* Posts by Charles 9

10428 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

WTF is your problem, Netgear? Another hijack hole found in its routers

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Already fixed?

Same here for my R7000.

0
0

Australia to review effectiveness of ISPs' copyright-defending website blocks

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: not good enough!

Watched The Fifth Element in the past?

0
0

'Grey technology' should be the new black

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Current pet peeves:

I think below 12kHz people disregard it as background and sleep through it. If a jarring sound doesn't work for you, then a sound-based alarm probably won't work for you anymore.

0
2

Apple kills activation lock check, possible dirty stolen device hack

Charles 9
Silver badge

I don't think the glue's been made that can thwart a determined hacker.

0
0

With net neutrality pretty much dead in the US, your privacy is next

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: So what's next?

They can do it ALREADY. Think ad WALLS. They won't let you through until you see the ad. Pretty soon this'll be the norm on the Internet. Then what's you do?

0
4
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: If I may...

Thus "as they CAN." If they CAN'T, we'll as they say in America, "Them's the breaks." There are 12 stranded starving islanders but only 6 coconuts. Someone's gotta go.

0
1

VPN on Android means 'Voyeuristic Peeper Network' in many cases

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "Google should [...]

Thing is, the seller (developer) should never be compelled to sell. If they want to make it a Hobson's Choice, that's the discretion of the seller. Don't like it? Just don't use it.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Free?

Except they'll probably just whip up ways to tell the fake data from the real stuff and go, "Naughty naughty, no lying to me!"

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Simple.

IPtables requires root, and since root can break apps, that's not an option for some of us. In which case the VPN route is the only one available.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I don't understand...

$60/yr is the rate for my VPN plan. I like it because it's a fixed IP, allows port forwarding, and they even throw in SOCKS5 and other proxies gratis.

0
0

Windows code-signing tweaks sure to irritate software developers

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "will only let apps be installed via their App store and devs are expected to pay lots of £££"

"For Android there are dozens of alternate app stores that compete with Google's Play Store, and you can find them by Googling, or even Binging if you prefer."

The trouble being only Google's App Store is trusted by default on Android, meaning the only way to accept installs from the likes of F-Droid is to either root your phone (which can break things) or allow untrusted sources. If Android REALLY were open, we'd have the option of ADDING store certificates so that other app stores can be accepted as trusted. But that isn't even an option: not even under an expert setting.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

YOUR computer, but THEIR OS, and they tend to get flak (blame or no blame) if something like a driver breaks things, so like it or not you have to deal with kiester-covering.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Change in mindset is needed IMO

But that presents a counter. What if the best option is still insufficient?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: and what will that hardware contain ?

For PUBLIC consumption. Never assume they follow their own recommendations internally.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: How long before...?

Given how irksome things are right now, why can't developers be bothered with doing it ALREADY?

5
0

Silicon Valley VCs: We're gonna make California great again – on its own

Charles 9
Silver badge

NO.

The thing about being thick is that you don't KNOW you're thick. That's why you're thick in the first place: nothing gets through to you, not even the idea that you're thick.

It's like with stupid: a self-reinforcing loop that's extremely difficult to get through. It usually takes a crisis to do it, and if even that doesn't work, odds are they won't be alive to realize it.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Those poor Trump voters are in for a terrible awakening

Since when have robots had intuition? A lot of what allows us to function is untaught: damn near instinct. How can we teach robots things we don't even know ourselves how we know?

0
0

Former Mozilla dev joins chorus roasting antivirus, says 'It's poison!'

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: AV is doomed to failure

" If my nana's PC in Iowa suddenly starts making TCP connections to a server in a faroff country, wouldn't that strike you as a little odd?"

Given how interconnected the Web can be, not necessarily.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Don't tar all AV with the same brush

Yes you do, because THEY only have to be lucky ONCE, and with so many of them beating at the gates SOMEONE's bound to think outside the box. Plus for them, making things difficult = challenge (meaning you egg them on).

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: From the trenches...

No, because YOU then get the blame for choosing such a, pardon by American, stupid moron.

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Don't tar all AV with the same brush

" For example if a process suddenly starts writing to lots of different files one after the other, they'll alert to say this might be ransomware encrypting all your files."

What about slow encrypters which try to fly under your threshold or malware that directly targets and tries to pwn your AV?

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

"I'm often asked "what AV do you use?" to which I respond, I don't - I just make sure I don't visit any dodgy sites and I don't open every email attachment that is sent to me."

What about drive-by attacks, which embed into mainstream sites and can usually penetrate blockers?

2
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Problem with Anti-Virus

"Security cannot be added on like a box on the side - or if it is, it won't work very well at all. Ideally it needs to be built right into the system at a deep level, preferably when the system itself is first designed. That is somewhat easier to do with FOSS, although there too there are serious obstacles."

The biggest obstacle, however, is the user that expects to just get things done. If things get in the way, they complain. Well, like the lock in the door, security necessarily gets in the way of the user's job. And they're not interested in learning more hoops to jump. So what do you do?

