* Posts by Charles 9

10419 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

US laptops-on-planes ban may extend to flights from ALL nations

Charles 9
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I'm still waiting for one of them to realize that a bomb small enough to be concealed inside a working laptop battery is also small enough to be put in something like a dildo. Meaning they can conceal the bomb from practically any scanner simply by being kinky enough to conceal it INSIDE themselves.

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UK ministers to push anti-encryption laws after election

Charles 9
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Re: Plugins

Two problems:

One, the qualifications for being a politician are essentially at odds with the qualifications for being in the sciences. The latter requires a relatively objective look at things while the former is almost entirely SUBjective, owing to the fact politicians essentially are playing with other people. Essentially, in general, great scientists make poor politicians and vice versa.

Two, it goes to the general population. The average person doesn't want to know this stuff. They just want to get through their day, enjoy themselves afterward, have the occasional day off, and repeat ad nauseum. Worse, any attempt to install an academic or some other meritocratic qualification for being an actual citizen WILL (not may) get corrupted in some way.

Frankly, you have to wonder if the human race really is cut out for this kind of civilization.

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Charles 9
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Re: So basically...

Not enlightened enough, I'd say, to realize some will believe their own words and will refuse to listen to reason. IOW, to them, his demonstration was simply him not trying hard enough. Some fights you just cannot win; an argument against an irrational person is one of them.

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Charles 9
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Are you sure about that? Treason, like most other things human, is relative. City-saver or kingslayer?

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Charles 9
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Re: Plugins

You may actually be onto something. Why else do the movie companies NOT allow 4K BluRays to be played on computers, ONLY on purpose-built, secured-from-end-to-end dedicated players?

Perhaps the next step is that all computers will be considered dangerous devices requiring registration the same way cars are. And all software firms and programmers will likely have to sign legal oaths and probably even post surety bonds.

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Charles 9
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Re: Plugins

Simple answer: forbid unsanctioned add-ons under penalty of not being allowed to operate in the country: regulating apps and industries ARE within the government's remit; see the Uber controversy.

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Charles 9
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It's not the bomb victims you need to consider but the idea the government was complicit in the bombing given they were warned, specifically, multiple times. What's it going to take? Some YouTube video televising the exact time of the bombing? Heck, if you want REAL terror, I'd use that as a tactic to convey hopelessness; you know it's coming and you STILL can't stop it.

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Charles 9
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They weren't desperate enough. Push enough of them into the "dead either way" zone and the results would differ.

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Charles 9
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Re: good idea but seriously

Then who pays for the care of the elderly POOR?

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Charles 9
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Re: good idea but seriously

"The rich will flee abroad taking their money with them and leaving the rest of us plebs to pick up the bill."

And if a mandatory exit tax was imposed?

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Charles 9
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Unless the fake COMES FIRST or somehow all the other certs get invalidated, basically replacing the pin. How else do corporate secure proxies work? Wouldn't a State-level one apply the same principles?

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Charles 9
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And what would that do versus a mass uprising, unless the government is willing to nuke its own cities. Which would then be the signal that civilization's pretty much over.

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Charles 9
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"None of this will however stop pier to pier encryption as pointed out by an earlier poster"

But it could make it easier to detect, especially combined with steganography countermeasures like image mangling and text sanitizing.

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Charles 9
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Nope, not in terms of a "hidden in plain sight" zero-knowledge system. Can you come up with a code-word system that doesn't require the other side to know what it is yet can be hidden in plain sight, not necessarily in steganography but like a message that looks like any other innocuous message (In other words, can you use a "Happy Birthday" message to tell others what to do even though they've never met before to establish a common code yet?).

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Charles 9
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Re: So the person had been reported to the authorities....

By what standard, though? In terms of absolute time spent (which would make sense since the most time people spend in any one place is usually at home) or risk factors relative to time spent (which changes the emphasis to how risky is any given point you're located)?

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Bitcoin exchange Coinbase crashes after Asian buying frenzy

Charles 9
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Re: Naive

Those countries permit Bitcoin trading because they also regulate the ways they are exchanged. As long as they know the exchange transactions, they're no different from other currency exchanges. The US tolerates Bitcoin as well because they have means of managing the exchanges.

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Charles 9
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Since I used to use Counbase, last I checked they don't really care until it passes a floor value. Otherwise, Counbase would be obligated to submit a tax form (1099-B, I think) for you (Counbase is a registered exchange in the US, permitting them access to banks).

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Charles 9
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Ah, but keep receipts. Above certain levels, these kinds of transactions become taxable events. And Coinbase is registered to various governments.

