* Posts by Jay 2

540 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

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They say we're too mean to Microsoft. Well, how about this... Redmond just had a stonking year. And only 8% tax. Whee!

Jay 2
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Re: A Stonking Year???

I loved that game, even if I was rubbish at it! I recall the only time I managed to win was when I led the enemy on a magical mystery tour and their supply line ran out.

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Second one this month: Another code bootcamp decamps to graveyard

Jay 2
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Re: Who didn't see this coming?

Agreed. The best IT bods I've worked with are people who like messing around with that sort of thing. On the other hand there are people who have drifted into IT for one reason or another and have no real passion for such things and it shows.

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Paxo trashes privacy, social media and fake news at Infosec 2017

Jay 2
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Re: "I am prepared to trust the security forces."

Or something like Buttle/Tuttle/whatever. And then before said mistake has been noticed/rectified they're bound to find something of interest to them to not make it a wasted visit and keep those arrest/convictoin stats up.

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Russian hackers and Britney Spears in one story. Are you OK, Reg?

Jay 2
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Paris Hilton

What's the Britney angle?

Obviously a few Britney fans lurking in the El Reg comments. Maybe a change to the Paris icon is required?

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Wowee, it's Samsung's next me-too AI gizmo: The Apple HomePod

Jay 2
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Re: Ohmigosh I am such a marketing sucker

For my sins I do have a few bits of Bose kit, all of which I quite like. The Wave CD is still going strong after 18 years, though to be honest it's only used as a glorified alarm clock nowdays. Though I've recently attached my old AirPort Express to it so that it can do a bit more.

Though a few years back I did try some of their new (at the time) in-ear cans, but to be honest compared to my UE with custom tips they weren't very good.

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BA IT systems failure: Uninterruptible Power Supply was interrupted

Jay 2
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Re: Isn't restore 101

Agreed. Though it looks like after the power off whoops event, someone thought that just switching on the power again without any full-on checks of all the various power bits and everything connected with it was a good idea...

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Toyota's entertaining the idea of Linux in cars

Jay 2
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Re: Ah but,

Yes, before you know it said system will want to start integrating itself with things like stearing and braking...

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EU pegs quota for 'homegrown' content on Netflix at 30 per cent

Jay 2
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Re: Brazil ? Or 1960s Britain ?

On similar lines, some classic Peter Sellers; Balham - Gateway to the South

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Sainsbury's IT glitch spoils bank holiday food orders

Jay 2
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Re: There is a simple solution

Agreed. We seem to have sunk to a level where to get some sort of response from many companies you have to publicly shame them on social media for them to actually take action. Quite annoying.

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Machine 1, Man 0: AlphaGo slams world's best Go player in the first round

Jay 2
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Yes I recall when Deep Blue was winning against humans one of the higher-ups involved with it dismissed thoughts of us being crushed by computers (or whatever) due to the fact that aside from doing one thing extremely well they were "as thick as two short planks".

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The revolution will not be televised: How Lucas modernised audio in film

Jay 2
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Re: Willow

This sort of thing annoys me more at home than at the cinema. Basically many films now have a volume range of too fucking quiet at one end, too fucking loud at the other and pretty much sod-all in-between. So you have to turn up the volume to hear WTF some acting type is mumbling and then there's bound to be some loud action-oriented event which will then cause the increased volume from your TV/receiver to deafen you and make your house fall down.

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'The internet is slow'... How to keep users happy, get more work done

Jay 2
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Re: What a wonderful world you live in...

One of the banes of my life as a sysadmin is people asking for stuff/permissions/etc without even bothering to check if they already have it or not. A plague on their houses!

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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

Jay 2
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Re: Actions == consequences

Ah I see, I didn't know that rather important bit of info. In that case, he better start researching how friendly the Oz government want to be with the US...

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Jay 2
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Actions == consequences

Well I'd like to think as soon as he steps foot outside the embassy we'll nick him for bail jumping.

At that point it wouldn't suprise me if Trump (after a quick win, and smarting about the release of Chelsea Manning) decides to put in an extradition request. After all it may have been Manning who aquired the data, but it was the Assange-led Wikileaks that gave it a wider audience.

