* Posts by John Smith 19

12536 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Northern Ireland bags £150m for broadband pipes in £1bn Tory bribe

John Smith 19
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Re: "If <ulster ascent> was a typo, it was quite an aposite one"

Ooops.

Yes you are quite correct.

But you could say it is a deeper truth. The DUP has indeed ascended in power.

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John Smith 19
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"If <ulster ascent> was a typo, it was quite an aposite one"

No typo.

The mock HTML is part of setting up the joke so you hear the words in the right way when you read them.

Many readers are not from the UK and will be mentally thinking of the mellow tones of "Pierce Brosnan", when they should be thinking Sean Bean (in "Patriot Games") or Sam Neil in "Peaky Blinders." Liam Neeson in "Taken" is a very mild version (ironic given he's actually from Belfast, but then you'd need subtitles for most of the movie if he used it).

The other thing about NI politicians is there remarkable loquacity.

They will never use a word when half a dozen will do just as well, or an adjective when three will do in its place. By the time they've finished the proverbial donkey is just a body lying in a field.

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John Smith 19
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Re: Not a bribe?

<ulster ascent>

The DUP finds any suggestion that the additional funds released to Northern Ireland are in any way, shape or form some sort of "bribe" for their continued support of the Conservative & Unionist Party of the UK.

The amount requested was arrived at by careful calculation, to address long standing under funding of the Ulster region going back to the last century.

Any suggestion that our Leader said to Mrs May during the talks "We'll support you for One Beeeeeelion Pounds. Mwwwwwhhhhha" is likewise a complete fabrication.

Furthermore our Leader, Mrs Arlene Foster, takes great exception to any suggestion that she resembles, in any way, the so-called "comedian" Paul Merton, and will be pursuing claims for damages through the relevant legal channels on this point, schedule permitting.

Signed

The DUP

</ulster ascent>

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John Smith 19
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"amazed that any Veterans Administration facility, medical or otherwise, is still intact."

I'd guess if you've spent a career in the armed forces the bit about "Defending the Constitution from all enemies, foreign and domestic" is quite important to you.

The question would be at what point do your feelings over your treatment as a citizen exceed your loyalty to the Constitution, and of the people who are implementing that Constitution.

I'd like to think that anyone so aggrieved would be more selective in choosing where they would express their grievance than by wrecking places that are offering even minimal care to them.

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John Smith 19
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"And how long will it be until the next general election?"

There are several mile posts (not kilometres, as Britain is "Taking Back Control" of weights and measures) in the Brexit process that look like obvious break points.

Before the German Elections in September.

They are key players. An improved mandate before then would be very helpful. But what if it wasn't and May's minority got smaller still? It would be another 60 days of chaos. Then again May said she would not be holding an election in the first place.

2 years time. It's all done and the Conservatives can start playing "Blame the old leader" for any unfulfilled delusions aspirations the party country has. Once they've hosed the (metaphorical) blood off the walls of a leadership contest they can start the next election.

5 years. End of parliament. The full distance. More chance of winning the Health, National and Euromillions lotteries all at once than May lasting till then.

In between times if the UKG fails a major vote Corbyn can trot down to the Palace and offer his services in forming a new government. Being 60 seats below a majority that would probably have to be a real coalition, or call an election to clarify the situation.

And of course that assumes the noalition with the DUPes doesn't develop any fault lines (VAT increases on Bowler hats and marching regalia for example).

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John Smith 19
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"This pretty much sums up the mentality of most established politicians in Westminster."

That was my point. It's the politicians view, not my view.

Once a group stops voting in significant numbers politicians can safely stamp "Ignore" on that whole section of the population. Put bluntly "You don't get us elected, so why should be helpful to you?"

Whatever country I'm in I come election time I always encourage everyone to vote.

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John Smith 19
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"Couldn't they have just bought each DUP MP a duck island ?"

Well, if you mean by "duck island" a several acre land mass in the Caribbean the answer is yes.

Sadly they'd soon complaining about the hue of their neighbours.

