* Posts by Charles 9

10015 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Top cop: Strap Wi-Fi jammers to teen web crims as punishment

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Just wondering....

Capacitive stylii still depend on your body to work, which is why you still need to hold them with either bare fingers or special conducting gloves.

So anything that can affect your using a finger will also affect the stylus.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Why would this happen-

And if they LIKE Vegemite?

1
0

Too much landfill, too little purpose: CES 2017

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Lack of imagination

Maybe it's not so much lack of imagination as it is the creative juices are running low. Everything we can imagine that can exist in reality already exists. The rest (like true VR and highly-accurate natural language processing out of the box) are still too far ahead of their time. There are only so many ways to build the proverbial better mousetrap before you run into previously-invented material, and since the best solutions tend to be the simplest, that limits your options, and it would take something truly revolutionary (like something that can disprove a fundamental tenet of physics) to really shake things up.

3
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "VR is hot right now"

VR won't be real VR until it's virtual EVERYTHING: including motion and sensation, like you see in sci-fi stories where your body doesn't have to move.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Trouble is the manufacturers KNOW they can't let that fish go or someone else will just hook it, so they make the cloud part and parcel and leave you a Hobson's Vhoice, figuring those that try not to will lose the critical repeat business and just vsnish later.

IOW, unless you can roll your own, you just can't have nice things; the long-term money isn't there.

1
0

Verizon is gonna axe its 'unlimited' data hogs

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Obviously not actually unlimited

Well, at least casinos RESERVE the right to evict unwanted patrons provided the law doesn't prevent them from doing so. They're just like any other public-facing establishment in that regard. Plus they tend to be up-front about it.

Whereas this whole "unlimited" business smacks of False Advertising: something that can be taken to court.

0
0

Is! Yahoo! dead?! Why! web! biz! will! rename! to! Altaba! – the! truth!

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Never understand why advertising wasn't their focus

Because in advertising, there's only room for one at the top. Also-ran quickly get pressured and squeezed out unless they have alternate revenue streams like Microsoft and Bing. Yahoo was probably trying for those alternate streams, but it's already final table and Google already holds 90% of the chips.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: In upside down world ...

After all, how do you get a CEO to sign onto what's essentially a sinking ship? Businesspeople are savvy enough to demand guaranteed perks or they won't sign, and sinking ships can't exactly wait.

2
1

TV anchor says live on-air 'Alexa, order me a dollhouse' – guess what happens next

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Could help reduce Piracy.

Oh, and another nasty touch. According to their official policy, digital downloads of movies or music are not returnable.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Again, it's illiterate tech users that don't do their homework

But then again, how do you appease an audience that demands unicorns and will happily dump their money on the first person to come along with a horn glued onto a horse?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Confirmation?

Then the NEXT version of the prank will insert a two-second pause followed by "Yes!" to include the confirmation phrase. Which means confirmation MUST be out of band. Trouble is, not everyone has a second factor with which to do this.

And no, one one will be willing to get up and push a button to confirm. Otherwise, they'd never be using voice activation in the first place.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Kill them with fire

And if it turns out to rise again like a phoenix?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Alexa or Lintilla clones

Then you're at a dilemma. The reason for fixed watch words is to conserve battery (the waveforms are in ROM). So you either have a battery-sipper with a fixed vocabulary or a dynamic battery hog. And while you can opt for meither, many will DEMAND it. Out voted by the stupid.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Comedy Material From the 70s

Remember the Clapper? I think it was Not Necessarily The News that did an ad about running a Clapper ad in a room with the TV plugged into a Clapper. Hilarity Ensued.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: PIN!

But a spoken PIN is dead easy to recognize AND record from a distance.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

You ever thought he could be absolutely sincere? I don't think gross stupidity is a crime yet.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Unless, of couse, such things were never set up in the first place. The wrong e-mail address, no app, notifications turned off due to inbox spam, any number of cracks to fall through...

3
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Alexa, Tea, Earl Grey, Hot

"When the system is as smart as me, able unambiguously to identify me, able to correctly understand free-form speech without error, and never allows any signal out of itself without confirmation and permission, it will still get it wrong."

Even humans can get confused by homophonic phrases. What chance does a computer have? Did you just tell it to "recognize speech" or to "wreck a nice beach"?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Could help reduce Piracy.

No, he got it right. The idea is that pirate tracks will contain Alexa commands in the beginning, basically forcing pirates to buy excessive music to make up for them not buying music normally.

1
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Echo is perfectly designed and working as planned

OR a bunch of lawsuits from people with a beef and the potential to stick it to not just Amazon but ALL e-tailers.

1
0

BT will HATE us for this one weird 5G trick

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Declutter!

But can't that backfire as well? TOO MANY signs results in confusion, accident, profit?

0
0

CES 2017 roundup: The good, the bad, and the frankly bonkers

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: You missed out the

Unless it's at YOUR direction. Otherwise, it isn't a selfie if you're using a Bluetooth trigger (because you're not holding the camera).

