* Posts by Mark 65

3030 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

Chinese web giant finds Windows zero-day, stays shtum on specifics

Mark 65
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Price to be paid

Microsoft would far prefer that users stopped using Internet Explorer and adopted its Edge browser instead. Some users are proving stubborn, though: according to Net Market Share, IE still has a rusted-on 12 per cent of the browser market.

That's the price you have to pay for stepping away from the W3C standards and implementing the shit that is/was IE6 that countless organisations are now dependent upon due to legacy author-gone-bust applications using some of its various quirks.

Karma.

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UK spy agency warns Brit telcos to flee from ZTE gear

Mark 65
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Re: Semantics

Surely it should say "Oop North"

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Mark 65
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Re: "excellent prices"

So that went well...

Certainly did for the little shit's bank balance.

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Mark 65
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Re: Irony Abounds

Am i the only one that see the irony in the 5 eyes, on one hand bleating about the security issues with Chinese gear and with the other demanding back-doors into all gear?

Whilst I understand your sentiment, would you rather they did nothing and we perhaps got royally owned due to use of the kit? They'd be absolutely slated for not pointing out the issues. Spying on your own people is shitty and used to be supposedly illegal but spying on foreigners and protecting our own comms. is their primary reason for existence.

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France wants you to put lights and beacons on your drone

Mark 65
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Not so sure

Though registration of all drones weighing more than 250 grams will certainly happen over here

A law requiring it may certainly happen but I very much doubt compliance "certainly" will. Heck, there are some that still drive with no MoT or insurance so it's unlikely to be complied with. More likely will be its convenient use by the police to then search, fingerprint, DNA swab you etc.

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UK health service boss in the guts of WannaCry outbreak warns of more nasty code infections

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Re: they will not learn...

Taylor said NHS Digital has developed a much more comprehensive disaster recovery plan since the WannaCry attack before embarking on a rigorous, ongoing testing regime. "The thing we’ve done since that is test, and test, and test again... when [anything] does happen, we’ll be in a much better position.”

and the point he's clearly missing is that the whole endeavour was preventable - prevention being better than a cure. Whilst it's essential to have a good well tested back-to-normal-ops plan, patching your shit would be better. Not using legacy operating systems where avoidable would be good and perhaps going for something like a Wyse terminal connecting to server sessions may be advisable (again, where appropriate).

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They're back! 'Feds only' encryption backdoors prepped in US by Dems

Mark 65
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Re: Simple, just call: 36-24-36

Moneytalks.

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Mark 65
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Into a coma would be nice.

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Mark 65
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Re: There is God given right to privacy

Next time anyone says that line I'm going to ask them if they approve of the methods used by the Stasi in East Germany during the cold war.

To which the honest answer should be yes seeing as how, information wise, we are way beyond their wettest dreams already. The general public posting everything on Facebook has been a great help. Imagine going back in time and telling the head of the Stasi that in 40+ years time you wouldn't need lots of spies or torture as the public would just offer up their thoughts, opinions, relationships etc for free in a giant cesspool of searchable data because they actually believe your catchphrase (and that of every despotic regime) of "nothing to hide, nothing to fear".

Who'd have thought re-education would simply involve lowering standards of education and letting nature take its course?

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Mark 65
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Re: We need a name for this, and I'll throw one out there:

Implemented using the all new Unicorn Chip.

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Mark 65
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Re: Criminal Defence

Considering the US is the country in which an accomplice burglar was convicted of murder and sentenced to 95 years after a police officer shot the other burglar dead when they were trying to escape.

The US has been the undeniable leader of the worst judicial system on the planet that masquerades as being fair or just for quite some time and by quite some margin. Countries with similar systems are often just accused of being openly corrupt rather than "the land of the free" - who says they don't understand irony?

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Mark 65
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Re: Political mindset extrapolation

Being smart isn't a prerequisite to being elected. Being a greasy rent-seeking parasite seems to be though.

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Mark 65
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...maybe you will be motivated to only store them on a device you've bothered to look through the firmware for?

Yeah, because leading phone models never get pen-tested by independents who actually have a clue what they're looking at do they? If things like the Intel/AMD design faults get discovered I'm pretty sure ant firmware or, more importantly, hardware ones will. And that is the point, your firmware may be open but what about the hardware underneath?

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Mind the gap: Men paid 18.6% more than women in Blighty tech sector

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@jabuzz: Not true. In the financial services sector you sign an exemption form. "Why would you do that?" - they won't be employing you otherwise.

