* Posts by John Smith 19

11716 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

John Smith 19
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So I guess he's been on

Beaverton Patrol

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Just delete the internet – pr0n-blocking legislation receives Royal Assent

John Smith 19
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Childcatcher

"when teens are sexting each other anyway?"

Or in Tory NewSpeak manufacturing, possessing and distributing child pornography.

Because under the relevant law that's what it is.

Context is irrelevant and society "Must be protected from this evil filth" (C Rabid Xenophobia Publications T/A The Daily Heil)

Authoritarian governments (and in the UK I'd count everyone from Thatcher onward) want more and more vaguely defined laws so there's always something anyone can be arrested for. Authoritarian govts believe in the KGB view that everyone is guilty of something. It's just a question of finding out what. And if we can't find out what, locking them up on general principles.

And that's how you do police "work" in a police state.

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John Smith 19
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Childcatcher

"Amber Rudd sounds like it should be a porn name."

Actually it does.

Old Victorian name for lady parts?

Hence "Tophat Charlie" icon.

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John Smith 19
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Childcatcher

Remeber folks, as usual it's all about "protecting" the impressionable yoof

TOTC and all that.

IE the usual excuse, along with catching paedos, terrorists, drug dealers and money launders of course.

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John Smith 19
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" and only a late addition to a fast-tracked piece of legislation. I"

The classic tactic for slipping in something the slipper knows is pure BS. You can smell the greasy fingerprints of the cabal at the Home Office all over this.

Age verification was the hobby horse of the woman MP CMD appointed Child Exploitation and Sexualization Tsar (not the current title but I found the original one far more amusing).

Y'know, the one who could not be arsed/work out how to set adult filtering on her browser.

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Shock horror: US military sticks jump leads on human brains to teach them a lesson

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ECT was quit popular in the FSU for people with dangerous addictions.

Dangerous addictions to telling the truth that is.

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John Smith 19
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Calm down this is DARPA. Snowballs-chance-in-Hell of success is SOP for them.

So odds on bet they won't get far.

But they might get just a little further than anyone else has so far.

Actually the DoD has run various projects since (and including) Viet Nam to improve soldiers language skills. IIRC the kick off tactic was a set of flash cards with key words and phrase (especially interrogative sentences like "Where are the VC hiding?" and " how many men are in your patrol?")

Who wouldn't want a little discretely placed plug you could fit the neural equivalent of a memory stick into and acquire skills with?

Downside. Malware now turns you into a human bot.

BTW it is possible to shut down (and more amazingly reboot) the human brain. It's been done when they do heart/lung operations and drain the patients blood (so no metabolism at all is running). I think the record is less than 10 hours.

Mines the one with the oversize pockets for a copy of "War on the Mind, the Military uses and abuses of Psychology"

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Software woes keep NASA's new crewed missions grounded

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"If you've designed your payload in 75 tonne chunks,"

In fact 90% of most of the payloads SLS is expteced to carry (because NASA doesn't have the budget to actually design anything for it except Orion so far) are propellant. So your "75 tonne chunk" is in fact a 10 tone payload, with a 5 tonne (empty) tank. The rest is propellant for the burns to get it to the Moon/Mars/Europa etc.

Propellant is the easiest thing to sub-divide, provided you're OK with on orbit transfer.

BTW NASA's Chief Technologist Robert Braun estimated better on orbit propellant management and transfer could cut the mass to LEO needed for a Mars mission by 60%, the biggest single factor in mission mass reduction.

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John Smith 19
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Just a few numbers for perspective.

If the US launched one of each of it's current big launchers (Atlas V, Delta IV Heavy, F9 and Antares) it could put 77 tonnes in LEO within 1 week.

That capability exists right now. With no R&D. Just buy the launches

When SX's SLC 40 is working again that will rise to 99tonnes and (assuming a good launch) FH will increase that to 141 tonnes.

ULA is planning to phase out Atlas and Delta to go to Vulcan. Vulcan is expected to be 5.4m in diam. ULA have said they have looked at launching an Atlas V (3.81m in dia) with a 7.2m payload fairing. A ratio of about 1.889. On a 5.4m upper stage that would mean Vulcan could launch a 10.2m dia PLF (the baseline 8.4m SLS dia is well within its capability).

