* Posts by mark l 2

631 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

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UK Prime Minister calls on internet big beasts to 'auto-takedown' terror pages within 2 HOURS

mark l 2

Since Youtube, Facebook and Twitter can't keep the spammers, pirates and scammers of their platform, I fail to see how they are going to identify terrorist content within 2 hours. Unlike content ID systems which uses hashes to identify for copyrighted material these terrorism photos and videos are unique so even they flag one of them its trivial for ISIS to create new ones that will pass the filters.

If you check some more nefarious corners of the internet you can get information on how to alter a copyrighted video enough to upload it to YT and bypass the copyright checks.

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Behold iOS 11, an entirely new computer platform from Apple

mark l 2

It amazes me to think that an iOS UPGRADE can take 1.8GB of space. Unless it comes with lots of HD videos included I can only assume its sloppy coding that makes everything so huge. It not like they have to include loads of drivers for lots of different hardware like Windows or Linux since they only need to support a few different spec of hardware.

As I mentioned on the BB QNX topic, they were able to put an OS, desktop environment and browser onto one floppy disk, how is it that iOS 11 needs 1000 x more space?

I am not singling out Apple here either as Android, Windows and Linux are all just as bad for growing in size every year.

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BlackBerry's QNX to run autonomous car software

mark l 2

I have not had much experience with QNX for a while, but I remember the impressive 1 floppy disk version from the late 1990s which would boot to a fully functional desktop and had a web browser built in. This was when OS like Windows 95/98 would fill about 50 floppies.

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Manchester plod still running 1,500 Windows XP machines

mark l 2

They don't give details of whether the PCs are standalone or networked, but if they are connected to the PNC and running XP they would be a gold mine if hackers could get access to them.

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DRM now a formal Web recommendation after protest vote fails

mark l 2

Like all the other DRM technologies they have brought out, someone will find a way around it and before they know it all their DRM protected content will be available for all the freetards to download from TPB.

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Apocalypse now: Ad biz cries foul over Apple's great AI cookie purge

mark l 2

It sounds reasonable although 30 days is quite a short period, there are websites that I use regularly but probably not once ever 30 days, Amazon and other ecommerce sites spring to mind as ones that I may not use for a few months but might want it to remember my details next time I do. So perhaps 180 or 90 days would be more reasonable?

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Downloaded CCleaner lately? Oo, awks... it was stuffed with malware

mark l 2

I always though most people were using it to CCleaner to remove evidence of the pron surfing from their PC, so now that pretty much all internet browsers now have a private browsing mode I thought their install numbers would have dropped?

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Google sued by Gab over Play Store booting

mark l 2

I don't see why any social network needs a specific app, they rarely offer any improvement from using their website from my phones browser. Then there are some annoying apps which could work fine from a browser but won't let you use outside of their service outside of the app and therefore don't get installed on my phone.

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Google to kill Chrome autoplay madness

mark l 2

There should be no whitelist of sites for autoplaying videos, how hard is it for someone to press a play button if they want to watch the video?

I use mobile broadband a lot and on capped data so don't want to be wasting my limited allowance streaming videos that I am not interested in so my FF will remain with media.autoplay disabled and Chrome will be left for testing purposes only.

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UK attorney general plans crackdown on 'trial by social media'

mark l 2

Well just as the US immigration are asking for people social media account before they can get a visa perhaps this should be part of the jury selection process where they have to have give over their social media account details before they can sit on a jury to ensure they don't post anything on their they shouldn't?

it would be easy to tell who is likely to do something stupid just get the judge to ask the idiots to accept a Facebook friend request, those who accept don't get picked.

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'Don't Google Google, Googling Google is wrong', says Google

mark l 2

Google are wanting people to say 'Search on Google' rather than to google or googling because if to google becomes a verb in common use they can loose the ability to trademark the name as it become generic. This happened to the word hoover in the UK where it was common for people to say they were going to hoover their carpets even if they actually meant vacuum,

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Google to kill Symantec certs in Chrome 66, due in early 2018

mark l 2

I dislike Symantec business practices more than I do Adobe and Microsoft. They all buy out other companies and often ruin a good product when they get hold of it but Symantec ruin EVER product they get their hands on. So i hope this blocking of their certs by Chrome really hit them in their bank balance.

