* Posts by Charles 9

11103 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Microsoft silently fixes security holes in Windows 10 – dumps Win 7, 8 out in the cold

Charles 9
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And if you MUST run them because your very expensive equipment won't work with anything else?

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Russian spies used Kaspersky AV to hack NSA staffer, swipe exploit code – new claim

Charles 9
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Re: Name One Reason Why The NSA, US Government or The WSJ (Murdoch) Should Be . . .

"Why, all of a sudden, should Kaspersky do things that could damage it's reputation?"

Because this time the Russian state is involved, and you don't say no to them, especially if you LIVE there. That includes denying denials if necessary.

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Hey, IoT vendors. When a paediatric nurse tells you to fix security, you definitely screwed up

Charles 9
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Re: IoT vendors bad for health care?

"The device wouldn't use generic WiFi, but a highly customized version where each workstation/device pair uses a unique encryption key, the software running on embedded read/only hardware, rendering them immune to standard hacking techniques."

Then what happens WHEN (not IF) an exploit is found on that immutable hardware that enables stealing the keys or even bypassing the system altogether? Since you have immutable hardware, you can't just upload new code (if you can, the update mechanism itself can be exploited); now you gotta roll out new hardware at additional cost: another strain on the budgets.

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Charles 9
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Re: IoT vendors bad for health care?

"Don't use the same hardware running on top of the same software in all the hospitals on the planet. As in nature you end up with a monoculture. And yes it is technically possible to provide the same functionality using a mix of different hardware/software. This only became a problem when we were stuck with the current duopoly."

But now you've raised the maintenance costs since now you have to cater to multiple different configurations, which means (1) budget strains and (2) more openings for Murphy. IOW, diversification just ran smack into KISS.

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Charles 9
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Re: But then comes the big problem: the bill.

But regulation introduces externalities. It can now cost less to bribe (or otherwise influence) the regulators to look the other way. If they're stubborn or have an Untouchable streak, go OVER them. And when you have that situation, nice guys finish last because by the time the fallout hits, the cumulative price disadvantage becomes too great for the nice guys to keep going.

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Charles 9
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Re: But then comes the big problem: the bill.

Simple. It'll probably cost less to deal with the fallout than to actually do things right.

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Another W3C API exposing users to browser snitching

Charles 9
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You would think that going "incognito" should return an empty wallet every time, since saved data isn't supposed to be available while incognito.

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Facebook, Google, Twitter are the shady bouncers of the web. They should be fired

Charles 9
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Re: Err .... aren't you somewhat glossing over...

"This doesn't mean that Google and Facebook should be immune from all responsibility. They should take content down when it's provably dangerous - but there's a debate to be had over who gets final say on what the definition of "dangerous" is (e.g. conference speech by the opposition political leader - clearly subversive material that should be banned...). Resolving this issue in a post-fact world where literally *everyone* routinely lies to promote their own agenda is not going to be easy."

Plus you can also get into the problem of "half-truths". As a board once said, "half the truth, twice the lie" because you're using facts in a misleading way that is very difficult to discredit. Point is, people have become so skilled at concealing lies behind truths that it practically takes fact-finding missions just for the chance to prove your average newspaper headline. Not to mention the downtrodden public, tired of having to fight 800-lb gorillas wearing flak helmets, bulletproof vests, and steel-toed boots all day long, you enter an atmosphere of near-constant physical, mental, and even emotional oppression from apparently all parties, it's hard to trust anyone (including yourself as you're also told you're deluding yourself). Frankly, I think all the political fallout we're seeing right now are danger signs of the fuse being lit on a major powder keg: the kind that causes evil to get elected out of desperation like what happened in the last century.

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Charles 9
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Re: Some nutter says "We'll cancel student debt"

Problem is, are we past the point of no return: where people are beyond the point of caring, given it's nigh-impossible to teach people who don't want to learn?

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Charles 9
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Re: 1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

"It's illegal for any foreign government to donate time, money or other advantages to any part in a US election. Quite a sensible law really."

Yes, and oh so easy to dodge. One word: shills.

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Charles 9
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Re: Social Media

"Is Addictive and needs a health warning."

Like that's going to do anything. Ever wondered why the most common type of people to call cigarettes "cancer sticks" are the smokers?

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Charles 9
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Re: Just like the Sun (News of the World) then

"Alternatively, we could all appreciate the massive positive benefits of these services accepting there are downsides, grow the F up as societies and individuals and be better educated so we can all read with a pinch of salt and a healthy dose of cynicism .. but ya know, Elon will shagging on Mars and Trump will be working as a volunteer in a Mexican drug rehab clinic for HIV positive users before that will happen."

