* Posts by Charles 9

8948 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Mr Angry pays taxman with five wheelbarrows worth of loose change

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: El Reg, missed the point...

"They called it a "personal property tax", and you pay it if your parked in the state for more than 10 days (or some other arbitrary limit), EVEN ON PRIVATE LAND."

That's because PRIVATE LAND is still COMMONWEALTH land (Virginia is legally defined a Commonwealth). Their territory, their rules. It's sort of like why you have to pay Virginia sales tax when in Virginia even when you don't live there (that's why tourtist-heavy states like Florida and Nevada rely on these instead of income taxes).

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Is it legal?

There's no law preventing it; then again, there's no law forcing it, either. And since this is a live transaction, not a payment of debt, it's between the buyer and seller to determine what's acceptable and what's not.

Legal Tender laws ONLY apply to DEBTS. And while there are no limitations in the US (most likely due to First Amendment grounds--just like burning the flag, a protest payment can be construed as speech, so any law that attempts to do this could be challenged), the UK does impose limits on what denominations you can use to pay a debt.

4
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Weigh the coins

Legal Tender laws ONLY apply if there is a DEBT involved. Stores and ticket counters are allowed to refuse service, meaning no debt gets involved. Bills, OTOH, usually represent a debt UNLESS it is for services TO BE rendered (a PREpay versus POSTpay).

2
0

Google floats prototype Key Transparency to tackle secure swap woes

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: paranoid...not too much!

No, what we need to do is find a way to do things on the average person's level. That is, bad memories, often without second factors, and looking for turnkey solutions that involve little more than "click here once or twice". We have to make security no more difficult than finding and using the front door key. Otherwise, people won't bother, as experience demonstrates.

2
0

Anti-smut law dubs PCs, phones 'pornographic vendor machines', demands internet filters

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Hahahahahahaha

And yet they get voted in time and time again. What does that tell you?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: won't pass constitutional exam

Point is, it's neither universal nor guaranteed, and since this is state law, it would have to go before that state's court system first, THEN if they still disagree take it up before SCOTUS, and ONLY if they agree to look at it.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

North Dakota is not a populous state. For many, driving out of state could be an all-day affair and involve filling up the tank a couple times. That alone would be more than the $20 removal fee.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: North Dakota is a very low population state

Forget the next state. I-29 is in North Dakota which goes through to Canada.

3
0

It's not just your browser: Your machine can be fingerprinted easily

Charles 9
Silver badge

The TL;DR version: websites and network people have already mastered the art of de-anonymizing you in ways that cannot be easily disguised, such as by location narrowing, click habits (which can be timed and are based on instinctive habits that are hard to break), and assorted Turing Tests to filter out chaff clickers. IOW, if they REALLY want to find you out (and there's a financial motivation to do so), they'll find ways that can't be stopped without breaking the Internet. After all, a letter normally needs a return address, and that's crucial information on its own.

2
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Mine doesn't give that data.

But the IP would still be the same because it would go through YOUR router. I'm sure they'd catch on to those tricks and just lump them together by IP and behavioral patterns.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Mine doesn't give that data.

"No we don't."

YOU don't, but you're outvoted.

5
13

Backpage.com kills adult section, claims government censorship

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Many of you really missed this one

"Child prostitution or not, it is still illegal as hell to advertise prostitution anywhere in the US."

Under which law, and why doesn't Freedom of the Press apply for business agreements between consenting adults?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Letter of the law

No because they tend to act in a cartel. Plus the companies you're talking about tend to be like utilities: requiring huge upfront infrastructure investments, so they heavily favor incumbents. Anyone else who tries to come in will either demand the same or won't touch it. There CAN be times when NO ONE will come in because the barrier of entry is too high.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Letter of the law

The problem is that big companies keep a stick. If countries pressure them they can threaten to leave, denying them ALL tax revenues. Which would you rather have: 10% of something or 100% if nothing?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Who on earth?

"How do these people look in a mirror in the morning? Do they tell their mothers what they do for a living?"

One, you're not familiar with sociopaths (they could look in the mirror AND SMIRK at what they're doing--the luzahs...). Two, who's to say their mothers weren't doing this to their own kids?

PS. Be careful about shooting on sight. Sociopaths are also the kind to take hostages and keep dead man's plans.

2
0

Peace-sign selfie fools menaced by fingerprint-harvesting tech

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Repeat after me...

A fingerprint is always on you unlike anything else you can think of.

A fingerprint is always on you unlike anything else you can think of.

A fingerprint is always on you unlike anything else you can think of.

What do you do when it's the ONLY thing you have to work with?

