* Posts by Peter2

970 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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FTP becoming Forgotten Transfer Protocol as Debian turns it off

Peter2
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Re: Filezilla

When those options are available on 1&1's platform and other shared webhosts running cPanel then I'm sure that people might start using them. Until then...

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Peter2
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Re: Filezilla

yet another filezilla user who migrated from WS FTP Pro, since filezilla does the job, and is free so you don't have to try and get money authorised for licensing if you want to use an FTP client at work.

What has FTP been replaced with for uploading/managing a website? Yes, niche thing, but it's not going to go away. And no, CMS's aren't replacements for FTP.

Yeah, i'll get my coat.

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Series of Seagate missteps as revenue generator spins down

Peter2
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Re: But everybody knows....

Faster than even the good old IBM Deathstar?

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Boffins supercharge the 'hosts' file to save users plagued by DNS outages

Peter2
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Re: Missing the obvious solution?

What usually happens though is that Primary and Secondary DNS are provided by the ISP automatically to the modem/router. I would say this is the case in well over 90% of DNS's set.

Yes, maybe I am being silly and should go off now and set my DNS's manually?

Yes. Set a dozen DNS servers on your modem or firewall and then forget about it. If you've not got those options because your a home user then goto the screen in windows where you can enter your DNS details, press the advanced button and select the DNS tab. You can stuff as many servers in there as you want.

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Irish Stripe techie denied entry to US – for having wrong stamp in passport

Peter2
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Re: I don't feel bad

The only reason I renew my UK passport is that places like banks apparently won't accept one as proof of identity if it has recently expired.

The requirement is for address ID, photo ID and for you to look like the photo.

So a modern photocard driving license is fine, assuming that people actually know what they are talking about when it comes to the "know your client" things.

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Controlled remote access reviews of Optane SSD give qualified yes

Peter2
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Or more likely:-

- Intel don't want it reviewed by third parties because the hype has considerably exceeded the achievable technical performance of the preproduction kit and they hope to improve matters before releasing it to a bunch of reviewers who might then slate it for being crap.

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Uber engineer's widow: Stress and racism killed my husband ... Uber: Let's make flying cars!

Peter2
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Re: Male suicide rates

Speaking as somebody who has dealt with "mental illness" as a result of being a First Aider and having seen things that would have been cut from a horror film for being too graphic, I'd personally prefer that people accept that having extreme reactions to extreme situations is actually a normal reaction to an abnormal situation rather than a disorder or illness.

If companies are encouraging bullying at work in violation of existing laws then those laws ought to be used as a sufficiently painful hammer to drive a point home that it's unacceptable.

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Kremlin-backed DNC hackers going after French presidential hopeful Macron

Peter2
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Re: Whats the point to this story?

If they have that level of (undiscovered) access then that fact itself is enough of a scandal that the people concerned didn't ought to be running the entire country in a similar manner.

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Peter2
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Re: Whats the point to this story?

Well, the issue really is that a Russian sponsored hacking team is digging into political opponents in other countries (including ours) and digging up scandals.

The parties, politicians and police know about these of course, and will publish full details after the election when there is nothing meaningful that we the people can do about it.

The difference is that the dammed Ruskies are releasing this information BEFORE!! the election which of course is a huge issue, interfering with our elections and such!

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Russian hacker arrested in Spain for bot-herding not election-fiddling

Peter2
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Re: 27 years

Only if it's 27 years for each computer on the botnet.

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Microsoft promises twice-yearly Windows 10, O365 updates – with just 18 months' support

Peter2
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Yes. Happened twice now.

I think Microsoft is trying desperately to encourage me to just give up and phone up Discount/Value Licensing and buy a bunch of old office VLK's and axe 365.

Which is weird, since I thought they'd intended to get me to migrate the remaining old VLK's to 365 rather than vice versa, but hey.

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Exploding femtocells: No need for a full recall, says Vodafone

Peter2
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Re: Is it just me?

Besides total lack of ability to fulfil the purpose of their existence, I really don't get why Trading Standards doesn't do random testing of stuff off of the shelf to see if it meets appropriate standards.

