* Posts by MondoMan

583 posts • joined 8 May 2007

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China 'hacked' South Korea to wreck Star Wars missile shield

MondoMan

Re: Russia

Yep, it's not like taking over parts of Ukraine or possibly the Baltics or helping out Sarin-man Assad or killing off Russian expats in the West have anything to do with our relationship with the P-man.

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Alert: Using a web ad blocker may identify you – to advertisers

MondoMan
Trollface

Re: Rage! Fonts

Mage Against The Machine? :)

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BT's spam blocker IDs accident claims as top nuisance call

MondoMan

re: Truecaller

Doesn't Truecaller slurp your whole contact list, as opposed to just your own cell number for something like NoMoRoBo?

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It gets worse – now WD says Toshiba memory business sale breaches joint venture terms

MondoMan
Mushroom

Re: US Nuclear Industry

"Highly radioactive" wastes are those with a short half-life -- the longer the half-life, the less radiation it emits per unit time.

That's why you let the fresh waste sit for a few years/decades while the worst stuff decays, then put the much-less-radioactive remnant down a salt mine so it doesn't get into people's food and bodies.

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Dieting cannibals: At last, a scientist has calculated calories for human body parts

MondoMan
Mushroom

What about zombies?

Given their well-publicized appetite for human brains, and no reason to think they're just a modern phenomenon, it's disappointing that they weren't considered by Fatboy Slim and his co-researchers.

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MondoMan
WTF?

Re: $ units grams lines

"the number of Americans who aren't aware that there are 28 grams in an ounce is vanishingly small."

Your definition of "vanishingly small" seems to be "approximately 300 million".

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Boeing details 'Deep Space Gateway' for Mars mission staging

MondoMan

Re: hotels in space

Isn't that the plan for the real and funded Bigelow space program?

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Researchers sink scalpel into Lazarus crew. Yup. Autopsy shows distinct hacker tradecraft

MondoMan
Pint

Meeting location

"during a session during its Security Analyst Summit in St. Maarten, West Indies "

Is this just so it doesn't have to be held in Russia, or do all the cybersecurity conferences happen in luxurious vacation spots (or maybe nice offshore banking havens?).

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One in five mobile phones shipped abroad are phoney – report

MondoMan

Prime ain't no sign of quality

All it means is that the vendor stores their stock in Amazon's warehouse for shipment via Amazon's system.

You've got to read the fine print for "Sold by Amazon.com" to have a decent shot at avoiding fakes (not that that worked for a couple of "Samsung" cell batteries that weren't...).

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Bloke, 48, accused of whaling two US tech leviathans out of $100m

MondoMan

Re: The "hi tech" version of the old "pro forma invoice" scam?2

We DO do concurrent sentences; wawp wawp wawp

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MondoMan

No comment from Greenpeace?

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Confirmed: TSA bans gear bigger than phones from airplane cabins

MondoMan

Re: Complete f'ing idiots compounding their Security Theatre fails

@inf

They got rid of the last ionizing radiation people scanners in US airports a few years ago.

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White-box slingers, Chinese server makers now neck-and-neck with US tech giants

MondoMan

Re: Isn't the interesting bit missing here?

@Nate

That's what I thought at first, but the story's hyperlink to the description of who's "ODM" seems in my reading to exclude the own-design custom servers the big cloud folks are running.

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MondoMan

Re: Isn't the interesting bit missing here?

@AC

They're not part of "the normal server market" sales-wise, but functionally they certainly are. It's as if in 1910 analysts carefully followed the buggy-making companies, but ignored the auto makers.

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MondoMan

Isn't the interesting bit missing here?

Namely, Facebook's, Amazon's, Google's, Microsoft's asf custom datacenter servers & equipment?

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Tech titan pals back up Google after 'foreign server data' FBI warrant ruling

MondoMan

Re: Anyone else bothered by the stock map illustration?

@AC

I suspect a Russian disinformation campaign to twist the "facts" of the West's stock photo websites, leading to confusion, fake news, Irish unification and Scexit.

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MondoMan
Headmaster

Anyone else bothered by the stock map illustration?

It locates "Silicon Valley" in the East Bay rather than its proper Peninsula/Santa Clara Valley location.

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'Mafia' of ageing scientists, academics and politicos suck at picking tech 'winners'

MondoMan

Re: All new science buildings seem to need an atrium.

Paul, many (most?) of the molecular biology research buildings built in the last few decades near Boston, MA, have clear evidence of architectural design foresight, with desks located by outside windows, lab benches further in, and big common-use equipment like chemical rooms and incubator rooms in the building core. To ensure easier access, there are even parallel rings of corridors and cross-corridors. Finally, the elevators typically work.

