* Posts by Bucky 2

574 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

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You lost your ballpoint pen, Slack? Why's your Linux version unsigned?

Bucky 2
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I was under the impression that yum would refuse to install unless you added --nogpgcheck to the command line.

That said, exactly how much time on "the roadmap" does it take to change:

rpmbuild -ba slack.spec

to

rpmbuild -ba --sign slack.spec

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Equifax fooled again! Blundering credit biz directs hack attack victims to parody site

Bucky 2
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Re: Typo

@FSM

But the universe was created by a big drunk, so who are we to judge?

R'amen

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Compsci degrees aren't returning on investment for coders – research

Bucky 2
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It sounds like the study says a degree in IT is a poor indicator of job performance.

That would be consistent with my experience. People fresh out of college with degrees in IT are strong on douchebaggery, but I haven't seen much difference in terms of relevant skill, compared to people with degrees in Communications, or incomplete degrees.

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Inept bloke who tried to sell military sat secrets to Russia gets 5 years

Bucky 2
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The Falcon and the Snowman

No wife killing. Secret selling, though.

Good movie. The astonishing motive of the dude selling the secrets was that if the US was doing nasty stuff, then the Soviets (in the movie, it was Soviets) must be the good guys.

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Microsoft won't patch Edge browser content security bypass

Bucky 2
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Black Helicopters

Required Security Hole

"By design" is nonsense if you assume that it's the spec that forced their hand.

We already know that the US government accumulates security holes. They may have just ordered Microsoft to build this one in. It would certainly explain the bizarre "by design" response.

Indeed, it may be intentionally bizarre. Perhaps they are publicly balking so that everyone will understand that they are not in control of their own destiny.

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Vivaldi boss: It'd be cool if Google went back to the 'not evil' schtick

Bucky 2
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That ship sailed years ago

The "don't be evil" thing has been false so long, it isn't even a laughing stock anymore. Surely Vivaldi knows this, too?

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Facebook will deny ads to repeat promoters of fake news

Bucky 2
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What, specifically, makes news "fake"?

For example: What's the status of sensationalism in headlines? Language targeted toward creating an emotional response is not news, certainly. Is it appropriate to behave as though it were? Is news mixed with non-news still news?

What about lazy reporting, like just sort of summarizing press releases? That kind of thing is certainly printed as though it were news. Does it count as "fake"?

What about even lazier reporting, like when reporters simply quote people, and then do nothing to identify what, if anything, was true about what that person said? I don't know a single US news agency that does not think of this as the beginning and the end of their responsibility to the public. Is it okay to let third parties to "fact checks?"

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75 years ago, one Allied radar techie changed the course of WW2

Bucky 2
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Typical

In spite of his heroism, Nissenthall was never given any official recognition for his part in the raid. None of the Canadians knew who he really was until 25 years later, when he turned up at a regimental reunion out of the blue.

Some things never change.

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Microsoft president exits US govt's digital advisory board as tech leaders quit over Trump

Bucky 2
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Mushroom

I'm so through

"Make America Great Again" is based on the premise that America is NOT great, but WILL be once we teach all the Arabs and Mexicans to be properly subordinate.

These CEOs were cool with all of that before. The only thing that's happened is a little publicity.

They've already demonstrated a lack of a moral center by getting all buddy-buddy with this administration in the first place.

I'm calling BS on their moral posturing. I'm insulted they think I'm stupid enough to believe them.

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Ancient IETF 'teapot' gag preserved for posterity as a standard

Bucky 2
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Millennials don't actually ruin everything. Once Baby Boomers have consumed and destroyed whatever was in their path, they just often happen to be next on the scene.

At that point the Baby Boomers wipe the blood from their fangs and say, "Look what you've done!"

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Old Firefox add-ons get 'dead man walking' call

Bucky 2
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Luddites, all of you

You all realize there's a difference between a "plug-in" and an "extension," right?

The only "plug-in" anybody has ever used in real life is flash. Everything else is an "extension." Anything you've ever downloaded from https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/extensions/ is an extension.

So before you start jumping up and down screaming "Change! Horror! Never change anything!" Please actually look at what's changing and think about it rationally.

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Google diversity memo: Web giant repudiates staffer's screed for 'incorrect assumptions about gender'

Bucky 2
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False incentive

Schools and education is a job sector where, in general, it is easier to apply for and be allowed flexible working for child care.

I see how this benefits families with children.

In order for this to be a positive thing that specifically benefits women, we would have had to secretly decide that, in an either/or choice between career and raising children, raising children should always fall to women, and building a career should always fall to men.