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Cuffing Assange a 'priority' for the USA says attorney-general

Peter2
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Re: Administrations go after leakers

So just so I understand your position.

1) You hate the Prime Minister because she wasn't the leader of her party at the last election.

2) You hate the Prime Minister because she has called an election.

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Ministry of Justice scraps 'conviction by computer' law

Peter2
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Re: Still "be able to" attend court?

Depends on how much experience with the courts they have. Regular visitors would tend to put in a "plea of mitigation" to the human judges where you suggest the sentence that your given as well in exchange for acting out a convincing sob story.

Frankly, I think that as a general rule making a plea of mitigation in anything but exceptional circumstances ought to attract punitive sentencing, but I know I'm in a minority.

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New MH370 analysis again says we looked in the wrong places

Peter2
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Re: Still no changes

If the plane ran out of fuel at ~30,000 feet and went into the drink in an uncontrolled manner at a significant fraction of the speed of sound how likely do you think it is that your suggested buoy is going to get deployed?

You might as well just stick an sealed unit in the aircraft (inaccessible from the interior of the aircraft to prevent tampering) that starts pinging location data via satellite should all of the other electronics go off.

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PACK YOUR BAGS! Boffins spot Earth-size planet most likeliest yet to harbor alien life

Peter2
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Re: Gravity well problem

You could escape it's gravity well using chemical rocket engines easily enough. It's just the scale of engineering problem, you'd need a multistage rocket probably about twenty times the size of the Apollo V rockets, which is still much larger than anything we are using today. And you'd need to deliver the entire thing to an interstellar rocket, transport it over 40 light years and then land it on a high gravity planet without damage.

Technically, we could do it with existing technology. Practically, people would get a bit upset at the price tag which could be called "prohibitive", but that's more politics about devoting a significant amount of GDP for a long time into something with no payback within anybodies lifetime with a huge risk of total failure.

Just like we could terraform Mars into an earthlike planet. It'd take about 70 thousand years at any remotely reasonable cost, but we could do it using technology existing today.

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Google's cloudy image recognition is easily blinded, say boffins

Peter2
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Re: One would have thought...

Depends. My system would only work as long as people buy less than 36 of product X per day. It may happen that they sell 18 every weekday and 30 at weekends, at which point you'd need a higher reserve stock. But you might not want a higher stock if they are (quickly) perishable, so running out might be preferable.

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Peter2
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The Register recently learned of a drone designed to photograph supermarket shelves so that image analysis can automatically figure out what stock needs to be re-ordered

!?

Wouldn't it just be easier to output the barcode references from the tills to a database so you know what's been sold, and then just reorder the difference to take you up to the preset stock level? ie, you have 3 boxes of 12 items each of item X, and once 12 items have been used the computer system reorders one box of item X and tasks a meatbag to stick in on a shelf.

Obviously subject to small variances due to theft, but that's what stockchecks and human management are for.

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Oh snap! UK Prime Minister Theresa May calls June election

Peter2
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Re: Who to choose?

Labours core vote (the working poor) was the bit of the country voting most heavily in favour of Brexit. If Labour turned around and said that they are going to block Brexit if they get elected then Labour would be utterly annihilated as their core vote decides to sit at home watching TV instead of turning out to vote.

Therefore, any Labour leader with a shred of intelligence would not make such a commitment.

Of course, if Labour doesn't make that commitment then the self described intellectuals who don't have the intellect to come to this conclusion themselves will vote for the lib dems, which simply splits the vote and clears the way for a Conservative victory of historic proportions, at which point those same "intellectuals" will then turn on the labour leader like a pack of rapid dogs for losing the election.

Hence why May is going for the election now, where she also stands to gain the UKIP vote back.

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Peter2
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If you haven't got a source, then it might as well just have been made up.

And by "no matter how many new houses are built" I think the issue is the discussed "ambitious" plans towards building an additional 20 thousand houses a year over existing construction of 180k P/A. That won't make a bit of difference when net imigration to the UK is 273k P/A, and that (obviously) excludes people born in the UK.

By any sane back of the envelope calculation we could fill several million additional houses right now.

Dusting off prefab plans and building 250k prefabs a year on top of existing construction would make a dent in the problem pretty much immediately.

