerous as a keylogger for most practical purposes. It becomes more scary at server or cloud level where it can pull out details of other users, but that's not relevant in a single user enviroment.

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Peter2
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Re: Optional title

Your bank details, your photos being held to ransom, the system being zombied to attack others in a DDOS.....

For a single user home PC meltdown is only effectively as dangerous as a keylogger; by the time you have let somebody root your computer to the extent that you can run a meltdown exploit then it's endgame anyway; everything but the bank details would be done with other bits of malware than a meltdown exploit.

Meltdown is most serious for servers and especially cloud services as you have multiple users sharing the CPU, and compromising one user allows you to basically read any users data from the CPU. For a home user, it's not too much more serious than a keylogger as far as I can see.

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Chin up, SMEs. You might get crumbs from Big Tech tax clampdown – UK MPs

Peter2
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Hundreds of millions of pounds could also be put towards paying down the massive national debt, but will probably end up being raided for vote buying schemes instead.

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Meet the open sorcerers who have vowed to make Facebook history

Peter2
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Re: serverless chat

The problem there would be that you wouldn't know if somebody was online or not because that information is held by the server. ;)

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Peter2
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Obligatary XKCD; https://xkcd.com/743/

You have to note that he was somewhat out, he expected 2010 rather than 2018.

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User asked why CTRL-ALT-DEL restarted PC instead of opening apps

Peter2
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Re: Feeling Old...

I'm getting the impression that the whole development of personal computing was driven by the desire to play games?

Pretty much. "The 7th Guest" was the killer app that sold the CD-ROM drive in it's infancy.

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Surprise UK raid of Cambridge Analytica delayed: Nobody expects the British information commissioner!

Peter2
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Meh

@Peter2

More likely the ICO forgot to put the application in the case with a bottle of 50 year old scotch whisky.

Ah. Yes.

Eldakka: And your honour, my closing argument is this bottle of 50 year old scotch.

Judge: That's 10 years.

Eldakka: No, 50 year old single malt scotch whisky.

Judge: No, I mean that's ten years inprisonment under Section 1 of the Bribary act 2010.

Eldakka: But...?

Judge: Yes, there has to be a seperate trial for that with a different Judge. Along with attempting to pervert the course of justice and abuse of process. But here's six months for contempt of court now.

Eldakka: But...!

Judge: For the benefit of the record (and cameras) I remand "Eldakka" to six months inprisonment for contempt of court. [mutters:] Does he really think that after spending 20 years getting to this position i'm going to throw it away over a bottle of bloody scotch worth less than my daily pay?[/mutters]

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Peter2
Silver badge

Re: Powers of entry without warrant

I believe the trick if you know what you're doing is to get a suitable other party involved in the investigation, one of those who either don't need a search warrant to enter premises(**) (HM Customs & Excise, the VAT man, now part of Inland Revenue) or I dare say getting a Child Protection Officer onside would speed things up massively (when the safety of a minor is demonstrably at risk a raft of further powers become available and warrants etc are easier to obtain).

No, it's not. It's really, really not. And taking your list of organisations:-

1) HM Customs & Excise is now HMRC.

2) The VAT Man is now HMRC.

3) The Inland Revenue is now HMRC.

and;-

4) HMRC require search warrants to search.

HMRC simply obtain search warrants like clockwork because they always fill out the form correctly and make the right arguments and don't give the court any reason to throw their applications out.

Here's the form the ICO probably didn't fill in correctly just so you can see the pitfalls.

https://www.justice.gov.uk/courts/procedure-rules/criminal/docs/crimpr-part6-rule6-32app.pdf

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Peter2
Silver badge

Anyone would think that the establishment are trying to give CA enough of a chance to clean their house before they have a snoop around.

Rather more likely is that the ICO hurridly wrote a search application and threw it before the judge, and a discussion went something like this:-

ICO: We want a search warrant, he's the form.

Judge: This doesn't say where it's for, what your looking for, or who's allowed to execute it?

ICO: Well, we want to look at you know, the stuff that's been in the news. And we want to execute it.

Judge: Specify *precisely* what you are looking for and what you wish to remove from the premesis, how long for and under what authority, and specify the name of the person who is going to execute the search warrant. And who's supervising them.

ICO: Um...?

Judge: The legal requrements for getting a search are printed on the application form. And on the guidence sheet stapled to the back. Here's the form back, pencil in the required information and i'll judge it on that.

ICO: I don't know, honestly. Can I make a call and get back to you in a few hours?

Judge: No, my next job is to deal with the case that you displaced because this was urgent, but not so urgent that you could fill in the form properly. Come back in the morning with the forms filled in properly.

ICO: But, but... we said we'd get a warrant today in the media!

Judge: THEN FILL IN THE FORM WITH THE INFORMATION LEGALLY REQUIRED TO GET A SEARCH WARRANT!

ICO: Um, Tommorow morning you said?

Judge. At 9AM. Be late and i'll hear another case instead.

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Magic Leap bounds into SF's Games Developer Conference and... disappears

Peter2
Silver badge

Re: But...but...

What film does? Allegedly, car manufacturers pay to have their cars in films.

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US mulls drafting gray-haired hackers during times of crisis

Peter2
Silver badge

Like most other people, I don't think this is liable to work well as the traditions and culture that the Army requires to be an effective fighting force are not in accordance with the conditions required for hacking or coding and I don't see any easy way of reconciling them.

What they probably need to do is to start a new organisation and then design it from the ground up to work in this enviroment, incorporating such elements from other organisations as are required to create a coherent and effective work culture.

Which will probably never happen, since the existing organisations will fight tooth and nail to maintain themselves, and actually acheiving the end goal is something that is considered somewhere after making sure that their existing ineffective efforts are not shown up by a new and more effective organisation.

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