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AWS baits cloud hooks with DeepLens machine learning camera

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There's a good reason for developers delve into AI disciplines: Companies are looking to hire AI experts. As with security, high-level talent is scarce.

As usual, companies want the latest and greatest at minimal cost. Although high-level talent may be rare, no training will be offered as self-starters are cheaper in the wage race to the bottom. This will end with people who don't know what they're doing pointing "deep learning" at every possible problem 'cos AI and swearing results they don't comprehend - obtained through a methodology they don't understand and most likely is inapplicable to the task in the first place - are gospel.

Already seeing it where I work. Apparently every problem ever can be solved though "Machine Learning". Jesus wept. The problem I want solving is "why their parents procreated".

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EUROCONTROL outage causes flight delays across Europe

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So some fuckwit was able to connect test code to the prod database or thereabouts? Unbelievable. Zero segregation of networks. That reliability to date is clearly through luck not planning.

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Why a merged Apple OS is one mash-up too far

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Re: OS !== UX && OS !== CPU

Isn't this where Microsoft was going with Continuum on Windows Phone? Plug it in and you get a Windows PC.

The thought of the registry being on my phone, ewwwwwwwwwwwwwww!

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Mark 65
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Re: Chip shortages...

Unless they're building their own foundry, chip shortages will still be a problem as it is down to capacity of your outsourced production. Storage and RAM are normally the bottlenecks rather than the processor.

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Students: Duh, of course we're blowing our loan bucks on crypto coins

Mark 65
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Re: What has become of students!

Well, they have a good chance of getting fucked...albeit financially. That will then likely lead to consumption of alcohol to drown sorrows. Fait accompli.

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Mark 65
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Re: Investing?

I'd also question the use of the term "investing". "Punting" perhaps, "gambling" maybe, but not "investing".

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Uber self-driving car death riddle: Was LIDAR blind spot to blame?

Mark 65
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Re: "...a [Lidar] blind spot low to the ground all around the car."

The question is: did the bike and pedestrian reflect laser light?

My question is more "what the fuck was the supervising meat-sack doing whilst this 'testing' was going on?". I'd have though that in any such test the human in the vehicle is still ultimately in charge else why be there at all? Not sure whether it was media bias and selective edits or not but the video I saw of the inside of the vehicle showed them paying zero attention to the road ahead when the accident occurred. Not really how a supervised test is really supposed to work.

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What's silent but violent and costs $250m? Yes, it's Lockheed Martin's super-quiet, supersonic X-plane for NASA

Mark 65
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I remember when I stayed a my Gran's house as a kid I used to go outside around 5-6pm (vaguely from memory) to watch Concord fly over. Never tired of hearing the noise and seeing something so different to all the other aircraft.

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Billion-dollar investor tells Facebook: Just Zuck off, already!

Mark 65
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Re: Its Not Just Videos That Aren't DELETED

If you ever had an account, they can still track and follow you

No more or less so than if you don't have an account, and not as much as if your browser is permanently logged in to Facebook.

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Europe dumps 300,000 UK-owned .EU domains into the Brexit bin

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Re: EURid

Can't beat a bit of petty-minded spite though can you.

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Why you shouldn't trust a stranger's VPN: Plenty leak your IP addresses

Mark 65
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Re: IPv6

Mine merely shows my VPN endpoint so all is well - advantage of using router based VPN. The fucks the ISP and the local council off. The nation state actors will likely be able to correlate / aggregate from various site access timings.

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Mark 65
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Re: disabling WebRTC

I'd amend that to be "don't use a VPN provider for doing something untrustworthy". If all you're doing is hiding metadata from your ISP and forcing your Govt to get a warrant rather than having the local dogshit warden read your emails then all is well. If you're a dissident or need better protection then I'm afraid you need better spycraft.

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Intel outside: Apple 'prepping' non-Chipzilla Macs by 2020 (stop us if you're having deja vu)

Mark 65
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Re: This doesn't surprise me

@Aitor 1: Macbook Air battery life with Macbook Pro 13" performance? To be honest, with the iPad Pro that end of the product line seems a little cramped. Perhaps it is an upward creep to the Macbook Pro line as they feel they are constantly waiting around for a performance/power kicker from Intel? That would give more synergy (MBA-ism, sorry) between the iPad Pro line and the next portable item up, leaving the real meat of performance in a (hopefully) revamped Mac Pro which would (presumably) remain Xeon.

iMac and Mac Pro to be Xeon, all else Apple ARM? Given where the bulk of sales sits it kind of makes sense to be master of desired characteristics in the volume segment and just buy in at the server-grade end from Intel/AMD.

