* Posts by Mark 65

2819 posts • joined 11 Jun 2009

iRobot just banked a fat profit. And it knows how to make more: By selling maps of your homes

Mark 65
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Re: Dodgy story

But it does a b***** good job with my floors. Especially the bedroom carpet, which (being deeper than others in the house) was visibly cleaner after the roomba than it ever had been after cleaning with a conventional upright vacuum cleaner.

All I can say is that you must have a really shit vacuum if one of these undergassed battery powered fluff flickers does a better job. I haven't encountered one yet that will even come close to my Miele.

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No time for nap, update your QNAP: RAIDed NAS data corruption bug squashed

Mark 65
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Re: This article should be a you should never buy a qnap array again.

I'll be honest, I love my QNAP NAS. I own one of the more expensive i5 powered variants that can, and does, run various servers on it. I like its compact size, hot swappable drives, web interface etc. However, this sort of thing does concern me - that whole aspect of not overly being in control of your own destiny. Also I have noted a change in QNAP with regards quality. My expensive NAS has plastic disk trays. My older 4 bay QNAP has nicer metal ones. Needless to say the plastic ones resonate at times - a touch irritating given the price tag and I suspect due to the quick release drive holding mechanism. I would prefer them to be metal with rubber grommets on the drive contact points. I also had an issue with them about firmware behaviour with a UPS system which mysteriously fixed itself with a firmware update that made no mention of fixes to the UPS software or configuration.

I originally came from a tower pc running Ubuntu as my "NAS" but downsized for the size and power savings along with the more appropriate interface for the task. If I were replacing the system today then I think I would do so by building my own box and running one of the NAS-targeted distributions or a linux server variant such as Ubuntu, Centos etc. At least that way fixes would be more readily available as would the ability to modify (or not) the settings and packages as I saw fit. The argument for a QNAP is, after all, that they have performed all the quality control and packaged up everything so it should just work - this is not what seems to be happening.

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TechnologyOne says City of Brisbane ignored its own reviews

Mark 65
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Useless twats meet inept parasites. Match made in heaven. Get the lawyers involved for the gravy train shitfest trifecta.

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G Suite admins have just one button to secure their sites, but don't

Mark 65
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Chances are if so many are getting it wrong it is either not obvious or has the wrong default value.

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The lady (or man) vanishes: The thorny issue of GDPR coding

Mark 65
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Re: @AC

The proliferation of copies of data is one of the prime 'crimes' of IT today.

But your backups and archives are presumably going to be caught up by this legislation also. Be a nice job for someone cleaning out records from backup sets, do the geniuses in the EU specify how this is to happen?

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Tapping the Bank of Mum and Dad: Why your Netflix subscription is poised to rise (again)

Mark 65
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While Uber has a clear path to monopoly profits one day – by wiping out the local taxi competition and installing itself as a municipalities delivery infrastructure – Netflix's path to world domination is much more questionable and tenuous.

I sincerely doubt that this will happen either. Uber is a money pit. Somewhere where VC dollars go to die. They are gaining market share by VCs subsidising the cost of your fare. At some point the VC dollars will dry up and Uber will be gone.

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Cops harpoon two dark net whales in megabust: AlphaBay and Hansa

Mark 65
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I thought it was known as "evolution"

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One-quarter of UK.gov IT projects at high risk of failure

Mark 65
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Re: Point of order, madam chairperson

"seems to imply" is your inference and is incorrect. "In the NHS" in this instance was referring to "within the realm of" or "in the area of" and not "by the NHS". The point being that it is a project by whomever targeting a massive user of IT for which it sucks up christ knows how many dollars out of the theatre side of the operation. Anything more malware resilient and reliable lacking the standover capabilities of a vendor such as MS would be an improvement.

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Mark 65
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Users hate it because "it looks different". When you look at their reasons for hating it you can pretty much discount it as typical whiny user bullshit. Hell, move from 7 to 10 and "it looks different". Look at the work that is being done in the NHS (article recently on El Reg) to produce a distribution that can be used across the system that would cut license fees and standardise desktops not to mention reduce hospital shutting malware issues.