Most actual mass of big payloads is usually the propellant to get them where they are going. So with Vulcan operational you could probably launch any payload NASA could come up with on empty tanks and load propellant on orbit.

The real issue is this. SLS is being run out of Marshall at Alabama (Von Braun's old centre). They are trying to prove they can still direct and run a programme to specify an ELV designed to NASA specifications and operated by NASA for NASA payloads.

I'd suggest the evidence is that they can't. In a normal USG agency HQ would shut down the operation and either set up elsewhere or end in house provision, but NASA does not have control over wheather it can shut its own centres. Congress took that power so they would not create unemployment in the congresscritters home states. I don't think they feel the need to do with with any other Federal agency.

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John Smith 19
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" the main lesson was they ALWAYS had some bloke paid to be on top of shit "

Then they got rid of Von Braun as being not quite American enough :-(

The ideal (which I think Shuttle lacked) is someone with the breadth of skills to understand (broadly) all of it and the authority to trade off margins on one system with those on another to ensure the whole thing gets the job done.

But the SW? FFS

There is no way on Earth (or anywhere else) that the task SLS (or Orion) has to fly is anywhere near as complex as Shuttle flight control. Apollo ran on 72KB of code. Shuttle on a couple of MB, written in a HLL. Orion (and SLS) has no wings, no control surfaces and no landing gear.

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NSA pulls plug on some email spying before Congress slaps it down

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Agreed. They don't want to reveal what a count query on their DB shows for nationality=US

And like the others I suspect they also have a "Plan B"

OTOH this won't be legal under the FISA court.

So if someone blows the whistle on them it's a)Completely illegal or b)"Legal" under some other piece of BS legislation.

It's not a policy decision.

It's a disease of the mind.

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Having a monopoly on x86 chips and charging eyewatering prices really does pay off – Intel CEO

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"We won't live to see that..scaling every two years, that's at least 15 years away. "

I think most of us can expect to live another 15 years, barring the D pressing the wrong button at the wrong time.

"And as problems continue to mount and expenses continue to rise, we won't be doing a new generation every couple years."

TBH we can't do that now.

"Though maybe we'll get there sooner from bottom up manufacturing since it will become unaffordable to keep making them top down long before we reach single atoms. "

I'd tend to agree with you. but of course that will require Intel to totally re-jig its mfg plants and the PHB's really don't like that idea. They will keep squeezing the next few nm out of the process before they swallow the idea of additive mfg applied to semiconductors and TBH no system exists that can give both the feature size and the production speed of lithography.

If that were to change, or come other company came up with a way to do that.....

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John Smith 19
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And remember the brick wall is fast approaching.

The day of the one atom wide transistor is coming.

Then everyone will be on a level playing field and it will be down to how many layers of active devices you can lay on top of each other, how thin those layers will be and how well you can extract the heat from them.

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Just how screwed is IT at the Home Office?

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And yet this is the price source of all the spy on everyone all the time forever laws.

There belief in government IT is simply delusional.

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Ewe, get a womb! Docs grow baby lambs in shrink-wrap plastic bags

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"Lois McMaster Bujold, if you please, not JM..."

Oops, fingers slipped on keyboard.

As the authors were very clear to point out this does not lower the survival threshold below the termination limit.

But premature babies have survived well below the maximum termination limit and have done so long before now, although I'm not sure how much care they've needed in later life to deal with the side effects of stopping further development assisted by their Mother at such an early stage. The question of course would be if a pregnant women came into the ER and went into labor at 22 or 23 weeks what would they do? "No sorry can't help you" or would they rush baby and fetus to the ITU? IDK but I think sooner or later someone will have to make that call.

Other interesting side effects of this technology would include pre-natal adoption and wheather people would choose to transfer to a support chamber if it was proved the environment was more stable and less stressful to the fetus.

Again this is on the boundary between medical necessity and social preferences.

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John Smith 19
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"an interesting perspective, I will now have to chromecast the whole film."

I think it's an under rated film from the opening scene (which most door staff will cringe at. Listen carefully) to the arrival of the assault team to take down the kidnappers.

Much of it had me in stitches.

Parental advisory. Violence, gore, offensive language from the outset, suicide advocacy. *

*Just complying with the UK internet access filter rules.