And then all the self-publicising idot may end up where he was trying to avoid in the first place, deep in the US legal system. All that because he wasn't very sensible when it came to use of what's in his trousers.

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Samsung Galaxy S8+: Seriously. What were they thinking?

Jay 2
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WTF?

Pure hipster wankery

I could hardly believe my eyes when I read "force users to revert back to old habits (eg the touch interface)". If it's one thing I can't stand it's jumped up UI/wizards/etc that will force you to do something its way or some bastardisation of not-at-all/as inconviniently as possible. See the fuckup that was Windows 8's TIFKAM for another example.

Surely Samsung, as a TOUCH SCREEN PHONE, the user may expect to be able to do what they require via the fucking great big touch screen that is touted as one of the main USPs of the phone in that it is big and doesn't have those pesky bezels to get in the way. If I'm going to talk in the presence of a phone it's beacuse I'm making a phone call, not talking to the sodding device itself.

This sort of thing is pure hipster wankery that comes when someone doesn't remember that just because you can do something, it doesn't mean that you should!

</rant>

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America 'will ban carry-on laptops on flights from UK, Europe to US'

Jay 2
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Re: So what about the battery

Some years ago I recall noticing at LHR tube that my lock was missing and in my bag found a note from TSA that said something along the lines of "It's your fault we broke into your bag to have a look and if there's any loss or damage it's your fault, so fuck you there's nothing you can do about it".

I had a small last laugh/cuckle as the iPad box was empty (contents in my hand luggage), so they couldn't steal it.

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Linux homes for Ubuntu Unity orphans: Minty Cinnamon, GNOME or Ubuntu, mate?

Jay 2
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Re: CentOS + Cinnamon

Yes, if you want bleeding edge (and potentially re-installing a new release every 9 months or so) then you could do worse than Fedora. But for something a lot more stable (and behind the times), then you could go with CentOS. Both assuming you're happy with the RadHat (RPM) branch of things.

As a sys admin I spend most of my day on the command line of RHEL/CentOS, fending off devs who want the latest and greatest version of something or other that invariably isn't in our repos and will probably cause some dependancy nightmare.

Every so often at home I usually download the latest Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Fedora into VMs to have a quick play and see what's going on. The last time out I preferred Linux Mint, but now that Ubuntu has dropped Unity I'll have to take another look.

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Well, hot-diggity-damn, BlackBerry's KEYone is one hell of a comeback

Jay 2
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Thumb Down

Rule one of tea club

Hang on, was that a cup of tea with milk in it where the teabag is still present? What sort of philistine are you?

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Flatpak and Snaps aren't destined for graveyard of failed Linux tech yet

Jay 2
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Given the lack of understanding by most devs where I work that the latest bleeding edge stuff they claim they need usually won't run on the old/boring/stable (and without loads of dependancy problems!) enterprise Linux we have, this sort of thing may be a good thing.

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European Court of Justice lays down the law on Kodipocalypse

Jay 2
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Re: pre loaded

I did briefly look at buying a (dedicated) Kodi box, mainly to stream from my NAS, not for all the dodgy stuff. I decided against it in the end as many reviews were quite hit and miss and I wasn't convinced about the offered hardware and more importantly the OS on top.

So in the end I plumped for an Amazon Fire TV box and sideloaded Kodi on myself. I'd like to think that Amazon will do a slightly better job of keeping FireOS up to date than whatver the dedicated Kodi boxes run. In a slight belt-and-braces approach I also sideloaded Kodi on my new smart TV last weekend. I'm a bit more concerned on how much effort Sony will put into keeping that Android setup supported though.

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FTP becoming Forgotten Transfer Protocol as Debian turns it off

Jay 2
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Re: Filezilla

Another Filezilla user here. Very handy for moving stuff to/from desktop to build/jumphost servers. we still use FTP a fair bit internally, though we also have a fair amount of HTTP/wget too. Also lurking is some SFTP, but I don't find it the easiest thing to set up (and quickly get working) on some of out Linux kit.

