* Posts by Charles 9

11115 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Equifax couldn't find or patch vulnerable Struts implementations

Charles 9
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Re: Here's the *other* really sick thing:

Well ask yourself. Which would've cost them more? A several-month blackout or paying for the fallout?

As for not spilling, remember what the stupidest thing the man who first found gold in California was: telling about it.

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Pumpkin bumpkins battle, 800kg monstrosity wins

Charles 9
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Re: Forget the punkin. Let's see some chunkin!

I will admit, after reading the details, that was a bit gruesome, and after giving it some thought, this is the kind of event that really can't escape Murphy's Law. I mean, Scrapheap Challenge and its US counterpart Junkyard Wars had seen many a catapult built (with a noted fondness for counterweight trebuchets), and even the MythBusters have done a few, but it's also easy to see how any of them could go wrong as well (some did go wrong, even). It's a difficult line to draw; where does it move from the builder's fault for not making it safe enough to being the spectator's fault for standing too close to the blasted thing?

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Charles 9
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And here I thought they were gonna actually launch these from catapults to see how far they could fly...

Forget the punkin. Let's see some chunkin!

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Five ways Apple can fix the iPhone, but won't

Charles 9
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Re: Obscene vanity

Because they normally take AA or AAA batteries. End result: they don't last long, and if you need charging in an emergency, you probably need it for a LONG emergency. You'd probably need something that uses like a 6V lantern battery or 4 D batteries, but all I've seen in that end are bodge jobs.

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Driverless cars will make more traffic, say transport boffins

Charles 9
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Re: Bah!

There's that big bug-a-boo about flexible capacity: that also means surge capacity, that rarely gets used but when it DOES get used, it gets USED! Like when the big game lets out, everyone gets out at once and needs a ride at once. Now you're caught in a vice. Having enough cars to handle this surge means a lot of idle rides most of the time, whereas anything less will mean people wait and gripe as a result. Lose-lose.

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Charles 9
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Re: Rational conclusions

Would you walk in an unfamiliar area? And/or the dead of night? And/or in the rain or snow?

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EasyJet: We'll have electric airliners within the next decade

Charles 9
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Re: Could this be more efficient than a turbo-prop or a jet engine?

But how would the generator operate? Turbojets are designed for thin-air operation. Also, they're often used (via bleed-air extraction) to pressurize the cabin. Seems to me you end up trading two to four smaller turbine engines for one big one (because how else will you run the generator in thin-air conditions), making it a case of excessive complexity.

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Charles 9
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You forgot the Joke Alert icon.

You're basically going the roundabout route to the generator attached to the motor it's supposed to power: the classic Overunity Device.

Quick primer: any wind force used to power a windmill doesn't come out the other side. Breeze goes in, calm comes out. A ram air turbine adds drag because of the previous (similarly how it's harder to operate a crank charger when the phone's plugged into it than when it's not), which is why they're normally small and only used to charge essentials when necessary.

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Charles 9
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Re: The usual error

"Namely the fact that an electric aircraft performs a lot better then than the megajoules in its battery would indicate by direct comparison with a fuel engine."

By how much? Perhaps you can show us some actual numbers. Also for the reduction in drag using smaller pods for the electric motors versus turbofans.

"Oh and a ground based CCGT is about twice as efficient as the same turbine in the aircraft."

Also a lot bigger since you're basically using TWO powerplants. Given your physical restraints, size matters, and is there anything more efficient than a turbojet for its size and operational conditions?

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Charles 9
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Re: Simple solution

Wrong icon, or are you forgetting about such problematic areas as oceans and mountains? How the heck are you going to run a carriage from New York to London, especially if it's hurricane season?

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Charles 9
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Re: It's cold up there.

Many GA craft still use them. In general, they're still useful for low-altitude and/or short-haul flights. Start going longer or higher and you transition to turbine-powered territory (either turboprops or smaller turbojets).

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Charles 9
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Re: It's cold up there.