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John Smith 19
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"has anyone ELSE drawn the obvious conclusion from this, i.e. instead of "

You mean that one women's premature baby is another women's abortion?

That's been the case for at least the last 30 years.

However given the way this issue stirs up the SEL contingent of US politics no sensible discussion can be had on the subject.

Personally I'd find out what the slowest abnormality test takes for defects and extend the termination limit to that.

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John Smith 19
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Re: Too posh to push - now too lazy to carry?

You're way behind the curve.

You may find this short orientation film useful.

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John Smith 19
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"More likely to do with "statistics". "

Interesting idea.

Premature births go up but stillborn deaths go down.

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John Smith 19
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"Now this is an extream example possibly but if this tech exists its not impossible a"

Actually if you watch the vid you'll see they've been very careful to note the tech is for Mothers at high risk of premature birth around the 23-24 week which is also the abortion cut off date

That said there are babies born considerably younger and the question may eventually be asked if it the technology could be extended backwards.

That however will be an ethical conversation that will await successful trials.

Remember this is V 0.2 tech at best.

No one's going to be running any GE super soldier programmes with this tech just yet.

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John Smith 19
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And it's only taken 52 years.

There's a Life magazine cover from 1965 showing a picture of an "artificial womb" with a small fetus inside it (not sure if it was staged or real).

Like deep brain implants this seems to have been one of those technologies that the scientists of the time felt was somehow unacceptable to society and put on the shelf.

It's exciting to see people pursuing this once again.

Obvious SF reference would be JM Bujolds novel "Barryar, " although I doubt they've gotten round to considering the ability to apply in vitro treatments to the fetus that could be lethal to the Mother.

But WTF "1% of all US born babies are premature and the % has risen over the last 2-3 decades"

How does US compare with other countries?

Something is seriously f**king wrong.

Looks like a vacuum packed package to me.

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Super-secure Pi-stuffed nomx email server box given a good probing

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But they sell a device that is supposed to protect against a 3Rd party?

Indeed.

If you're going to the expense of buying a separate mail server box you must already have security concerns.

Nothing can ever be totally secured but a lot can be done. It depends on the threat you're facing. What could stop 90% of all skiddies in their tracks probably wouldn't stop any state sponsored hacking crew (you chose which state you're most concerned about). Ultimately breaking into the premises if that's what it takes.

I'm not sure how good this box is. From the description definitely not state sponsored hackers. But with no update feature even the skiddies look like they've got a shot if they can find on the 'net.

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John Smith 19
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"you have described the exact process this guy has been at pains to avoid.."

I wouldn't be surprised as it's time consuming and damm hard work.

And in this business those spell e-x-p-e-n-s-i-v-e.

But that's the difference between real security and the appearance of security. BTW reading the article again suggests the inter-box protocol is not that secure. If that's the case anyone tapping the connection has got a window into any traffic between boxes, with a possible ability to spoof new external emails with malware on board, unless all inter-box traffic is fully encrypted.

If the inter box traffic is un-encrypted this is upgraded to an epic fail and it's a Razzie in a small box running a mail server that does not appear to be updateable.

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John Smith 19
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TL:DR It's a mail server in a small box. Mfg claims its V. secure. BS detector red linning.

I can think of a way to

Take the source for a mature Linux distro.

Strip every module out that's not directly needed to carry out this task. No apps included "just in case." No language processors. Include secure update facilities

Run every remaining module through source code analysis tools to identify latent bugs and insecure coding practices. Fix them and re run the tools.

Put the source code up on a site and offer generous bug bounties. Leave it for some months. Scour the internet for every possible exploit of those applications. Start work on the server side of your secure updates system.

While you're doing ind the most up to date minimal tool chain you can find and run it through the same tools.

Compile the tool change with the most minimal possible compiler. Then re-build them with full versions of the tools to get an efficient tool chain.

Now build the code and put it into the hardware.

Run all the known exploits against the code base in situ. Log any that failed then re-write to eliminate all of them. After the code has been up on the site for 3-6 months take any reported bugs and add them into the re-write process.

Re-run the code analysis tools on the source code. Drive out any further bugs found. Re-build the code, Assuming all tests are passed and all current exploits fail to penetrate ship the hardware with the current executable.

It's a long winded process and it's not cheap. It will significantly reduce the available attack surface for an attacker but it does not guarantee unconditional security for all time.