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TVs are now tablet computers without a touchscreen

Jay 2
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Meh

I agree. Just got a new Sony 43" 4K over the weekend, and I find its user interface less than good. Took me while to hunt down where the main settings were (brightness, contrast, colour etc). In fact as it's a "smart" TV running Android then it needed loads of questions answering when I first switched it on before it got anywhere near to doing what a TV should do.

More of an annoyance is that Sony seemingly no longer provide proper full manuals either in dead tree form or via PDF. You're now expected to go to some website (which you can print off, which looks shite) to figure out all the advanced features. And more annoyingly some of them are stunningly generic and don't explicitally mention the model of TV.

That aside I do quite like it. I wasn't intending to use its smart features (as I have SkyHD, Amazon Fire TV, PS4 to do that sort of thing and stream from NAS), but was fairly impressed with the fact it'll run Kodi and VLC as well as BBC iPlayer, YouTube, Amazon Video etc.

The catch is now that I have a 4K TV, a 4K source and 4K friendly HDMI cables, they all talk to a receiver which isn't 4K. So that will have to be replaced...

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IT error at Great Western Railway charging £10k for 63-mile journey ticket

Jay 2
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Re: IT Error?

GIGO = Garbage In, Garbage Out. I put it down to duff (human supplied?) data somewhere and the computer just doing its normal thing.

Meanwhile, to err is human but to really mess things up, it takes a computer.

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Lyrebird steals your voice to make you say things you didn't – and we hate this future

Jay 2
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Re: Program for a puppet

My main problem with that film is that it gives the impression that the drug completely surpresses all emotions etc. And I recall that because of that some bits of the plot didn't make much sense. But in some cast/crew chat they refined that to be that it mostly surpresses emotions etc. That made a lot more sense, but they didn't make it at all obvious in the film.

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Dark times for OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source Solaris project

Jay 2
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Re: It was designed to fail

Agreed. I recall running Solaris 7 (I think) on x86 and it was OK (not fantastic or anything). But sometime after that the x86 offering went away and came back a year or so later with a slightly different name and some associated Sun x86 hardware.

At this point I noted that Sun had at least two big problems. One was that people who were burnt on them withdrawing Solaris on x86 for whatever reason would think twice. The other was that their own x86 hardware was a lot more expensive than other 1/2U offerings from other manufacturers. And (at the time) on the horizon was something called Linux...

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Stanford Uni's intro to CompSci course adopts JavaScript, bins Java

Jay 2
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Re: Introductory

For the lot doing MSc it would depend on what they're actually doing. Whilst I was doing my BSc we shared lectures with some MSc who were effectively on a 1 year IT conversion course. As a result they were significantly less experienced than us. In hindsight maybe we shouldn't have been so harsh on them. Though I'm sure for many a HR department an MSc would trump a BSc...

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Microsoft promises twice-yearly Windows 10, O365 updates – with just 18 months' support

Jay 2
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Happy

Re: Dear gods...

Have you started looking at your migrations to RHEL 7 yet? :)

In some cases we had to purchase extended support for 5.x servers as there was no way they could be moved. However we put in a pretty big effort to get (mostly) everything onto 6.8, but I'm not looking forward to have to get it all to 7 in a few years...

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Tesla hit by class action sueball over autopilot software updates

Jay 2
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Unhappy

I really wish Tesla hadn't called some feature or another "autopilot". It gives off all the wrong ideas about what it actually does.

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Apple's zippy silicon leaves Android rivals choking on dust

Jay 2
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Re: What's so wrong with a Ferrari engine in a metro?

I seem to recall a Vauxhall Nova (beloved of many a Max Power reader) having a rather larger engine dropped in it without any major tweaks to structural integrity or the brakes. Apparently its chassis was a bit wonky after some use of the new setup.

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Flaws found in Linksys routers that could be used to create a botnet

Jay 2
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Unhappy

Don't hold your breath

From previous experience, Linksys' pace of firmware releases are slower than glacial and are as frequent as hen's teeth. And when they do it'll be for something really important, like a logo change on an admin webpage.. http://cache-www.belkin.com/support/dl/Linksys%20X3500%201.0.01.006%20Release%20Note.txt

Mind you, that seems to be par for the course for most manufacturers of 'leccy-using kit nowadays.