Because TPTB don't want people to grow the F up. Stupid, unenlightened people are easier to control and easier from which to wrest away their rights. People instinctively react more to bad news than to good news. After all, bad news could kill you, directly. Since when has ignoring good news directly killed someone?

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Charles 9
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I think the problem is that people AREN'T learning. In fact, places like Facebook act like giant echo chambers, actually growing participation when limited connections in the past contained conspiracy nuts. Now they're spreading beyond control and threatening to overtake the regular population.

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Charles 9
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Re: 1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

Trouble is social media is like a utility. The market really won't tolerate more than one, trending them towards natural monopolies. Competition really can't last in such a market; winners eventually emerge.

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Charles 9
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Re: 1984 was not supposed to be an instruction manual.

But not always the ability, given some people's ability to fashion credible fake news complete with referrnces.

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Toshiba, you can't have 14TB served on a platter. It'll take eight, at least

Charles 9
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Like I said, tape is out of reach in the consumer end. Has been since the QIC days.

Silent corruption I can deal with via error codes if necessary.

Like you said, BDs are too small for archival needs in the TB range.

And drive rotation is part of any archival plan. As long as it can be held to about one every 4-5 years, it's still within reason.

And large-capacity SSDs are still too expensive. They need to drop A LOT before they can fall into consumer range.

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Charles 9
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I'm the other way around. There are plenty of packrats around who want to be sure what they have is still there in the event of a company going down or no Internet (remember, no Internet = no Cloud). Tape storage is out of reach for the consumer, so a way to economically store a lot of data (speed is not an issue, and pairing up helps guard against a catastrophic failure) is a boon in my book.

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Foiled again! Brit military minds splash cash on killing satellites with... food wrapping?

Charles 9
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Re: Bah!

One big problem with any kind of "foam" approach. Do you know of any substance that retains its foam properties at near absolute zero? Most of that stuff turns very brittle when it gets very cold, meaning you end up with a spalling effect. One chunk of space junk goes in. Cloud of ice-cold frozen foam fragments spray out.

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Charles 9
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I thought it was originally called just "Window" and is now known as just chaff (still has a use today for confusing radar-guided missiles).

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Charles 9
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Re: If there's a changing magnetic field...

Doesn't that require ferrous material to work, though, and most space junk is non-ferrous?

Also, the convert into heat part presents another problem: how to get rid of it. Without a solid or gaseous outlet for the thermal energy (meaning conduction and convection are out), the only way out is via radiation, which is actually pretty difficult in space and is a known issue with spacecraft design.

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RAM, bam, awww ... man! Boffins defeat Rowhammer protections

Charles 9
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Re: We can't we just admit that sandboxes don't work?

PS. NO distribution matches all my values, so compromises need to be made. Thing is, those compromises can end up compromising YOU, and for me, there's no way around that. Welcome to the Jungle.

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Charles 9
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Re: We can't we just admit that sandboxes don't work?

"2. Have you ever seen the web before Javascript and Flash? Everything worked much faster, despite of Browsers that choked on some GIFs and dialup connections."

Not things like eBay because of the round-trip issues. That bus left long ago. Plus it was pretty, well, boring.

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Charles 9
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Re: We can't we just admit that sandboxes don't work?

No, because that means computers can't do what we want anymore. How do we get new programs if we can't download them? They're potentially unworthy sources (because even if they SAY they're trustworthy, can we BELIEVE them?)

And websites became interactive and Turing-complete to meet consumer demand. Not to mention ANY protocol, not just WWW, can be similarly vulnerable to the right confluence of events. If you don't want to be attacked from the Internet, your only guaranteed option is to unplug, just as the only way to keep a computer from being hacked is to unplug it.

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White House plan to nuke social security numbers is backed by Equifax's ex-top boss

Charles 9
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Re: government by the people

But you have to assume that most people are uninformed because, frankly, they have better things to do. Perhaps that was why the Founding Fathers originally required voters to be landowners: on the assumption that people with actual skin in the game would pay attention to the government.

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Charles 9
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Re: Obscure number

Then it's not quite right. I think you meant 5318008.

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Charles 9
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Employers MUST collect the SSN because SS taxes are levied and withheld against the employee's wages and needs to be processed accordingly.

