* Posts by Peter2

1175 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Universal basic income is a great idea, which is also why it won't happen

Peter2
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Re: "The way that Communism was actually implemented"

To be fair, wine was frequently sweetened with lead in Rome back when IIRC.

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Peter2
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Re: A shorter term problem

The problem is that legal if amoral accounting makes the entire discussion a nonsense. Amazons declared profits for this year were $200 million, though they announced a $13 billion purchase of another company.

I do beleive that the pre tax dodge profitibility was much more than that, and that buying other companies means that the money spend is written off as an operating expense and therefore as it's not profit it's not taxed. (And pity poor old broke Amazon, who is so really deeply broke and that they can't afford to pay their staff entirely independant contractors the minimum wage or other workers rights such as holiday pay, a pension, protection from unfair dismissal etc)

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Peter2
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Re: A shorter term problem

So Amazon has a revenue of over $136 billion ($136,000,000,000.00) per year, most of which is "reinvested" into tax dodges to avoid having a profit and therefore paying any tax. And yet a pay rise is going to bankrupt them?! Who actually beleives that? Profitibility in a normal company is about 40% which would be about $54 billion a year for Amazon. Even assuming that true pre tax dodge profitibility is half this figure it's still perfectly adequate to be able to pay their staff an extra few dollars an hour without causing one little problem for the company, much as they may scream about it.

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Peter2
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Re: We already pay people to do nothing

So I take it that you don't need anti fraud departments to prevent identity theft and then getting a 100% rise in UBI income through stealing the identity of somebody who's died or gone abroad?

And also that with UBI at £400 per month is enough to scrap disability benefit, housing benefit and everything else.

Meanwhile, in the real world the department that used to manage unemployment benefit ends up managing universal benefit, and all of the other departments continue to exist.

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Peter2
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The Roman Empire was at it's time the greatest power in history. However, it doesn't even make it into the top ten empires in terms of land occupied or people under it's rule, even allowing for the slaves.

" It will destroy democracy and hand all power to a tiny ruling elite.

You don't think we are not in that position now?

Personally, I think we are about two thirds of the way there. The next hundred years will decide that one way or the other.

I think the causes of the collapse of the Roman Republic/Empire is far more complex than can be summed up in a post on el reg. Gibbons takes six books to provide a reasonable accounting and only covers many major events with one liner explanations.

That the Roman Republic Senators had corruption perfected to an art form beyond anything that our politicans aspire to and were far more despised than our politicans is certainly true.

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Peter2
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Re: A shorter term problem

Yes, and no. Personally, I think UBI is a stupid idea. However, I don't think too many of your objections to it should be too serious.

For instance, farming (in terms of the picking fruit type) is widely considered to be a example of a sector that you have to have hard working low paid employees doing a physically strenous job and offloading the cost of injuries caused by inproper heavy lifting etc to the state in healthcare etc despite the fact that you can already buy harvesting equipment to do the job. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bt73GOk4JRY) The only reason it's done with cheap labour is that this removes the need for capital spend on equipment.

"horrible" minimum wage jobs exist because the employers know full fucking well that they can get away with treating their employees like dirt. Object? Your out on your ear and the next poor desperate sod comes in to replace you.

Both the money and treatment comes down to economics, that a huge number of people are competing for a small number of jobs. If the labour supply suddenly drops, then you have to start paying and treating staff better. It's not as if JD sports or Amazon couldn't afford to pay/treat their workers better with their levels of pre tax dodge profitability, doing so is a deliberate choice.

IF JD Sports/Amazon went bust overnight then it would have about the same impact as wollies going bust overnight. People would moan a bit, and then just use another shop. What it'd mean is that there would be competition for better working conditions to attract staff.

The few unthanked and nasty jobs (eg, prison officers, police etc) would simply have to be offering yet better pay to attract people willing to do the jobs.

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Prosecute driverless car devs for software snafus, say Brit cyclists

Peter2
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I think i'm actually with Cycling UK on this. Sort out the legislation so that the "driver" of an autonomous vehicle is the entity that programmed it, and ban changes to the software.

