* Posts by Charles 9

9761 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

Charles 9
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Re: Is Windows 10 Faking Disk Corruption Notifications to force a scan/upload of user files?

The "Scanning for Errors" notification has been there since XP. It indicates the drive wasn't cleanly unmounted the last time it was used, and that could've come from whatever last used it, some of which lack the facility to to properly unmount the drive. Windows installs can be instructed to treat highly-portable USB drives differently so you don't have this problem, at the cost of performance since it means Windows can't use advanced drive management on them.

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Charles 9
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Re: Soft target?

"While I really don't care about who slurps my data - I don't want *anyone* of them doing it."

The only way to really do that is to go full Luddite and stop using computers. Otherwise, you can't trust what your software or hardware are doing behind your back, laws be damned.

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Charles 9
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Re: Why can they not grasp

Simple. They FULLY grasp the concept of a CAPTIVE MARKET, as most people are held hostage by their applications which have no acceptable substitutes. Especially people like enterprises with custom jobs (meaning jumping risks them going under in the attempt) or gamers (just compare the compatibility lists, especially for newer games; they simply DO NOT compare).

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Charles 9
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Re: Fine fine fine

How will they be able to force the issue if Microsoft simply decides to remove themselves from Europe, hiding themselves behind US sovereign immunity? Plus Microsoft may be helping to undermine the EU itself, removing its sovereign authority.

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Charles 9
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Re: It's trust or rust

"Even one of the inveterate gamers I know is talking about installing Linux and is researching just what Windows games can be got to run on Linux via Steam/Wine/PlayOnLinux etc. as well as going dual-boot until they wean themselves off the games that just cant be got to work on Linux."

And he'll soon find out most of the games DON'T work well on Linux. Trust me, I looked. Especially the newer games like Fallout 4 and Overwatch. Bethesda swore off Linux, and all reports concerning Overwatch are listed as Garbage. And they are not alone. Otherwise, I'd have already jumped.

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Charles 9
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Re: Fighting back?

Oh, what about via external devices? Why can't you block Microsoft telemetry say at the router?

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Governments could introduce 'made by humans' tags - legal report

Charles 9
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Re: High value targets

The way I see it, there are two obstacles to machines taking over every job at this time: dexterity and Uncanny Valley.

Some jobs require not just fine motor control but also simultaneous adaptability (such as a position where no two jobs are the same). The first problem is being worked on steadily with more articulate mechanics, but the second one goes to machine learning and will be more difficult to apply in a generic form.

And then there's the natural human instinctual desire to see a friendly face (we have pretty strong evidence this is instinct since the behavior is shown even in newborns). If a job requires (or even just highly recommends) a face-to-face interaction, then it'll naturally prefer a human in it to provide that face.

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Charles 9
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Yup. Worse comes to worse, they can just close the walled garden and hash it out amongst themselves. As long as there's at least "two to tango", mutual commerce can still take place.

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Charles 9
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Re: Land Value Tax

Land value due to usefulness can still fluctuate. Sometimes suddenly if discoveries are made. For example, what's to stop some barren tract of land from hiding a gold vein, a Kimberlite pipe, or a shallow source of petroleum?

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Charles 9
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Re: April 1st lasts a long time ...

Thing was, the 20th Century still had room to grow (the population was a fraction of today and lots of resources were still being discovered), plus a couple major wars and a pandemic thinned the population and provided more space. Now, the circumstances are different. The post-war baby boom is coming home to roost, resources are trickier to get, and we haven't had an inequality of wealth of this scale since before the Black Death.

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Charles 9
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Re: ASDA

If it was 1983, probably the latter, as voice synth tech was still pretty new (think the early talking videogames like Berzerk and the Votrax SC-01). Even today, using recorded voices and concatenation, the results still come out a touch weird sometimes.

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Charles 9
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Re: Illogical conclusion @Charles 9

And can YOU tell that to Congress who insists on only taxing assets as they're sold, not as they're held, discouraging hoarding?

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Charles 9
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Re: A Lesson from History

I think that needs to be qualified, though. OLD expensive stuff, yes, because they were usually hand made custom jobs, sometimes with threats attached. Expensive stuff TODAY? I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of that "expensive" was really just bling.

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Charles 9
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"If everyone can make what they want or need, then we are on the path to universal wealth."

That's assuming everyone CAN make what they want or need. Trouble is, in the future, many will lack the skills, the rest will lack the resources. Making things requires BOTH, and NEITHER are guaranteed, and there's no way the haves will EVER let the governments take their wealth away. They can either move or usurp the government, and if the proles rise up, call out the killer drones; if that doesn't work, nukes.