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Peter2
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The real solution to getting children out of poverty is getting the parents out of poverty.

Anybody with a calculator can figure out that a single parent on the average wage, (or a couple earning a bit above the minimum wage) are going to struggle due to the property prices taking around half of their wages before getting onto council taxes, and things like food, light, heat, clothing etc. Heck, how many people are just priced out of having children altogether?

One of the reasons we have a recession is that people are spending most of their money on basic necessities and frankly have no disposable income to spend on luxury items. Easy solution? Build more houses.

Lots more houses. Dust off the plans for prefabs, suspend or amend planning rules that NIMBY's use to maintain their house prices at crisis levels for a couple of years, build on the green belt (yeah, more people in the UK means more houses. Deal with it) and let's aim for putting up around a quarter million a year. If it could be managed after WW2 with large parts of the population dead or maimed, with the industry bombed flat then we have no reasonable excuse for not managing it now when vastly less manpower is required since most of it can be automated via CNC machines etc.

Large numbers of houses built means that housing costs come down, which means more disposable income, which means more spending on things other than housing, which means more jobs in other sectors. It's good news for everybody except housing developers, or the rich with "buy to let" portfolios which would then devalue somewhat.

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Profit with just one infection! Crook sells ransomware for $175

Peter2
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Of course, if the malware gets sneaky and goes after the backups first, and they need to be online at some point in order to receive the backups...

Ah, well done. You've just mentally constructed the argument against online only backups and lack of seperation.

This be why many of us simply kept using those horribly unfashionable and uncool tape drives that the company had already paid for, and simply continued to feed it tapes every day. As a result, many of us have several weeks worth of full backups with archived tapes dating back literially years stored offline and offsite so we just sort of look bemusedly at people who have these problems.

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Cowardly Microsoft buries critical Hyper-V, WordPad, Office, Outlook, etc security patches in normal fixes

Peter2
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Re: Proper procedure?

What most people do is have two groups for releasing patches, the Canary group (named after the canary that miners took down mine shafts as the canary snuffing it was a good indicator of toxic gasses) and the production group for everybody else.

The Canary group should consist of loud users who will report issues promptly, but in the worst case who's loss won't cause serious damage to the business.

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Oh my Microsoft Word: Dridex hackers exploit unpatched flaw

Peter2
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Re: See earlier comments

I have on a (albeit small) pool of systems changed their default file association for application/hta & .hta to Notepad

I don't honestly think that's actually an effective blocking method. If somebody is running an API from word then I would assume that you could simply execute mshta.exe with a command line argument to open the HTA file in which case having changed the windows default wouldn't do anything.

The appropriate blocking methods for the executable is basically denying the executable from running through group policy (which is built in to every version of windows as a free tool) to block it with either a Software Restriction Policy or an AppLocker policy.

Personally, I advocate using a software restriction policy with a default level of "disallowed", with allow rules for %program files%. As the users then can't run programs outside of program files, but can't write to that directory then they simply can't actually execute- I had this blocked already before taking any further precautions.

That said, never get complacent, don't rely on a single point of protection and keep reviewing what your doing when new threats pop up. On my network, this HTA threat was blocked in several different ways before this hit the news and is now blocked in six different ways before Microsoft even gets around to doing the patch. But then again, my companies relatively small size has unfortunately no relation to the level of effort miscreants put into emptying our bank accounts so I put equal effort into ensuring that the contents of our bank account stays where it is. So far I'm winning the contest quite decisively.

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Peter2
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Which study after study as well as general experience demonstrates that they do dozens of times on a daily basis. Mostly as a result of actually having to do in order to do their jobs in most environments. You know what? I did it this morning. Had a quote in from a supplier, and I opened it.

Having a 100% onus on the user not to open the wrong document as 100% of your security policy is overly lazy and dangerous when even MS word comes with enough group policy options to make most potential threats more or less harmless, such as disabling Active X, Macros and file downloads etc which would prevent this attack using already existing and freely available options that can be enforced on your users centrally with about 2 minutes work, 90 seconds of which opening MMC and the group policy management console.