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US government: We can jail you indefinitely for not decrypting your data

mark l 2

Truecrypt used to offer a 2 tier password system for such cases, one to access the real data and one to access bogus data which would be 'safe' to show. I believe Truecrypt is no longer under active development now though so don't know if there are any replacements.

This act of wills law sounds like a case of an archaic law being used in the modern world for things that the original writers of the law had never envisioned or intended to get around the defendants statutory right not to incriminate himself.

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Oh, ambassador! You literally are spoiling us: Super-stealthy spyware hits Euro embassy PCs

mark l 2

These problems all come about when what should be a document format containing text and images is allowed to have executable code embedded. If PDFs and MS Office documents contained no executable data most of these attacks wouldn't be possible.

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Judge: You can't call someone a c*nt, but a C∀NT is a cunning stunt

mark l 2

What a waste of the courts time, how people can take offense to one particular word more than others is beyond me. If the placard had said vagina or pussy then he probably wouldn't have even been arrested.

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EE!? The sound customers make when the interwebz don't work

mark l 2

I have been tethering my phone using EE to connect to the interenet since 08:30 today and it has been working fine but then i remembered i have changed my DNS to use 8.8.8.8 a while ago so it does appear it is a DNS problem.

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New York Police scrap 36,000 Windows smartphones

mark l 2

I doubt they would have paid that much for the Lumia's compared what they will have to pay to move over to iOS as even the cheapest iphones are quite expensive, but i don't see any other option.

There is really a hole in the the marketplace for a Android phone for businesses that has guaranteed security updates for a number of years like you can get with a desktop OS. Although i am an Android user myself it is really just Apple as a choice for businesses if you need the phones to be kept secure with updates. Even the big manufacturers of Android phones such as Samsung can take ages to provide updates for security holes well after they have been published and fixed by Google if they get updates at all.

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China to identify commentards with real‑name policy

mark l 2

Google have a similar requirement already, try registering for a new Gmail account without providing a telephone number. They will allow you to register but then after a period between a few minutes and a few hours you will get a message saying "Google has detected some unusual activity on your account and needs you to provide further verification" and you won't be able to login until you verify it using a mobile phone number.

Sure you can in the UK still get pre-paid sim cards without providing ID to remain anonymous but how long before they close that backdoor to.

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British snoops at GCHQ knew FBI was going to arrest Marcus Hutchins

mark l 2

I am assuming the only reason he wasn't arrested in the UK and extradited was because the evidence was very thin on the ground and the authorities doubted they would win the case. I find it difficult to think you could successfully win a case where some sort of computer crime had occurred without doing a search of his residence for computer equipment and taking that as evidence.

If i were him I would head directly to the US border with either Mexico or Canada and get out of that $hit hole to never return.

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What weighs 800kg and runs Windows XP? How to buy an ATM for fun and profit

mark l 2

I remember an episode the 'The Real Hustle" from a few years ago where they set up a fake ATM consisting of a laptop connected to a card reader and keypad housed inside a large box on a busy street and the amount of people who would just come along and put in their card and pin and when it threw up an error just walk away and go to use another.

There are even companies that turn up to festivals and other pop up events with trucks with a load of ATMs in the back, I whenever possible just use the ATM at the banks and no these little ones in shops, especially as they usually charge to use.

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UK.gov is hiring IT bods with skills in ... Windows Vista?!

mark l 2

I don't think I have seen a machine running Vista in the wild since around 2009 when everyone had either 'downgraded' to XP or upgraded to 7.

Surely there can't be any good reason to leave machines on Vista in 2017 as I very much doubt there was any software written for Vista that wouldn't run on 7 or 10 and a upgrade is cheap enough.

