* Posts by Mark 65

3072 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

No fandango for you: EU boots UK off Galileo satellite project

Mark 65
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Re: Well

As you voted leave, you're responsible for these folk negotiating for the UK.

I think you'll find that whichever way you voted you want the best people negotiating. To have twats doing the job will benefit neither remainer nor leaver.

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Mark 65
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Re: Well

I suspect the response to the UK telling the EU to come up with a solution to the Irish border problem would be along the lines of "It was your referendum, your decision to leave and your decision to start the clock ticking before you had even the first idea of what you wanted beyond 'Brexit means Brexit.'

I think you'll find that we could quite easily state the solution is "keep the border open as is" if we felt like it. It's their rules that say that cannot happen, not ours. Therefore they need to come up with a solution, we've already got one.

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Mark 65
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Re: Dictionary anyone?

As 'remain' literally meant 'carry on exactly as we are' I think we all knew the implications, even if leave voters WERE too stupid to realise that.

Except any remainer who thought that is equally stupid. Remain was never "carry on as we are", rather it was "you want into this ever tighter controlled group, lock, stock, the fucking lot". For the EU there is no "as you were" in the grand project. They want countries to be all in or in our case...get out. It is about ever close union and that does not mean "the bits you want and veto the rest". Those are the choices that were realistically on offer. The tolerance in the EU for the UK's selective pick and choose membership was seriously coming to a head. If you cannot recognise that then you should pay a little more attention. Stupidity and ignorance is abundant on both sides.

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Computer Misuse Act charge against British judge thrown out

Mark 65
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Re: So in summary

I disagree. I would be highly sceptical of a judicial system whereby a potential office junior goes to see a (potentially senior) judge to ask what they were up to. If they suspect something unlawful has taken place then they did the right thing by reporting it up the chain. Your argument is really whether the CPS should have prosecuted not whether the person reviewing the access should have reported it to the CPS. The final judgement is with the CPS as to which cases go to trial.

I'm also not in favour of a judge making the decision that a jury was never likely to convict. Really? That's really for them to decide, not you Justice Fuckwit. Otherwise there's little point them ever being there.

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Mark 65
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Re: Thrown out? Or she should be jailed?

As someone has already mentioned - she could have made contact through official channels once her daughter was summonsed to appear. There really was no need to have a look through the files.

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You know what your problem is, Apple? Complacency

Mark 65
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Re: Just more BS

even though they treat customers like bitches, they go back and scoop it up by the bucket load handing over the wallets and first born.

To be fair, for mainstream users that require paid apps / creative suites most will only have a choice of Windows 10 or OS X. On that basis I know which one I'd go for. Very much a "pick your poison" contest.

I like Linux and the BSD variants but for some things it comes back to either of the above. It is changing but unfortunately the pace is slow.

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Oz sports’ pee-samplers outed buying Cellebrite phone-crack kit

Mark 65
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and promptly get told to "get a fucking warrant"

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Mark 65
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Re: I can see the pub from here!

Just a question - is a ~12 year old able to give informed legal consent in the eyes of the law? Curious as to what age that would be.

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Mark 65
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Simple - get your parents to supply the phone and pay your bill. Not your phone and they can go get fucked. Still wouldn't have a warrant for it anyway and I doubt you'd be able to write the rules to circumvent normal judicial processes.

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Braking news: Tesla preps firmware fling to 'fix' Model 3's inability to stop in time

Mark 65
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Clarkson and chums demonstrated the misinformation that is the Highway Code stopping distances when they put a range of cards through a braking test from sports to cheap shitbox. All pulled up well within the distance.

Problem as I see it is that common sense is in short supply on the roads. Many a time I've witnessed some tit in the outside lane racing the bollocks off of a Yaris and getting up the arse of something like an M3 or other car that would likely stop in half the distance it would.

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High-end router flinger DrayTek admits to zero day in bunch of Vigor kit

Mark 65
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One thing I found with them when I was using ADSL is that they are very stable even on shitty lines and would reconnect when required to maintain as constant a connection as possible, whereas other brands failed and needed power cycling.

Still use their VOIP service to this day (voucher supplied with Router/Modem).

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nbn™ isn’t fixing HFC, it’s ‘optimising’ it

Mark 65
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That's what VPNs are for. I noticed my mobile internet is way faster when I run a VPN than without. Can only dream of how much tap/filter/intercept the mobile provider is doing to slow it so much in general use.