Locking them to motorways actually seems pretty proportionate for a first step, as they ought to be able to operate there safely enough, and if they can't then they have no business trying to do anything more complicated.

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Coming live to a warzone near you: Army Truck Driver for Xbox!

Peter2
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Re: "used drones to observe the Ukrainians' movements"

In a crisis (the word you used) a response might be required in days at most, not some large multiple of months or years.

Ok, let me answer that in a different way. Let's say that we decide to forward deploy the entire army to say, poland. How does it take to get there? Assuming that all of our transport aircraft work then it'd take months to forward deploy an inadequate sized army and their supplies which probably wouldn't make a huge amount of difference to a shooting war.

Forward deploying a few hundred cutting edge fighters however could be done in days, as they can all fly there and acquire accomodation by group booking a hotel next to the airfield. Ground crew can follow in by airline with their equipment on military transport aircraft and you have a small, but powerful and and useful military fighting force deployed which could sweep the skies clear and screw up an advancing army with Britains very well regarded bleeding edge Brimstone anti tank missiles. This is (IMO) a far more effective contribution to a military force than a small land army.

It takes years to build a modern fighter jet, or ship. A decade for capital ships, as seen with our aircraft carriers. Land vehicles can be built in weeks.

Ergo, a sane military strategy would be to stock up on the long lead time items like aircraft and ships, and maintain enough of a reserve of small arms and tanks that the gap between starting conscription and people graduating training and equipment rolling off the production lines is covered by equipment from reserves.

IMO.

And btw, even in WW2 there was a ~18 month gap between starting conscription and the start of bullets flying at our troops.

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Peter2
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Re: "used drones to observe the Ukrainians' movements"

May I suggest gathering the assorted MPs (and Lords), both government and opposition, putting them aboard some RAF C-130s (if enough which actually work can be found) and dropping them onto the enemy of the day? (Parachutes optional.)

For my money, the lords do better than the commons. Every issue directly affecting me has gone through the commons on party political votes and ended up being kicked back down by the lords with a message that they aren't passing the law until there it contains a reasonable amount of sanity.

That said, with the exception of the lords that actually have been doing good work holding sucessive governments of any colour to account for longer than i've been alive, i'd shed few tears should all of the politicans and political appointments to the lords tossed out of the back of a C130.

And speaking of which, the C130. It was slated to have been replaced by the A400M by now, which is supposed to be a larger C130 with a better range, but cheaper than a C17.

About that.

C130 $67 million.

A400M $179 million

C17 $218 million

We're buying 22 A400's, for a total of $3,938 million. Can we have 25 C130's for $1,675 million instead, and then spend $2,180 million on 10 C17's and then put the leftover $83 million back in the budget to spend on something else?

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Peter2
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Re: "used drones to observe the Ukrainians' movements"

it's alarming a 25 year old technology don't have proper countermeasures....

There are appropriate countermeasures, mostly systems around the Oerlikon 35mm gun. The UK's Oerlikon GDF was retired due to budget cuts at the end of the cold war (havng been acquired via nicking them from the opposition during the falklands war) and is now in storage in the UK. Marconi developed the Marksman anti-aircraft system to stick 35mm guns on a tank, which Poland bought.

So if we wanted or needed a system to shoot down drones then we can dig up the existing systems from storage and train people on them, or buy new ones from Marconi and train people on those. More pressing questions would realistically be what purpose our army is equipped for. Fighting the Russians seems to be in vogue again, so let's consider that for a moment.

Our army has 227 tanks, plus 181 in reserve. The Russians have the following types and numbers of tanks:-

T14 MBT- 100 active

T90 MBT 350 Active 200 in reserve

T80 MBT 450 Active 3000 in reserve

T72 MBT 1900 Active 7000 in reserve

It should be immediately obvious how inadequate our little army would be/is for fighting Russia.