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Brit firms warned over hidden costs of wiping data squeaky clean before privacy rules hit

mark l 2

Re: How does it work for historical orders?

I was wondering the same thing, the sale of goods act mean that a customer can return an item to the seller for years after it was purchased if it was not deemed fit for purpose. But if the customer asks to have all their personal details removed then how are you supposed to verify that the customer ever bought the product in the first place if they come back and say its faulty?

It won't take scammers long to exploit this to their advantage.

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Infosec eggheads rig USB desk lamp to leak passwords via Bluetooth

mark l 2

My cheap 100 quid phone has Android 6 and that has the option for Charge only when you plug in to USB. I don't think this option has been implemented for security reasons more so it can charge the batter faster but if it disables debugging and file transfer its better than nothing.

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Alibaba: We're no haven for pirates – we'll yank fake goods from our web bazaars within 24 hours

mark l 2

ebay is just as bad for counterfeit goods, i reported a seller to ebay for selling fake SD cards and yet the seller still remains on the site selling the same memory cards.

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Don't buy Microsoft Surface gear: 25% will break after 2 years, says Consumer Reports

mark l 2

I never thought that Microsoft made particularly good hardware, look at all the problems with the red ring of death on the Xbox so i doesn't come as a suprise that 25% of Surface will break after 2 years.

I am using a Dell Latitude laptop from almost 10 years ago and it is still going strong but obviously not running the original OS anymore as it came with Vista.

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At last, a kosher cryptocurrency: BitCoen

mark l 2

" BitCoen would rank at about 115th among the more than 1,000 cryptocurrencies tracked by coinmarketcap.com."

Who knew that there were this many cryptocurrencies? Until the other day I had only every heard of Bitcoin and Etherium. I do think that any man and his dog seems to be creating a new currency and with a relatively small market the fragmentation is not good.

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New Amiga to go on sale in late 2017

mark l 2

I have just recently got my A1200 (fitted into a tower case) back up and running after it being stuck up in the loft for almost 10 years and apart from some bad caps which need replacing it all works.

Its a shame that bad management at Commodore led to the demise of the Amiga as it was amazing what could be achieved on its hardware/software combo. I would love to see what could have been achieved if development had continued over the last 20 years.

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Go fork yourself: Bitcoin has split in two – and yes, it's all forked up

mark l 2

Slightly confusing names for the end users with them sounding so similar, people might end up buying the wrong currency and find out that the service they want to spend it with doesnt actually take the one they have bought

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Browser trust test: Would you let Chrome block ads? Or Firefox share and encrypt files?

mark l 2

When it comes to the FF file encrypt and share feature, i would trust it as much as I trust other 3rd party files lockers such as Googledrive and Dropbox so it is nice to have an alternative. I don't think i would use it for mission critical stuff but handy for sending large files to people in remote locations. Will the downloader need to be also on FF to download though?

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Dark web doesn't exist, says Tor's Dingledine. And folks use network for privacy, not crime

mark l 2

Doesn't connecting to Facebook over an anonymous network defeat the object of being anonymous unless your using a fake account which is against FB T&Cs? These days Facebook require you verify your account with a phone number so surely this would give away your real identity and location.

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Petition calls for Adobe Flash to survive as open source zombie

mark l 2

Re: Please, No!

"And how would I activate Windows XP without the activation servers? Even with emulation we need to resolve the licensing and activation issues."

I haven't activated a copy of XP for ages.(even when it was still in support) Using a OEM edition with the SLIC entries in virtual box you can trick it into thinking its a factory install on a Dell, HP, Lenovo or other manufacturer which activate without needing an internet connection and will pass any of the validity tests.

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Greek police arrest chap accused of laundering $4bn of Bitcoin

mark l 2

Although there has clearly been a criminal offense it goes to show how if your operating a internet based business it is best not to have any data stored on servers based in the US if the service you offer could possibly fall foul of US law or the world police will be coming for you

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Microsoft ctrl-Zs 'killing' Paint, by which we mean offering naff app through Windows Store

mark l 2

The best bitmap paint program for me still has to be Deluxe Paint III on the Amiga. Back when EA used to do software other than games.