Perhaps molecular biologists with their cool big-data genomics and fancy-looking neuroimaging can sweet-talk big donors better than the physicists (who after all developed nuclear weapons over 50 years ago now).

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'Maker' couple asphyxiated, probably by laser cutter fumes

MondoMan
Unhappy

This happened in Berkeley?

Famously progressive American cities have in recent years been enacting requirements for home carbon monoxide alarms as required equipment in all rental dwellings. In fact, a City of Berkeley web site advises:

"...Property owners should be aware that all dwelling units intended for human occupancy shall have carbon monoxide device(s) that are listed and approved by the State Fire Marshal. Carbon monoxide device(s) are required in each existing dwelling unit if the dwelling or building is equipped with a fossil fuel burning appliances, fireplace, or an attached garage. "

In Seattle, CO detectors are required in ALL apartment dwelling units without exception -- sad that Berkeley had apparently not followed suit.

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Cutting Hewlett-Packard Labs down to size

MondoMan
Pint

Re: I've never even heard of most of those memory thingies

HP Labs DID invent the thermal inkjet, which had some impact on HP's corporate trajectory :)

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Welcome to the Wipe House: President Trump shreds climate change, privacy, LGBT policies on WhiteHouse.gov

MondoMan

So does this mean Trump should be the "new populist" replacement for Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill?

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Sysadmin chatbots: We have the technology

MondoMan

That T3500 warning sounds suspiciously similar to a warning about impending failure of an AE-35 unit :)

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Boffins turn timid mice into psycho killers – by firing lasers into brains

MondoMan

Re: Psycho killer

My first thought upon reading the headline -- thanks!

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NASA taps ESA satellite Swarm for salty ocean temperature tales

MondoMan

Re: Astonshing.

Rik, your 2nd point is demonstrably wrong. For example, global surface temperatures rose substantially in the quarter-century following WWI, and rose similarly substantially again in the quarter-century starting in the 1970s. However, greenhouse gas concentrations were substantially different during those time periods, with much much lower greenhouse gas concentrations in the earlier period. If greenhouse gases were really responsible for most of the 1970s warming, as alarmists claim, then what caused the 1920s warming? It seems likely that natural variation was responsible for most of the earlier warming; however, a similar magnitude of natural variation in the later warming is ruled out by alarmists without good scientific basis -- why?

As a quick closing note, the use of epithets like "denier" is associated with religion, not science.

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MondoMan

Re: Hmmm....

@ES

The problem is that all the "attribution" studies trying to calculate how much warming is natural variation and how much is human-caused greenhouse gas driven depend on the global computer climate models. Thus, they are subject to the same problems of uncertain inputs and missing parts of the climate system as are the predictions of future temperature rise as greenhouse gas concentrations rise.

AKAIK the most significant currently-identified problems are (a) apparently the estimates of atmospheric particulate concentrations for the 20th century were too high; to "retro-predict" the correct 20th century temperatures, the models' sensitivity was essentially turned up and (b) nobody yet has much of a scientific clue as to how the many types and locations of clouds figure into things.

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Feds cuff VW exec over diesel emissions scam

MondoMan

Re: 'the Germans can do it".

Some Germans CAN do it -- isn't Mercedes using a urea-based system successfully? It's just that VW didn't want to spend the money on that.

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The Life and Times of Lester Haines

MondoMan
Pint

Well done

Raising one to Lester, his family and friends, and to John for fleshing out more of Lester's backstory. Vultures got game!

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How Google.org stole the Christmas Spirit

MondoMan

It's not always a Google conspiracy, Andrew

I'm a repeat donor to DonorsChoose projects. This story's parenthetical note of DC's policies that raise costs are valid, but the emphasis on Google is not.

In my experience, plenty more teachers request iPads and Macs than Chromebooks. In addition, writing materials' costs are low enough that they can be self-funded by teachers or the parents/community, while technology is much harder to fund locally. Since Chromebooks are MUCH more cost-effective than iPads or traditional laptops, I see the request for a few Chromebooks as a fiscally-sound request by a teacher.

One aspect of many funding requests that annoys me is requests for new, full-price books in this era of easy availability of MUCH cheaper used books.

Finally, the "choice" part of DC's name is a key check -- donors themselves get to choose which projects to fund (or not).

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Netgear: Nothing to see here, please disperse. Just another really bad router security hole

MondoMan

Been like this for more than a decade

As with other commenters here, I swore off Netgear over a decade ago. Not only was their firmware buggy, but they clearly had decided not to invest much time or effort on updating/fixing firmware, even on so-called "business-class" products. The only Netgear items I keep around are their unmanaged ethernet hubs/switches, because they're dirt cheap and don't have any user-changeable firmware.

