* Posts by Charles 9

10418 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Boffins exfiltrate data by blinking hard drives' LEDs

Charles 9
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Re: air gap

Yes, how do you get data in and out of an airgapped system in the first place, especially if the data is not of the type to be easily grokked by the Eyeball Mk I. Otherwise, you've got yourself the equivalent of the PC in the ground: sure, you can't infect it, but you can't USE it, either.

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Tosh doubles 64-layer 3D flash chip capacity with a bit of TLC

Charles 9
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Re: Cost/TB

It wouldn't have to be comparable, just low enough that its premium can be justified to the buyer since solid-state drives do provide tremendous benefits. It's just that the premium at this point is still too high for most. I would say once it gets to double (or less) the price/capacity of rust, especially at large capacities (pretty much rust's last stand), then the sun will set for rust.

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Global IPv4 address drought: Seriously, we're done now. We're done

Charles 9
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Re: Dear network geeks, IPv6 is crap because...

"You should not be NATing at all on v6. It's true that 1:1 NAT is less terrible than masquerading, but it still involves rewriting addresses on packets. Just give your public addresses directly to your machines; I promise it's way less effort than NATing."

But also riskier since an outsider could sniff out the network topology by ID'ing a few machines, and without ephemeral outgoing addresses, machines can be back-hacked. That's why BOTH are now in the IPv6 spec, to protect against those prospects, both of which cropped up in the IPv4 Net. And neither of these can be easily blocked by the firewall, either (the former because all the info is gleaned from the outside, the latter because you're re-using an already-established connection).

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Charles 9
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Re: It's all Excel's fault

Still doesn't address the problem. Target device has a 128-bit IPv6 address. Source can only send 32-bit IPv4 addresses. It's like a native Frenchman trying to talk to a native German. Nothing in common, and you can't relay your way past the language barrier because IPv4 has no room for extensions that the (nonupgradeable) device can comprehend.

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Charles 9
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Re: IPv6 is fundamentally broken

"Apps on internal devices do not send IP addresses, they send to names."

Actually, ALL IP devices send to numbers. They MUST, as that's all the protocol recognizes. Names get sent to resolvers which return numbers for the app or device to use. But they can still break.

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Charles 9
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Re: Dear network geeks, IPv6 is crap because...

It does if you change things around, change providers, or move. Then you have to look everything up again.

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Charles 9
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Re: Dear network geeks, IPv6 is crap because...

"Eh, no. I just have to remember the "external" IP on the NAT box that gets me to the machine on the "inside"."

Unless you're trying to set it up, in which case you WILL need both internal and external addresses so that you can configure your gateways to reroute the connections.

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Charles 9
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Re: Dear network geeks, IPv6 is crap because...

"You should be getting enough address space to not need to NAT on v6"

The idea with NAT on IPv6 isn't to allow many machines to share one address (a one-to-many NAT) but to allow you to keep outsiders guessing about your network topology. NATs in IPv6 are meant to be one-to-one, taking advantage of the vast address space to scramble addresses in two ways.

One, outgoing connections get temporary IPv6 addresses, only good for those sessions. This helps prevent backtracking. Two, you can scramble the relations between external and internal IPs so that network snoops can't figure out hour your network is structured from the Internet-facing addresses listed. The Internet gurus don't mind one-to-one NAT because it preserves end-to-end connectivity (and thanks to the firewall that remains with IPv6, that connectivity remains yours to control or disable at your choice).

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Charles 9
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Re: Dear network geeks, IPv6 is crap because...

But doesn't V6 behind a one-to-one NAT mean you have to remember MORE addresses, because you have to remember TWO addresses PER node if they're Internet-facing, especially since with address scrambling (which is in the spec) there's no relation between the interior and exterior addresses, particularly if it's something like a gateway that wouldn't be allowed to use things like DNS (because it runs BELOW it) to smooth things over?

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Charles 9
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Re: Dear network geeks, IPv6 is crap because...

We're trying to future-proof the damn thing so we don't have to deal with this again in a few decades as uptake could spike and we jump from 48 bits gone to 64 bits gone faster than we go from 32 to 48. And before you say why won't we hit 128 bits gone, physical limits kick in. There just isn't enough matter in the universe to do that. That's why ZFS uses 128-bit limits.

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Researchers offer simple scheme to stop the next Stuxnet

Charles 9
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Re: Dangers of PLC firmware updates malware?