IMO: Britain has no place fighting a land war against pretty much anybody unless they are trying to cross the channel, and we'd be better off nationally having a smaller army but with lots of equipment in reserve. This means that we can relatively quickly ramp up the army in response to a crisis, but we don't have a standing army which our politicans can use to invade other countries because they want to look big on the international stage.

We can then have a defense policy around having a larger navy to protect our trade (as evidentely we don't have the ships to protect it against pirates in speedboats with AK's at the moment) with a large and well equipped airforce. We'd then be able to contribute a usefully large and powerful airforce and navy taskforce to international operations instead of sending an inadequate number of illequipped troops.

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User asked help desk to debug a Post-it Note that survived a reboot

Peter2
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Re: PBKAC

Ah, my second favourite (most stupid caller) is at this point, but the user indignately refused to go under the desk to check, as it was too dark in their office with the lights off.

The user was very politiely asked if they could turn the lights on, and replied that they couldn't, because there was a power cut.

I have very little faith left in humanity.

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Intel's super-secret Management Engine firmware now glimpsed, fingered via USB

Peter2
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Re: The year of..

It would appear that Intel appreciated the Minix Microkernal design over the monolothic kernal design.

I look forwards to seeing the next round of the infamous flame war with great dread.

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Openreach boss says he'd take a burning effigy on the chin

Peter2
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. . . Did you have the joyful experiance of dealing with the GPO/BT pre-privatisation?

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Brit moron tried buying a car bomb on dark web, posted it to his address. Now he's screwed

Peter2
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Re: er...

"RE: "why are you assuming he's a 'jihadist' exactly?""

I think the assumption goes something along the lines of

1) He was in poesssion of a (fake) car bomb.

2) This has no other purporse than blowing up a car and killing people nearby with shrapnel.

3) That's usually connected with terrorism.

4) The substantive majority of people slaughtering random crowds at the moment are jihadists. (replacing the IRA, and wide variety of terrorist groups funded by the soviet union during the cold war in revenge for us bankrolling and supplying the taliban and causing the soviet union to have to quit afghanistan)

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Peter2
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For sale, or listed for sale with delivery of one long jail sentance?

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Londoners: Ready to swap your GP for an NHS vid doc app?

Peter2
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Re: Choice

To be frank, a great deal of time and money could be saved by asking "is this an infections disease eg cold, flu, other" remotely.

From there, ask if they are demanding antibiotics (and do they realise that these are pointless as can't cure either colds of flu and only increase antibiotic resistance) and if they are still demanding antibiotics then post placebo-icillin to them.

That way the people with colds and flu wouldn't end up infecting everybody at the GP's surgery and the doctors there could get on treating people who actually need their attention.

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Wheels are literally falling off the MoD thanks to lack of cash

Peter2
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I hope things have improved since then ............................ ?

Talk nicely to your account manager at the supplier, then order a bunch of gold bars on the last week of the year. These can then be billed for and paid, then found to be "unavailable" by the supplier, and the account had a credit note applied the first day of the new accounting year. Hence, the money is "spent" so that you don't get a budget cut, but also available for spending on normal equipment with that supplier the next year without wasting money.

Additionally, the next year you basically have however many months worth of spending with that supplier carried across, so you maintain the same money available in the budget to spend on things actually needed if required without wasting a penny.

*THAT* is how you deal with a budget underspend. Not wasting it buying crap you don't need.

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Peter2
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In theory, the defense budget goes:-

Wages: 30%

Equipment Maintenance 30%

Future equipment development/production 30%

contingency 10%

However, in practice everything in development and production is overbudget and the contingency budget goes into the development/production. When more money is required, it comes out of maintenance. Without a maintenance budget parts are then robbed from production to keep the existing equipment running, so building equipment takes longer, making it more expensive. Then order numbers are cut to keep the programme cost down, which forces higher utilisation of the next generation of equipment so there is more wear and tear, and maintenance periods are reduced as higher uptime is required from individual bits of equipment.