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Don't panic, friends, but the Chinese navy just nicked one of America's underwater drones

MondoMan

Re: Something doesn't add up about that scenario

More like your neighbor stealing your car rather than a frisbee. The drones cost something like $200k apiece, and are sovereign US vessels, even though unmanned.

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LAKE OF frozen WATER THE SIZE OF NEW MEXICO FOUND ON MARS – NASA

MondoMan

Re: McMars Distillery

No need -- just activate the ancient alien machine hidden under Mars' surface.

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Office Depot halts PC Health Checks amid bogus infection claims

MondoMan
Pirate

Yet another unintended Amazon.com side effect

Starting back in the 80s, OfficeDepot/Officemax (the 2nd and 3rd rank chains recently merged) and Staples drove all the little stationary / office supply stores out of business as part of the "big box store" revolution. They provided one-stop shopping, good prices, and often helpful advice, and made good profits as they took over the SOHO & small/medium business supply market.

Over the last decade, these big box stores have been hit hard as internet shopping (especially Amazon) plus Costco have provided better prices, cheap/fast delivery to the premises, and a wider range of good quality products. Businesses (and most consumers) aren't stupid, so Office Depot (especially!) and Staples have been hanging on by a thread. Clearly, Office Depot seems to be getting desperate.

PS - many people not comfortable with technology developed good impressions of Office Depot / Staples as helpful places to buy technology during their growth, and have not yet learned that the situation has changed.

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RIP EarthLink, 1994–2016: From AOL killer to regional ISP's attic

MondoMan

Earthlink is an ISP.

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Facebook ads in race claim

MondoMan
WTF?

Re: Oh man, another american multicultural pseudo-problem

It would seem that race is irrelevant in your example, rather geography or household income or credit score would be the relevant factors. What's your point?

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Possible reprieve for the venerable A-10 Warthog

MondoMan

Re: Costs per hour for F-35

How exactly does an ISIS "Drone" attack an A-10??? In the Gulf War, they made it back with big chunks of wings and stabilizers shot off -- doesn't seem "VERY susceptible" at all.

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App proves Rowhammer can be exploited to root Android phones – and there's little Google can do to fully kill it

MondoMan

Re: ASLR

I think there was a recent report about defeating ASLR by looking at the addresses in the branch address cache and matching those with the known structure of the OS, thus figuring out the current OS layout in memory.

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Cheapest Apple iPhone 7's flash memory is waaaaay slower than pricier model

MondoMan
Facepalm

architectural issue?

Leaving aside that the 32GB phone is reported to have a read speed *double* that of the higher-capacity phone, it's my understanding that flash drives typically achieve faster write speeds by writing to multiple flash modules in parallel, since individual flash module write speeds are so slow compared to their read speeds. This can be seen in the read/write speed specs by drive size within many SSD lines.

If a single flash module in these phones is 32GB (as seems likely), then the 256GB phone model would have 8 such modules, resulting in 8x parallelism on write, and a predicted write speed 8x that of the 32GB model. Fits the data, doesn't it? No resort to a "cheap flash" conspiracy needed. :)

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Just what Europe needs – another bungled exit: Mars lander goes AWOL

MondoMan
WTF?

"plasma noise"?

It was my belief that the initial lander signal loss upon re-entry was due not to it being overwhelmed by "plasma noise", but rather to the plasma blocking signal propagation. A quick web search reveals a paper from the 1960s discussing ways to overcome the plasma blackout which suggests that the main issue is that the plasma strongly *refracts* radio signals so they do not reach the ground.

Any commentards have actual knowledge about this?

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T-Mobile USA: DON'T install Apple's iOS 10, for the love of God

MondoMan

Re: VZW and Sprint use CDMA. AT&T and T-Mobile use GSM.

PM claims "While true at one time, none of this matters now since all four rely on LTE."

In the US, not every spot has the latest LTE coverage, and LTE uses a number of different bands, not all of which are supported by a given phone model. Thus, it is common for US cell phones to actually use GSM/CDMA to make voice calls, and to often fall back into using older data protocols.

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Yelp wins fight to remain morally bankrupt

MondoMan

Calling the El Reg Detective Agency!

The story claims "...something that the company often does, complete with a quid pro quo that it will hide negative reviews in return ". This claim could be true, but Yelp has always denied that it offers such a quid pro quo -- can El Reg provide any links to actual evidence that Yelp offers such quids pro quo?