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Let's harden Internet crypto so quantum computers can't crack it

Mark 65
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Re: Possible deadly flaw - compromised software

One more reason to use open source software then?

I'm also pretty sure that researchers would be able to check whether the key generator / random number generator in IE/Edge is producing shite. It's not like there wouldn't be many eyes (more than just the 5 usuals) looking at this aspect.

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Jodie Who-ttaker? The Doctor is in

Mark 65
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Re: Sorry, but ...

I think the Doctor should have come back as K-9.

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UK spookhaus GCHQ can crack end-to-end encryption, claims Australian A-G

Mark 65
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Re: Let Pi = 3

You missed option 4 - attack the endpoint. If I have the ability to run code as root on your device then chances are I can get at the data before it gets encrypted thus, in "Brandisology" I have cracked the end-to-end encryption. This is how they plan on doing it and GB is just another legal fuckknuckle that cannot comprehend what he's being told. All the more reason to get some sort of Qubes for mobes.

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Mark 65
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Physics is just applied mathematics, so gravity will be easy-peasy

I always remember my physics teacher saying that mathematics was just a subset of physics, but then he would say that wouldn't he?

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Slower US F-35A purchases piles $27bn onto total fighter jet bill

Mark 65
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Re: How much for one?

With the price levels and delays being reached by this white elephant I would not be surprised to see them superseded by drones before ever going into mass service. Greater G-force can be encountered, less worries about an expensive to train meatsack.

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Former GCHQ boss backs end-to-end encryption

Mark 65
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Re: Pah.

The problem I have with his concept of 5eyes and tech companies working together to allow the circumvention i.e. bugging the device rather than backdooring the actual apps is that we will then end up with mass circumvention because these arseholes just cannot help themselves.

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Everything you need to know about the Petya, er, NotPetya nasty trashing PCs worldwide

Mark 65
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Re: The real blame goes to..

It still amazes me how people are using bog-standard OS variants for critical tasks. Maersk for their global shipping operations and whomever is in charge of monitoring radiation at Chernobyl. Sure, there's likely some forced aspect of software X only runs on Windows but for massive companies with real market power and scientists I cannot see why you wouldn't enforce the usage of a hardened OS suitable for the task. Some suitable Linux variant springs to mind.

How many times must an OS fail in critical applications before the right people have a fucking light bulb moment?

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Mozilla dev and Curl inventor Daniel Stenberg denied travel to USA

Mark 65
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Re: So ESTA can't manage reliable data transfer but its the passengers who get it in the neck.

More to the point

“ESTA” is the Electronic System for Travel Authorization and is a pre-screening program for citizens of nations that don't need a visa to visit the United States. Securing an ESTA authorization takes a few minutes on a dedicated web site and costs US$4 to apply and then a further $10 if approved, whereupon the US Department of Homeland Security lets your airline know it's okay for you to board.

That looks and smells like an electronic visa to me.

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Photobucket says photo-f**k-it, starts off-site image shakedown

Mark 65
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Re: Pulling The Rug From Under People's Feet

It works almost everywhere. It's called market inertia

More like "bait and switch"

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Mark 65
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Re: "That includes free/cheap being a temporary illusion,"

A national health service is just about the only viable and effective way to provide one. If it is private you effectively get held to ransom over your health. How much are you willing to pay to carry on living a worthwhile existence with full mobility and a functioning body? Politicians (and people like the OP of the "socialist" rant) don't seem to get how the main things a society (and economy) needs are healthy, educated workers and a minimal legal framework within which everyone can operate. Minimal because things will find a natural equilibrium provided abuse (or lobbying) is not tolerated.

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Australian govt promises to push Five Eyes nations to break encryption

Mark 65
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Re: Imminent danger.

Man, I have and will always believe that George Brandis is a fucking despot. One seriously nasty piece of work. He is an absolute stooge for the 3 letter agencies. No doubt they have photos on him.