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Simon's Cat app rapped for random 'racy' advert

Peter2
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Re: Why?

Why....

Why....

Why....

I guess they just want a quick buck, so where do I sign up for a bit of the cash? ;)

On your own website, having sucessfully created a set of IP that is more popular than Simon's Cat. At which point, given the work that you'd put in, you'd probably consider advertising a very slow buck and be slightly irate about how advertisers flag their adverts on API's to get around normal categorisation rules which are supposed to prevent these sort of things from happenning.

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Car insurers recoil in horror from paying auto autos' speeding fines

Peter2
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Re: Critical updates

Personally, I think the reasonable way of handling it on startup would be to display a warning that autonomous functions are disabled pending completing an update, and that you can drive manually instead.

Because the manual functions are carefully seperated from the autonomous ones so that you can drive the vehicle manually in an override mode should the car decide to do something dangerous, right?

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Chinese whispers: China shows off magnetic propulsion engine for ultra-silent subs, ships

Peter2
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Re: The Silentist

The Upholder class were perfectly good submarines when in commission with the Royal Navy. It would appear that they did seriously and severely deteriorate in the 6+ years they spent basically unmaintained in storage between being decommissioned by the Royal Navy and being bought by the Canadian Navy.

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It's time to rebuild the world for robots

Peter2
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Re: autonomous vehicles we redesigned the world around.

Though what are Alphabet/Google's motives?

Profit?

Trains are expensive but low margin, last often 30+ years in service and have longstanding safety boards who searchingly investigate problems with practically infinite resources and eliminate them, often with the full power of government behind them. If the automated train is the problem, it would be eliminated. So, small market with high safety requirements and compliance costs with the impact of problems passed back to the manufacturer makes it hard (and unprofitable) to enter this market.

Cars meanwhile are a large, profitable market with low safety requirements and low compliance costs as the impact of problems is applied (possibly with lethal force) to the driver who can take the blame while their insurer picks up the costs without the manufacturer bearing any liability, while investigations into accidents are rarely done in any detail beyond stating who was to blame.

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New phishing campaign uses 30-year-old Microsoft mess as bait

Peter2
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To be fair, you can configure office not to allow file downloads and act in a pretty much perfectly secure manner. It's just that most users* have no idea that you can download a gpo from microsoft and then configure it to behave safely.

* and most administrators, apparently.

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Facebook, Google and pals may be hit with TV political ads rules

Peter2
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So, Mrs Clinton spent $1,191 million dollars on advertising.

Mr Trump spent $646 million.

Mr Putin or agents thereof is claimed to have spent $2.3 million, and this tipped the election.

Right. Are putins advertising agents for hire? Because if they can get those sort of results despite being outspent by a factor of 600/1 then I could use them in our marketing department...

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Yes, British F-35 engines must be sent to Turkey for overhaul

Peter2
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Re: DoD Contracting

UK content is trivial, so we're busy importing something that doesn't work, that we can't afford, and will be overhauled by an untrustworthy nation veering towards third world autocracy, one that's playing the US and Russia off against each other.

Pretty much. The biggest problem with the F35 is pork barrel politics. Because of the UK's workshare on the jet we are going to make more money through buying thouse 138 aircraft through making parts for all 3k+ F35's that we'd save by not buying it. Militarily it's an abomination.

http://aviationweek.com/shownews/rolls-royce-snags-work-uk-f-35-engines

That said, it seems that Rolls Royce can do the engine maintenance as well as the other countries listed, so we are probably pretty well off compared to many other countries maintenance wise.

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So the 'Year of Linux' never happened. When is it Chrome OS's turn?

Peter2
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Re: Widespread Linux on the desktop remains elusive.

The ONLY reason that LInux isn't the #1 OS on desktops is the LACK of MARKETING.

No, the only reason is that practically all commercial productivity software is written for windows, and this has never seriously been in dispute.

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Peter2
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Re: Widespread Linux on the desktop remains elusive.