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Problem with Anti-Virus

"IMHO it's not that they are dumb at all - many of them are very intelligent."

When it comes to computers, though, even surgeons can be dumb as a brick. I speak from experience. How can you educate users when, as the comedian says, "You can't fix Stupid"?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: :unsure:

"I'm not removing my AV solution yet, because while it may 'only' protect against 99% of threats, I'd sooner have that protection against those 99% at that layer, and trust that the other 5 or 6 layers of security in my network will deal with the rest. Firefox, on the other hand, is already gone."

But what happens when a malware EXPLOITS the AV software to say create an admin-level exploit and uses it to leapfrog all the other defense layers? Is a layer of defense really worth it when it can be made into a mole?

1
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Unless the layer becomes a LADDER? As in the AV BECOMES the means by which the malware gets in. Now layers are useless because the malware can use the AV to leapfrog everything.

1
4
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: From the trenches...

"AV has one major advantage that keeps us installing it, even though we know it greatly increases attack surface and doesn't catch much of what it's supposed to catch. It stops us getting sacked. Imagine a post-incident enquiry by senior management, "so how did this happen? Why didn;'t the AV catch it? What's that you say -- you're such a brilliant security expert that you uninstalled our antivirus software??" Your feet wouldn't touch the ground."

Until you find out that the AV was the means by which the company got pwned?

1
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Er, the Browser Cannot Save Us

"And their absurd passion for one of the worst languages in the world, Javascript, is driving down coding quality so much that there's bound to be severe repercussions somewhere or other."

Except that getting rid of JavaScript would have EVEN MORE SEVERE consequences. As in users would stop using it, because many sites REQUIRE JavaScript, have no alternatives, and The Customer Is Always Right. So what do you do? Open security holes or fade into obscurity? And don't even start with education since the average user isn't capable of learning.

1
4

Wow, look out, hackers: Trump to order 60-day cybersecurity probe

Charles 9
Silver badge

Simple. It's reached the point where one man could ruin the world with enough motivation. If Armageddon can come from anywhere at anytime without warning, then as they say, all bets are off.

PS. Not saying it's actually true, but there's your perfect, undefeatable excuse.

1
0

Americans fear their data isn't safe, yet do little to defend it

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Living outside the USA is not so bad

Until you realize that simply means the government WHERE YOU RESIDE will just do the same, laws or no laws.

PS. How do you keep your private stuff off the Internet when the government is injecting PII into the Internet FOR YOU?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I've said it before and I'll keep saying it

"It is the kind of arrogance you see in so many industries that eventually leads to their downfall. It is NOT the retail customers responsibility to understand your product. It is your responsibility to educate them. If that is not practical, then you need to simplify and improve your product."

And what if that's not possible. What if the most complicated design the market will tolerate is not secure enough to be practical? Like the most they'll tolerate is pushing their finger against a sensor, yet fake fingers are easier than that? What happens when the market demands unicorns?

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Safe Data anywhere, anyhow? As if!

"Stop blaming the users, wherever they live! When the very governments tasked to protect us and the companies making the tech we buy are all destroying our privacy as fast as they can, what the HELL is the end-user supposed to do?"

Elect an honest government. Consider how most of these got in the first place. Like someone said, Hitler was elected.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Public wifi networks

No, because Gene and Mallory can perfectly masquerade as Trent. IOW, there's no system of trust that can defeat the perfect masquerade, and since we're talking an encounter between two assumed strangers, First Contact applies, meaning there's nothing in common between them, which according to First Contact means no true trust is possible.

0
0

2017 is already fail: Let’s try a Chinese reboot

Charles 9
Silver badge

Nah, experience tells me they're usually closer to the boss than to you, so they act the same and you find yourself between dumb and dumber. No winning there.

2
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Until you find out they did #1 and told all their friends so you don't end up hired by ANYONE and your fridge is empty and the rent is due...

2
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Can I just mention in passing....

Chop Suey IS American. It's based on the ACTUAL Chinese "tsap seui" and is most basically described as "leftovers". It was what the cooks whipped up out of the leftover cuts from their entrees.

Pizza, though, IS Italian in origin (at least, as we know it now) and spread by immigration. The flatbread idea, even the idea of topping it, seems to come from Greece, but it was Italians who hit on the sauce (because it was Italians—specifically Neapolitans—who first embraced the tomato en masse).

And I'll give you China and the pasta bit, as far as the idea of a noodle is concerned, though it should be noted Europeans probably got the idea from the Arabs, not the Chinese. I also wonder which was first to really go gung-ho on using wheat for pasta? BTW, did you know America's first industrial pasta factory was set up by a Frenchman?

6
0

President Trump tweets from insecure Android, security boffins roll eyes

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Douglas Adams nailed it

And also the people with the actual skills to do the jobs. The talent, just not the temperament. So if you can't rely on politicians, whom can you rely?