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OLE-y hell. Bug in MSFT Word allows total PC p0wnage

Peter2
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Re: Blocking this attack?

. . . I hadn't actually considered dropping anything with application/hta at the network level, you can tell I usually work with server/desktop! Added that just for good measure.

Ok, so far. If emailed in then :-

1) the anti spam system should recognise active content in the word document and drop it.

2) If it was (somehow) delivered to the endpoint then word is blocked from downloading anything via GPO.

3) If it (somehow) bypassed the Group Policy options for this then it'd get blocked by the firewall.

4) If it somehow was downloaded and attempted to get executed then it'd be blocked by the Software Restriction Policy as an unauthorised extension type.

5) If that fails, the HTA processor is blocked from running by SRP.

6) If that fails, then I'm reliant on the AV.

I don't think I'm going to get too much safer.

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Peter2
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Blocking this attack?

So, I'm sure I'm not the only person who's actually maintaining a network who's looking at this, and more importantly how to block it.

"In short, HTAs pack all the power of Internet Explorer—its object model, performance, rendering power and protocol support—without enforcing the strict security model and user interface of the browser." and "an HTA runs as a fully trusted application and therefore has more privileges than a normal HTML file; for example, an HTA can create, edit and remove files and registry entries"

An HTA is executed using the program mshta.exe

Definitely not something that I want running on the network.

I already have "Restrict File Download" set in the office GPO, so in *theory* then on opening the document winword shouldn't be able to download the payload in the first place so I should be safe.

However, I don't wish to be complacent, and I do wish to be professionally paranoid (ie, doing my job...). So, on the safe side then by adding a disallowed path rule for "%SystemRoot%\system32\mshta.exe" to a software restriction policy GPO would prevent the any HTA's that make it to the endpoints from running.

And that's absolute protection against this? Or have I missed something. Opinions from fellow professionals welcome.

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Utility company picks NB-IoT, actively spurns rival techs' USPs

Peter2
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If it's sitting inside a meter cabinet, wouldn't lining the inside of the cabinet with tinfoil be cheaper and just as effective as a Faraday cage?

I'm not sure your business has a great future. ;)

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Huawei mystery memo (and phone strategy) confirmed

Peter2
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Re: Last two paragraphs lost in translation?

Presumably they mean "if it's broken you can't return it" in terms of:-

"it just stopped working, honest. <2 minutes later> How did you know that I dropped it in the bath?" which isn't covered under a warranty anyway. Presumably they mean that if you think it's crap then you can just take it back within 3 months provided that you haven't destroyed it, which is a reasonable sales pitch.

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Device spend will rise 2% to $600bn in 2017, say techno-seers

Peter2
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I don't agree.

I think the problem is down to cost, and value. If the value the device delivers to the customer exceeds the financial cost of the device then people will buy it.

What we are seeing is that smartphones and many other things people are spending all of their money on don't actually really deliver value equivalent to the purchase cost for many people, especially when upgrading from a previous version of that device. The value delivered in many cases is "LOOK AT MAH COOL FASHEONABLE SHINEY TOYZ!1!!" and this is increasingly been seen as insufficient reason to buy a new device that's effectively identical to the old one, even by the fashion crowd as the phone contracts they are on to get the phone are shorter than the refresh period of the device.

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Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

Peter2
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Re: I thought

There is a real problem with that.

On a 3 year replacement cycle then we ought to have a replacement for Win7 by now to be moving to. We haven't got that alternative, and Microsoft seems viciously opposed to maintaining their OS monopoly by renaming Win7 to WinClassic and offering it for £1 p/m on a subscription basis with bug fixes out to ~2100.

Originally, mainframes dominated. These were destroyed by the cheaper client/server wintel alternative. We are now headed back to a mainframe style environment with the "cloud" largely as a result of everything being priced to a point where it's cheaper to go with the cloud than buy the desktop software because the prices keep getting jacked up.

I do wonder if the next move is going to be back to a client/server model to eliminate constantly increasing licensing costs. When you think about it, I could probably move about 60% of my staff to running on Rasberry PI's running Nix with OpenOffice right now given how even CMS's are accessed by webbrowser these days. The equipment cost is a tenth that of a desktop with basically no licensing fees and honestly the latest generation pi's are probably faster than the desktops staff had a decade ago. The biggest problem is availability of software.