That's why most turbojet engines are designed they way they are: they help compress the air in the combustion chamber to make it richer: allowing for a fuller burn in the thinner atmosphere. Indeed, most turbojet engines are deisgned to work best at high altitude and eating the transient inefficiencies of operating too rich at lower altitudes.

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Charles 9
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Re: Mr Fusion - Atomic Powered Aircraft.

Who needs fusion. The US Navy's currently trying to do exactly that using the fission from their aircraft carriers, as it provides a double blessing for them: less need to take on fuel (you can now replenish on the fly) and the flexibility of potentially longer duty cycles since more stowage can be given to foodstuffs instead.

Indeed, some sci-fi visionaries picture this is how we will handle roving missions should we leave the solar system. A large powerhouse handles the mothership and produces portable fuel for the rovers.

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Guntree v Gumtree: Nominet orders gun ads site must lose domain

Charles 9
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Re: Gun gun gun fun

The MythBusters' tree cannon was in fact a smooth-bore muzzle-loader, and it actually fired a ball (they never found it IIRC), so by your definition it qualified as a gun.

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Charles 9
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Well, if you expand your definition of a "gun" to include stuff we normally call "cannon", then yes you can make a gun out of a tree. Historical record supports this and the MythBusters proved it possible.

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Internet-wide security update put on hold over fears 60 million people would be kicked offline

Charles 9
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Re: Just look at IPv6?

Well, enterprise happens to be most likely place to find IPv4-ONLY equipment: acquired before IPv6 was a thing yet too indispensable and/or too expensive to replace. You can't roll out IPv6 selectively because the old stuff will lose touch with complicated bodges, becoming a case of "If it ain't broke..." best not to rock the boat internally and address external IPV6 needs via specialized structures: dedicated subnets, gateways, proxies, etc.

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Charles 9
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Re: What a load of cow pats

You incorrectly assume all such positions are filled by competent personnel. Consider nepotism, tight budgets, and basic barrel-scraping.

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Charles 9
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Re: The problem?

I meant to say entire COUNTRIES. Plus you can't tell if it's YOUR country that would be affected or not since the servers could be upstream of you. Sounds fun to say, "let 'em suffer" until you discover YOU'RE suffering...AND can't change ISPs because ALL of them were affected at the same time.

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Charles 9
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What significant downsides are there apart from some smaller organizations needing to update their tools to more modern ones (which can have the benefit of less drudgery)?

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Charles 9
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Oh? What about spoofing? Redirection attacks?

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Charles 9
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Re: The problem?

"Roll it out for a short period then roll back."

They're already at that point. BOTH keys are accepted. What's being pushed back is the point of no return which happens when the old key is revoked (key revocation is one-way).

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Charles 9
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Re: The problem?

And note some of those blacked out could be entire regions or countries.

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Charles 9
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"Are there more layers of DNS ( like managers) . some group of "master servers"?"

Yes. DNS is hierarchical in nature with varying levels. The "master servers" are the 13 root servers at the top of the hierarchy. It's THEIR keys that are being changed, and each layer down needs to copy or everything below them can go dark.

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Charles 9
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Re: The problem?

Unless they're servers for entire regions or even companies, meaning nowhere to defect. Remember, DNS is hierarchical in nature, and we don't know how far up the tree the rot has settled.

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Why Uber isn't the poster child for capitalism you wanted

Charles 9
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Re: In this respect it is the perfect poster-boy for Free Market Capitalism

"Order points are already reducing the staff requirement for many places. Online has made a massive shift from customer service to warehouse worker. The internet has replaced skilled knowledge. It would be harder to replace low wage labour if they stay that way. But with people pushing for unrealistic minimum wages and such the worker is pricing themselves out of the market."

They seem unrealistic until you figure in the Cost of Living. If you have to work two or three jobs without a day off and STILL can't pay the bills even for a Spartan living, the system is stretching to the breaking point.

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Charles 9
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Re: In this respect it is the perfect poster-boy for Free Market Capitalism

Why don't they just make robots to maintain the other robots, then? And then operate them in conditions non-conducive to pest life?