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Charles 9
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Re: "Legal tender"?

Legal tender doesn't apply to pure sales since the seller can always walk away. The legal importance is when it comes to DEBTS.

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Life is... pushing all the right buttons on the wrong remote control

Charles 9
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Re: Home made solution

Once thought of that, then remembered some of the devices have inconsistent reaction times. Like the TV, which like I said can't switch inputs on a single press. No, you have to press a button, press up and/or down a few times (and it sometimes doesn't react), then press ENTER when it's just right before it overshoots.

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Charles 9
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Re: For the older ones

"Do you remember the time when you had actually to walk to the TV set to change the program to one of the three available channels?"

"And if the President was on, your night was shot, too." — Jeff Foxworthy

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Charles 9
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Slim TV has no top to speak of, and it's on a wall mount so nowhere else to put it. Several units on top of each other mean you can't put the right remote on top of the right thing (beside is not an option, either: too narrow a shelf). TV remote is required because the amp doesn't have unified output (still need to switch to component to use the one device that can ONLY use component, for example, instead of HDMI).

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Charles 9
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Re: rather watch Benny Hill reruns

Oh no, not Yakety Sax again...

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Charles 9
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Um, is it REALLY that hard to have a remote button that jumps you to a specific input without all the rigamarole? Jump to HDMI2 or the Component input in a single press. Without that, you can't really automate device switching.

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Charles 9
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Before we go on with Remote Lottery, perhaps we can enforce standards on functions. Like, say, being able to access any input in a multi-input device with just one press. Lack of it stops a lot of potential automation cold.

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Charles 9
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Re: Finding and identifying the correct AC to DC power blob

"Apply sticky labels for adding identifying information. And put a small "flag" of interestingly and distinctively coloured or patterned tape around the cable. With writing on the coloured tape, identifying the matching device."

Which is a fat lot of help since you frequently have to snake your arm and figure everything out by Braille.

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Charles 9
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Re: Harmony.......

Just don't go overboard. A basic 350 model can handle most things without too much a hit on the wallet.

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Sergey Brin building humanitarian blimp for lifesaving leisure

Charles 9
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Perhaps because the truth lies somewhere in between. Distribution is a tug-of-war between different transport costs. Too small an area and like you say you have goods scattered all over the place; however, too LARGE an area and you end up with lengthy in and/or out transportation costs as you reach too far. It's really quite complicated as you try to optimize the two legs of your distribution chain: the incoming and the outgoing. That's why locally-sourced products are a boon (they reduce the incoming transportation costs) as is location close to population centers (to reduce and average out the outgoing costs).

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Init freedom declared as systemd-free Devuan hits stable 1.0.0 status

Charles 9
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Re: John Sanders you are Poettering

Except when it comes to modern sound renderers, that's TOO simple. Too raw. It's basically exclusive mode to a sound device, and we left that kind of sound world back in the 90's. You're going to need some kind of audio compositing layer on top of OSS to handle the more intricate matters of multiple streams, multiple targets, and so on. If PulseAudio isn't to everyone's liking, then we need an alternative.

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Tech firms sends Congress checklist of surveillance reforms

Charles 9
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Re: They're Not Wrong

Wouldn't they just reply, "Oh? By what law can you compel us?"

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LastPass now supports 2FA auth, completely undermines 2FA auth

Charles 9
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Re: Is this really 2FA?

I'm not. I'm just saying that for many 2FA smacks of "hoop jumping," and you know how people think about hoop jumping.

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Charles 9
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Re: The other side of the argument

Unless, of course, they just hack LastPass itself, steal the contents, AND figure out ways to crack or hack them, which is not outside the realm of possibility. Then they can pwn you without hacking you.

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Charles 9
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Re: Fewer Secrets

OR they can glean your details and use that in social engineering to get better access to your more-sensitive stuff through identity theft.

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How good are selfies these days? Good enough to fool Samsung Galaxy S8 biometrics

Charles 9
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You'd have to match the IR map of a face against a cold background: not possible with a candle and tricky with a lamp without a sophisticated heat mask.

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Charles 9
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Re: Hardly a big deal

The trouble with edge cases is that they don't REMAIN edge cases for long. Think STALKERS...

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Charles 9
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But you have to MOVE the finger to do a pattern match, which you'd probably need if your memory is too poor to remember a PIN (and note that since I'm talking arthritis, this usually means the elderly whose memory is failing).

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Charles 9
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Re: RFID ??

"Concave or convex

To suit either sex"

But who'd use since ne'er was it clean.