Now who thinks anyone is going to do this IRL?

Security is a process, not an event. And if you want to be a serious player IE nation state resistant security (like privacy) is pretty f**king hard to do properly.

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FCC's Pai: I am going to kill net neutrality in US

John Smith 19
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"Looks like trump is working on a 5 year only plan"

Au Contraire, rumour has it he already has his 2020* slogan already worked out.

"Keeping America Great."

Catchy, don't you think?

*Barring death, serious injury or impeachment of course.

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John Smith 19
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"He's the telco Trump."

Well, he's the Telco's something alright.

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FTP becoming Forgotten Transfer Protocol as Debian turns it off

John Smith 19
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So they may not like it but it's quite a lingu franca of hassle free file tranfer

Whereas most of its "replacements" depend on what host OS you're running.

So back to walled gardens then..

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Homebrew crypto SNAFU on electrical grid sees GE rush patches

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Remember GE is the home of "Not Invented Here"

Because if it was a good idea "we would have invented it already."

So they did.

Not very well it seems.

Capital equipment has a very long operating life. These gadgets were probably first hooked up to a proprietary interface (I think GE was supporting something called the Mfg Automation Protocol around then) then a dialup modem and now to an IP router.

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Fistful of flaws blow away SolarWinds network appliances

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Disabling default logins <> running full patch.

Likewise not having an IPv6 connection is not the same as not having a vulnerability ready to be used.

Sadly I suspect some sysadmins may feel that is all that is necessary in these cases.

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A switch with just 49 ns latency? What strange magic is this?

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"It's a multiplexer."

Absolutely.

My understanding of a true switch is it's an N-N device. Any I/P to any O/P. This a 1:N or N:1 device

A very radical loss in flexibility.

If it's targeted at HFT's I'm sure it will be "reassuringly expensive" to coin a phrase but for the rest of us?

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

You say HFT I say automated man-in-middle attack

Because that's what they do.

These people contribute no benefit to the financial system. They are well financed parasites who could not last a day if they actually "traded" in the real meaning of the term for any actual goal.

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NATO secures adoption of submerged drone data comms standard

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"Underwater Communications and Networking" Magazine

That's an actual thing?

Who knew?

So it's like an TCP/IP for underwater use and operates on a variety of media IE from VLF radio waves to say ultrasound?

Here comes the IoUT (Internet of Underwater Things).

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Insuring against a future financial crisis

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WTF?

"banks need to hold enough capital and do sensible forecasting "

And boy do banksters hate having to do that.

Which is why they are so fond of inventing ever more obfuscatory BS like CDO's that give the appearance of being actual capital but are in many cases completely f**king worthless.

And then they "insure" this PoS with "insurance" that multiplies the risk (not to mention betting against their suckers clients in the case of Goldman Sachs)

BTW the clauses to accept such things could be viewed as capital were tacked onto a 1000 page finance bill, probably by another ex Goldman Sachs employee. Goldman Sachs is looking more like an Organized Criminal conspiracy (in the legal sense of the term) to me.

A 1000 page finance bill should alone be sending peoples BS meters redlining.

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FYI: You can blow Intel-powered broadband modems off the 'net with a 'trivial' packet stream

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So any hardware using Puma 6 as it's processor family is f**ked basicall?

I wonder who knew about this?

And how long?

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Intel redesigns flawed Atom CPUs to stave off premature chip death

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Let's see what this does to their earnings

I don't know what the lead time on major chip purchases (and the processor is a major chip in this context) so maybe there will be no dip.

But down the line people will be considering.

1)How long Intel took to let anyone know

2)How long it's taken to fix.

3)How much trouble will a board re-design take accommodate their changed protocol

4)How much trouble to go with ARM/MIPS/PowerPC/SPARC and rebuild their software.

Maybe people will think Intel were OK in their response and it's too much hassle to change. Then again maybe not.

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UK.gov throws hissy fit after Twitter chokes off snoop firm's access

John Smith 19
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"Amber Rudd..a fucking idiot..lesser understanding of the balances required..my teenage daughter.

Much like the previous 9 or so Home Secretaries.

All champions of the Snoopers Charter in its current or previous forms.

It seems the only properly functioning section of the Home Office is it's PR department.