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Mark 65
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Re: "cheaper than Intel"

Economies of scale are the vendor's profits not your saved costs. Sure, they pass on a little for bulk orders but, just like cloud providers, those economies add to their profits not your savings - there's a reason Bezos is loaded and it ain't his altruistic generosity.

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Re: This doesn't surprise me

I don't really see any evidence or logical reason why they would remove macOS either. It would essentially completely kill their Mac business as iOS is absolutely not a competent replacement for a proper desktop OS. I would drop Macs like a stone if that were to happen and never look back.

Unfortunately given the history and current direction of Apple that doesn't mean they wouldn't jump off of this particular cliff in the name of short-termism. The MBAs are piloting the ship at present and seem to be disappearing up their own arses. More engineering and less form over function now desperately required.

Their so-called modular Mac Pro replacement could be the make or break for the future of the Mac desktop and OSX in general. iMac Pro may have power but it has shit heat characteristics with poor upgrade-ability and part replacement capability. It's been 5 years and counting - it best be f'cking good.

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Re: The only fly in the ointment...

All the native OSX stuff is an update upgrade from the App store or recompile away.

FTFY.

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Mark 65
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Re: Why?

Existing machines won't stop working, nor will their CPUs change the instruction sets they use.

+1 for subscription software? Just kidding, you've more than paid for the update.

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Mark 65
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Re: Makes a lot of sense

Please tell me why I should care whether my C or other compiler level language is executed by an ARM, Intel, Motorola, MIPS, IBM, or other processor.

The endless merry-go-round of version upgrade fees on all your major applications, sometimes because a lot of work was involved and other times just because they can?

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This could be anything from an attempt to create a lower end laptop a la Chromebook with better performance/energy characteristics than they could achieve using Intel chips to a way of end-to-end controlling the entire ecosystem with a handy side effect of removing Hackintosh boxes from it (although I believe they tolerate and don't care about that side ecosystem due to the potential for up-sell).

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Apple, if you want to win in education, look at what sucks about iPads

Mark 65
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I think that iPads work great in education for older kids who have their own personal one and use it to cart around text books and to take notes etc - more something for the private school than the state one. Same for University where you may want the texts, the multimedia, the touch/pen interaction, the battery life and the low weight. For me the typical state school use should revolve more around a computer lab with machines that run off of network images like an internet cafe such that the machines are ready to go at the start of each lesson and pretty much guaranteed to work. Storage can be quota'd on a network.

I've always felt the "hand out the shared iPads" mentality smacked of convenience over outright practicality. Just because the kids have them at home doesn't mean they are fit for purpose in the classroom, especially once cost and budgets are considered.

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World celebrates, cyber-snoops cry as TLS 1.3 internet crypto approved

Mark 65
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Re: Round we go again

The backdoor that was defeated - that was just a diversion. The real backdoor is the 0-RTT Resumption. Sure it relies on access to the machine but when has that caused the security agencies an issue? There's plenty of zero days to go around for that. This is undoubtedly their "in". Does it provide access to prior conversations as well as continuing? Who knows but I'm sure they'll be all over this.

It never ceases to amaze me how this shit continues to happen. Backdoor argued for. Discussion ensues. Concept defeated. Much praising. Security bods spot another issue. Swept under the carpet for reason "X". Likely flawed security protocol enacted.

FFS when will we learn that convenience is the enemy of security?

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Amazon warns you have 30 days before Music Storage files bloodbath

Mark 65
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Re: Aaaahhhh... the Cloud...

I used to think the same. I simply view the cloud as where my data is stored if my house is burgled or burned down, or burgled and burned down. That's as well as the onsite and offsite backups. It's just one more layer and it certainly isn't my go-to backup.

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You also need the means to read the data. That is why the millennials will have the paradox of having taken more photographic records of their lives then previous generations - but will have then lost them.

There is no guarantee that the next generation of computing equipment will have the hardware/software to process the data.

Please explain. I have yet to find a camera format that open source RAW file readers have "forgotten how to read". Storage is constantly evolving and hence you will always have periods of overlap whereby you can transfer files, especially given how transfer rates keep improving - IDE -> SATA -> NVMe. I can still read data CDs and they went out of fashion a fair while ago. Therefore I fail to understand your comment regarding having a local copy but not the means to read it, it makes no sense.

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Bitcoin's blockchain: Potentially a hazardous waste dump of child abuse, malware, etc

Mark 65
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Re: Since when is currency clean?

If it would survive to the present day it could be auctioned for millions even if it had accummulated a thick layer of shit.