You infect the machine upon which the PLC code is written, hijack that code, then use low-level tricks to conceal this as the bad code is then passed on (can be via SneakerNet, so you CAN jump an air gap) to the PLC itself.

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Your next PC is… your 'Droid? Remix unveils Continuum-killer

Charles 9
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"And they were all capable of doing useful WORK."

Unless your definition of useful work is high-quality HD video encoding or 3D modeling work, in which case you're still gonna need more oomph.

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Charles 9
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I'll believe an Android phone can replace the desktop then it can do Crysis...3...at 60fps at full 1080p resolution or higher. THEN it'll have the oomph to replace my desktop.

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Beeps, roots and leaves: Car-controlling Android apps create theft risk

Charles 9
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Re: no car apps here

"That I strongly doubt. Yes, fobs can run out of battery but in my experience you tend to get at least a small warning where for a few days or weeks you have to press it a few times before it goes entirely. And yes, operating then with gloves can be a challenge."

I'm holding one for a Buick right now. Changed the battery twice and it STILL won't work, and I'm not paying $100 to get it replaced.

"Now I grant that water can block some frequencies used by key fobs, but frankly if the ice is that thick, you ain't even getting to the handle, forget about driving it today."

Way up north, driving in those kinds of conditions is considered de rigeur; you can't really call yourself a resident if you can't.

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Charles 9
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Re: because....

"If the time comes that I forget where I parked my car I know I have reached the inevitable age related crumbling mental state where driving is no longer a good travel option"

Until you realize it's your ONLY option...

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Charles 9
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Re: Why would anyone want to unlock the doors [remotely]

Then they change the signs and designations on you while you're away. Or you lose the note...or your wallet. Crap happens, and you may STILL need to find your car when you've lost all your clues on where it is.

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Connected car in the second-hand lot? Don't buy it if you're not hack-savvy

Charles 9
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Re: Newer cars are far more dangerous...

You underestimate the perceived skill level of the average driver (as in they always rate themselves a 10 out of 10). Heck, some of them probably wouldn't be scared of a spike in the steering wheel. Besides, what if you crash WHILE switching gears?

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Charles 9
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Re: Factory reset - default passwords and security

Because it doesn't make them money. They don't make money in secondhand sales most of the time, and as for costs associated with lawsuits, they figure their lawyers will let them dodge most of them.

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Charles 9
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Re: The criminals are already using this weakness

"It seems they hide a gizmo in the car to clone the signal for automatic garage doors which can then be operated remotely."

Hmm? But don't most garage door systems use rolling codes these days?

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Charles 9
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Re: Fingerprint readers

And what about gummy fingerprints and frog marches?

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Charles 9
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Re: to quote him, “identity management for devices is best served when it's centralised.”

Except what if you willingly or are coerced to give up your credentials, INCLUDING your certs?

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Charles 9
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Re: Now ask me why ...

"The entertaining part is that that also has an as yet unused positive byproduct: thorium, which can be used to make far safer nuclear power plants than the current uranium based ones."

Wanna bet? The thorium cycle produces Uranium-233. VERY weaponizable. Can't rule out a state being desperate enough to extract it. Not to mention U-233 is a real problem in cleanup time, as it's even MORE problematic than Pu-239.

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Charles 9
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Re: "Without naming the machine's maker"

"I would like to see it work with its fuse pulled."

Sure, only will you have a working car at that point. Never underestimate the deviousness of Big Brother so that one cannot disable the telemetry without disabling the device altogether: all or nothing.

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VPNs are so insecure you might as well wear a KICK ME sign

Charles 9
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Re: "It's just that few ISPs support IPv6 natively"

Probably something like a 6to4 tunnel, which can be autoconfigured by a magic number address to who-knows-where.

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A webcam is not so much a leering eye as the barrel of a gun

Charles 9
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Re: What works, what doesn't?

They may HAVE admin rights, you know, to pwn your machine. This can give them the ability to install replacement drivers (which they may do anyway to make the camera lie about it being turned off).

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Charles 9
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Re: When squirrels were squirrels and men were men

"Any software (trojan or other) can easily re-enable your webcam and send as much video as it wants. Putting something in front of the lens removes that possibility."

Unless, of course, what you think is the lens isn't really the lens and it's much more insidiously concealed in a spot where tape isn't an option. And no, you can't cut the wires off the camera without potentially bricking the machine...

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Charles 9
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Re: Black tape for the mic?