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Come celebrate World Hypocrisy Day

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"There are some ideas so absurd that only an intellectual could believe them,"

I've been digging into AI work on language understanding.

That quote alone was worth the rest of the article.s

A couple of other points

1) Try that picture exercise with teens and then tell them what FaceBooks T&C say they can do with your material.

2) personal data should also be your personal data. IMHO medical corporations (icluding the NHS) who collect and aggregate the data to sell on are no different (or better) than any other data aggregator such as Google or FaceBook.

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UK drops in World Press Freedom Index following surveillance and anti-espionage threats

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I'm sure Gauleite May will feel the UK can do better.

And by better I mean move further down the chart.

Probably already to kick off her "40(th place) by 20(20)" campaign already.*

*Yes that is fake news. So far.

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John Smith 19
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"and of course FN will get in because "OMG Terrorists" and rights will be further eroded."

One of the greatest myths a party can generate is the myth of its own invincibility.

If a party formed barely a year ago can lead one that's had decades to prepare for its "moment" in the spotlight I'd say it's not over.

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Victory! The smell of skunkworks in your office in the morning

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"and just enter the rotating pool of management that flows continuously between companies."

The Chief Executives & Senior Survivors club.

IOW the CESS Pool.

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Swamp-draining Trump pushes ex-AT&T lobbyist to oversee AT&T mega-merger

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"Wouldn't work. Twitler spends all his time golfing in Florida."

And they say snowflakes always melt in the sun.

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After blitzing FlexiSpy, hackers declare war on all stalkerware makers: 'We're coming for you'

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It's interesting. The hackers are illegal. The business is legally legal

Or at worst a Grey area.

But they make just-about-legal stalkerware (if they weren't a spouse, and who checks if the purchaser is or isn't they'd, definitely be a stalker).

Like anyone who's business involves either finding out (or protecting others from finding out) people's business they should expect to be hit and hit hard on a regular basis.

If you want to play in the more abrasive parts of the IT business you'd better be prepared to take a beating on security. It's not going to be "if" it's going to "when" and "how often."

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HipChat SlipChat lets hackers RipChat

John Smith 19
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Go

seems like quite a professional response to me.

Spotted a problem, advised customers, too action.

Rather than the "A few customers were affected. It's all taken care of. Nothing to see here" BS of people like Stalk Stalk.

For bonus points advise the library supplier of their fault.

Not a bad performance for a breach situation.

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A bot lingua franca does not exist: Your machine-learning options for walking the talk

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No mention of Scilab or SciCOS

Which is European and open source.

Scilab is the core system and SciCOS lets you set up the block models control systems (and other) engineers like.

And IIRC it can generate C/C++ code if necessary.

Scilab is here

SciCOS is here

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Ex-NSA techies launch data governance tool for future algorithm-slavery

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"Ex NSA" staff does send a very mixed message.

Skillz. Yes.

Trustworthy. TBD

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Kremlin-backed DNC hackers going after French presidential hopeful Macron

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So Putin want Le Penn to win?

Ah the love absolute dictators have for each other.

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We're 'heartbroken' we got caught selling your email records to Uber, says Unroll.me boss

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Re: once again Uber...Seems there is nothing too low or dirty for them to stoop to.

I think that's the unofficial company motto. *

*Or possibly "We are the underminers. We are beneath everybody, but nothing is beneath us."

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Northrop Grumman can make a stealth bomber – but can't protect its workers' W-2 tax forms

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"Linkedin has ~56k Northrop Grumman employees;"

True, but as you point out they chose to appear and I'm pretty sure their SSN or personal phone numbers are on there.

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Not auf wiedersehen – yet! The Berlin scene tempting Brexit tech

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Should be a great place for NYC businesses.

First we take Manhattan.....

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John Smith 19
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Headmaster

"She also said brexit means brexit. Lets see if that's true."

That's what they call in logic a tautology, like X = X there is no way it can ever not be true.

What it will actually mean will be decided over the next 2 years* **

It is semantically correct but syntactically meaningless. Like if X==X {}

*At least partly, depending on how much is actually negotiated before the "watchdog timer" times out.

**Other than a clusterf**k of epic proportions as about 42 years of EU regulations and the laws that implement them have to be gone through and at least some of them dealt with.

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