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Charles 9
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Re: They invest the money which brings jobs

"We dont really have natural resources in abundance yet we are one of the richest countries in the world, our minimum wage being enviable to other countries who know real poverty."

Except money is RELATIVE. To REALLY compare, you have to measure it against that area's cost of living to see if that wage really is a living wage or not. I mean, there are places where $5 a day will get you more than enough food to survive the day while others where $10 wouldn't get you a decent lunch.

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Charles 9
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Re: In this respect it is the perfect poster-boy for Free Market Capitalism

"Does the 1% then consume itself? Wiping out the bottom 99% of the 1% till only one is left standing with all the money.

Holy Shit! I've cracked it. The world is just running one huge game of Monopoly!!!"

I tend to see it more as a gigantic poker tournament. Same principles (big guys pushing the small guys out until there's only one left).

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Charles 9
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Re: China being a fair example

Except all that does is kick the can down the road because what happens when THOSE children age and go into retirement? IOW, at some point, you WILL have a reckoning to get the population back under control.

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Charles 9
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Re: They invest the money which brings jobs

"I can accept that, but then they are not locking the money away, instead it goes to the whole stream of people involved in developing that project (from the top in an office to the tradesman on the ground). I can very well believe they put there money where they hope it will grow in value, we all should be trying to do that surely?"

That's IF they develop it. If they just let it lie and allow it to appreciate simply out of scarcity, that's another story. Like buying gold, jewelry, and other precious commodities to sit on them and appreciate.

"That covers some people's situation, so what about the vast majority?"

That's EXACTLY what I'm saying. Give or take.

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Charles 9
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Re: Bad Products

Not even that's sufficient against a sufficiently powerful entity able to REWRITE the ethics and dumb down the public enough to see their plight as a GOOD thing.

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Charles 9
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Re: They invest the money which brings jobs

I'm back on a keyboard, so now I can respond in detail.

"This comes back to my question of where? Do they put it in some vault where it is locked away never to see the light?"

Depends. Most invest it in idle stuff like real estate that, by simple dint of human growth, becomes increasingly scarce and thus more valuable. That's why it's the go-to investment for the REALLY rich. Thing is, once they lock in their investment, THEN they sit on it. After all, why bother to move it if you don't have to. It becomes a nest egg. Plus it helps in Tax Planning 101 (aka Buy, Borrow, Die), where they borrow against their assets to avoid taxes (heirs then use the carry-over basis to pay the debts off after they die at reduced capital gains taxes).

To take a literary example, consider the late Terry Pratchett's view of the rich through the perspective of the Ramkin family: old and very, very rich because they're holding lots of value that kept appreciating over time.

"This is an option most people have yet still the number of people I know who spend it all and more amazes me. So many people could be so much more comfortable if they didnt just spend all they had and more, but their interest payments do provide cheap and free bank accounts for the rest of us."

Thing is, the Cost of Living tends to be inflexible for a given area. More people than you know aren't earning enough take-home to cover this; many others are barely over and still need to cover other necessary (and sometimes unexpected) expenses. It's hard to save up when your paycheck is already spoken for.

This is true. And people from those societies seek to reach our societies. However some people in our societies seem to desire changes to turn into the more dangerous societies.

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Angst in her pants: Alleged US govt leaker Reality Winner stashed docs in her pantyhose

Charles 9
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Re: Fed agent: "feel a little better knowing that we don't have a real serious problem here"

For espionage, that's getting off light. Life's always a possibility. So is death.

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Charles 9
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Re: 10 Years? Fck!

That's getting off light. Espionage is a potential CAPITAL offense (see the Rosenbergs), plus the federal prison system doesn't believe in parole.

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Smartphone SatNavs to get centimetre-perfect GNSS receivers in 2018

Charles 9
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Re: I seem to recall the GPS sats have a dither error parttern

And as I recall, the EO was due to it being moot due to things like A-GPS and other commercially-available means to correct out the wobble. Basically, if someone wanted REALLY accurate information, they could do it whether SA was there or not, so remove it and let the higher accuracy be put to use commercially. Most drift these days is due to physics (atmospheric interference and so on), not sabotage.

