* Posts by Tom 7

4482 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

El Reg straps on the Huawei Watch 2

Tom 7
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Re: Nah

How else do you expect google to provide you with life enhancing adverts if they dont know where you are?

I must confess I've only ever used GPS 'services' once and that was to drive to a garage when low on car juice. It was shut.

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Capita payments service Pay360 goes TITSUP

Tom 7
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Re: Major payment system ..contract says

You do realise most of the contracts are largely written by the contractor? The government save us money by getting rid of the decent lawyers who can spot a loophole the size of the earth in a contract and the contractors run rings round those left.

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What's got a vast attack surface and runs on Linux? Windows Defender, of course

Tom 7
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Re: Fuzz?

It was given a name in 1989 - many of us had been doing similar for many years before. I saw my first bit of what is now called fuzz testing in around 82 or 3 and it was written in coral 66 I believe. A colleague used it to test functions to see what would induce functions to blow up rather than to look for attack 'services'. When code, and systems took minutes or hours to get to a useful state catching shit like that was a lot easier than working out why a system was on its arse.

Sensible compilers make it a lot harder/redundant.

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Nokia's retro revival 3310 goes on sale and disappears immediately

Tom 7
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Re: 2G only?

If you have a 3310 with 4g AND can use it to tether to then there is no need for their really expensive phone with all that lovely snooping android on it.

Or in english, shit I was going to get one just for the above.

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Schiaparelli probe crash caused by excessive spin, report concludes

Tom 7
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Re: Why don't they test them on Earth first? A thicker atmosphere

You could make a parachute that would be a pretty close approximation in terms of behaviour to that of the other one on Mars. And as it would be noticeably smaller and could be tested by firing it from a gun, lots of times for not a lot of money.

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DARPA orders spaceplane capable of 10 launches in 10 days

Tom 7
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We dont need a space elevator

we need a moon based elastic band.

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Windows is now built on Git, but Microsoft has found some bottlenecks

Tom 7
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Re: SourceSafe

Their methodology worries me - I 'touch' thousands of files but I dont get push them back unless I've contributed something I want to actually think is needed.

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Britain's on the brink of a small-scale nuclear reactor revolution

Tom 7
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After Manchester

One can only guess how many armed forces are scurrying around our nuclear sites at the moment. I cant imagine us being able to defend all these little reactors from some ill informed seeker of some invisible truth or other.

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Euro Patent Office staff warns board of internal rule changes

Tom 7
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Re: Just say no?

I'd imagine Battistelli has reduced productivity in the workforce to the point where a strike would not make much difference.

I'm guessing he has some clandestine photos of the board members or something,

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SoftBank-Saudi fund raises world's biggest tech pot at $93bn

Tom 7
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Re: Interesting...

"Softbank believes the next stage of Softbanks revolution is to keep expanding before someone realises we're a tad overoptimistic and a lot bigger than we really are"

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Tom 7
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Re: Robots and AI software don't pay tax

It wont take long for them to discover they cant just buy and sell from each other for very long.

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No nudity please, we're killing ourselves: Advice to Facebook mods leaks

Tom 7
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RE What if I pixelate it?

You'll never see it again!

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Cloud giants 'ran out' of fast GPUs for AI boffins

Tom 7
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Re: They should have used AI...you have 20 days to submit your

You dont understand deadline. Or 'management' who will not allow you time to do your real work until you point out if its not done today they wont be able to take your work to conference.

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What is dead may never die: a new version of OS/2 just arrived

Tom 7
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@jake

If IBM had used the 68008 rather than the 8088 the PC may have started a teeny bit slower but we would have avoided 10 years of some of the finest brains in the world trying to work out which 64k block their brain had exploded in.

Shit even MS might have written a decent OS on that!

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And finally, monsieur, a wafer-thin hologram ... Sir, it is only wafer thin

Tom 7
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Re: Holograms

Some 20 years ago I saw a hologram in which an american football player ran a few yards as you tilted the hologram, which IIRC was about the thickness of old 120 film. I was gobsmacked by it but couldn't think of any use for it other than maybe advertising. I'm guessing the designer hasn't either.