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Charles 9
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Re: What to do with the unemployed?

""They" will have to do nothing. It's up to the 7,000,000,000 individuals involved to make their own choices about what they feel like doing."

Oh? What about when it comes time to find a way to earn their daily bread and nothing's available? Kinda harsh to be telling 7 billion people, "You lose. Game Over. Better luck next life."

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Charles 9
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Re: ASDA

Plus, most people using the self check-out would probably qualify for the Express lane (if it was open and not running to the back). They scan a few things, pack up and go. A minute of effort to beat a wait of several minutes at the checkout is a win for them. And before you say hire more cashiers, that would raise the labor costs which would in turn be passed to the customer: another trade-off.

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Charles 9
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Re: A Lesson from History

"Most people will just go to Walmart and buy their disposable crap products rather than spend a little more on something that will last 10 times longer."

The way things are, the more expensive things get abused more and end up wasted sooner. Cheap Walmart goods these days are being bought by penny-pinchers that eke out the most use out of their Chinese and secondhand goods. A bit like how Sam Vimes still preferred cardboard-sole boots (he liked the thin soles so he could orient himself by his feet).

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Charles 9
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Re: Illogical conclusion @Charles 9

Some things have intrinsic wealth, like land (especially arable land; we gotta EAT). The richest of the rich know this, which is why most of their assets get turned into real estate. It's not only the most stable asset out there, but because its value is constantly mutable, it's hard to tax.

"Even if that doesn't end up being the case you only need to look as far as countries like France & Russia to see what happens when the poor are pushed too far and for too long."

Problem is this time, the State has a lot more resources with which to control the population. Think why the proles don't rebel in Nineteen Eighty-Four. There's the carrot-and-stick approach. Distract them with bread and circuses, and if that doesn't work, bring out the nukes.

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Charles 9
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Re: Child labour?

"Wrong, child labour / slavery is alive and well. 4 year olds mined the cobalt in your phone battery."

Really? Care to prove that claim?

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Charles 9
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Re: Land Value Tax

The problem with taxing asset value is that it's all relative. Food may not seem much to you, but to a starving person it may be worth his shirt. One person may value the land much more than another. And so on. That's why they normally wait until it is sold or transferred and tax it there, because the transaction attaches a value to the asset.

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Charles 9
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I think it's both: a society of the mediocre being led by mainstream media mind control.

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Charles 9
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So what happens when EVERY store transitions to this and ONLY has self-checkouts (or the only human checkout has a line going to the back)? Walmart, Kroger, Home Depot, and Lowe's all do self checkout. Best Buy is the only big-box I know that doesn't do it, but that's likely due to the nature of the products they sell.

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Charles 9
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Re: Illogical conclusion

"It's only once the damage has been done that they'll be forced to think otherwise."

Not really. By then they'll have most of the wealth. They can close ranks, close the walled garden, and hash it out amongst themselves.

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Bloke cuffed after 'You deserve a seizure' GIF tweet gave epileptic a fit

Charles 9
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Re: I have had the strobe spam,ads and popups many times

The difference being that at least women tend to know when their period is coming and can schedule things around it if necessary. Epilepsy is a little more random than that.

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WWW daddy Sir Tim Berners-Lee stands up for end-to-end crypto

Charles 9
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Re: More security means no security - no problem

"If the government demands back doors and those back doors are breached by criminals then the government must pay those hacked the costs incurred because of the hacking."

Guess you never heard of Sovereign Immunity before.

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Charles 9
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Re: I'll just leave this here,

Now can you use it in a non-obvious, stego-hardened way to get your message across in a paranoid world where the mere use of obvious encryption makes you a target?

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Charles 9
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Re: Populist government comments...

Wouldn't work in a world where using ANY obvious encryption (and public-key encryption, due to its mathematical nature, can't be made non-obvious) would make you a target.

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Charles 9
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Re: Now I get it!

But monopoly interests have the money. Plus some of them (like Facebook) ARE multinational in nature.

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Charles 9
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Re: Populist government comments...

Besides, you have to establish that code to use it unless you the Navajo code talker trick. That puts you into the First Contact problem.

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Charles 9
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Re: Fixed It .....

"It was not broken, and if I remember correct it is still pretty secure."

Not really, as more people know Navajo and are aware of the technique. It was just away to use native tongue to get around the First Contact problem.

As for the rest, that was mostly down to luck.

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Charles 9
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Re: No, it's not settled

OR it could be the crook wanted detective work so they'd pick up the false leads and get thrown off the trail...

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Charles 9
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Re: Now I get it!

You'd be in the minority, meaning they can then tell you they'll just F you back. Unless you make people stop going to cinemas, you don't have a financial foot to stand on.