I said about a decade back that the year of the linux desktop will be the year after there is a viable *nix alternative to office 1997, and for word excel/writer/calc that's true apart from the lack of being able to interoperate with CMS's that generate documents programatically through the API's.

As it can't do that, it can't exist in a workplace using a CMS. Which is virtually everywhere as even cheap accounts packages generate invoices via word.

Ironically, the killer of windows on the desktop is probably actually going to be microsoft accidentially. Office 365 online is pretty much as good as the installed application, and it's entirely possible that if CMS's continue being web based that could eliminate both obstacles to *nix on the desktop.

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Brit spooks 'kept oversight bodies in the dark' over data sharing

Peter2
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Re: The Smartest People in Rooms are Never Ever where you Think they Be, nor Who They Be

Good heavens, our resident bot has made something approaching a coherent post. Maybe AI is improving after all...

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Peter2
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Well, define "stupid". People *should* be able to assume that the only people reading those posts are the people they authorise, plus possibly the system admins and law enforcement bearing a valid court order.

Law enforcement accessing the data without a warrent and then deciding to sell/give it to whomever they feel like should not be a thing given that it's illegal under even existing laws supposedly controlling GCHQ. It shall be interesting to see how this plays out.

That being said, personally I assume that everything online (including encryption) is compromised or compromisable by GCHQ/NSA and that anything posted or communicated online is probably read by them. I'm confident that the contents of my internal business network is safe from prying, but not utterly certain given the extreme resources that can be brought to bear on suppliers making security assumptions invalid. (ie, that certs won't be forged by high level suppliers, tokens ID's are secure and that out of band auth via phone will mean the end users phone rings etc)

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Man prosecuted for posting a picture of his hobby on Facebook

Peter2
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I'm a former airsofter. You've been misinformed on the last bit and there's no need to give the "ban airsoft" crowd ammunition. :)

Airsoft rifles can't legally be over 328fps muzzle velocity with a .2g bb as this is 1 joule of imparted energy when something is hit, and at <1joule then the home office consider it a toy on the basis that it takes 1.3 joules to break the skin.

Anything over 1 joule makes it an air rifle, not a s1 firearm. Semi or auto makes no difference. This explains it usefully:-

http://www.mileoakshootingclub.co.uk/8.html

So by the formula on his site to get a airsoft rifle firing a .2gram plastic BB to >12 foot pounds you'd have to take the muzzle velocity from about 300 FPS to something like 1500FPS, which is something like mach 1.3. That's not even remotely acheivable from an airsoft rifle with a spring; the maximum acheivable is less than half that.

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Storms blow away 2017 Solar Challenge field

Peter2
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People don't laugh at the concept of electric cars. Electric motors are a well understood and very efficient technology.

People laugh at the idea that batteries are going to replace the internal combusion engine on broadly three issues.

Firstly is range and capacity, which the advocates claim will be resolved by batteries becoming more efficient because they want them to be more efficient, rather than because of any likely acheivable technical progress in the area.

Second is charging the things in any reasonable and realistic timeframe.

Third is generating the electrical power required to do the charging while decomissioning most of the generating capacity required to simply keep the lights on at the moment, without factoring in a huge increase in capacity to deal with millions of electric vehicles requiring huge amounts of power. The joke is that the people protesting against building new power plants are generally those for electric vehicles.

If the power generation required to power the cars was built alongside other infrastructure, and ideas such as powering electric vehicles in high use areas such as motorways and highways by either overhead power as seen in electric trolleybusses from 1880 (which you can still ride on in transport museums to this day)or some other form of power delivery such as induction then people might be less skeptical about the idea.

As it is, I can't see battery powered EV's working at large scale.

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I love disruptive computer jargon. It's so very William Burroughs

Peter2
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Re: Hmm.

Personally, I just pronounce all acryonoums as single letters and have found that everybody on this side of the pond understands me perfectly.

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BOFH: Oh dear. Did someone get lost on the Audit Trail?