You could argue Bitcoin has attracted more than a thick layer of shit thus far.

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Ex-GCHQ boss: All the ways to go after Russia. Why pick cyberwar?

Mark 65
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Re: Nothing new here, move on.

My objection to talking as if the chap and his daughter were already dead was because, I feel, it is in rather poor taste.

To be fair, from what I have read online about the affects of nerve agents (even when treated) the results are not good. Given the amount of time they were exposed before receiving treatment they are likely to be utterly fucked if they survive if they're not already clinically dead.

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OK, deep breath, relax... Let's have a sober look at these 'ere annoying AMD chip security flaws

Mark 65
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I thought it would be obvious by now that we are all being played for suckers with these never ending security issues. I know of a group of people (using Windows 7) who have not updated for nearly a year now and they have had ZERO security issues with their computers.

The think they've had ZERO security issues. FTFY. The point of some of these exploits is it is near impossible to tell. More so for people who haven't updated in 12 months and have saloon doors for security.

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Capita screw-ups are the pits! Brit ex-miner pensioners billed for thousands in extra tax

Mark 65
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Maybe el reg needs a crapita corner, a weekly round of the weeks outsourcing screw ups.

Should copying the naming from Viz's "Up the arse" corner seeing as that's more how it is turning out for those paying the bill.

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Co-op Bank's shonky IT in spotlight as delayed probe given go-ahead

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Re: UNCOOPERATIVE

If they're bad compared to Nat West then they really must be shit.

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Mark 65
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Re: Raid on COOP

Given the chief complaint seems to be the risk levels in the loan book it would be through unrecoverable debt. You borrow to build a business that is high risk or with a low probability of being viable long term and subsequently go titsup. The money has been lost on setting up and running a business that couldn't repay its debt. Depending on the business the recoverable amount may be low digit pennies in the pound. Likewise if you made 105% loans on overpriced housing that went to shit post GFC. Do this enough times and you'll get your £1.5bn.

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Mark 65
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Re: "banned the bank's disgraced former chairman"

To be honest if I'd caused a loss of this magnitude I'd expect my sanction to be a little more than "you can still have an extremely highly paid job, just not in this sector". Fine or sentence would be more in order.

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Mark 65
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So fuck 'em.

Yet from your previous post I get the impression you still bank with them? Hardly fucking them is it sir? The only notice a financial institution will take of you is when you up and leave, especially if enough join you in doing so. Staying put and ranting? They couldn't give less of a shit about it.

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FBI chief asks tech industry to build crypto-busting not-a-backdoor

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Re: I'm sure they know better

Several posters here have mentioned "but the bad guys won't use the new flawed encryption". I am left wondering whether they were ever the target but rather this is a long term operation to ensure mass data collection is kept viable. They had the comms companies on the payroll but then we went https. They were into the tech companies but then they switched to encrypted at rest and in transit with independent keys to which said companies had no access. People are gradually using more and more secure chat/messaging systems. It would appear that LE can see the limit to only being able to grab Facebook data with all else disappearing from view and they're trying to be a little pro-active (albeit too late) about maintaining their feeds.

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Mark 65
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Re: I'm sure they know better

Not going to happen for several reasons:

1. By laying waste to their software/services industry they open the door for others. There's big money involved so why would other countries forgo both the economic boost and tax grab?

2. The genie cannot be put back into the bottle.

3. No financial institution will stand for weakened encryption as, in most reasonable countries, they are responsible for any losses incurred by weakness in their systems. Alter this burden and you destroy your banking sector also.

They can try as they might, but they are fucked on this one and they know it. Hence the persistent wailing.

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WordPress is now 30 per cent of the web, daylight second

Mark 65
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Re: It could be worse...

Except most often it isn't. I known several graphics designer types (who aren't really even proper graphic designers but just did a course) who specialise in charging high fees to create custom websites for idiots with more money than sense that use Dreamweaver to pop out little WWW turds on a regular basis. They got into it because they had time on their hands after the kids went to school full time and it was a nice little earner. They cannot code for shit and have zero concept of the way anything should be setup but can drag, drop, and publish. Job done.

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Brit semiconductor tech ended up in Chinese naval railgun – report

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Re: China

@AC: The US will undoubtedly default on its debt as it has absolutely fuck all chance of ever repaying it. It can't even inflate it away it grows so fast.

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Brit spooks slammed over 'gentlemen's agreement' with telcos to get mass comms data

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Re: Give them an inch...

When your title states "Give them an inch..." are you referring to the security services or to the politicians? They're both duplicitous pricks in my books.

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