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Charles 9
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Re: Other Options

So what if they take your phone and then use it to make incriminating phone calls or texts in your name?

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Charles 9
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Re: Iris scans can be done properly

"This is similar to proper fingerprint scanners which should incorporate IR Doppler to detect flowing blood under the skin."

Does that also defeat the gummy fingerprint on top of someone else's finger which would have live blood flow and everything?

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Charles 9
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Re: ... and you STILL need a strong identity

"Well, I wouldn't hire you for any job that require a strong identity - such a person would be unfit for the role, sorry."

So basically it's, "Game Over. You Lose. Better Luck Next Life." How Spartan...

Ever considered the person doesn't have to work...because he or she is retired? Old people still need to be able to access their accounts and so on, and if the last local branch closes...

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Charles 9
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Not so good for palsied or arthritic hands. As for avoiding the phone, what if the bank is branchless?

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Intel pitches a Thunderbolt 3-for-all

Charles 9
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Re: A few things--a Luddite rants..

"Would you move into a house that only had one electrical outlet in the kitchen?"

If you REALLY need additional ports, they would respond, "Get a powered hub!" And to use your kitchen analogy, you would not believe how many places I've seen using multi-plug orange extension cords strewn about the place...yet they STILL pass inspection.

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Google now mingles everything you've bought with everywhere you've been

Charles 9
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Re: Paying by cash just became mandatory....

And then you find out they can track that, too. Consider "Where's George?".

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Charles 9
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Re: Another good reason to avoid Android

Only to be replaces with CHINESE bits inserted to replace them. And before you say, "Who cares?" don't forget China's busily engaged in an economic war with the West, too, so there CAN be serious consequences.

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India makes biometrics mandatory for all e-gov projects

Charles 9
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But guess what education helps to do? Condition the mind to be able to do what you describe. Even in the old days, the hands-on education of skilled trades and so on conditioned the mind to be able to think out of the box for the sake of their position (adapting to changing conditions). If OTOH everyone did things by rote...

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Charles 9
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And I'm sure you realize the obvious counter.

Many in India are POOR and likely have POOR education.

Meaning in a world of "Are, Know, Have", many in India neither KNOW nor HAVE anything of value. How do you handle an identity system when the ONLY thing of value you possibly possess is something you ARE?

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What's got a vast attack surface and runs on Linux? Windows Defender, of course

Charles 9
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Re: But isn't the environment itself just as important?

Partly useless, because you can't fake PANIC. You can't fake a fire, and so on. Even the late Terry Pratchett noted it. IOW, unless people REALLY feel their life is on the line, they won't behave the same way during a drill than they will during an actual emergency. Practice isn't all you need, you ALSO need discipline: the ability to not panic when surprises DO come. Say detonate a flashbang once in a while nearby to condition people to react in desired ways.

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Charles 9
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Re: But isn't the environment itself just as important?

But the point stands. What if the exploit is a gestalt, meaning it ONLY appears in a certain environmental combination and then becomes something greater than the sum of its parts? IOW, it's like planning for an emergency: the ONLY way to really know if the plan works is to have an emergency, with all the environmental factors that ONLY come from true emergencies.

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The real battle of Android's future – who controls the updates

Charles 9
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Re: No Skins please.

There's more than one manufacturer, so there's no real supply monopoly, and since the manufacturers come from different countries (Taiwan, South Korea, etc.) with different economic incentives, they're unlikely to act in a cartel.

As for the carriers, there has always been a market for carrier-free phones, particularly in regions where common settled frequencies have been established like LTE Band III, allowing for easier carrier-jumping. Areas with more prepaid rather than postpaid carriers tend to encourage carrier-jumping and thus carrier-free phones. Even in America that trend is growing with increasing numbers of "Bring Your Own Smartphone" MVNO carriers. Most of the headliners for the past ten years or so have been offered carrier-free in some form, plus there was the iPhone which carriers were SO desperate to carry that they let Apple dictate terms for a while. So I doubt there's a real monopoly on the distribution end, either.

No, I think the real demand is strictly with the customers. Thin is in, and simplicity sells, thus closed-in slim phones win out over thicker and easier-to-grip phones with removable battery packs and expansion slots.

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EU security think tank ENISA looks for IoT security, can't find any

Charles 9
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Re: Rule zero

The existing iteration of "The Internet"

There, FTFY. The truth is, nothing known to man can ever be really secure as long as someone knows about it. Not even a One-Time Pad is proof against Rubber-Hose Cryptanalysis. The only true secret is one known to NO ONE and NO-THING (because the thing can be used by man to access it).

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