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Queensland Police want access to locked devices

Mark 65
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Re: I used to really think Australia would be a cool place to live

Sorry, but that is a bullshit counter argument. The truck driver will not be waiting for an hour unless he's a fucking idiot and so's his employer. Dawn varies in time throughout the year by more than 1 hour so if cows are milked "when the sun rises" then his arrival time varies from around 4am to around 6am throughout the year. He's based on sunrise + X, so daylight savings makes no difference.

As for the North of 40C at 8pm argument - so what? If that 8pm stayed as 7pm then North of 40C at 7pm is not likely to drop by too much by 8pm. If you live in that kind of heat zone then you have air con or sit and sweat. 1hr does not make a difference to that.

The "no daylight savings" arguments in QLD are archaic and simply shit-kicking in my opinion. I believe they stem more from a desire to be different from the rest of the eastern seaboard than anything based in reality. More a case of "NSW want us to but they can get fucked cos we don't take orders from the likes of them blues" than fact-based.

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Mark 65
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Re: Folks are dumb where they come from

Hmmm, you could think that way but I prefer to think that if it gets over the line in QLD it'll soon be present in NSW and VIC especially given the fun-police legislation south of the border. There's nothing they like more in NSW than a bit of "rule your life/can-do can't-do" on the books.

Ever tried drinking spirits in Sydney because you may prefer a good Whiskey or G & T more than an over-fizzed beer? Best of luck with that - you may get your first but try for two or three and see what happens.

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Mark 65
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Re: Restricting Complaint is nasty

The bill's explanatory note (PDF) complains that currently, Police can't demand “relevant information” from people who aren't suspects in a terrorist incident, but are thought to know something that might help an investigation.

The bill also seeks to silence citizens who've had their phone searched. Currently, “there is no requirement for a person to keep confidential the fact that information is being sought”.

So there's "thought to know something" and silencing, anything left in 1984 that hasn't been covered?

Given the history rife with police and political corruption in the state of Queensland (Fitzgerald era etc.) I wouldn't trust these pricks with the steam off of my piss let alone a far reaching piece of legislation such as this.

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Google hit with record antitrust fine of €2.4bn by Europe

Mark 65
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Re: but fines cannot be a solution

Microsoft NEVER prevented users from installing and using Netscape

I believe that, on more than one occasion, updates that were installed on users machines via the usual patching process decided to set IE back to the default browser. That right there is a breach. The user made their "FREEDOM of choice" selection and MS decided "no thanks".

MS were a massive abuser of monopoly power especially when it came to PC manufacturers installing the OS by default - have a little read through history of the shit they pulled for that to occur.

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Mark 65
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Microsoft has been dealt with, on the others you're generally wrong. Juniper, Sql Server/PostgreSQL/MySql etc, Cray, and who fucking cares about social networking.

You need to understand just what level of market share Google has and hence how much power it has in order to appreciate you then get to play by a special set of regulatory rules due to that power. MS found out in the past.

Why Google now and MSFT in the 90s? Errr, not sure but I'm guessing that's when they offended.

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Idea to encrypt stuff on the web at rest hits the IETF's Standard Track

Mark 65
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AES 128

Rather, Thomson's RFC suggests using AES 128 in Galois/Counter Mode.

By choosing AES 128, and given the amount of time this may take to come to fruition, are we not MD5/SHA1-ing ourselves here? It's just possible by the time this gets implemented AES 128 is not as safe as it used to be. Given the amount of processor power available in just about any chip these days, especially when you can have embedded AES circuitry, should we not be shooting for AES 256 just to be on the safe side?

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F-Secure's Mikko Hypponen on IoT: If it uses electricity, it will go online

Mark 65
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Re: Save me from the evil "Things"!

Whispernets. Direct, unblockable connection. Try to cage them and they'll brick.

Breach of Christ knows how many sales and consumer goods acts anywhere outside the US. Fit for purpose etc. Ain't gonna happen.