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SpaceX Dragon capsule lands in Pacific carrying 12 moustronauts

MondoMan

Re: Deja Vu

In fairness, though, most of these in-orbit bio experiments are not very good science. Their main function is to make the public think that the manned space program is producing some scientific return-on-investment. Pretty much the only useful bio research in orbit is monitoring the astronauts themselves as to how their bodies degenerate under microgravity/enhanced radiation conditions, and what techniques might ameliorate that. And, of course, how to prevent or stop space-sickness, which still affects 1/3 to 1/2 of astronauts IIRC.

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MondoMan

Re: Eh?

Whoever is assigned capsule-breaching duties should probably first ascertain whether the occupants are indeed "Musketeer" relatives rather than Mouseketeer relatives...

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Google breaks heart, White Knight falls off horse

MondoMan

Re: "The majority of the population is concentrated in urban areas."

Ahhh, AC, I feel for you -- you've been taken in by the Wiki again!

A careful reader would discern that the so-called "urban areas" include large percentages of what civilians would call suburban or rural areas. As even the Wiki notes, the "urban area" is composed of core census tracts/blocks " *along with* adjacent territory containing non-residential urban land uses as well as territory with low population density included to link outlying densely settled territory..."

Thus, for example, the Seattle "urban area" includes the entire circum-Puget Sound area from Port Ludlow down to Olympia and back up past Marysville, an area reaching ten to twenty miles inland all around the Sound.

"Connecting" at least this "urban area" is much more difficult than reaching the three times as many inhabitants in Seoul.

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False Northern Lights alert issued to entire UK because of a lawnmower

MondoMan

BTDT

I remember chatting with a Caltech student some decades ago as he described his friends' plan to set off the Southern California major earthquake alert system by simultaneously detonating (very) small charges near a number of Caltech seismographs in the region. Apparently, at least 3 seismographs had to register an event for the major earthquake alert to be triggered. This was in pre-GPS days, so getting the timing right was the tricky part of the plan.

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MondoMan

Re: "what had caused the huge anomaly"

I see your #Z80assembly and raise you #6502machinelang for 1977's snow in Palo Alto.

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California to put all your power-hungry PCs on a low carb(on) diet

MondoMan
Thumb Down

"high end" computer power use

A more realistic value of power use for a high-end system with some power-intensive gaming use would be 250W. Multiply by 7% to get 17.5W, or about 0.25kWh savings during a 14-hour workday. Using a typical US electricity price of $0.13/kWh, the savings amounts to a bit over 3 cents/day USD, or almost 12 USD for a year in which the computer is in use 365 days a year, 14 hours/day.

Even in such an unrealistic high duty-load case, the savings are a bit sad, aren't they?

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MondoMan

Re: CPUs vs PSUs

"It is way better to use low power CPUs than high efficiency PSUs."

Surely you mean "high-efficiency CPUs", not "low power CPUs", right? The ultimate "low power CPU" is achieved just by unplugging your computer, but that may or may not increase productivity.

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MondoMan

Re: abundant, reliable, sunshine

Having grown up in California, I distinctly remember walking to school before sunrise and later on, returning from work at 5PM after sunset. Methinks solar production for either domestic or office use would suffer greatly at such times. Perhaps you have a brilliant scheme to store solar power from the summer for winter use -- a sort of anti-seasonal modern equivalent of the old icehouse? Or perhaps your plan is to seasonally populate ANZ with Canadian and American snowbirds?

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MondoMan

Re: Maybe this will encourage popularizing low wattage cpu's

Sadly, you've missed the forest for the CPU tree. :)

Firstly, the wattage ratings are intended as indications of the *maximum* power used under constant full load, just as the CPU internal clock is a ceiling, not a constant. Modern CPUs, dynamically adjust their clock speed, internal voltage, etc to provide just enough performance to accomplish the requested tasks, wasting little energy on full voltage or clock when the load is low. Thus, your 2GHz low-performance CPU is severely limited in its maximum performance vs. a standard 3.5GHz Intel CPU like the i5-6500 (65W maximum TDP), but likely uses not much less power when both are at idle.

Secondly, the relevant power use is the system's power use, not just the CPU. Depending on the chipset, motherboard design, memory type, power supply, and other components, as likely as not your AMD system uses more power on a system basis when idle than does an equivalent system built around the i5-6500.

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Cats, dogs starve as web-connected chow chute PetNet plays dead

MondoMan

yet another SciFi plot made real

IIRC this was a plot device in one of Larry Niven's stories about warlike alien felines he called Kzin. The Kzin leader is assassinated by human hackers who inactivate the leader's home kit-feeding mechanism. When he returns home, he is attacked and devoured by his own starving kits.

Perhaps PetNet owners should exercise caution in opening their front doors?

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