I dread to think what life will be like when someone finally works out how to make lcds on a sub-wavelength scale so we can create holograms on the fly. As you point out bandwidth needed would be huge and there appears to be a physical law that the script intelligence content is the the inverse of the bandwidth.

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MP3 'died' and nobody noticed: Key patents expire on golden oldie tech

Tom 7
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Re: No, No NO!

In 1969 Quad (as they were then) were testing their new current dumping amplifier. The did double blind tests with golden eared journos from the HiFi mags of the day.

They tests their MkII valve ampr (1% distortion) , their 33/303 transistor amps (0.1% distortion) against the 404/44 (0.01%)setup.

Not one of the golden ears could accurately tell the difference in double blind testing. The golden ears response was to refuse to do double blind testing and put themselves out of the valuable work of bullshitting about HiFi.

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Tom 7
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@ac challenge

Careful there - no-one has ever been able to tell the difference between un-encoded* 16 bit or higher but MP3 adds features to the stream that are audible with experience and people can tell the difference in double blind tests.

* presumable flac would be undetectable too but that assumes the decoding is carried out seamlessly and the spec doesnt cover how the operating system works so it is possible for flac decoding to add very small gaps which may be unnoticeable by some but observable by others.

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Tom 7
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Re: MP3 vs other formats

"I should re-rip all my CDs, Vinyl and tapes (reel and cassette) to FLAC."

Why on earth would anyone in their right mind want to change CD to FLAC? You've said space is not a problem so leave as is.

I've been digging around for years and I've yet to find any double blind tests that can reveal anyone who can hear the difference between 16bit CD and higher res of any form and I have no doubt that FLAC will not loose any quality but it just seems pointless for 30% saving that on some devices may cause jitter during decoding when it could be directly streamed to the DAC.

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Robot lands a 737 by hand, on a dare from DARPA

Tom 7
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RE: Flight deck crew costs doesn't even enter into the picture.

Still wont stop some accountant saving the company money. Saving that $100,000 a year may not make any difference to ticket prices but its a health bonus for someone.

I've noticed in some companies above a certain level saving $100,000 will lead to a much higher bonus. Maths is different in the thin air at the top.

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Travel IT biz reportedly testing 100TB SSDs

Tom 7
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Data centre in your pocket.

Mind you it will take a time search for a file from your phone.

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Have a go with this WW2 German Lorenz cipher machine – in your browser

Tom 7
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Re: 3D Simulation

re screw slots. I wouldnt bet on that - I've seen heavy machinery where that happens. Some watchmakers do it to.You can either make sure its engineered like that* or put small spacers at the bottom of the hole.

*Some modern machines will always start tapping the holes at the same angle and the screws from batches can be similar enough to achieve that Anal Retentive look.

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Tom 7
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Re: Enigma, the cipher famously cracked by Tutte's colleague Alan Turing

Doh! Spat that one out without thinking again.

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Tom 7
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Re: Enigma, the cipher famously cracked by Tutte's colleague Alan Turing

Primus Secundus Tertius

As I understand it the Bombe emulated the Lorenz machine and ran through various encodings to rapidly find settings that looked like they might be the ones used to encode the message and then these were tried in Colossus.

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It's 2017 – and your Mac, iPad, iPhone can all be pwned by an e-book

Tom 7
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Re: Greedy Apple!

Apple hardware tends to last? I've not seen an iPhone in someone's hand without a crack in it.My daughters spent more on new screens than the phone cost.

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Australia considers joining laptops-on-planes ban

Tom 7
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Re: And in other news,

I travelled many hundreds of times on business before the internet thingy. I think maybe 1% of those trips would be necessary in the www world. I may be able to work on the plane but no where near as well as at home and definitely not at the airport or on the way to and from. Its nice to get away paid for but I much prefer to have a proper holiday I paid for.