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Microbot Push

Why not just come up with a new version of "The Most Useless Thing EVER" (look it up on YouTube)?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: That ain't VR.

And who says that's a bad thing? Steady isn't sexy, but at least we wouldn't have the Internet of Stupid Things.

1
0

Google nukes ad-blocker AdNauseam, sweeps remains out of Chrome Web Store

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Ad blockers on Android

NoScript is an old-school XUL (pre-Chrome) add-on, and mobile Firefox only supports Chrome-style XUP add-ons (uBlock Origin is XUP, thus why it's also on Chrome).

PS. You might want to hook up your BD Player. Otherwise, it may not be able to play newer titles if your player's been used as a cracking tool in the past.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: you are the product

Doesn't matter if it's intentionally blocked or lost to static. Still means no impression.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Message to advertisers and ad agencies

Counter-counter:

The thing about an endless sea is that it's endless. Ten thousand or a hundred thousand means as much versus infinite. Besides, if you're in a boat, a rising ride means little to you.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: you are the product

Simple. The ad doesn't get requested. The server always knows if a request goes through and if the connection completes fully since it can measure the transfer total (part of its job for reporting purposes). Basically, if the request isn't sent and the ad not sent in its entirety, the server can assume the ad wasn't sent and the impression not made. The only way to fool that is to load the ad out of sight, but that means you use up (for many, precious) data allowance.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Maybe they should've thought the whole video ad thing over

"Perhaps one day your clients will take the hint - after all many of them are probably blocking ads too because, of course, this making people pay attention bit gets you the WRONG sort of attention - pissed off people are not going to be good customers."

Didn't you read? "Love me or hate me, as long as you KNOW me." Especially if I can smother the alternatives on the market and make it a Hobson's Choice. Now what will you do? Alternatives don't always exist, and it's not always possible to roll your own.

And, I'm no shill. I just know that ads are a fact of live, have been for over a century. Hell, even E. E. Smith wrote about advertising in First Lensman (which dates back to World War II) and about how they go to great lengths to get your attention.

4
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Ad blockers on Android

uBlock Origin works on mobile Firefox.

4
0

Dodgy dealer on Amazon lures marks towards phishing site

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Amazon Could (Should) Do More

Except the shysters are prepared for this. They just play whack-a-mole and reappear as another seller, then another, then another. They could have hundreds of accounts stashed away and can probably make dozen's more on a moment's notice with help from CAPTCHA farms.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I am surprised the address is visible

They either use Unicode lookalike characters or images that Amazon's algorithms can't grok (though you would think at this point they'd be running images through something like Tesseract to get around this trick).

0
0

Microsoft goes retro with Vista, Zune-style Windows Neon makeover

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: At least they're trying!

"If you look at it all in retrospect, it appears that upgrades beyond 95 happened because people wanted something that crashed less and worked better, not because they wanted a new, shiny UI. Once they find something that works, they stick to it like glue-- they're not out there looking for something new, not by a long shot. They're out there looking for more of the same as what they already have, UI wise."

But now we come back to the vacuum cleaners, and OS's and vacuum cleaners do share one thing in common: they still AGE. Filters need to be changed out, belts need to be replaced. Once in a while the motor needs to be changed out. At least with those old Kirby and Electrolux cleaners, their designs have been so monolithic that people know what go in them. You could end up with a Theseus Vacuum Cleaner, but it's still working. But OS's require continual support from the supplier. Of course, that's a money sink to them, especially as miscreants find more and more ways to break them. Thus they use the term End-of-Live, an incarnation of Planned Obsolescence. And there's really very little you can do in a war zone like this. Not even the law can help because that would just insert an economic motive for a company to up and quit, taking all their secrets with them (and they'll rather take their secrets to the grave than be forced to give them to "the enemy"). I'm sure many people would love to stick with XP, but given its history of being pwned within 30 seconds of going online and with plenty of known (and never-to-be-patched) exploits, diminishing returns starts to kick in.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: At least they're trying!

Even if that old bed was starting to rot and get bedbugs in it?

0
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: At least they're trying!

"That's because people are inherently old farts who don't want things to change. MS, like you, seems to think that change for the sake of change is a good thing..."

Because that's a practical business consideration. There's no long-term return in a one-and-done, which is why you never see Kirby or Electrolux vacuum cleaners in stores anymore (because anyone who bought one still uses it--makes it hard to sell new ones). There's no business like repeat business, and businesses who can't get repeat businesses into them don't tend to last long-term.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: retro?

Not desserts. Sweets. Eclairs, ice cream sandwiches, and Kit Kat bars are all considered sweets.

4
0

FM now stands for 'fleeting mortality' in Norway

Charles 9
Silver badge

You know SSSS PREDATES DAB? Wasn't SSSS on FM all the talk in the 80's, so in those terms, SSSS is a wash. Besides, modern lossy audio codes are perceptual, so silent subliminals would likely get lost in the codec. That's why Cinavia encodes on the audible spectrum.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Don't forget the content in the discussion about the technology

"Why is this so hard?"