Under the circumstances, I have to call the policy irrelevant to bringing equality to the workplace.

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Solaris, Java have vulns that let users run riot

Bucky 2
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I'm guessing most of the vulnerabilities relate to browser integration

Nowhere does the article mention the word "browser" or "applet," so I'm pretty sure we can rule in-browser java out completely as the source of any of these vulnerabilities.

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Insurers claim cyber calamities could cost more than Hurricane Sandy

Bucky 2
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Fun fact

Fun fact: The Great San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 wasn't the cause of most of the property damage. It was arson. People were insured against fire, but not earthquake. So while emergency crews were busy, people burned their houses and businesses down.

With that in mind, I wonder how accurate those vulnerability estimates could possibly be. Business a little slow? Infect your own workstations yourself and reap the rewards.

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Linus Torvalds may have damned systemd with faint praise

Bucky 2
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Re: It's a phase young programmers go through

Now if we had a decent "remote desktop" protocol that supports audio as well as video, we'd have completely new capabilities.

I ask because I don't know:

Why doesn't whatever xpra uses count as "decent"?

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GnuPG crypto library cracked, look for patches

Bucky 2
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WTF?

Fixed in 1.7.8

Rather than enumerate two distributions, it's more informative, I think, to name the version of the library where the problem is fixed, so people can quickly know whether their fully-patched machine is, or is not safe.

The issue was fixed in libgcrypt 1.7.8. If you have that version, you have a fixed libgcrypt.

The release announcement for that version is here:

https://lists.gnupg.org/pipermail/gnupg-announce/2017q2/000408.html

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In touching tribute to Samsung Note 7, fidget spinners burst in flames

Bucky 2
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Re: So it was nothing but God that held us back....

If He wanted to destroy the fidget spinner without hurting the people, it would have been a whole lot less drama to just miracle the thing "lost." Or maybe let it fall into the toilet. Unless His power lacks precision.

Just saying.

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See you in 2023 – Bitcoin exchange Coin.mx bigwig gets 66 months in the slammer

Bucky 2
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I never managed to get my head around bitcoin. Why would someone use a currency that can only be used in a limited number of places (and never the local grocery store, pub, or cafe)? Why not just use normal money that you can spend anywhere?

The whole thing has always sounded like a money-laundering scheme to me.

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Ever wondered why the universe only has black holes in S or XXXL? No? Boffins have an answer

Bucky 2
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Re: An alternative theory

That's what the department stores say, but it explains nothing.

The first season the store is in business, maybe. After that, the store should have a fair idea of how many of each size they can sell at a regular price.

So if they end up with a bunch of odd sizes that they have to get rid of with a deep discount, then somebody isn't doing his homework.

To put it another way: Why shop at a store run by the same people who used to cheat off you in class, and make fun of you on the playground?

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Robocall spammers, you have one new voicemail message: CUT IT OUT!

Bucky 2
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Well, they wouldn't call unless some people give them money.

How about a law that if a person engages with a telemarketer, then that person's phone is taken away, and they're held for psychiatric evaluation for not less than 6 months?

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Research suggests UK consumers find 'fibre' advertising misleading

Bucky 2
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Methinks the main failing here is that the retailers don't use those terms because they might confuse people....

That's what they say. What they mean is, they don't understand a particular term. And rather than take 12 seconds to learn it, they prefer to try to Minitrue it out of existence.

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OnePlus accused of installing cheat codes for benchmarks with new handset

Bucky 2
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I have questions...

If benchmarks were of no use, wouldn't there then be no point in trying to subvert them?

No matter how I look at it, it seems like their intention was to mislead. How is that ever okay?

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Putting AI to work in finance? Think algorithms, ethics first

Bucky 2
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Re: AI, banking and ethics.

I was thinking along similar lines.

If they added ethics to a finance AI, that would certainly be a new addition to the industry. I wonder how long it would be before they removed it because it hampered performance.

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Google, Mozilla both say they sped up the web today. One by blocking ads. One with ads

Bucky 2
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Re: Why don't we ditch HTML+CSS+JS and just deliver websites as PNGs/JPEGs?

For my money, you've got the problem/solution backwards.

A bad web implementation uses images when well-considered css would produce the same effect.

A bad web implementation uses javascript to provide layout and state-change feedback, again when css (well, modern css) is sufficient.

I'd say your solution is an image-free, javascript-free experience, with nothing BUT text and css.

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Bucky 2
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Joke

Re: Paradox. Everyone hates ads. Everyone wants stuff for "free".