I remember using it to edit some IFF's of the Flintstones cartoon I had grabbed from TV using my Vidi frame grabber on my A500+ when I was about 12 year old. Happy days.

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Alphabay shutdown: Bad boys, bad boys, what you gonna do? Not use your Hotmail...

mark l 2

I think that people are going to be wary of using whatever takes over from Alphabay after this news has broke. It is one thing that the site owner got caught because he was stupid enough to use a hotmail address that he also used elsewhere. But to leave all your data exposed on an unencrypted laptop means that the police will be able to start tracing the details of all the transactions that took place on the site and start to arrest the dealers and the buyers.

I am still unsure what to make of this suicide in prison story though, all seems a bit too convenient. I know someone who spent several months in a Thai prison over immigration issues. He tells me that if you have money you can pay off the prison guards and live quite comfortably with your own cell with DVD player, fridge and food brought in for you from the outside and lot of other comforts. If your poor (like most of the Thai prisoners rather than westerners) then your sharing a cell with 30 others lying on a concrete floor with one toilet between you all.

With the amount of money he had i am sure that would have bought him a lot of KFC meals from outside.

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Why can't you install Windows 10 Creators Update on your old Atom netbook? Because Intel stopped loving you

mark l 2

I can't see what is so different about the creators update that MS won't be able to offer Atom support yet they can provide it on the Anniversary update for another 5 years?

It is sad that a piece of IT equipment that was new in 2013 is now considered obsolete.

I am typing this on a 8 year old Dell laptop which runs Windows 7 and Linux Mint absolutely fine and will probably continue to use it for the next couple of years unless something fails on it.

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Dark web souk AlphaBay shuts for good after police raids

mark l 2

Re: re: Could be another scam

I was thinking along the same lines, the Thai police can be pretty corrupt and if you have millions of dollars in the bank I am sure you could bribe enough people to have 'died' in jail and get yourself a new identity.

He would need to get out of Thailand as soon as possible though as once you have paid the cops off once they will be back again for more

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UK spookhaus GCHQ can crack end-to-end encryption, claims Australian A-G

mark l 2

Re: So what's the use?

Assuming that GCHQ can break E2E now I guess they want it putting in law so that if some future app comes out that the spooks cannot break the legislation requires the app maker to add a backdoor to operate in Australia.

What worried me more is they keep mentioning handset manufacturers and not just app creators, which sounds like they want a backdoors putting into all phones even those that don't use these E2E messaging apps.

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Ransomware-slinging support scammers hire local cash mule in Oz

mark l 2

Perhaps this Ozzie chap was genuine and thought he was just the local rep for a tech support company in Asia or wherever they are based so he set all the companies up using his real name and address. The scammers are obviously quite clever and probably had flashy looking websites genuine phone numbers for him to call etc and could fake official looking documents to make it all look genuine.

I mentioned a similar thing on another post a few days ago where people are duped into selling goods using their own ebay account from drop shipping companies and the ebay sellers get to keep 50 quid per item for everything they sell. Obviously when the goods don't arrive with the customer the police come tracking it back to the ebay seller. These scammers rely on people being a bit naive and also out to make a fast buck.

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Good luck building a VR PC: Ethereum miners are buying all the GPUs

mark l 2

I doubt the Ethereum miners are going to create enough demand for PCs with GPUs to suddenly rescue the failing PC market. All it takes it someone hackets to set up a bot net mining Ethereum with 1000s of machines and then in another years time the price of Ethereum will then fall to a level that makes it uneconomical to mine them that way

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Fast-spreading CopyCat Android malware nicks pennies via pop-up ads

mark l 2

Re: I feel retarded

My guess is that the scumbags get they money by getting innocent people to unwittingly accept money to their bank accounts. China has a lot of people who live on a few dollars per day so if you offer them to open bank accounts with the promise that they can keep even just 1% of the money deposited in there you will probably get a lot of people willing to sign up.