Because analog radio is basically the KISS principle. It's all physics: no magic or jiggerypokery. That's why you can listen to radio with just a few parts: just enough to repeat the physics. It's also why it needs so little extra power: the signal IS the power essentially. And since radio has emergency applications, you REALLY need it as simple as possible because some out in the field need to be able to MacGyver their solutions.

If any government dares to take analogue radio off, dare them to be able to get news of a major disaster through in time during a major blackout.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: @ Commswonk

"That is why music "works" with most instruments: the harmonics that characterise it (that are all ratio related) seem to be equal spacing in a tonal sense, and the note scale and corresponding chords have a set ratio."

Anyone who combines music and computers/tech quickly learns of the logarithmic nature of music. Going up an octave, for example, doubles the tonal frequency, vice versa, and/or in reverse.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Considering that most digital radio is utter crap in quality...

Also, stereo on FM and analog TV is a delta setup (mono+difference) rather than true dual channel, which causes artifact issues of their own.

0
0

Yep. Bitcasa's called it quits

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: There's a lesson in this:

So how does the ISP get out of trouble if taken to court for false advertising?

0
0

Could YOU survive a zombie apocalypse? Uni eggheads say you'd last just 100 days

Charles 9
Silver badge

We got lucky with Ebola. It's hard to transmit at range and doesn't tend to become conagious until symptoms appear. A mutant strain that can drift and/or transmit asymptomatically (like aggressive flu) is a lot harder to handle.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Relevant and accessible?

"Nope, not even there. There's nothing in the Bible to say that, never was. These people should get to know their Bible a bit more if they believe such nonsense!"

Pretty sure Eve was made from Adam's rib, according to Genesis 2:22...

"Then the LORD God made a woman from the rib he had taken out of the man, and he brought her to the man."

0
2

Fatal genetic conditions could return in some 'three-parent' babies

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Prediction...

"If an expert says something can't be done - then they are possibly going to be proved wrong in the future."

Unless, of course, one can BACK UP the claim like Alan Turing did with the Halting Problem.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

And if one of the siblings happens to be a devout Catholic (or married to one) or other such that abortion is taboo?

0
0

WD slims down SSD to squeeze into little Black drive range

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: skill level of changing your own oil or replacing the air filter.

And if you don't HAVE a 14-year-old in your immediate area (say it's an elderly community and the younger generations are medico-trained instead of tech-trained)?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: What sort of motherboard slot?

M.2 and NVMe are two aspects of a newer drive standard designed for solid-state and portable (as in laptop) applications. NVMe is the slot spec, M.2 is the physical device spec. Since you mention a five-year cycle, you probably don't have a capable motherboard, and that's no big shakes since the standard's only been around a few years now.

To summarize, solid state drives don't need big honking housings (M.2 drives as you can see are comparatively tiny, the numbers used in the spec describe sizes) nor do they need interfaces designed for slow spinning rust (good NVMe drives hook direct to the PCI Express bus, addressing them more as memory than as drives). End result, a highly efficient drive bus you can still squeeze into a laptop.

But who's to say laptops have to have all the fun? Servers caught on to the idea first because space is also a premium to them; smaller drives mean you can cram in more of them or give the case more room to breathe (being solid-state with higher reliability helps, too), and with two legs of the computer triangle already down, endpoint PC makers realized the future is PCIe-attached SSDs: likely followed by SSDs as RAM (this is probably waiting on post-DRAM tech: a while longer right now). Since the wiring is PCIe-compatible, it doesn't take much work to shift some lanes into an NVMe slot or two. If you have a spare 4x PCIe slot, you can fit a bridge card that lets you take an NVMe drive as a stopgap, but future computers will already have the slots on board the way SATA ports were included in the past.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Installation complexity!

"When working in IT it's easy to forget how difficult things can be for the typical punter but I don't think the installation of an M2 drive deserves the ranking of "complex"."

I don't think they are calling it "complex" so much as "not a lift-the-cover-and-pop-it-in job". If you're familiar with the innards of your computer, you've probably got the skills, but if your idea of adding a hard drive involves going to the computer shop, perhaps you should do that instead. To use a car metaphor, this is somewhere along the skill level of changing your own oil or replacing the air filter.

0
0

Those online ads driving you bonkers are virtually 'worthless for brands'

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: All the bad ads

"As for driver sites: they're ALL security risks. Run Linux. :P"

Um, many devices DON"T HAVE Linux drivers, or the support is too spotty to be useful. I run into that problem all the time. So no, Linux is not an option.

0
0

Raspberry Pi Foundation releases operating system for PCs, Macs

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: So lightweight...

If it really brings convenience, then it's not really perceived. Why do people pay extra at the C-Store, after all? Because it beats going the extra mile to the supermarket or whatever. Especially in the middle of the knight when you suddenly discover your party-goers drank all your beer three hours early, despite your double-stocking the fridge.

0
1

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017