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AWS v Oracle: Mark Hurd schooled on how to run a public cloud that people actually use

Jay 2
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FAIL

Twice as good? Maybe significantly slower!

Not entirely on-topic, but Oracle really do need to spash some cash on hardware to support their own services. I've recently started using Oracle Linux and attached a server to their Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN), basically their version of RedHat's RHN/RHSM. In short any interaction with the ULN repos takes an ice age and is completely unusable. As an example, a yum repolist all took almost 30 minutes(!). On a comparable RHEL server talking to RHN/RHSM the same command takes upto 30 seconds.

The reason for this is that Oracle host ULN on their own hardware/network, which is obviously not fit for purpose. More so, when you consider that you have to pay for a licence/subscription/support to access ULN. Ironically the bulk of Oracle Linux is freely available (and at no cost) and is availble at yum.oracle.com which is hosted by Akamai and is fast enough to be usable.

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Stop asking people for their passwords, rights warriors yell at US Homeland Security

Jay 2
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Re: Brilliant!

Q: Is the sole purpose of your visit to bring down the US government?

A: No, I'm also going to do some shopping

And then there's the question still on the immigration cards along the lines of "were you involved with the Nazi party 1939-1945" when an increasing amount of people going to the US wheren't even born then.

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Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

Jay 2
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Re: A paid Red Hat Edition

Your analogy is slightly broken in that under the various software licences involved RedHat have to make the source of RHEL publicly available. So it is quite legal for anyone to take that source and make their own version as long as they don't mention RedHat or use any of their proprietary code. That is why OS such as CentOS, Oracle Linux and Scientific Linux exist.

It gets a bit tricky after that. CentOS are mostly onside with RedHat, and I believe various bugs/fixes found/squashed are then sent back upstream to be folded back into RHEL. Oracle Linux is a slightly different matter in that they do quite a bit of their own messing around (very customised kernels etc) but as they're Oracle they don't feel the need to contribute much back to the upstream. Though in a rather strange move (for money-grabbing Oracle) you can download and use the bulk of Oracle Linux completely for free, it's just the support and some of the proprietary software you need to pay for. I don't know too much about Scientific Linux, but they seem to send stuff back upstream too.

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Sysadmin 'trashed old bosses' Oracle database with ticking logic bomb'

Jay 2
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I don't see anything in the article to say when he gave the second (wiped) laptop back. I would assume it would be after the alleged hack.

More worrying though is the inference that he used the company WiFi to gain access. There really shouldn't be accessible WiFi that can allow access to production kit. Any remote access should be via some sort of VPN via 2FA. The 2FA alone should have been enough to stop the alleged login as someone else.

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Parcel bods Hermes become latest London drone delivery droogs

Jay 2
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I wouldn't like to be the person typing in all the steps if it was!

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Troll it your way: Burger King ad tries to hijack Google Home gadgets

Jay 2
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Flame

"It's as gross as its grease-drenched fries."

Many years ago BK changed their way of cooking fries and since then I've never been a fan. Out of those two I prefer burgers from BK and fried from McD. But given more choice (and a bit more cash) Five Guys is my current favourite burger joint, even if I'm not sure about their fries.

Fire inco, as allegedly something from BK is flame grilled...

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Verizon's bogus bills tanked my credit score, claims sueball slinger

Jay 2
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Re: Wow, deja vu

It might be different over in the US, but over here in the UK the collection agencies don't really care about the reasons for the debt, they just want to collect the money. In your example it's a cop-out from Verizon to say "nothing to do with us" when I'm sure they could stop it if they felt like it. More so given that the colections types are working on their behalf and (in the case of the UK) the collectors will contact the client regarding possible deals if the debtor can't (or won't) pay in full.

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India to world+dog: Go ahead, please hack our elections ... if you can

Jay 2
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Re: Hackathon?

I don't think a pure hacking-oriented contest will do much. As you say in the real world there's a lot that can be achieved via social engineering and physical access to said machines all greased with a bit of cold, hard, cash.