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Webcam sex blackmailer faces extradition to Canada to stand trial for bullied teen's suicide

Peter2
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Re: Murder in the First

Making the crime out to be something that it is not does not help the cause?!

If you said something to somebody in passing who then killed themselves as a result, it'd be one thing. But this is recognised in law with the term "Mens rea", which is a latin legal term that arrived in Canada via the UK, which arrived in the UK via the Roman Empire. It basically means "guilty mind" and it's an ingrained part of common law.

Let's check the article again.

The 38-year-old Dutchman persuaded and pressured dozens of girls to perform sexual acts on their webcams and then blackmailed them by threatening to send the footage to their friends and family. If they refused to post more images, he warned them he would drive them to suicide.

The article says that he deliberately drove her to suicide. That is an unlawful act.

Murder is a sub-category of culpable homicide which is defined as causing the death of a human being

1) By means of an unlawful act;

So yes, he's a murderer.

Yes, people shouldn't kill themselves over bullying and people should be less naive. However, "Naive" means "(of a person or action) showing a lack of experience, wisdom, or judgement: " This is pretty much the definition of somebody who hasn't left the education system yet. The education system is supposed to bridge the gap between enthusiasm and experience.

Deliberately targeting naive children is reprehensible and deserves to be punished in the most severe terms. The victims shouldn't be blamed for being victims. The young are arrogant, gullible and make stupid mistakes such as thinking "it'll never be me". Pretty much everybody did that when they were young. The difference is that by far and by large our mistakes weren't recorded and were quickly forgotten by everybody involved. (generally including ourselves with the exception of us becoming more cautious)

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It's 30 years ago: IBM's final battle with reality

Peter2
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I remember the pictured computer in the article, and this was typed on the (pictured) model M keyboard that came with that computer.

They don't build equipment like that any more.

Which is probably just as well, given that the keyboard weighs practically as much as a modern laptop notebook.

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Wi-Fi sex toy with built-in camera fails penetration test

Peter2
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Re: In other words

In other words, security wise it's completely fucked.

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Drone complaints to cops are up twelvefold in three years

Peter2
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Re: Shotguns?

If you have a shotgun license, then your allowed to have a shotgun. If you have a FireArms Certificate then your allowed pretty much anything from small arms from .22 up through .303 or 7.62, or even black powder cannon that you can demonstrate a reasonable cause for owning, although good luck storing a 24 pounder in the mandated gun cabinet and getting stopped with a cannon and powder tends to lead to interesting and very protracted discussions with the Police according to reenactors I have talked to with this sort of artillery.

You are allowed to shoot on your own property, which is frequently exercised by people out in the country, who will happily pot pests such as rabbits, foxes and burglars. The latter tends to cause some public outrage however (see Tony Martin) as your required to use "reasonable force" which should be proportionate to the threat. Shooting people is generally seen to be a bit extreme, given that our criminals won't be armed. Hells, our terrorists aren't generally armed with more than a carving knife.

I should note however, that any license holder firing live ammunition in a town is unlikely to remain a license holder for long due to public attitudes on firearms, which could largely be summed up as "out of sight, out of mind" and the general public is apt to get very severely upset when firearms are discharged in towns. The real question would be "would you lose your liense via being shot by the police reponse" when our version of a SWAT team turns up with twitchy trigger fingers, or just losing the license when either the police or your shooting club finds out you discharged a round in a residential area.

Suffice to say that blowing away drones with a shotgun is not likely to happen over this side of the pond.

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Point-and-pwn tool for posers dumbs down ransomware spreading

Peter2
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Open RDP port on the internet? Really? Even our external facing home access server which uses RDP is sitting behind the firewall and requires a VPN into our network to access.

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Security co-operation unlikely to change post Brexit, despite threats

Peter2
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Re: British intelligence is so fucking great…

You can never prevent every nutter from slaughtering people.

And really, trying to claim that the EU is singlehandedly responsible for the Northern Ireland peace process is absurd. The biggest drivers are (in no particular order) that:-

1) The USSR fell in '91 and so funding for their overseas terrorism section got eliminated leading to a large number of terrorist groups across Europe abruptly disappearing in the '90's.