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John Smith 19
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"They came out and voted for PM (next week) Corbyn. "

For the first time in a long while in large numbers.

I'd suggest that had a big effect on turning the Conservative expectation of an 80-100 seat majority (and the destruction of Labour as an a viable opposition for a generation) and helping to turn a 17 seat absolute majority into her getting into bed with Arlene Foster and the other DUPes.

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John Smith 19
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Excluding the young. They stopped voting in the UK so f**k em.

That's what the politicians thought.

And UK politicians have been able to get away with it for quite some time.

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John Smith 19
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Remember it's not a "Coalition" it's a "No-alition."

This means the UKG can continue in it's role of "fair arbitrator" in the Good Friday agreement.

And I'm sure they've arranged things so the Barnet formula won't be disturbed and May has to throw a bundle of cash to the Scots, the Welsh and the UK regions.

And only £100m per seat in support.

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John Smith 19
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"and whip the bollocks of a complete stranger to a bloody mess"

Well that would certainly go down with the traditional Tory core voter. Although possibly not quite as well as the idea of a "Killed a tramp with a hammer" that Franky Boyle suggested. :-)

"but apparently he goes down well with the sad-sack milennials at Glasto."

I think UK voting patterns have changed, to the point where it is impossible for any party to be elected without reaching out from it's traditional core supporters.

It was noted some time ago that "The young don't vote," hence there needs and wants could be ignored and the re-directed toward sectors of the vote likely to turn out, like codgers.

By putting them back in play Corbyn has reminded there is a big section of the UK electorate who has been acting like Sein Feinn in the HoC.

But unlike them their passivity can change.

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John Smith 19
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"with bribes for the young, old, working class, middle class, pensioners, etc."

Excluding the young.

They stopped voting in the UK so f**k em.

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A good time Woz had by all: We peeked our head into Primary Data and this is what we saw

John Smith 19
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So it does what was hidden in the bowels of an AS400 with users data?

But is open source and multiple level.

Can it support tape?

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Facebook hit two billion users today and SugarCRM reminded us you are Zuck's product

John Smith 19
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Trollface

And the rock in question is even called the "Trollpikken "

Excellent.

It seems someone has tried to cut the Trolls cock off.

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John Smith 19
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"Creepware As A Service"

And remember your donations (of personal information) make this product possible.

We thank you

Signed

SugarCRM.

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Intel launches 64-layer 3D flash client SSD

John Smith 19
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I presume this is "early adoptor" pricing.

But I'm not really sure what part of the spec screams "I cannot live without this in my life"

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A minister for GDS? Don't talk digital pony

John Smith 19
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"..16 different government departmental systems that need to talk to each other..for freight"

In a nutshell why government IT is so very challenging if done properly.

Big system X multiple interfaces X complex data issues X high reliability X multiple jurisdiction X P88s poor formal salary structures. --> Poor candidates + poor implementations

You need some one who's excited, not terrified by that level of complexity. Historically the UK Civil Service did train its in house staff and they could have a career (with associated pension) in the UKG. Naturally that ended decades ago and they thought it a genius grade idea to not just gut themselves of their technical staff, but also their technical management stuff.

Meaning they relied on their con-tractors to tell them what was what.

Like the Australian Tax office trusting HPE.

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What is the enterprise cloud?

John Smith 19
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A nice summation of what it is and how it came to be.

With some available tools listed as well. Thank you.

The big picture, going from a lots of "best-of-breed" point solutions to management to more of an integrated solution.

The danger of all "unified" approaches is of course how they cope with some piece of must-have kit they don't have a standard interface for (or possibly something with a proprietary UI it's makers really don't like you being able to hook into through an API).

This time around it does sound quite promising.

On demand growth of processing and storage when needed and (nearly) painless scaling up if that's still not sufficient. All the while quietly gathering performance data warning you of impending failure in time for you to retire the misbehaving bit of kit without anyone noticing. A smooth, dram free and affordable IT service.

Time will tell how well the implementations deliver the concept.