Banks generally need you SSN if they need to get a credit report. If any account you have pays interest or dividends, that's taxable income. If you hold a mortgage, the interest you pay on it is tax-deductible and a frequent reason to itemize deductions (Schedule A). If taxes are involved (the latter two), the bank MUST know your SSN.

PS. If you have an SSN, yes it is your TIN. But aliens can have a TIN but not an SSN.

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Charles 9
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But the credit agencies are BIG companies, SO powerful they can push the legislators (and with them, the LAWS) as they please, and there's little the citizens can do about it since they have enough to influence the stupid. And as the comedian says, you can't fix stupid. Makes you wonder if this whole government by the people is overrated.

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Charles 9
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Re: Le roi est mort, vive le roi

My thought exactly. SOMETHING will take the SSN'S place as primary key (already does for aliens and others without a SSN). Plus with today's database and computing technology, tracking a hundred numbers may as well be as easy as tracking one.

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Town wants Amazon's new HQ so much it plans to split off new town called 'Amazon'

Charles 9
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Re: Ireland

As I recall, Atlanta is a hub city for at least one major airline, so routes are less of an issue.

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Charles 9
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Re: Stonecrest, Georgia?

Doesn't need to. Atlanta's the capital of Georgia, so state taxes already head their way. Plus keeping suburbs separate as part of Fulton County reduces overheads.

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Equifax couldn't find or patch vulnerable Struts implementations

Charles 9
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Re: Well prepared team?

IOW, it costs less to handle the fallout and bribe and legislators to keep regulations lax than it is to actually do things right.

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Charles 9
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Re: Here's the *other* really sick thing:

Well ask yourself. Which would've cost them more? A several-month blackout or paying for the fallout?

As for not spilling, remember what the stupidest thing the man who first found gold in California was: telling about it.

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NetApp scraps first day of Insight conf talks at Mandalay Bay after terrorist guns down 59

Charles 9
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Re: Heard at the NRA headquarters

"Of course a local ad-hoc force could not effectively defeat a modern military. A measure of local control is retained in the National Guard. I do wonder if military hardware should be in the hands of amateurs."

Don't be so sure. Look at Vietnam and the slogs that were Afghanistan and Iraq. There's something to be said about home field advantage in war.

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Charles 9
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Except when it comes to suicides, the US is strictly middle of the pack, and its per-capita suicide rate is pretty average. You want bad suicide rates? Go to Japan and especially South Korea: both countries, you should note, with strict gun policies. The three main methods of suicide in Japan? Throwing oneself in front of a vehicle, self-defenestration, and self-poisoning/overdosing. No guns involved. Indeed, given there are still plenty of non-gun suicides in America, it's hard to say that taking away guns will take away suicides (which account for plenty of the gun deaths in America). Guns to them are just low-hanging fruit. As Japan demonstrates, though, there are plenty of other ways.

Escalation violence can still be quite deadly without guns. Take them away and you still have knives, improvised clubs, and of course the old "ram their head against the wall/floor with your bare damn hands." And why aren't the brains engaged? Probably because most of the time both belligerents are drunk (which lowers inhibitions).

As for Charles Vacca, a similar thing could happen in a chemistry lab, a trade shop, or many other places where dangerous things are taught to youngsters. It was an accident. Crap happens.

PS. 30,000 pa in a country of 300+ million is, per capita, not as big as it looks. Furthermore, your reference of "people determined to kill people" is inaccurate because the #1 reason for gun deaths happens to BE people determined to kill people. Most gun deaths in America are attributed to criminal activity: specifically, criminal activity against other criminals (IOW, gang-on-gang violence, drug wars, and other violence BETWEEN criminal organizations).

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Charles 9
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Re: Heard at the NRA headquarters

That was exactly how the Supreme Court justified the right as an individual right. Militias have no definition under the law, so a militia of one was completely and legally possible.

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Charles 9
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I had originally thought Bath Township had 89 deaths (more than this), not 43. In any event, the point was that if someone wants to kill you, they'll find a way. For example, in response to lower gun violence in places like Europe (due to fewer guns), the usual answer is to look for violence by other means such as knives as well as to account for criminal-on-criminal (particularly gang-on-gang) violence (which accounts for a lot). Bath Township was committed by a farmer (meaning at the time it was legal for him to possess TNT, which he used in the massacre, as excavation charges), while IINM one of the three Oklahoma City perpetrators owned a farm (meaning he had justification for owning ammonium nitrate fertilizer--note, it had been denatured, but they found a way to REnature it).