@Law:

I use none of the BBC content

Am I given to understand you don't watch Dr. Who?

Burn the witch!

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US voter info stored on wide-open cloud box, thanks to bungling Republican contractor

Bucky 2
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Re: Hillary

They already decided Hillary wasn't guilty of anything, so why would they continue with this investigation when they've already made their decision?

I think the GOP thought they could control Trump. It is possible that they do. His antics make for good TV, and should be pretty effective in hiding subtler mechanizations.

Even if they don't, Trump is their dude. They have to continue hating Clinton. If they stop, they would have to accept that Clinton would have been better for the nation, and quite possibly, even healthier for the GOP itself.

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'OK, everyone. Stop typing, this software is DONE,' said no one ever

Bucky 2
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Some software is "done"

As I recall, Mozilla Thunderbird was proclaimed "done". It happened July 6, 2012.

The last sentence of the first paragraph here really does suggest that there's little room for improvement:

https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird/Proposal:_New_Release_and_Governance_Model

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Bucky 2
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WTF?

Re: I cannot agree more.

Firefox. I miss the old reliable with low memory use, fast, responsive and looked like firefox. Still use it but still miss the older versions.

Have you noticed that since they put multithreading in to make it "faster," that when you open the javascript console, you've got 30 seconds before it populates itself.

That's thirty. Seconds. It's pretty astonishing.

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Teen girl who texted boyfriend to kill himself guilty of manslaughter

Bucky 2
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Re: Factor in suicidal people are not exactly thinking rationally.

I'm not sure you're right about suicidal being the same as irrational.

Sometimes you'll get worried that maybe you aren't thinking clearly, and you'll tell somebody what you're thinking about. And they'll get pissed, and believe you're being a drama queen and emotionally manipulative. Sometimes they won't say it. But you can see it in their eyes. And you think about it, and you completely understand their point of view: If you were truly, authentically, "suicidal," you be dead right now, not talking to them. Rationally, you evaluate yourself as a fraud.

Rationally, your misgivings about whether you're thinking clearly are now are proved to be nothing other than cowardice. The choice you're struggling with is proven to be how much longer you're going to pretend that anything you do or anything you are is worthwhile.

Rationally, of course, not forever. At the outside, you're still mortal. You're going to die eventually. And as long as it's going to happen eventually, there's really no rational point in drawing it out artificially.

Maybe you haven't seen the Wonder Woman movie yet, so you'll want to see that at some point. And you want to see the final Avengers movie. But that's kinda it. Eventually, you know you're going to run out of stuff. The only control you have over your future at that point is how much you're going to put up with the crap -- how long you're going to be eating 3 kinds of antidepressants every day just to stay functional. Is that anyway to live? Rationally speaking? How much longer can you keep it up? Rationally speaking?

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When we said don't link to the article, Google, we meant DON'T LINK TO THE ARTICLE!

Bucky 2
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I think I'm missing something

The right to be forgotten (as I understand it) is a human right. I'm not under the impression human rights are automatically inherited by corporations. I am not a lawyer. It could be the case. I don't think it should be the case, though.

If a corporation has simply been libeled (as some have suggested), then the proper agency to bring charges against is the offending web site. It's not appropriate to bring charges against Google simply because it's an easier target. Some have suggested that the original author could be difficult to find, but that's not really relevant.

If a corporation committed some act of misinformation and is under a court order to remove that information, I don't see how a reasonable court would insist on not only removing the misinformation, but removing any hint that the misinformation existed.

And that seems like it's the whole issue. The company wants to remove any evidence that it has been embarrassed. I don't understand why a company should have that right.

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Look who's joined the anti-encryption posse: Germany, come on down

Bucky 2
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Facepalm

It isn't a difficult topic

Governments' objections to encryption all hinge on the presumption that governmental motives are fundamentally positive.

This is a false presumption. Even for so-called "enlightened" governments.

Look at what happened to the US in the space of a single election.

Yeah, getting past encryption would make the government's job easier, just like limiting freedom of expression, jailing without charges, bills of attainder, and so forth. The simple fact is that no government can be trusted with such powers. Not yours, and not mine.

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Teen texted boyfriend to kill himself. It worked. Will the law change to deal with digital reality?

Bucky 2
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Re: Assisted suicide

You wouldn't use carbon dioxide for assisted suicide. As the carbon dioxide builds up in your bloodstream, you start to gasp and panic.

If you were looking for a particularly unpleasant way to die, that would be one of them.