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Met Police laggards still have 18,000 Windows XP machines in use

John Smith 19
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FAIL

And will happen every time around as 10s of 1000s of desktops X multple bespoke S/W -->

Total clusterf**k of a migration.

Each time.

Every time.

I am not clairvoyant. It's not an act of $deity.

It's a completely f**king predictable consequence of the organizational environment. And £30K for the PM for this? Are you f**king kidding me? Big performance bonuses at least I'd have thought.

When is the time to start planning in the migration to the next generation of desktops?

Simple, while you're still planning what should be in the current generation upgrade of course.

Given what the Met does TBH I'd wonder how many of those machines spend all their time just running the Line-Of-Business apps, (IE Copshop-in-a-box) and the users sole actual contact with Windows is when they start it up (or more likely log in, as it's probably not been shut down for a month).

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John Smith 19
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"or just under one thousandth of a DUP."

Should have just outsourced all the hate crime to the DUP.

I hear they can do it wholesale.

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HMS Windows XP: Britain's newest warship running Swiss Cheese OS

John Smith 19
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"if it does everything you need it too, and it's properly protected, then why change it."

Fair point.

I think "properly protected" is where it get tricky.

But these (essentially) embedded boxen.

How many ports should be open? Practically none?

Stripped down install, no games, nothing but the embedded app they will spend their life running?

But is that how they are actually configured?

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John Smith 19
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Headmaster

How dare you sir. It is not "outdated."

It's a "classic" OS.

Right down to those classic attack vectors we've been seeing recently.

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Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

John Smith 19
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Re: Next, apply the technology to ...... bullets.

Actually IIRC the very early work on development shaping was done using bullets.

Essentially firing differently shaped bullets to get a rough idea of what (at the same mass) sounded quieter.

Obviously you needed a reload bench to do this but that's still pretty cheap compared to a supersonic wind tunnel.

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John Smith 19
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"but your aeroplane has a big nose. "

True.

But possibly worse, it seems to have a very little fuselage, where they put most of the payload in passenger jets.

As in "The load that pays."

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Former GDS head Mike Bracken quits Co-op

John Smith 19
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"Agile"

Sounds like a description of the job hoping of the senior management.

I am not opposed to Agile, or any methodology. My instinct is

Project development is complex.

The work always gets split up, one way or another, regardless of wheather it's the way management wants (or understands). The question is does the split work. If not how do you get people to change?

A one size approach will not fit all teams, or even one team all the time. People need options.

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Mozilla dev and Curl inventor Daniel Stenberg denied travel to USA

John Smith 19
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Gimp

So ESTA can't manage reliable data transfer but its the passengers who get it in the neck.

Because the show must go on. The security theatre show that is.

Seriously. 9/11/01 was 16 years ago.

All of the flights were internal, to either SF or LAX.

So why is the USG 16 years later hoovering up every foreign visitor's travel details (including their credit card details)?

Does it serve any actually useful purpose at all, other than to remind any visitor to a 5 I's country that you are a suspect (just like their everyone who lives t here in fact)?

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Everything you need to know about the Petya, er, NotPetya nasty trashing PCs worldwide

John Smith 19
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Lots of fishiness here.

Competent enough coding to produce chaos on its targeted networks but not spread (by design) and a trivially easy way to stop the ransom from being collected, locking the computers permanently. Almost like the ransom parts were cobbled together as an afterthought, rather than their ultimate objective.

Conducted pre, rather than during, a public holiday.

An incompetent team of ransomware writers or a very competent team seeking to a)Cause substantial disruption to Ukraine or b) Cripple competitors of certain software businesses. c)Eliminate the evidence for a large scale fraud

This would mean everyone else is merely "collateral damage," or a free pen test that they failed.

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The 'DUP' joins El Reg’s illustrious online standards converter

John Smith 19
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Old rule of the British upper classes.

Never pay off a blackmailer.

They will always be back for more.

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Software glitch led to London Ambulance Service outage – report

John Smith 19
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At first I thought they were talking about the Windows recycle bin, but that made no sense,

as I've never heard of anyone having any trouble with it (just about the only piece of Windows I haven't heard of some problem about).