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Half-baked security: Hackers can hijack your smart Aga oven 'with a text message'

Jay 2
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Aga Saga

I always though Agas were on all the time, but I've learnt from these very pages that's the old ones. It woud appear the newer 'leccy ones are a different beast.

I'm not a great fan of all this IoT stuff, for the usual reasons. Can't say I'd ever really want to switch my cooker on when I wasn't there. I don't like having such appliances on when I can't keep an eye (or nose) on things.

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DTMF replay phreaked out the Dallas tornado alarm, say researchers

Jay 2
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The more things change, the more they stay the same. Or more realistically, they've never changed! I'm sure this will get people running for their nearest box of Captain Crunch (or whatever cereal it was that was phreaker-friendly).

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Canonical sharpens post-Unity axe for 80-plus Ubuntu spinners

Jay 2
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Re: so this was the real reason

Yep. As a sys admin I find myself constantly explaining to some of our newer devs why they can't have the latest shiny software on our Enterprise Linux systems because it's very nice and stable and because of that somewhat behind the times. And then there's all those package/library dependancies...

Generally we stick to the line that if it's in our in-house repositories you can have it and if it's not, then I'll make an excecutive decision regarding how much of a pain its going to be to source and install it (where possible I prefer RPM rather than tarball stuff).

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HMRC beer duty bungle leaves breweries struggling to pay online

Jay 2
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Re: Clearly this tax change has taken all the devs by surprise

...and that they can change their minds in the future and retrofit said taxes. Though I hear the current big book of tax laws (or digital equivalent) is now so big and complex no-one really knows how it all works. So they're probably making it up as they go along.

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Boss swore by 'For Dummies' book about an OS his org didn't run

Jay 2
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Maybe get nostalgic and dig out some older ones?

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Jay 2
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Re: But the real issue is

Amen. The chocolate (are they actually allowed to call it that?) used in most mainstream Easter eggs is not very nice at all. It's probably not too far removed in quality terms, but I'd prefer a bar of Fruit & Nut.

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Hasta la Windows Vista, baby! It's now officially dead – good riddance

Jay 2
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Re: Won't miss it

That's a fair point and I'm sure it doesn't help. Though in reply to that, the fact that the Win7/10 (in my case) updates systems are so slow and somewhat broken from a user experiece point of view still causes me grief.

Win 7 update is horribly slow, but at least it will give you an idea of how much data it is trying to download and how long it might take. Plus you can pick and choose when to down load and install. Win 10 is not only horribly slow it, it downloads when it feels like it and gives no indication as to how much it's attempting to download and then how long it may take. And in both cases there's the crappy thing where you shut the box down and it sits there twiddling its thumbs installing stuff and then when it comes back up again it will do the same thing. Then you find out that due to dependancies, there are still more updates required, so repeat. Admittedly the last bit is lessened if you do it more often!

I'm glad for my own main usage Macs aren't quite as bad for updates (they do the shutdown/install thing) and at work it's Linux so just one reboot sorts you out. I feel sorry for the poor buggers who after to look after Win in the enterprise.

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Prisoners built two PCs from parts, hid them in ceiling, connected to the state's network and did cybershenanigans

Jay 2
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Hmm, that does sound like a fair amount of fail. Especially the unsupervised bit!

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Facebook's 'delightful' AI Clippy the Paperclip creeps into Messenger

Jay 2
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It looks like you're sending a dick pic. I suggest editing the picture to use the enlarge tool first.

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An echo chamber full of fake news? Blame Google and Facebook, says Murdoch chief

Jay 2
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Re: Hillarious

Moreso if you take fact-less opinion as news.

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Twitter sues US govt to protect 'Department of Immigration employee' who doesn't like Trump

Jay 2
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Maybe they hope it will all blow over before they try again. Though I'm sure someone will notice and whip up some opposition. Then repeat until the government gives up.

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Graffiti 'dying out' as kids dump spray cans for Instagram, Twitter etc

Jay 2
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Re: Short attention span

Wow indeed. Now that's "graffiti" I can agree with. Actually a lot of proper graffiti (not that tag everywhere crap) is usually quite artistic and very well done.

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