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Charles 9
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Re: Utter bollocks

Perhaps you can elaborate how multiple frequencies solve the problem of multi-path interference, particularly in the case where the ONLY signals visible are reflected (as in a concrete canyon where direct line-of-sight is blocked by buildings).

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Charles 9
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Re: I seem to recall the GPS sats have a dither error parttern

I think they either turned the dither off or reduced its range after consumer tech caught up and was able to compensate for the dither, rendering the practice moot.

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Charles 9
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Re: GPS is bad at measuring height

"If you lose the signal you lose the signal, what's the difference whether it's up, down, left, right?"

Because it could lose the signals just as you get on. End result, it doesn't know which deck you entered. Murphy's Law. Like I said, most satnavs I've tried (including Google Maps) get mixed up simply by going into a reversible lane.

"No. Short of a bridge with vertical a car elevator (which would be freakin' awesome) you're still coming in on a physically different road, which is easily distinguished with sufficiently precise data, which this is."

I still haven't gotten a clear answer to just HOW precise the thing is at motorway speeds. It needs to be within 2m while driving 100km/h to not get mixed up, especially if the ramps involved are very close to each other (which actually happens at those two bridges; I used to live on Long Island). Other complicated interchanges like Bruckner and Washington's Springfield Interchange create similar mixups.

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Dot-Amazon spat latest: Brazil tells ICANN to go fsck itself, only 'govts control the internet'

Charles 9
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The fact their threat would be toothless. They're not a big enough market to matter and their active stake is too small.

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Charles 9
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Re: FFS it's not as if Bezos pulled the name out of thin air.

IIRC, internet.com was already taken at the time: I believe by one of the search engines, lycos or altavista. And tat wasn't really a word back then: not to mention it's at the low end of the alphabet and as you said, he preferred an A to be on top of alphabetical listings.

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Charles 9
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And if Amazon simply says, "Your loss" since they already don't do much trading there for other reasons?

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Charles 9
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Re: I fear ...

"Unless he's an "honest" politician. You know, "An honest politician is one that once he's bought, stays bought.""

You assume the politician has already sold himself. What if he's still for sale?

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Charles 9
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Re: I fear ...

Or it could be that Brazil (a sovereign nation) offered BIGGER envelopes on the condition they IGNORE Amazon's. After all, one classic way to beat a bribe is with a BIGGER bribe.

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iOS apps can read metadata revealing users' location histories

Charles 9
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"The easiest solution may be to have separate albums each with their own access permissions and virtual albums which can hold photos from any albums with each retaining the permissions of the source album."

And if you want to CHANGE the permissions? Say give one friend access to one particular album but another friend access to a different one, each of which could hold a mix and match that has different contexts? At least offer an option to override if you're going to do this.

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Charles 9
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"That's just it - no app should access files other than its own unless it's generally meant to handle files or receives access to open certain files directly."

Which kind of defeats the purpose of thngs like Gallery apps, which are DESIGNED to go through your storage for pictures and so on. Comes with the territory. And again, your thumbnail idea will just become another potential avenue for a Confused Deputy attack.

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Charles 9
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There MUST, or you get switchboard anxiety, aka "too many options".

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Charles 9
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"The OS could allow apps access to temporary copies of the files that have the EXIF information blanked, unless you choose to allow the app "photo metadata" permissions - that's what you'd use for something backing up photos or copying them off the device."

How would it know to do that, especially if the app accesses the photos as files rather than as images? If you say it's the OS's responsibility to look for things like magic numbers, that defeats the minimalist approach and can introduce possible exploits by doing a Confused Deputy.

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Brit broke anti-terror law by refusing to cough up passwords to cops

Charles 9
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Re: Seriously... with the double standards

"When they come for you no-one will speak up."

Because they'll grab EVERYONE at once. When they come for you, you WON'T be expecting them, even when you are.

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Charles 9
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Re: Micro SD cards....

What about the newer detectors that can detect nonferrous materials as well? I believe some are x-ray based so can detect nigh anything non-obvious on your person while others can detect traces.

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