Heck this even happens over in the west. If you look on some of the classified ads websites that are not moderated you will see people advertising 'jobs' to "sell items on ebay and get paid £50 per item" Anyone who takes these offers up is likely to get a knock on the door from the police in a month or two down the line when all the customers who bought stuff complain they didn't receive their items and ebay have frozen the accounts.

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Crashed RadioShack flogs off its IPv4 stash

mark l 2

Things aren't helped by the fact that the entire 127.0.0.0/8 range is reserved for loopback. And we have to different ranges for internal none routing networks. I guess when the standards were being devised they couldn't for see it ever running out

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Brit prosecutors ask IT suppliers to fight over £3 USB cable tender

mark l 2

It has been a while since I worked for a local council, but I am guessing that whoever put this out to tender did it to cover their own back to show that when they ordered the 3 quid Amazon cable they were getting 'best value' as they are told they have to do. It's doubtful that the usual IT suppliers would better that price. It's ridiculous bureaucracy to have to do this for such a low value item. I don't remember our department having to do this for such small items but it was 10 years ago. We would often buy small items such as the odd replacement, keyboard, mice, DVD-ROM drive etc from the local PC World down the road.

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Story gone

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Ubuntu 'weaponised' to cure NHS of its addiction to Microsoft Windows

mark l 2

Sounds good but I would have thought that something like scientificlinux.org or CentOS would be a better distro to base it on than Ubuntu since the recent announcement by Shuttleworth about Ubuntu concentrating on the server side from now on.

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How to pwn phones with shady replacement parts

mark l 2

If someone has physical access to my device then I assume that someone with sufficient technical knowledge can gain access to the contents. The only thing I have on there that would be of concern to someone tampering is my banking app.

I am more concerned with manufacturers fixing remote exploits that affect millions of handsets than something that will only affect a small number of devices.

But then again I usually buy low end phones that cost about 100 quid so if the screen breaks its probably cheaper to just go and buy a new phone.

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Photobucket says photo-f**k-it, starts off-site image shakedown

mark l 2

Hopefully they won't just 404 the externally hosted pics but instead replace them with one that says 'click here to view the image' and it then takes the user through to view it on the Photobucket website then there won't be any loss of potentially useful images.

But where did they pick $400 per year from? Even if there weren't free alternatives and you were willing to pay. You can still save money by getting storage with a hosting provider and then paying someone of Fiver to go through all the photos on your blog and upload them to your new hosting. You also won't have to worry about breaching the Photobucket T&Cs on things such as nudity going down that route either.

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Report estimates cost of disruption to GPS in UK would be £1bn per day

mark l 2

I guess one worry is all the debris that floating about in near earth orbit. A flake of paint traveling at 10000 mph can put a hole through a fragile satellite. Image if a you get an out of control satellite that impacts another satellite that could create enough debris to cause a chain reaction which could wipe out every satellite in orbit, not just GPS.

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Huge ransomware outbreak spreads in Ukraine and beyond

mark l 2

If it is just file tables / MBR then it maybe possible to recover with something that can rewrite them. I think testdisk can do this under linux and I seem to remember some utility on the UBCD Windows PE boot disk could do it also.

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We'll drag Microsoft in front of Supremes over Irish email spat – DoJ

mark l 2

The US already thinks that their law should be applied worldwide so this is hardly a suprise. They went after Kim Dotcom for the Megaupload site even though neither the servers, data or Kim Dotcom were in the US.

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Men charged with theft of free newspapers

mark l 2

How is prosecuting this a useful use of our criminal justice system. Which bozo at the CPS told the police to go ahead and charge? Unless they were well know to the police before but alway got off for lack of evidence and this time they were caught red handed. But as others have pointed out, if they are taking something that is given away free, have they broken the law by taking them all?

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