For genuine assisted suicide by asphyxiation, you'd want to breathe an inert gas. There's no serum CO2 buildup, and therefore no final moments of terror. Nitrogen is, of course, best, but a nice pressurized tank of helium is easy to rent from any party store, for not a whole lot of money. Beyond that, you just need a little hose, a garbage bag, and some duct tape. If you have a CPAP machine already, then you can use that hose, and you can use the mask instead of the garbage bag. It would be as peaceful as going to sleep normally.

I've gotten as far as assembling all the materials except for the helium. They've been in my bedside chest for two years. The nearest party store that sells helium is 3 1/2 miles away.

You can say "Freedom of speech" or "she was only 17" or "he was depressed anyway" as much as you like, but from where I'm standing, she's as guilty as if she put a gun to his head and pulled the trigger herself.

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Bucky 2
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The compelling evidence isn't that she said mean things. It's the repetition. She brainwashed him into killing himself. The fact that he was already depressed is what made her successful. It is not a mitigating circumstance.

5 years? I'd throw her in the clink for 30. If there were friends, family, or faculty who knew what she was up to, I'd give those people 5 years under the Massachusetts duty to rescue law.

I have no compassion for bullies.

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Donald Trumped: Comey says Prez is a liar – and admits he's a leaker

Bucky 2
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Criminal Foolishness?

There are a number of things being said that don't ring true for me in this whole setup.

If the FBI is "independent," then how in the world did Trump have the power to fire Comey? If it's supposed to be independent, that power must be removed, no matter how this ultimately plays out.

The fact that a foreign nation wanted to put a useless douche in power doesn't make that useless douche complicitous. Heinlein called this technique a "Black Frost" campaign: Remove effective people from power, and leave incompetents in place. Even if it's not as commonplace as Heinlein suggested in "Friday," it's certainly not a new idea.

The fact that Trump was abrasive and inappropriate shouldn't have been a surprise to Comey. Trump's been that way his entire life. He was elected based on the fact that country people get a boner for pompous dickwads (look at who they elect as senators). And Comey — G-Man extraordinare — recorded his experiences using what kind of futuristic FBI device? A diary? After the first meeting, sure. But afterwards? Sorry, but something doesn't hold water. I'd get the heebie jeebies, too, but being unpleasant isn't against the law.

Trump is America's Cicciolina (except, you know, president instead of parliamentarian). He's an embarrassment, but I haven't seen anything yet that can't be explained by foolishness.

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Pop-up Android adware uses social engineering to resist deletion

Bucky 2
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Re: No other options but to press "OK"

One possibility is that the intention of the bad spelling and syntax is to filter out targets with even a little skepticism.

It sounds logical. But writing malware, to me, would be a lot of stress. What if you get caught? What if you extort money from someone who can't really afford it, like someone's grandmother or something?

No. You write malware because you don't have the option of making a decent living doing normal programming, and then going home, and sleeping peacefully through the night.

The best reason I can think of for the lack of options, is that your salable skills are iffy.

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State senator sacked by broadband biz Frontier after voting in favor of broadband competition

Bucky 2
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Re: I dont get Americans...

I still stand by my inability to understand Americans acceptance of political corruption.

I'm American, and I share your opinion. We haven't been a democracy in some time. We're a plutocracy. It's been that way since before I was born. We know it. We feel powerless to do anything about it.

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The internet may well be the root cause of today's problems… but not in the way you think

Bucky 2
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It seems to me that money, religion, and all those things that government officials are fond of talking about are all emergent properties of the power of self-determination, not fundamental properties in and of themselves.

If you don't address self-determination, then manipulating any of the other things is just putting lipstick on a pig.

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The open source community is nasty and that's just the docs

Bucky 2
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"Polite" is a relative term

There is a protocol to interacting with an expert, or expert community.

First, do your own homework. Asking for definitions of fundamental concepts without first attempting to discover this information on your own is unspeakably rude.

Second, express your question or contribution clearly and completely. It isn't the project's responsibility to enter into a game of 20 Questions with you. Assuming otherwise is outrageously self-absorbed.

Third, reserve spoken "conversation starters" for spoken conversation. No matter how informal a forum feels, it's a written medium. Dropping "Can I ask a question?" is useless, and frustrating. Yes, yes, I acknowledge your existence -- but please, if you need that kind of constant reassurance, save it for therapy.

Finally, pretend that you're communicating with an actual friggin' HUMAN BEING. Pretend that the only thing that human being could possibly know about you are the words you write. Pretend that the human being may not have the luxury of putting his life on hold while he tries to winnow out what you're trying to say or do.

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Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

Bucky 2
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Re: As for the idea of being charged for using an adblocker...