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Mark 65
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If all manufacturers are doing it then a new one will appear that doesn't do it, provided that is what the customer base wants (rather than a few individuals). That is just basic economics. Don't even think that a major player wouldn't break ranks if it meant it could steal market share.

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Mark 65
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Re: "We can't avoid the IoT revolution by refusing to play part."

I don't understand his statement of

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Hypponen says IoT is unavoidable. "If it uses electricity, it will become a computer. If it uses electricity, it will be online. In future, you will only buy IoT appliances, whether you like it or not, whether you know it or not.

</quote>

It either needs a connection, i.e. through my router which I will not allow, or it comes with its own communication method such as 3G/4G etc in which case his software is pointless. Either way no sale.

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FOIA documents show the Kafkaesque state of US mass surveillance

Mark 65
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Re: "Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court,"

Hard to believe that this exists in a country that proclaims so loudly it's support for a right to a fair trial and due process.

I normally apply the doctrine of "thou doth protesteth too much". Any country that harks on about how free and fair it is, invariably isn't. There may have been a point in its history when it was but that time has long since passed.

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Samsung releases 49-inch desktop monitor with 32:9 aspect ratio

Mark 65
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Re: 125% of the sRGB colour spectrum

For true photo editing you'll be using an NEC or an Eizo ColorEdge.

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Software dev bombshell: Programmers who use spaces earn MORE than those who use tabs

Mark 65
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Re: A question

Don't most IDEs these days have a setting to convert tabs to spaces?

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Brit hacker admits he siphoned info from US military satellite network

Mark 65
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I believe the big number is there to justify a request for a long sentence. You could hardly ask for years for $13.

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Mark 65
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Re: I Wonder

My guess is that he's a fuckwit. Now looks can be deceiving, but in the photo he's either been up all night or he looks a bit "challenged". I would hypothesise that he didn't really know what he was doing and was either directed by someone else or, more likely, found some toolkit on a forum somewhere a "gave it a crack". To not even use Tor for the hacking or, better, use Tor to research how to hack shit without leaving a dirty great Hansel and Gretel trail to your bedroom smacks of ineptitude. Unencrypted bounty on the HDD just adds to it.

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WikiLeaks emits CIA's Wi-Fi pwnage tool docs

Mark 65
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Yet another reason to buy an open-wrt/dd-wrt/gargoyle/tomato compatible router and flash the firmware.

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Australian oppn. leader wants to do something about Bitcoin, because terrorism and crypto

Mark 65
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Re: Oh Dear.....

Breaking bitcoin is not about anonymity or terrorism it is about controlling money and being able to tax shit. Bitcoin gives rise to a potential "World Currency" that is harder to print like it's going out of fashion or tax into oblivion to pay for your asshatted spending plans. At present banks control money (and Governments) and they'd like it to stay that way. Disintermediation is not in their interest.

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FreeNAS releases version 11, so let us put the unpleasantness of failed V.10 behind us

Mark 65
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Re: "WTF is a NAS doing hosting virtual machines?" Quite, just because you can...

Several reasons for running VMs on a NAS:

  • The VM is sat on the machine where the data storage it requires resides thereby removing the lag of accessing data over 1Gb/s link in a home environment vs straight off of the RAID array.
  • You wish to run software such as Crashplan which doesn't run on your NAS natively but can be run in a Linux Server VM on top accessing a read-only share aggregating the folders that need to be backed up.
  • You want to run SabNZBd, Couchpotato, and Sickbeard/Sickrage/Sonnar on your system and it won't run natively, or will run natively but keeps getting fucked up by firmware updates therefore segregating it into a nice Linux Server VM and giving it limited storage access makes a lot of sense.
  • You may wish to run a build server, dev environment, Jupyter instance etc etc on a machine that otherwise sits there doing not a lot

There are many reasons, just because none appeal to you does not mean others are wrong to do so.