Like many government travel policies this will cause more damage to air travel than it causes - people will learn to avoid travelling and that it is in fact more cost efficient not too.

Mind you its not as bad as the 6000 lives a year wasted in extra security since 9/11.

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Google DeepMind's use of 1.6m Brits' medical records to test app was 'legally inappropriate'

Tom 7
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RE: Did the hospital or Google

Well the hospital certainly did for not protecting the patients data and identities.

I'd be happy for my non-identifiable data to be used in an experiment of this form so long as the full results are returned to the NHS.

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74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+

Tom 7
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RE: We can't afford it all

I worked for one company that sadly told us it didnt have enough money for the touted 1% pay rise as the end of the world was near and a couple of days later the company accountant turned up in a new car where the wheels alone would have paid for the 1% rise. And they wonder why people dont think its worth working their arses off for them...

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PC repair chap lets tech support scammer log on to his PC. His Linux PC

Tom 7
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Re: VOIP why can't BT do that?

BT get paid by the call and the time - or a contract. I'd imagine you VOIP comes out of your ISP non-existant monthly allowance.

BT dont do it cos they make money out of it, your ISP does it to stop sending them an email which costs more to respond to that than simply cutting off the hawker.

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Tom 7
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Hold them on the phone as long as possible.

As someone in semi-retirement I used to walk them down the garden path and throw them in th compost heap. Alas the PC I was pointing them at (w98) died and I cant be arsed to find the disc to set up a VM. I've have been tempted to brake the law and take them over but can imagine how pissed off you'd be going up before the beak for doing the world a favour.

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Warm, wet, mysterious... sound familiar? Ah, yes, you've heard of this second Neptune, too

Tom 7
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RE There's obvious and there's obvious

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2130188-earth-may-have-been-born-in-a-huge-flare-up-of-the-young-sun/ for more complications.

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Tom 7
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There's obvious and there's obvious. Planetary 'theory', or the stuff I've seen seems to make very sweeping assumptions which are mainly necessary to make the maths a bit easier - i.e. possible. Things like flat rotating disks of matter that form the star and planets. When you look around the skies the chance of these things happening seem pretty slim.

We are only now spotting planets around other stars and none of them seem to support such simple models as being of much use and looking at clouds of matter from supernovae that might form systems suggests the models are a bit simple - but we've got to start somewhere! Now we are getting to the point where we can run simulations of system formations we then have to make models to run and test.

Its not rocket science - its a lot lot harder.

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Tom 7
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Re: Some reassurance...

Always in the wrong bloody jobs though!

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UK hospital meltdown after ransomware worm uses NSA vuln to raid IT

Tom 7
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First degree?

So the only way to get decent qualifications these days is to kill people for them?

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Tom 7
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Re: Oop North

The internet and phones are down then!

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Beeb hands £560m IT deal to Atos. Again

Tom 7
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Re: That's a Labour Government for you!

No - it was the Wigs ffs.

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Tom 7
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Re: Ex bbc

Lots I'd guess, but obviously not the talented programmers the BBC once had.

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DSL inventor's latest science project: terabit speeds over copper

Tom 7
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Re: This of course begs the Question: How much bandwidth do you need at home?

It seems to be a zero sum game. At home I have 2Mb which is not enough to watch video over but is more than adequate to browse the web except where people fill page with unnecessary and uncompressed images by the thousand.

If you take into account what I ignore the real data rate is as fast as I can read most of the time, its just the noise level has gone up since 2400 baud dial up.

Upgrades can be scheduled to run overnight with minimal effort and caching proxies reduce my bandwidth volumes by the eight or ten machines I'm running regularly. Intelligent downloading of TV is possible - things I miss on BBC are get-iplayered overnight and if tv services did the same for box sets and series I'd guess the average family could live on less than 20Mb - people in my local village who have 70Mb say they never needed the fibre upgrade from 17Mb - apart from one mate who has more video than he can watch in his lifetime already.