0
1

Apple eats itself as iPhone fatigue spreads

Charles 9
Silver badge

"You do realize, of course, that this statement makes no sense in the context of the millions of drones who buy the product?"

Those drones, you'll note, aren't as rabid as they once were. Apple's Midas Touch is fading.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

(users needed to use a phone one-handed, Apple argued)

Thing is, some of us have big hands and fat fingers, meaning a larger phone is more comfortable for us, yet we're still able to use them with one hand. Anyway, I've always been a two-handed phone user (hold in the weak hand, tap with the strong), probably because I was weaned on a phone with a hardware keyboard which pretty much requires you use two hands.

2
0

'It will go wrong. There's no question of time... on safety or security side'

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: IoT is not industrial automation/control

You didn't read the ENTIRE reply. I said, "Things slip now and then." But note, AFAIK, no one DIED as a result of the Dreamliner scandal, so Boeing gets some egg on their face, but they move on.

"Never seen any evidence of that. Have you?"

The Jungle sure scared the meat packing industry straight. After a couple airplanes broke up in mid-flight, airplane engineers cottoned onto the concept of flutter, and now you don't see flutter-based breakups anymore. Just look up your favorite engineering disasters, and you'll usually see fallout that forces industries to pay attention.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: IoT is not industrial automation/control

"Except they probably will, eventually if they haven't already done so, because the low cost suppliers and low cost methods drive the better quality more expensive ones out of business,"

In heavy industries (the kind that involves huge things, billions of dollars, and plenty of lives), quality usually trumps price because they have the price of failure to consider (not just monetary but legal--these are the kinds of industries that can draw the attention of legislatures when crises emerge). Sure, things slip now and then, but once things like the Toyota and Volkswagen scandals appear, they usually tend to get back in line for fear of being next.

1
0

Top cop: Strap Wi-Fi jammers to teen web crims as punishment

Charles 9
Silver badge

And if the guy's a masochist?

0
0

Hitachi ponies up $3.5m for laptop battery rip-off

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Good job if you can get it

And there's little you can do about it without some kind of global authority. Because if you push your hand too much, they'll vanish and take their ill-gotten gains to the protection of another sovereign power, at which point they'll regroup and re-enter under a new identity. Which would you rather have? 10% of something or 100% of nothing?

0
1

More mobe malware creeps into Google Play – this time, ransomware

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Different checks for different apps?

But what happens when it's an app that legitimately needs admin privileges, like say Greenify in non-root mode (can't root because it breaks apps)?

0
0

Doomsday Clock moves to 150 seconds before midnight. Thanks, Trump

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Bollocks ...since when did 'global [warm|cool|change]ing' get added?

But Iraq didn't have nukes. Russia and China DO. Plus China's philosophy is more amenable to preferring everyone losing to the enemy winning, meaning MAD is not necessarily a deterrent to them.

1
2

US Congress asks FCC to snuff out Google's TV landgrab

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I for one ...

"And based on the current rules, the cable company has to provide the cablecard for free."

What rules require this? MY provider charges $2/month for it, and due to the ancient architecture, it's one-way meaning no VOD capability.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Step away from the kool aid, sir

It has to be able to cover cable and satellite, MPEG-4, H.264, & H.265. And got that matter, specify a form factor so it can be slotted behind the TV.

But of course, no one wants to give up their captive audiences. If they don't get you on box rentals, they'll just get you on data overages. Either way, they have you over the proverbial barrel.

5
0

Penguins force-fed root: Cruel security flaw found in systemd v228

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: So, do somethng !

"So, if you systemd haters go out and make a new distro without systemd, the world will beat a path to your door. Call it deb-sansd perhaps ? You will rule the world ! You could even set up your own mailing list and "discuss" systemd there (and not here...)."

If that were true, why hasn't a major supplier done so and beat the haters to the punch (and the bucks)?

0
0

Modular dud drags LG to first loss in six years

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Modular was always a silly idea

"It's a lot of mess and complexity to achieve something that nobody wanted in the first place. There are enough phones out there to suit everyone. Having a device that could be built up to something that can be bought for less money makes no sense."

Why doesn't it make sense for phones but it can for laptops and the like (think M.2)?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Modular was always a silly idea

"Add-ons that are proprietary to your brand (and thus give the consumer no reason to believe the system will be supported in future) are not that great an inducement to buy your brand. The only way that add-ons can be an inducement is if the consumer knows they can be used across handsets in the future."

And cross-brand add-ons can be a DISincentive to buy your brand. People can DEFECT. Ergo, if proprietary add-ons are a sink and cross-brand add-ons can encourage defections, the only practical option is the one we see now: practically no add-ons at all.

"It is better to have a small chance a will buy your brand than no chance at all."

And they do that by encouraging lock-in. That's why most Android phone makers don't produce stock (especially Samsung). Those that do cater to a niche clientele.

0
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017