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Europe-wide BitTorrent indexer blockade looms after Pirate Bay blow

Mark 65
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Re: So freetards will change their DNS and life will carry on

@AC: That just ends up as whackamole

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Look who's joined the anti-encryption posse: Germany, come on down

Mark 65
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It is clear from the German interior minister's comments that it is focusing on the third, most pragmatic solution: gaining access to someone's phone or other device.

It is also clear that such behaviour will rapidly lead to wide availability of a Qubes style OS for smartphones in order to prevent said pricks from installing shit on everyone's phone because, as we all know, they just simply cannot help themselves when it comes to mass rather than targeted surveillance.

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Record number of non-EU techies coming to Blighty

Mark 65
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Re: Skills Gap

Failing to get decent candidates or failing to get decent candidates at the rate you want to pay? Either way there is a talent vs pay mismatch, only who is at fault is up for grabs.

The fact you mention "normal pay" leads me to think the problem may be on your side.

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Mark 65
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Re: Skills Gap

I'm pretty certain there isn't a skills gap in the IT market. Wanting to pay sub-market rates for skills and, hence, getting few responses does not constitute a skills shortage. I've witnessed now in several cities around the world the age old "recruiter advertises for highly skilled role at highly unlikely pay level, nobody applies, prospective employer appeals to Government for skilled visas" scam. It's bullshit and always has been.

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Ta-ta, security: Bungling Tata devs leaked banks' code on public GitHub repo, says IT bloke

Mark 65
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Advantageous?

The data is a boon for rival organizations developing similar features

Not sure if data from Tata would ever be useful

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Australia to float 'not backdoors' that behave just like backdoors to Five-Eyes meeting

Mark 65
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Re: To be fair...

I'd love to see a protester smash Brandis in the nuts, preferably like in the game show on Idiocracy.

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HPE ignored SAN failure warnings at Australian Taxation Office, had no recovery plan

Mark 65
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Re: RMA the controllers?

Because the WHOLE array job inclusive of management was OUTSOURCED to HPE and ATO decided that it is a good cost saving measure NOT to have any staff directly involved in managing its critical infrastructure.

To be fair, the OEM should have staff more capable of looking after their kit than the client will. In this case it appears HPE does not fall into this bucket. It also appears they made some pretty clueless choices.

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Apple gives world ... umm ... not much new actually

Mark 65
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Seems a pretty limited use case. Most media professionals, especially in photography, will be using Eizo ColorEdge level monitors, Wacom style tablets of varying sizes and not putting grubby fingers on the screen like in the MS site photos. I don't blame Apple for not bothering with a touch screen.

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Break crypto to monitor jihadis in real time? Don't be ridiculous, say experts

Mark 65
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Re: The Elephant in the room

Checking that you really live in the catchment area of the school you've applied for etc etc.

And that it was you who didn't pick up your dog's shit / left your bins out one day too early etc etc.

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Mark 65
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Re: "The former policy wonk -

Any non-tech person listing would have been listening along and saying, "Why can't we do this, it all sounds reasonable."

Unfortunately that is a real-time reflection of how many fucking idiots are present in society.

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Hotel guest goes broke after booking software gremlin makes her pay for strangers' rooms

Mark 65
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Re: ma1010 "Sounds like a lawsuit"

Good to see her bank had systems in place to detect fraudulent transactions like most banks have had for the last decade or so. This would have stood out a mile.

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First-day-on-the-job dev: I accidentally nuked production database, was instantly fired

Mark 65
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Re: So....restore from backup

Where's the segregated VLAN? Anywhere with such important data and of such a size should be capable of setting up an environment where dev network logon credentials only work on the dev VLAN and so do not permit the crossing over into the production VLAN whether you know the prod db connection string or not. One account for troubleshooting prod environments (which they wouldn't have had in this case), and one for performing dev tasks. Not that difficult.

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If you live in a network lab, you'll get gigabit NBN over HFC soon

Mark 65
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Great. So in a few years time we may be able to see speeds near to what South Korea and Finland have had for quite some time. Before anyone mentions Australia being a much larger country over half the population exists in three cities so there's no good reason why it'd be uneconomical for them to have faster internet.

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