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Charles 9
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Before anyone mentions gun control, let me remind everyone about two worse massacres perpetrated by natural-born Americans: Bath Township and Oklahoma City. Note that NEITHER involved guns and indeed are likely to have been impossible to prevent due to their circumstances. I'm not going to comment on the Las Vegas incident until further information is given.

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Internet-wide security update put on hold over fears 60 million people would be kicked offline

Charles 9
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Re: The problem?

"Could they introduce lag to processes using the old cert? Start with 1 minute and increase the lag by a minute each day?"

No, because most give up and time out before then. You'd be doing a wholesale block the hard way.

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Charles 9
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Re: Just look at IPv6?

Well, enterprise happens to be most likely place to find IPv4-ONLY equipment: acquired before IPv6 was a thing yet too indispensable and/or too expensive to replace. You can't roll out IPv6 selectively because the old stuff will lose touch with complicated bodges, becoming a case of "If it ain't broke..." best not to rock the boat internally and address external IPV6 needs via specialized structures: dedicated subnets, gateways, proxies, etc.

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Charles 9
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Re: What a load of cow pats

You incorrectly assume all such positions are filled by competent personnel. Consider nepotism, tight budgets, and basic barrel-scraping.

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Charles 9
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Re: The problem?

I meant to say entire COUNTRIES. Plus you can't tell if it's YOUR country that would be affected or not since the servers could be upstream of you. Sounds fun to say, "let 'em suffer" until you discover YOU'RE suffering...AND can't change ISPs because ALL of them were affected at the same time.

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Pumpkin bumpkins battle, 800kg monstrosity wins

Charles 9
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Re: Fun, but inedible ...

Given a pumpkin IS a squash, what's the difference?

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Charles 9
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Re: Forget the punkin. Let's see some chunkin!

I will admit, after reading the details, that was a bit gruesome, and after giving it some thought, this is the kind of event that really can't escape Murphy's Law. I mean, Scrapheap Challenge and its US counterpart Junkyard Wars had seen many a catapult built (with a noted fondness for counterweight trebuchets), and even the MythBusters have done a few, but it's also easy to see how any of them could go wrong as well (some did go wrong, even). It's a difficult line to draw; where does it move from the builder's fault for not making it safe enough to being the spectator's fault for standing too close to the blasted thing?

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Charles 9
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And here I thought they were gonna actually launch these from catapults to see how far they could fly...

Forget the punkin. Let's see some chunkin!

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Five ways Apple can fix the iPhone, but won't

Charles 9
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Re: Obscene vanity

Because they normally take AA or AAA batteries. End result: they don't last long, and if you need charging in an emergency, you probably need it for a LONG emergency. You'd probably need something that uses like a 6V lantern battery or 4 D batteries, but all I've seen in that end are bodge jobs.

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Driverless cars will make more traffic, say transport boffins

Charles 9
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Re: Bah!

There's that big bug-a-boo about flexible capacity: that also means surge capacity, that rarely gets used but when it DOES get used, it gets USED! Like when the big game lets out, everyone gets out at once and needs a ride at once. Now you're caught in a vice. Having enough cars to handle this surge means a lot of idle rides most of the time, whereas anything less will mean people wait and gripe as a result. Lose-lose.

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Charles 9
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Re: Rational conclusions

Would you walk in an unfamiliar area? And/or the dead of night? And/or in the rain or snow?

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EasyJet: We'll have electric airliners within the next decade

Charles 9
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Re: Could this be more efficient than a turbo-prop or a jet engine?

But how would the generator operate? Turbojets are designed for thin-air operation. Also, they're often used (via bleed-air extraction) to pressurize the cabin. Seems to me you end up trading two to four smaller turbine engines for one big one (because how else will you run the generator in thin-air conditions), making it a case of excessive complexity.

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Charles 9
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You forgot the Joke Alert icon.

You're basically going the roundabout route to the generator attached to the motor it's supposed to power: the classic Overunity Device.

Quick primer: any wind force used to power a windmill doesn't come out the other side. Breeze goes in, calm comes out. A ram air turbine adds drag because of the previous (similarly how it's harder to operate a crank charger when the phone's plugged into it than when it's not), which is why they're normally small and only used to charge essentials when necessary.

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Guntree v Gumtree: Nominet orders gun ads site must lose domain

Charles 9
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Re: Gun gun gun fun

The MythBusters' tree cannon was in fact a smooth-bore muzzle-loader, and it actually fired a ball (they never found it IIRC), so by your definition it qualified as a gun.

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