Peter2
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I was breifly wondering what (or who) the shredder was loaded with, but I take it that it was just the PFY running the (now) missing paper records through it rather than running the auditors through the shredder.

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Night out in London tonight: Beer, Reg and platform wars

Peter2
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Re: I hate each and every platform/language/etc.

The fundemental problem is that there are huge groups of people who only are deeply familiar with one OS and then insist that it's the most superior despite (or because of) their total ignorance of the alternatives and their capabilities.

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Rejecting Sonos' private data slurp basically bricks bloke's boombox

Peter2
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Re: "reach out to Sonos customer care"

Are you seriously and seditiously suggesting not using newspeak? You thought criminal!

;)

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Peter2
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Re: Connected?

Good luck with your unconnected light bulb.

Unconnected to data? That's standard. No internet of things at home for me, thanks.

Unconnected to the mains? That's a torch.

Personally, at the end of the day when I get home I don't want a bunch of bleeding edge equipment that I have to spend the evening debugging. I just want nice reliable equipment that >WORKS<.

If that means some of it (especially speakers) is ten years older than me, then so be it.

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Sniffing substations will solve 'leccy car charging woes, reckons upstart

Peter2
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Re: Local Generation and Storage FTW

Peak load spikes on the Grid are thus significantly reduced, with lots of local storage removing the need for mass transfer of power across the country. So your Nuclear power stations can be turned up a bit to provide a bit more baseload, and your coal and gas can be turned off :)

Ok. Let's just say that we do what your suggesting and see what would happen. Demand at the time of writing is 40.11 GW demand. (http://gridwatch.templar.co.uk/)

Nuclear is generating 7.57GW out of a max capacity of 8GW.

Gas is generating 18.33GW out of a max capacity of 25GW.

Coal is generating 1.15GW out of a max capacity of 10GW.

Wind is generating 5.78GW out of a thereotical capacity (which has never come close to being obtained) of 16.3GW

So you want to turn nuclear up by 0.43GW (by skipping the maintenance/refuelling operation on one reactor) and turn off 19.47GW of coal and gas generation, which is 49% of the power generation being used in the country at the moment? Are you really sure this is a good idea?

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Peter2
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Even the most simple back of the envelope calculation will immediately show that large scale uptake of electric cars is going to lead to exceeding the amount of spare capacity that the grid can generate at the moment.

This is a bit of a problem, since the closure of our coal and most of our old nuclear plants by 2025 is going to leave us with much less capacity than we have now. Yet we are expected to have more capacity available for electric cars despite not building it, and people actively objecting to building any practical scale power generation.

I spy a design flaw, and power cuts waiting to happen.

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Judge says US govt has 'no right to rummage' through anti-Trump protest website logs

Peter2
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"Curious though, what if someone posted "It they want a riot we'll give them a riot"? would that be enough to get their information?"

Yes, easily.

FYI: In the london 2011 riots there were two cases of under 18 year olds posting basically that what you've said, plus posting a time to meet IRL on facebook. The people responsible were arrested before the time/date, bail was refused and they got sentances of over four years imprisonment in a young persons institution. Nobody turned up at the locations beyond a couple of hundred police.

People over 18 who did similar are still in jail 6 years on. I'd suggest that advocating riots as opposed to peaceful protests is not a good idea, especially since the criminal justice system in the USA is if anything known quite well for being rather harsher than ours.

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They've only gone and made a chemical-threat-detecting ring

Peter2
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Re: I think I know how this works.

I was thinking pretty much this. All you've got to do is ditch the ring format and stick the sensors in a mobile phone and it's probably usably useful for disaster response as is.

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IT admins hate this one trick: 'Having something look like it’s on storage, when it is not'

Peter2
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Re: Great article - thanks

Your saying that your locked in, leaving the vendors as being the only people able to access your data, making it difficult for you to extricate yourself later (ie, replacing the vendors equipment?)

I can't see why, as you should be able to simply buy adequate storage space from elseware and then restore your backups to the new storage? Or do you either let them control your backups or not do backups?