2) Nobody in Northern Ireland wanted to be blown up, and killing and maiming huge numbers of people by blowing up car bombs in random crowds attracted widespread international condemnation.

3) The American support line for weapons, money and general holidays where people were buying "brave fighters" drinks abruptly vanished after 9/11.

The EEC had no involvement in any of the above.

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Is that a Veeam in HPE's eye? IT giant may gobble backup biz

Peter2
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Re: Hang on

Generally not. The problem with large companies buying smaller ones and leveraging their experience to increase profitability means something similar to the below in the real world....

Fire all of the decent support staff at the company they've just bought and outsource the support to India because it's cheaper. Then replace the managers who built the company who are now retiring with the proceeds of sale with a committee of experienced managers who've never used the product (and never will) to consider the future direction of the product and company.

The developers paid in proportion to their high talent leave to other jobs (replaced with generic developers from $largecompany who couldn't just walk in most companies to a joyous welcome) and the price of the product gets jacked up to the point people say "screw this, I'm using something else" at which point the same managers calculate if the number of customers leaving is worth the increased price.

A few years later, they wonder why their install base has stopped rising by a few thousand a year, and is now dropping proportionately.

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Robots are killing jobs after all, apparently: One droid equals 5.6 workers

Peter2
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Re: 1-9 years?

The sort of definition of AI that would allow it to become prevalent in the short term would also encompass an excel macro calculating and outputting an correct yet unexpected result.

I make this comment having written and edited somewhat complicated AI's. Most people who are arguing about how intelligent AI's are at the moment appear to possess a fundamental ignorance of their basic capabilities and limitations.

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How Ford has slammed the door on Silicon Valley's autonomous vehicles drive

Peter2
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Re: Security ???

Access to the vehicle data is already securely available via OBDII on every car built since the mid '90's when it was made mandatory, and OBDII to Bluetooth adaptors have been available since forever to pull data out of this interface for under a tenner (and it's a readonly interface while the engine is running, if you had a competent car manufacturer) Now, if my 20 year old car can get this right then I fail to see why it can't be done by a brand new car!

Liking tech toys I use this interface to project a HUD in the corner of my windscreen with most of the information that the article says that I can't access. The only thing that's not available in my car is the fuel status, because it's not required in OBDII as it was intended for garage diagnostics in the '90's. So, declare that OBD3 has the fuel status indicator available, and job done. Does a smartphone have any business writing data to the cars internal network? No? Then just don't give them the access.

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Spotted: Bizarre SpaceX rocket-snatching machine that looks like it belongs on Robot Wars

Peter2
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I doubt it. My first thought is that it's actually a pretty practical design if your working in blazing sunlight as it provides shade to cover the face and neck and has enough of a lip to deflect small objects dropped from a height away from the wearer. Also looks a bit better than the normal hard hats, which is obviously the point.

Presumably you'd need a minimum spacing between the helmet and head to take an impact as well as an all around lip for a compliant hard hat, so doing things like flat caps or baseball caps are probably out. I'd have thought a bowler hat or top hat would be possible, but who'd buy one?

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First the Rise of the Machines, now this: UK military's Exercise Information Warrior

Peter2
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Re: Warships?

Alas, both Victory and Warrior share the same problems.

Victories guns are fiberglass replicas as the weight of a hundred off 2 to 3 ton guns would pull her apart, her sails are in the national maritime museum and the only plane onboard is in the carpenters stores, which is probably rusted solid.

Warrior's guns are also fiberglass replicas, she doesn't have a set of sails and her steam engines are mostly comprised of fiberglass. HMS Trincomalee might be a better bet if your after recommissioning a sailing warship. ;)

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Plusnet slapped with £880k fine for billing ex customers

Peter2
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Re: How can you not notice?

Moreover, your statutory rights say that they can't do that.

Write them a letter titled "Letter Before Action" and offer them the opportunity to either:-

A) Refund the money within 28 days.

B) Face a claim in the small claims court showing that your sent them a letter saying "I wish to cancel" and the fact they continued billing you.