But this Oracle whatsit is a whole different ball game.

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SpaceX nails two launches and barge landings in one weekend

John Smith 19
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The big item is what this will do to $/lb of mass to orbit

That's the end game.

Unless that drops a lot, and for a payload that in the tonnes, not the 100s of tonnes class, you can forget any dreams of opening the "space frontier" to "the rest of us."

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John Smith 19
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" If I'm wrong about getting 2 orbital launches up in less than 3 days, I"

You are.

1989 Titan at Cape Canaveral and VAFB within 44 hrs.

Also Dec 1966 2 Atlas SLV3's.

It's not as impressive to people with background knowledge of the subject.

And these days getting that knowledge is quite easy.

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John Smith 19
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"That said, launching from two different sites within 44 hours?"

Actually they did.

September 1989. Titan III from Cap Canaveral and Titan II from VAFB 44 Hrs later.

It's like a United Airlines 747 taking off from New York at the same time as another United Airlines 747 takes off from Chicago. What are the odds?

The answer is of course "who cares?"

Now landing them both on the same barge 49 hours apart. That would have been phenomenal.

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John Smith 19
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"It's a record for SpaceX, "

It's meaningless.

It's like two service engineers visiting two sites coming from two service depots and (OMG) arriving at the offices of the companies they've come to service at the same time.

Only they didn't.

Sorry but it's just not that impressive. Not even historically as NASA did it with a shorter window (about 44 hr s IIRC) in the 1960's

Had it been a single team rushing between those sites that would have been unprecedented, but it wasn't. .

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John Smith 19
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"Watched the BulgariaSat launch live,"

I wondered how many Bulgaria's are on board. *

*I think they're like Budgerigars on Steroids.

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John Smith 19
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Re: Even old curmudgeons knows nothing of any use about subject they are posting on.

And you really don't. You're comments about Shuttle and Skylon demonstrate a truly American level of ignorance in both.

Let's put this in perspective.

2 separate launch sites on opposite sides of the country, with 2 completely separate but equally experienced launch crews, manage two launches within 49 hours of each other that land on 2 completely separate landing barges

None of this is a record, which IIRC was 44 hours apart.

Now had they landed both boosters on the same barge that would have been astonishing.

Had they launched 44 minutes apart and rendezvoused in space that would have astonishing. Just the 44 mins apart bit would have been very impressive.

To anyone who knows what resources are available and what's happening this is not amazing. It's competent (and steadily improving) Launch Operations.

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US engineer in the clink for wrecking ex-bosses' smart meter radio masts with Pink Floyd lyrics

John Smith 19
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"Sack employee without changing passwords he had access to? Root passwords? "

It's a fair point, which is why I upvoted you. They fired him and they didn't think he was going to be a tad upset by this?

Still, it does sound a little like blaming the victim though, doesn't it?

Abuse of trust Vs V.Poor outplacement process.

Hmm, six of one, half dozen of the other......

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John Smith 19
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Cound never happen in the UK

Where the "smart" meter reading will be done by a company run by those heroes of HR, Capita.

Known for their excellent working environment, careful hiring policies and air tight IT security. *

*Some of these statements may not be literally true.

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Braking news: AA password reset email cockup crashes servers

John Smith 19
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""If a patrolman fails to salute you, stop and interrogate him"."

....As he's probably spotted a speed trap ahead and you should ask him where it is.

Mines the Canary Yellow one with the history book in the pocket.

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Coraid's Coile resurrects storage biz, swears off VCs' filthy Valley lucre

John Smith 19
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"developing a stable and reliable business funded on profits from sales "

Goddammit the man is practically a terrorist!!

Doesn't he realize the only way to a Face Book sized IPO is to get a yuuuuge bag of cash off VC's, giving yourself a much needed payrise in the process, and then, er, do stuff?

He does?

Goddammit the man is practically a terrorist!!

Hell bent on undermining the principles of what makes (modern) America great (again).