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HMRC opens consultation to crack down on off-payroll working in private sector

Mark 65
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Re: I swapped

Hardly. They could have been dedicated to a single project piece and the company witnessed the merits of their skills and competence and figured "it would be good if they were solely ours". Don't just jump straight to the (seemingly envious) conclusion you wish to be true.

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Mark 65
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Re: Shooting themselves in the foot

@AC: I think you'll find it is definitely a lot less. I was earning 3 times what the permies were during my last contract. I also got to attend the Christmas party. If you took into account the training costs (tax deductible) sick leaver, annual leave etc you'd find they'd need a hell of a lot of leave to come anywhere close.

The reason that I did it and they didn't was, principally, that I was more comfortable with the risk of future unemployment/downtime than they were. Plenty like the feel of a secure permanent job, it's just that (other than the redundancy payment) few realise that a permanent job isn't that much more secure than a defined contract. Given contractors often have more specialised skill sets required by the business I have been in the situation where permies are let go and the contractors stayed.

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Mark 65
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Re: Not a contractor (any more) . . .

Their statement

However, HMRC said it also believes "that the available evidence shows that the public sector reform has been effective in tackling noncompliance with the off-payroll working rules".

tells you all you need to know. The extra budget cost of paying the increased rates in order to retain key staff that would otherwise have left are not considered when contemplating the "effectiveness".

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Navy names new attack sub HMS Agincourt

Mark 65
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Re: So sad

That the Ministry of Defence still uses such outdated, uninspiring names for its warships.

HMS Britney it is then.

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UK Parliament roars: Oi! Zuck! Get in here for a grilling – or you'll get a Tower of London tour

Mark 65
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Re: fail

I've been trying to warn folk off of Facebook for some time now. but It's to no avail, they are all hooked on it. :(

Pied Piper for the 21st Century.

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Australian SigInt spooks won't get power to spy on locals

Mark 65
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Re: Do it anyway?

Likely already are and were looking to legalise it before anyone gets the hard evidence. Whistle-blower laws a coincidence? All designed to hide the bits they don't want you knowing about.

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Mark 65
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Re: Mr Potato Head

No need for a sentence to describe him when "c*nt" will do.

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Blighty: If EU won't let us play at Galileo, we're going home and taking encryption tech with us

Mark 65
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Trollface

They started it

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Mark 65
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Re: TwatNav

The difference between me and you is that I actually have done my homework - I have enough assets on the continent sufficient for me to have to do it. Something the clowns in the Brexit department of HMG have yet to do by the way.

So go live there and stop your damn whining.

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Mark 65
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Re: Hypocrites

But we were still popular for our skilled high tech industries and major financial trading.

I can assure you that our major financial trading was not popular in the corridors of power in the EU. There were certainly moves afoot to neuter the City and remove whatever power could be taken. Brexit will speed up certain areas but there was always the intent to weaken the hold the City had over European finances as it doesn't suit the EU mandarins to not have absolute control over this aspect, especially when such markets smash your bond prices raising the cost of borrowing for your project.

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Mark 65
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Re: Hypocrites

You seem confused about predictions (and, by the way, the change in value of Sterling happened immediately after the vote, which indeed had a nasty economic effect) and *facts*.

What nasty effect was that, more competitive exports? You do realise that the exchange rate forms a balancing act between how much we export versus import don't you? If a weakened rate caused hardship due to pricier imports it kind of shows that we're importing a little too much, you know that whole unsustainable consumption part of the economy?

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Mark 65
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Re: Hypocrites

Bottom line is this: there are two questions: (1) shall we leave the EU? and (2) if the answer to (1) is yes, what terms?

Bottom line is this: there are two questions: (1) shall we remain in the EU? and (2) if the answer to (1) is yes, what terms?

See how that can work either way? The terms under which you'd stay were/are by no means certain. If you're thinking "the ones we currently have" then I have a bridge to sell you.

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Mark 65
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Re: Hypocrites

The bit that always got me about the Brexit vote was the remain campaign thought that voting against it was a vote to stay in the EU under the current circumstances, as is, ad infinitum (not sure what all of the leave camp though, wide and varied no doubt). Unfortunately this deal was never really on the table. Given the current direction of the EU - closer union, EU army, new members must adopt the Euro etc - it is quite clear that the status quo was never on the table as far as the EU was concerned and eventually there would have to be a reckoning. The UK's position would have gotten ever weaker with the majority no longer willing to be stalled by vetos from a single "not really in" member. To ignore that and think you could keep your current sweet deal is just wilful ignorance.