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Peter2
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Re: Great article - thanks

Forgive the innocently ignorant question (I've been working at SME scale and so haven't dealt with enterprise scale problems for a decade) but can't you just restore from backups to move your data elseware if push comes to shove?

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FCC gives Google's broadband balloons 'experimental license' in Puerto Rico

Peter2
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Re: What could possibly go wrong ?

No worries.

I wouldn't say they don't worry about it "at all", thereotically you could fly an airliner straight through the middle of a hurricane at low altitude but it'd structurally stress the airframe massively and thus reduce the number of allowed further flying hours quite considerably. (As well as dealing with the entire load of passangers screaming OMG we're going to DIE when dealing with very severe turbulance)

At 30,000 feet i'd guess it'd be "please fasten your seatbelts". I guess most airlines would prefer to spend the fuel to climb to the service ceiling of ~40,000 feet to avoid the negative feedback on review websites. I'd guess that at 60,000 feet the turbulance would probably be pretty mild, but honestly i'm making educated guesses.

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Peter2
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Re: What could possibly go wrong ?

Probably not to any serious extent actually. At 60,000 feet ( > 11 miles up) your in the stratosphere and above about 80% of the atnosphere. Hurricane effects aren't enough to worry airliners at 30,000 feet too much, so at double that you ought to be pretty safe.

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VPN logs helped unmask alleged 'net stalker, say feds

Peter2
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Re: Completely incorrect

That is a somewhat unqualified presumption. Many people use VPNs because they value privacy - that doesn't make them criminals.

No, it doesn't. But the fact that the VPN service knows which IP's you have connected to the VPN from doesn't appear to compromise your privacy. Somebody paranoid enough to bother with a VPN would presumably be doing it because they think (or know) that their ISP is providing information on their connections in any case. If that is the case then logically you'd expect your ISP to know that you are accessing a VPN service.

ISP: The VPN connected to $VPN

VPN provider: The VPN connection came from $IP

This is rather circular. It was only a problem here because they proved that he was accessing information from home and work, and his employer handed over the machine that he'd used and the FBI pulled information out of it via digital forensics.

That doesn't sound like it has huge privacy implications if your not doing something illegal enough to justify a warrant seizing your equipment for forensics work?

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Peter2
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Re: Completely incorrect

The only people who would run for the hills knowing that the company is logging the IP's that you connect to it from are those engaged in pretty serious criminality? Nobody else cares.

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Star Wars: Big Euro cinema group can't handle demand for tickets to new flick

Peter2
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Re: it's up, but doesn't work

.. for the first day/ week.

After which the film will probably be in cinemas for many months. (roughly until the cinema starts selling less than a third of the seats in their smallest thearter on one showing an evening)

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Video games used to be an escape. Now not even they are safe from ads

Peter2
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I agree with you on this. However, this applies to games I have actually bought.

If it's a "free to play" game then the person who bought it wants (and usually deserves) to earn a living. Personally while I don't like advertising i'd prefer it to Google style invasion of privacy for free games.

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AMD comes out swinging, says: We're the Buster Douglas of the tech industry!

Peter2
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Re: AMD has rebult themselves properly

Intel has never shown any intent that they would like to exit the CPU market.

They would certainly like to stop spending huge amounts of money on R&D and just farm in a huge profit from chip sales as they have been able to for about the few years but that's normal business. It's also why we don't want AMD going down, because competition from AMD forces Intel to put more money into R&D.

If AMD had never existed then I think that chip speeds today would probably be at around the levels that we had around 15 years ago. It's undeniable that the competition between Intel & AMD has been great for faster processors, we've seen pressured R&D on a scale only seen before when nation scale R&D has been poured into research to win a war.

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New coding language Fetlang's syntax designed to read like 'poorly written erotica'

Peter2
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Re: Fetlang is not recommended for production use

It's probably not recommended to put anything much about having any experiance with it on your CV either...

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