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Tremble in fear, America, as Daesh-bags scrawl cyber-graffiti on .gov webpages no one visits

John Smith 19
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Gimp

A high threat level is the handmaiden of repressive and intrusive laws

And of course if the threat level is not naturally high enough it must be "encouraged."

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Researchers blind autonomous cars by tricking LIDAR

John Smith 19
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Creating mirages for fun and profit.

Who knew?

I'll note there are ways to encode the pulse patterns produced by an active laser to be unique. They are called Gold codes and are uses in the GPS system.

However you'll need a pretty good RNG to ensure that in dense traffic yours is unique to your vehicle.

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Encrypted chat app Telegram warned by Russian regulator: 'comply or goodbye'

John Smith 19
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"he said Roskomnadzor had demanded Telegram give keys to decrypt "

So, not just Western governments who don't understand what the phrase end-to-end encryption means?

Just sad.

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Idea to encrypt stuff on the web at rest hits the IETF's Standard Track

John Smith 19
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Essentially it's a move toward untrusted hosting, which sounds like any cloud server to me

But how good is the security with HTTPS?

The real challenge for effective privacy with TCP/IP will be the routing data.

How the f**k do you encrypt routing data (IE The headers) but still make them usable?

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No way to sugarcoat this: I'm afraid Uranus opens and closes to accept particle streams

John Smith 19
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"majority of exoplanets that have been discovered appear to also be ice giants in size."

Perhaps because it's easier to spot a big (tiny) dot moving in front of its parent star than a tiny (tiny) dot moving in front of its parent star?

Some where on a planet far far away.

"What? We made spin with an axis close to the solar systems ecliptic, with a magnetic field 50 deg off that and the Humans still didn't think it was worth inspecting more closely?"

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Queen's speech announces laws to protect personal data

John Smith 19
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"No-alition" with the DUPes is on. Foster "We'll support you for 1 Beeeelion pounds in aid"

Because technically a formal coalition agreement (actual DUP ministers in govt) with them would breach the UKG's role as "impartial broker" in the Good Friday Agreement but

And they've published the written part of the supply agreement the Conservatives have with the DUPes.

Which just leaves the unwritten parts.....

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John Smith 19
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Re: " (It is already mandatory for new build towers to have sprinklers.)"

"1: Some of them are now using pentane as the refrigerant rather than HFC/CFCs (and of course the insulant burns, so leak + spark = trouble.)"

I can recall an article in either New Scientist or Electronics & Wireless World that mentioned this was a risk as people moved off CFC's in fridges and fridge freezers (I think the actual model was established as a fridge freezer).

But the flip side was thought to be such a small volume of vapour that it would not be a serious threat.

I guess they ended up with one of those aersol-sprayed-at-ciagarette-lighter situations.

The other 2 I was thinking of was combustible cladding in the first place and the encapsulation on the cladding failing (in some way) to let the sparks get to it badly enough to start it burning.

And had any one of the point you make not happened the death toll would have been substantially lower, possibly zero.

I wonder if the tenant in the original frige freezer fire flat was the lucky one, as presumably they'd been asked to evacuate the flat over night.

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Researchers solve screen glare nightmare with 'moth-eye' antireflective film

John Smith 19
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Fairly obvious solutions to the dirt clogging issue

Mount the film with the patterned face to the screen. Or

Fill holes with a clear plastic of suitable refractive index that it fills the holes but leaves the optical properties intact. Plastic hardens in holes to leave smooth flat surface.

"Moth eye" coating concepts have been around for decades. I think the first idea for their use was a single use CD ROM scheme, but I don't know if it went anywhere.

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WannaCrypt blamed for speed camera reboot frenzy in Australia

John Smith 19
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"Public utilities boxes and similar are usually easy to open. "

I'd heard this but I'm not so sure it's true these days with assorted security theatre,

Also the speed cams I've seem seem to be pretty heavily boxed. The flash of one going off can be like the proverbial Red rag to a bull, leading to attacks with tree branches, crow bars and even welding torches.

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