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Mark 65
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Re: Chokes with laughter

@AC:

...I still won't support Brexit as the freedoms I'm losing are worth much more to me than money.

So move to fucking Europe and quit whining, nobody is stopping you.

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Fancy that, Fancy Bear: LoJack anti-laptop theft tool caught phoning home to the Kremlin

Mark 65
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Read conference materials? I'd be incredibly surprised if they didn't have people writing the materials and making presentations as "researchers" etc.

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Mark 65
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Nah, pretty sure Kanye is just a dick.

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Mark 65
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Re: Worrisome? Yes. Surprising? Not really.

What is more worrisome to me is that the method of persistence is modification of the BIOS/firmware. I understand why it is done, but that would want to be some pretty well quality assured, controlled and secure software to be allowed to do that. I'm also guess a firmware flash by a competent thief nullifies this anyway.

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It's World (Terrible) Password (Advice) Day!

Mark 65
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Missing the point

Maybe I'm missing something with password policies I've encountered online. If a user's password is stored as a salted bcrypt hash, which is presumably then of a fixed length, why do some policies then specifiy 10-18 characters in length? I've witnessed this a number of times and unless it is an arbitrary limit based upon computational resources to repeatedly hash something what point does such a low maximum length serve - I understand the minimum length requirement? I have other accounts where I've used random 30 characters and those sites don't care and just accept them.

Can someone in the know explain this phenomenon?

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Shocker: Cambridge Analytica scandal touch-paper Aleksandr Kogan tapped Twitter data too

Mark 65
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Re: Email Address

That's the whole point about Big Data. It isn't about better relationships with customers etc it has always been about Big Snooping. Collect as many different data sets as possible and then link and analyse. Not that the work isn't interesting but it is certainly creepy. What a lot of people don't realise is that these data sets all end up in one place. They think data from company X and company Y never meets because they belong to rival chains but X & Y will both monetise their grandmothers for a dollar or two. Data brokers - now there's a thing.

Just think...Tweet history, followers and following, Facebook posts, likes and network graph, shopping history, electoral role data, LinkedIn or recruitment agency data etc. There is a shit-tonne of information out there to be analysed.

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Mark 65
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These people are likely posting pictures straight from their phones or from an app on their phones in which case all bets are off. Always thought there should be a setting, much like Lightroom uses on exporting pictures, to strip metadata before sending.

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Windows USB-stick-of-death, router bugs resurrected, and more

Mark 65
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Re: I am surprised at TP-LINK being vulnerable

I think the best direction these days is to look at dd-wrt, open-wrt, tomato, gargoyle etc; decide which one you like; then look at the list of compatible hardware and choose your router from there. Vendor updates seem few and far between and only for the latest models. A decent router can last for many years - as I have little need for AC wireless my 802.11a/b/n router is still just as useful today as it was when I bought it 7 years ago - so it makes sense to go with open firmware and get timely openssl updates.

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nbn™ CEO blames copper for performance problems

Mark 65
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Mandated Telstra dealings

that the use of Telstra copper was a political, not an economic, mandate

Funny that, as of 28/8/2009 the Government's Future Fund (you know, the one that holds the money to cover their superannuation liabilities) held over 1.3bn Telstra shares according to this

statement from the fund itself (10+% of the company)

http://www.futurefund.gov.au/news-room/2016/11/11/media-release---future-fund-sells-34-per-cent-of-its-telstra-holding

I doubt they've made any large sales since as they normally state so.

That's a nice incentive to juice your pension pot. Before anyone dares state "but if they didn't cover it in the fund it would come out of taxation" - it just did. The fuckers.

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Cutting custody snaps too costly for cash-strapped cops – UK.gov

Mark 65
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Re: Too difficult?

She argued that trying to clean up the central database to remove images relating to people without charges might not be worth the time and money, especially as the cops would have to cough up themselves.

Reading that I thought "Is that the best you can come up with?". We need to keep all this illegally retained but nevertheless really handy for facial recognition data because...too hard, much cost, not worth it.

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Yahoo! webmail! hacker! faces! nearly! eight! years! in! the! cooler!

Mark 65
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Baratov's team, meanwhile, contends this was his first run-in with the law and he was in his teens for much of the alleged activity

"The Extenuating circumstances in the instant matter are plentiful. This is Mr Baratov’s first arrest. Additionally, Mr Baratov was under the age of 22 during the majority of the time that he hacked email accounts," they argue [PDF].