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Microsoft's in-store Android looks desperate but can Google stop it?

Charles 9
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So you just switch from having Google as Big Brother to having Microsoft as Big Brother?

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Charles 9
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Re: Hmm...

Then what about firmware: software IN hardware?

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Charles 9
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But an OS that still contains Google Play Services and all the associated baggage, even if Samsung wanted otherwise because without the Play Store and most of the apps like Maps/Navigation for which viable substitutes do not exist, Samsung would be severely handicapped. There's barely any market beyond the phones for non-Google devices as Amazon found out when they tried to make a phone (they've since given up and stuck to tablets which are becoming more niched).

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Charles 9
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Re: Not the same...

But the Services App the proverbial Eye of Sauron. It's the biggest problem in your entire setup. Unless you can kill the Services app (permanently), Google CAN and WILL continue to spy on you, even if you have nothing else installed.

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Charles 9
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Re: It's dead, Jim

"UnaOS is reported to be released in April https://unaos.com/"

It was also funded by IndieGoGo. And their attitudes don't give a lot of people confidence in their ability to actually deliver (for example, they're reluctant to subject their code to scrutiny).

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Head of US military kit-testing slams F-35, says it's scarcely fit to fly

Charles 9
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Re: $ 391,000,000,000 @bombastic bob

"The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting."

But did he ever encounter an enemy for which the word "surrender" is taboo, meaning they will fight to the last no matter what you do?

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Cheap, flimsy, breakable and replaceable – yup, Ikea, you'll be right at home in the IoT world

Charles 9
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Re: If the lights can dim properly....

"And when the LED claims to be dimmable, and the dimmer module claims to be LED compatible it's a problem with the manufacturers."

Or it could be a problem with physics, as in you can't make LED lights dim too much without them starting to act funny or cutting out early.

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Symbolic IO reveals tech bound to give server old guard the willies

Charles 9
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Re: RLL was just encoding, not compression

I guess 8b/10b and the like (like 128b/130b) are all variants of the technique. You're right that RLL isn't a compression technique but an encoding technique meant to maintain clarity when transmitting data through a physical medium.

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US ATM fraud surges despite EMV

Charles 9
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Re: Imprinters

No, they've BEEN in the pan for decades. A good chunk of it either doesn't want to climb out or can't afford to do so.

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Charles 9
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Re: What you don't know

"And you *can* get money at most places by simply asking for cash back."

But that requires you use the card as a DEBIT card. And one thing that hasn't changed is that DEBIT cards require you enter a PIN.

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Charles 9
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How much of that fraud, though, wasn't the kind that C&P can help, such as e-tailer (CNP) fraud?

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Charles 9
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Re: Problem is...

The smarter ones can pretend to be technicos (keys and passwords aren't of help if they have an insider) and alter existing kiosk ATMs so that the customer can't tell the difference. It's been talked about here in El Reg.

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Firefox Quantum: BIG browser project, huh? I share your concern

Charles 9
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Re: I don't know about lynx and w3m

"Besides, there are so many sites now that require JavaScript to even be usable."

I make it a point to avoid websites that require JavaScript to operate, as they could be drive-by sites in disguise. If it's a place I can't avoid (like a manufacturer's website), I tend to inform them on the strongest of terms how I feel about not using a simple HTML link listing like in the old days.

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Charles 9
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Re: I don't know about lynx and w3m

Thanks for pointing me to a Windows port. This seems to be the best of the lot compared to Links and OffByOne, especially when used together with Freenet, making it my browser of choice now for that purpose. Might also be a nice option for a Tor browser since it has internal proxy support.

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Who's behind the Kodi TV streaming stick crackdown?

Charles 9
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"The revolt is in the form of people choosing to still consume their products but shafting them for their arrogance. The movie industry has been dominated by 250 million dollar pictures that are unoriginal and aside from a big budget; leaving the audience longing for a better film."

If that were true, cinemas would be in decline, yet the box office numbers are bigger than ever.

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Europe to push new laws to access encrypted apps data

Charles 9
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Re: Meet the law, and defeat it.

The moment you do, the law will just download their own copy and break the system. The only way to ensure that is to make sure the law never gets a hold of the code, which can't be guaranteed due to the First Contact problem.

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Charles 9
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Re: and picture messaging will be banned

What about a COMPUTERIZED Panopticon, with humans reserved for the red flags? Think how casino security works, cranked up to eleven.

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DDR5 to jump off the drawing board in 2018

Charles 9
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Re: Persistence

Not really. Just treat memory like you would storage. If you're paranoid, destroy it down to the chips.

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