That's exactly the issue.

If a web site washes its hands of what ads are or are not served, and accepts no responsibility for them, then I'm certainly not going to accept the ads, either. That's fair.

If a web site wants to serve ads, but doesn't feel like it needs to commit any network resources to do so, then I don't feel like I need to commit any network resources to do so, either. That's fair.

If a site chooses to solve these problems, it has the side-effect that ad-blockers don't work well on them, either, if at all.

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Gravitational waves permanently change spacetime, say astroboffins

Bucky 2
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They did this on ST:TNG. The episode was called "Force of Nature." It was the one where they found out that warp drive damages space.

Or it could just be tire tracks, I guess. But I'm still hoping for subspace rift.

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PayPal peed off about Pandora's 'P' being mistaken for its 'PP'

Bucky 2
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Nobody who knew one of the logos, but not the other, would confuse the unknown logo with the known logo (absent a profound disability).

So the suit is obviously about something else. There's some kind of corporate politicking at play.

On the other hand, I said similar things about the intelligence of the general public during the last election. So maybe PayPal's right. Maybe normal people can't tell the difference.

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PC repair chap lets tech support scammer log on to his PC. His Linux PC

Bucky 2
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How do you tell the difference between a genuine scammer and an ordinary sales person?

I mean, okay, one is legal and the other isn't. But it's the same game. It's all about trying to convince someone to give you their money against their own better judgment, either way, isn't it?

Wouldn't you have to be on the sociopath spectrum in either case?

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Mozilla to Thunderbird: You can stay here and we may give you cash, but as a couple, it's over

Bucky 2
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Mushroom

Re: Can someone give me an idea of what sort of money is involved?

TB, however, needs but 3 things adding that would allow it to make a rather massive impact:

If there are Thunderbird developers still in existence (and I frankly doubt it), they have rejected each and every one of your ideas every hour of every day for years upon years.

What about Sieve support? Nope, screw you. You can write a plugin; we can't be bothered.

What about refreshing the calendar UI to something a little more this decade? Nope, screw you. You can write a plugin; we can't be bothered.

Thunderbird has been intensely hostile to any feature recommendations. I wouldn't be inclined to give someone money who's been giving the rest of us the finger for this long.

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IBM: Remote working is great! ... For everyone except us

Bucky 2
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Except you need competent management

If you have competent management, and information flows properly through the proper channels, it doesn't really matter where the employees are located. Working from home is as good as anywhere else.

However, if your manager neither knows nor cares how anything gets accomplished, you have to take it upon yourself to get things done. That involves walking around to other departments and asking people directly whether or not the thing you need from them is ready.

Of course they have told the manager. That's proper procedure. But the manager is--apparently--having you cleared with the FBI before divulging that vital information. The other possibility is that he is waiting until you're down on your knees begging, because he likes how powerful it makes him feel.

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Don't panic, Florida Man, but a judge just said you have to give phone passcodes to the cops

Bucky 2
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@AC

What happens if you hold out on your pass code/word till the phone eventually dies? 4-5 years?

I believe the maximum lifetime, as measured by phone vendors, is 3 years. This is assuming you buy it the moment the model is released.

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Don't click that Google Docs link! Gmail hijack mail spreads like wildfire

Bucky 2
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It's a kind of social commentary

Okay, wait. It's a mail to hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh@mailinator.com AND it asks for permission to access your email and your contacts?

And not only that, but an industry which people expect to be populated by critical thinkers is hardest hit?

If the press ever needed an example of why it's not someone else's fault that people are losing faith in them, here it is.

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Rejoice, for Linux 4.11 has been delivered!

Bucky 2
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Trollface

Re: Real changes to the Linux Kernel ?

Of course. Who doesn't? But you were kind to ask.

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FYI – There's a legal storm brewing in Cali that threatens to destroy online free speech

Bucky 2
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This reminds me of a time I had to sit on a jury.

During the selection process, the prosecuting attorney made a big deal about how even despicable people could be harmed by others, and entitled to legal remedies.

While this is of course true in theory, we found it wasn't true in reality.

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SPY-tunes scandal: Bloke sues Bose after headphones app squeals on his playlist

Bucky 2
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It all depends on WHEN he was told. IANAL, but it is my understanding that contractual obligations can't be added after a purchase. Only before.

The dispute will probably hinge on the fact that the app was not bundled with the headphones.

He'll probably argue that he purchased the headphones based on the availability of the app, and the headphone case didn't say "conditions apply" or something.

If the app was free, he's probably SOL.

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