To these two points I would respond:

1. First run-in with the law simply translates to first time caught breaking it

2. Who gives a shit? He was an adult and the age of criminal responsibility is substantially lower.

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There is no perceived IT generation gap: Young people really are thick

Mark 65
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Re: That takes me back

For anyone over the age of 40, these doughnuts look just like the crumbly bleached dog turds you’d see decorating every pavement curb corner.

White moulder.

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No way, RSA! Security conference's mobile app embarrassingly insecure

Mark 65
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Re: Which is more embarrassing?

More embarassing?

RSA has maintained that it didn't take the NSA's money to bork its own products.

How about them feeling incompetence is the better option for a security outfit?

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Apple's magical quality engineering strikes again: You may want to hold off that macOS High Sierra update...

Mark 65
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Re: countless issues

High Sierra is looking like Apple’s Windows ME. From what I have read on here and other sites it has been a monumental hubris filled fuck up from start to finish. Even though he could be “you’re holding it wrong” arrogant, I do not believe shit like this would have been tolerated in the latter part of Jobs’ reign.

Apple may be cash rich but it seems like there are some serious problems emerging - is the quality control a reflection of a cultural malaise?

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ISO blocks NSA's latest IoT encryption systems amid murky tales of backdoors and bullying

Mark 65
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Re: Why does each IoT device need strong encryption?

There’s clearly two categories of IoT device here, medical implants and everything else. For the latter the OP makes a valid point. For health implants I’d argue they need to be very short range and engineered entirely different from a convenience widget.

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Mark 65
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Re: "Leaving the Standards Authority with no choice but to"

Word’s document format isn’t really a lingering concern for most although it is likely a security hazard.

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Mark 65
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Re: NSA helped Microsoft "secure" Windows Vista

I have always wondered how “if they have physical access the game is over” and “secure cloud services” can live together. If you don’t control the hardware, the firmware, the virtualisation layer etc how secure can it really be, especially in a post spectre/meltdown world?

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Chinese web giant finds Windows zero-day, stays schtum on specifics

Mark 65
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Price to be paid

Microsoft would far prefer that users stopped using Internet Explorer and adopted its Edge browser instead. Some users are proving stubborn, though: according to Net Market Share, IE still has a rusted-on 12 per cent of the browser market.

That's the price you have to pay for stepping away from the W3C standards and implementing the shit that is/was IE6 that countless organisations are now dependent upon due to legacy author-gone-bust applications using some of its various quirks.

Karma.

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UK spy agency warns Brit telcos to flee from ZTE gear

Mark 65
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Re: Semantics

Surely it should say "Oop North"

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Mark 65
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Re: "excellent prices"

So that went well...

Certainly did for the little shit's bank balance.

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Mark 65
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Re: Irony Abounds

Am i the only one that see the irony in the 5 eyes, on one hand bleating about the security issues with Chinese gear and with the other demanding back-doors into all gear?

Whilst I understand your sentiment, would you rather they did nothing and we perhaps got royally owned due to use of the kit? They'd be absolutely slated for not pointing out the issues. Spying on your own people is shitty and used to be supposedly illegal but spying on foreigners and protecting our own comms. is their primary reason for existence.

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France wants you to put lights and beacons on your drone

Mark 65
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Not so sure

Though registration of all drones weighing more than 250 grams will certainly happen over here

A law requiring it may certainly happen but I very much doubt compliance "certainly" will. Heck, there are some that still drive with no MoT or insurance so it's unlikely to be complied with. More likely will be its convenient use by the police to then search, fingerprint, DNA swab you etc.

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UK health service boss in the guts of WannaCry outbreak warns of more nasty code infections

Mark 65
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Re: they will not learn...

Taylor said NHS Digital has developed a much more comprehensive disaster recovery plan since the WannaCry attack before embarking on a rigorous, ongoing testing regime. "The thing we’ve done since that is test, and test, and test again... when [anything] does happen, we’ll be in a much better position.”

and the point he's clearly missing is that the whole endeavour was preventable - prevention being better than a cure. Whilst it's essential to have a good well tested back-to-normal-ops plan, patching your shit would be better. Not using legacy operating systems where avoidable would be good and perhaps going for something like a Wyse terminal connecting to server sessions may be advisable (again, where appropriate).

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They're back! 'Feds only' encryption backdoors prepped in US by Dems

Mark 65
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Re: Simple, just call: 36-24-36

Moneytalks.

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Mark 65
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Into a coma would be nice.

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