0
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Fingerprint readers don't read fingerprints

But what do you use when that's the ONLY thing you have to work with? The big thing about biometrics is that, barring an injury severe enough to basically put you out of work, they'll ALWAYS be there unlike anything else you can propose. People have TERRIBLE memories so WILL forget passwords no matter what the length (heck, people forget their own names and dates of birth--I speak firsthand). Plus people frequently have to wear clothes with no pockets or lanyards so have no way to store external credentials (plus if the security is high they may not be allowed to for sake of blocking hidden recording devices).

As for recording the impulses, I thought ATMs found a way out of this by black-boxing the scanners and only emitting encrypted streams that include timestamps or other nonces so no two reads produce the same signals, defeating replay attacks.

1
4
Charles 9
Silver badge

Thing is, they never verified if the photographed fingerprint was good enough to pass a scanner, and they weren't in a position to find out.

2
0

Tell us about that $1m horse, Mr Samsung: Bribery probe slips deep into South Korean giant

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Hmmm

And note it's spelled "oah" instead of "aoh". They didn't realize the mistake until it was too late.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Are you also forgoing LG and Hyundai as well, given they were also listed in this current scandal? You'll also have to wonder if other chaebols like Lotte are also involved but haven't been caught this time.

2
0

Raspberry Pi Foundation releases operating system for PCs, Macs

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: content still needs to be CREATED

"People used to say that kind of thing about UNIX workstations once upon a time too - "I need a proper workstation and a proper workstation application" (games are a different arena). Fine, if that's what people need, someone is going to have to pick up the bill for their hardware design and build costs, and maybe software development costs, and if it's no longer cross-subsidised from the volume market, the PHBs won't like the bill."

Thing is, the costs are pretty much already sunk with the incumbent x86 (solutions already exist), so ARM is already handicapped. And once you factor in power-chomping things like memory bandwidth which you need to feed true high-performance applications, ARM really loses its efficiency edge versus x86, leaving x86 with its incumbency advantage. In short, in order to unseat x86, ARM has to leapfrog x86 in just about all its remaining application, including things like video encoding (which is too generalized for GPU work while still memory- and FPU-intensive). They're not up there yet and will probably need a few technological leaps to catch up, and meanwhile x86 isn't sitting idle, either.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: So lightweight...

A MODERN HTML5 browser, though? I don't think so. This was before stuff like Java script took off.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Obligatory Dumbass Question

Here's a different hint: content still needs to be CREATED. Video and audio still need to be edited, and pro gamers still need an edge. Plus, for them, money isn't necessarily an object as they're in positions to pass costs along.

0
0

Too much landfill, too little purpose: CES 2017

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Some products show promise

The problem with trying to get robots to turn away unwanted people for us is that the miscreants just start making smarter approaches to make sure they get the human, not the robot. Eventually, you get into Turing Test territory with potential knock-on effects (if you can make a robot that can fool any cold caller into thinking you're human, they can just turn around and use the same trick on you).

Frankly, without a way to verify the identity of ANY caller (and even then, what about pay phones?), there's no real way to effectively screen them out (because any loophole you're forced to leave will be abused).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Lack of imagination

Except many of them are to fill a demand. SOMEONE had to have asked for it for them to not only make it but SELL it, too.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: All the gadgets and IoS stuff...

And if they SURVIVE like roaches?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I must be way out of step..

It's not just that systems are expensive. It's also that systems people actually WANT are difficult because they (especially now) tend to involve things that are, for lack of a better word, "fuzzy". Take the examples above: cooking dinner and doing the laundry. How does a robot know if the milk in the fridge is still good, especially if the "best by" date is smudged? How does it know the sock on the floor is really a rag because it's lost its mate? How will your drone army recognize the lost child if the kidnappers immediately ties a wide-brim hat on the child, wraps a towel around her, and keeps her under an umbrella?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Lack of imagination

Maybe it's not so much lack of imagination as it is the creative juices are running low. Everything we can imagine that can exist in reality already exists. The rest (like true VR and highly-accurate natural language processing out of the box) are still too far ahead of their time. There are only so many ways to build the proverbial better mousetrap before you run into previously-invented material, and since the best solutions tend to be the simplest, that limits your options, and it would take something truly revolutionary (like something that can disprove a fundamental tenet of physics) to really shake things up.

3
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "VR is hot right now"

VR won't be real VR until it's virtual EVERYTHING: including motion and sensation, like you see in sci-fi stories where your body doesn't have to move.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Trouble is the manufacturers KNOW they can't let that fish go or someone else will just hook it, so they make the cloud part and parcel and leave you a Hobson's Vhoice, figuring those that try not to will lose the critical repeat business and just vsnish later.

IOW, unless you can roll your own, you just can't have nice things; the long-term money isn't there.