The letter will go to their legal team, and it'll suddenly become possible to refund your money, since it's a lot cheaper than getting a judgement against them.

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Defence in Depth: A 'layered' strategy can repel cold attackers

Peter2
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Re: Analogies

<quote>The military have a concept called 'counter-attack' but you probably don't want to go there.</quote>

Frankly, if the internet is a "wild west" where anything goes in terms of attacking us and the police can't enforce the law then personally I wouldn't mind counter attacking.

Introducing some elements of risk of hacking people would tend to introduce some factor of cost to a cost benefit ratio that is essentially risk free at the moment.

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Effort to fire Euro Patent Office president beaten back – again

Peter2
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I think the difference is that the EPO is an organisation created by international treaty between governments and so has a form of diplomatic immunity, whereas a bank is a private company that happens to trade in multiple countries.

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New disk drive maker? No such luck

Peter2
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Re: Disk Drives?

At the time of writing, a 3.5" 1TB HDD costs £40 and a 2.5" 500GB SSD costs about £150.

HDD's are going to be with us in semi mainstream use until SSD storage prices drop to somewhere near the same price. I think that's likely to be at least another five years.

Even after then, my guess is that HDD's will end up cornering the high capacity storage market and will survive there until or unless SSD storage prices come down enough to finish them off.

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US military's latest toy set: Record-breaking laser death star, er, truck

Peter2
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Re: Slow moving targets only

I take it that your not aware that such weapons have been developed and deployed? There was a laser weapon deployed in the falklands and the ship with it mounted on was attacked but the weapon wasn't used as the ship was pointing the wrong way, according to the Admiral in charge of the task force in his memoirs.

Having mentioned that they have been deployed, i'll then point out that they have been banned since. Remember the landmines ban? It banned fragmentation weapons using any material that wouldn't show up on an x-ray, landmines, booby traps, and blinding laser weapons.

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US Marine Corps chiefs declare WAR on stolen sex snap sharing scum

Peter2
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Re: "pervert our culture"

I think what your missing is that behaviour is deliberately designed to make all of the people hate the instructor, which causes immediate team bonding right from second one. The cultures aim is to make everybody trust each other with their lives, and be willing to fight together as a team. Where you are doing things that are insanely dangerous but somewhat safe if everybody is doing exactly what they are meant to be doing then everybody has to trust each other.

Breaking that trust so people are always looking over their shoulder at their fellows in peacetime means that in wartime things are going to go horribly badly because you'd be looking around to check that the other hundred and fifty odd people your fighting with are doing what they are supposed to be doing instead of doing what your meant to be doing. And as soon as everybody starts doing that, everything grinds to a standstill.

Hence why they are declaring their determination to exterminate this with extreme effort.

This particular army culture however is one of three. You want the enlisted people to follow orders precisely, without question so this is how they are trained. This however would be disasterous in the NCO's, who are the enlisted troops line management who are trained in tactical battlefield control. And following orders without question would be even more disasterous in officers, who provide the strategic planning etc.

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Lawyer defending arson suspect flees court with pants on fire

Peter2
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Re: Ahh colloquial meanings of words.

>Good post - Can anyone trump that?

As member of a multinational forum, the equally multinational staff once had a great deal of amusement discovering that our names for the products in a bakers window meant different things in each language.

For instance, what the UK would consider a biscuit, the American's consider a cookie, which is not the same as what we consider a cookie to be, and their idea of a biscuit is our idea of a scone etc.

Finally after some hilarity from our side over a sign in the window solemnly warning that food or drink might become hot when heated, and a total lack of understanding from the Americans we had to point out that it was true that Americans totally lacked a sense of humour, but we did generously concede that they had a sense of humor instead and tried to explain the difference to them.

Their reaction sort of proved the point. ;)

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Microsoft: Can't wait for ARM to power MOST of our cloud data centers! Take that, Intel! Ha! Ha!

Peter2
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According to this site:-

http://www.tweaktown.com/news/56440/intel-rocked-core-over-ryzen-price-drops-begin/index.html

The i7 6900K price dropped 20% to $999 last week as the Ryzen pricing and performance was hitting the press.

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