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Tom 7
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Re: Exponential Drop off

The annoying thing is the technology is available to make low power gigabit repeaters for a couple of quid that could be cheaply dropped in every couple of Km on copper anyway.

But then BT had the capability 27 years ago to put in 10km of fibre and have 2.4Gb end to end for an equipment cost less than £100 per line but they 'didnt do research' anymore.

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Microsoft's .NET-mare for developers: ASP.NET Core 2.0 won't work on Windows-only .NET

Tom 7
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Re: I find it astonishing

Na - the promise was there from the start? Remember the 'End of DLL hell"? I wrote a load of useful shit in .NET1 which of course wouldnt run in .NET2. And those I knew who'd written a lot of active web pages in other languages looked upon ASP.NET as a large pile of poo.

It's like Bazza says above - the Marketing types are running the show and doing a lot of the coding too. I'd recommend nuclear powered seriously pissed off honey badgers myself.

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Tom 7
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@AC MS Access

Seriously? I was automatically extracting data from Access files into whatever other DB I felt like 15 years ago using simple C or VB.

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European Patent Office dragged to human rights court – by its own staff

Tom 7
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Vive la republic.

sans text

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Rich professionals could be replaced by AI, shrieks Gartner

Tom 7
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If AI can do the things that are asked of it

then management will be exposed for what it is.

They will never allow that to happen once they work this out.

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Michael Dell? More like Michael in-Dell-nial: No public cloud, no future

Tom 7
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Theres no money in the cloud for Dell.

It's not like they can make any money from it - so long as your PC or Laptop can see the cloud there is no need to upgrade. Its not like MS who can update their cloud so you need a new OS to access it.

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'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

Tom 7
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Re: Use Windows 10 for the best protection

Sting vest condom - lightly ribbed for greater pain.

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User loses half of a CD-ROM in his boss's PC

Tom 7
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Re: Dying out

I look forward to hi fi buffs re-booting CD music in the not too distant future. I wonder if I can get some green felt tip pens...

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Tom 7
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Re: Paper yes...

I still think one of the best abuses of equipment was my daughters primary school headmaster who, while the class were working quietly on something, proceeded to laminate various items. These include plastic knifes and forks, badge collections and other small items and only broke the classes concentration when he failed with a cup cake or muffin. It was hard to tell afterwards.

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Industrial plant robots frequently connected to the 'net without authentication

Tom 7
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Squaring the circle.

So you buy a robot so you dont have to pay for someone's wages only to discover to run it securely you have to employ someone who will be as expensive as the staff you have replaced!

We live in a post capitalist world because the capitalists have got all the money but refuse to invest in the post that holds their world up.

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Fortran greybeards: Get your walking frames and shuffle over to NASA

Tom 7
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Re: "The code's in Fortran – Modern Fortran, to be exact."

I'd guess its more likely that someone with a lot of experience might just be able to spot where in the program accurate speedups can be obtained - modern fortran isn't slower its just easier to do more generic things so people do that rather than partition things properly. A lot of 3d problems can be mostly solved in 8 bit but only a few bits need to be calculated in 64bit and working out which is which can give you an order of magnitude speedup but leave people gibbering at the code cos that's not how it was done in college.

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Tom 7
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RE;The notorious (in the UK at least)

The storm was predicted - it was just not predicted as a hurricane which it wasnt but the press didnt give a fuck about that, I lost some of my roof, cried because I didnt park my car under that tree I knew would come down in a storm. The best bit was walking back from the pub at 2 in the morning into the tooth of the gale and almost being able to touch the pavement standing up!

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Gig economy tech giants are 'free riding' on the welfare state, say MPs

Tom 7
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Re: Time for a turnover limit on IR35?

"If you are billing over £100k a year you probably don't need protection from modern day slavery." I'd imagine there will be people billing over that but after overheads will taking home less than the living wage it their 'employers' can work out ways of loaning them the money for cars, being off sick for a day etc etc.

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