1
0

Top cop: Strap Wi-Fi jammers to teen web crims as punishment

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Just wondering....

I don't think it works for just any sausage. It takes specific kinds, plus I would think they're not very sturdy or long-lasting, and I wouldn't want that in my pockets.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Not if it's the GOVERNMENT doing the jamming, since last I checked State use of jammers is exempt, especially for security reasons.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Just wondering....

Capacitive stylii still depend on your body to work, which is why you still need to hold them with either bare fingers or special conducting gloves.

So anything that can affect your using a finger will also affect the stylus.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Why would this happen-

And if they LIKE Vegemite?

1
0

WikiLeaks uploads 300+ pieces of malware among email dumps

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I before E except after C and except when it sounds like A as in "neighbor" and "weigh"

And BTW, words like "ancient" and "science" that supposedly break the "except after C" exception I believe are also diphthongs, with the I and E belonging to different syllables. In the case of "ancient" and similar words (like "prescient", "omniscience", etc.), we tend to pronounce the CIENT as "shent" though this is probably a corruption of "si" followed by a distinct "ent".

0
0

TV anchor says live on-air 'Alexa, order me a dollhouse' – guess what happens next

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Alexa?

Because the catch phrase is built into the unit like a ROM. Can you think of another way to do it that's quick to access, easy on the battery, AND inexpensive?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Changing the name

Um, the catch phrase DOESN'T get sent to Amazon, only the parts after it, and there are some VERY simple ways to run comparisons to a fixed target (like a ROM, which unlike RAM can still be quick to access AND not need to be constantly refreshed--with RAM, it's one OR the other, not both) using inverse match and delta graphing.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Could help reduce Piracy.

Oh, and another nasty touch. According to their official policy, digital downloads of movies or music are not returnable.

0
0

Basic income after automation? That’s not how capitalism works

Charles 9
Silver badge

People started hawking their food stamps for beer money or cigarettes. Even with the transition to EBT cards, there's still a black market for trading in EBT benefits for those particularly exempt items people would prefer to food.

Here's the hint: people will CHEAT. It's in the human condition.

0
0

Verizon is gonna axe its 'unlimited' data hogs

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Obviously not actually unlimited

Well, at least casinos RESERVE the right to evict unwanted patrons provided the law doesn't prevent them from doing so. They're just like any other public-facing establishment in that regard. Plus they tend to be up-front about it.

Whereas this whole "unlimited" business smacks of False Advertising: something that can be taken to court.

0
0

Is! Yahoo! dead?! Why! web! biz! will! rename! to! Altaba! – the! truth!

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Never understand why advertising wasn't their focus

Because in advertising, there's only room for one at the top. Also-ran quickly get pressured and squeezed out unless they have alternate revenue streams like Microsoft and Bing. Yahoo was probably trying for those alternate streams, but it's already final table and Google already holds 90% of the chips.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: In upside down world ...

After all, how do you get a CEO to sign onto what's essentially a sinking ship? Businesspeople are savvy enough to demand guaranteed perks or they won't sign, and sinking ships can't exactly wait.

2
1

BT will HATE us for this one weird 5G trick

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Declutter!

But can't that backfire as well? TOO MANY signs results in confusion, accident, profit?

0
0

CES 2017 roundup: The good, the bad, and the frankly bonkers

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: You missed out the

Unless it's at YOUR direction. Otherwise, it isn't a selfie if you're using a Bluetooth trigger (because you're not holding the camera).

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Microbot Push

Why not just come up with a new version of "The Most Useless Thing EVER" (look it up on YouTube)?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: That ain't VR.

And who says that's a bad thing? Steady isn't sexy, but at least we wouldn't have the Internet of Stupid Things.

1
0

Google nukes ad-blocker AdNauseam, sweeps remains out of Chrome Web Store

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Ad blockers on Android

NoScript is an old-school XUL (pre-Chrome) add-on, and mobile Firefox only supports Chrome-style XUP add-ons (uBlock Origin is XUP, thus why it's also on Chrome).

PS. You might want to hook up your BD Player. Otherwise, it may not be able to play newer titles if your player's been used as a cracking tool in the past.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: you are the product

Doesn't matter if it's intentionally blocked or lost to static. Still means no impression.

0
0

Dodgy dealer on Amazon lures marks towards phishing site

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Amazon Could (Should) Do More

Except the shysters are prepared for this. They just play whack-a-mole and reappear as another seller, then another, then another. They could have hundreds of accounts stashed away and can probably make dozen's more on a moment's notice with help from CAPTCHA farms.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I am surprised the address is visible

They either use Unicode lookalike characters or images that Amazon's algorithms can't grok (though you would think at this point they'd be running images through something like Tesseract to get around this trick).

0
0

Forums