But it's also easiest to detect, meaning your OS will probably keep bit ching at you. At least it's not yet to the point that killing spy gear bricks your machine.

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Suffering ceepie-geepies! Do we need a new processor architecture?

Charles 9
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Even when the situation is FAR from predictable or typical?

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Charles 9
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Yes, but it MIGHT be nice for it to consider that, with cars bumper-to-bumper on the one side blocking that exit, that it may be preferable to try to ram the guardrail on the other side or navigate the otherwise-illegal "emergency opening" in the median, even if it was never taught this before. Perhaps, as a last resort, intentionally put itself on its side to present less cross-section to the oncoming truck and focus the meat towards the median. IOW, to think outside the box and find a third option through which the driver may be better able to escape with his/her life.

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Smash up your kid's Bluetooth-connected Cayla 'surveillance' doll, Germany urges parents

Charles 9
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Re: Take it apart

"Better still, some enterprising hacker should figure out what makes it tick, and trace all the circuitry to see if its all just hype or not."

And once you find out that the device is equipped with suicide circuits such that defeating the telemetry bricks the device?

And then you find out they're standard equipement in all the devices you can find in the store and online these days?

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Charles 9
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Re: Take it apart

"Interesting factoid, if you work for TLAs you can now get smoke detectors which "look" exactly like the real thing and even detect smoke/heat but have a small 1080p camera hidden inside them."

1080p? That's an improvement over the one I found at Amazon a couple years back. That only had 600TVL. Anyway, you don't have to be in a TLA to find such a camera. And yes, they ARE working smoke detectors, too.

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Cattle that fail, not pets that purr – the future of servers

Charles 9
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No, because we're considering beast-of-burden steer, not milking cows: whole other load of dung. Last I checked, team members aren't beasts of burden.

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US anti-encryption law is so 'braindead' it will outlaw file compression

Charles 9
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Re: @Robert Jenkins

Actually, they're still lossy. Because they're digital. The very process of ADC (which is needed to produce the bitstream) can be easily demonstrated to be lossy. Sure, a high-quality 24-bit 192KHz recording is not going to be THAT lossy, but it also won't capture every last harmonic or ultra-fine or ultra-high-frequency sound.

Take it even further, and you can claim that ALL recording is lossy because it involves a process in the analog world, and ANY process in the analog world can't be perfectly preserved.

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Charles 9
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Re: WTF?

I think it was "In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king." But the thing about election is that they suffer (like anything else communal in nature) from imbalance of knowledge. In fact, EVERY form of government is extremely prone to fatal corruption. Even democracy, which can be corrupted by fooling an uninformed electorate.

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Charles 9
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"The US has the highest per-capita prison population in the world, and you want to make it bigger? I'd suggest that as a policy it's not working, nor are US prisons cosy hotels that no one would want to leave."

Compared to some of the hellholes cons go through, they'll consider a US prison a paradise. Especially compared to prisons elsewhere in the world (or even within the US, consider some of the more infamous ones like Angola, Louisiana).

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'At least I can walk away with my dignity' – Streetmap founder after Google lawsuit loss

Charles 9
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And if you DON'T? And the addresses aren't obvious or prone to misspell malware attacks?

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Charles 9
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Re: Eat up or destroy the competition.

"Why is it that the only perceived options in the world are to eat up, destroy, or be destroyed? Survival of the fittest doesn't mean destroying everything else, because if you did there would be nothing to eat."

Because if you don't destroy the competition, some of them will start beating you to your lunch, meaning you don't get to eat, either. I mean, that's how it works in most other parts of nature. And we're still part of nature. Sure, there are some who would demand that businesses cater to their fellow man first (and if they can't make a buck while doing so, they're in the wrong line of work according to them), but businesses are just extensions of people, and people still have primal instincts such as to live, reproduce, and so on. What goes on beyond their little tribe (and remember, humans are more tribal than social),as long as they're not in the way, isn't really their concern. After all, a little altruism has as much chance of turning against you as going forward.

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Charles 9
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Re: The world does not need another mapping application !

"You might equally argue that it doesn't need another satellite based navigation system but I understand that currently the fourth is well on the way to being complete, and these are not exactly cheap."

They're also politically and militarily motivated. None of the owners of the four systems wants to be at the mercy of the other three, especially in the event of disagreements or even a conflict.

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Charles 9
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Re: You rate Here?

"HERE? Are you joking. They wanted £160+ per year for SatNav updates."

Since when? Last I checked, Here and its maps were free on Android.

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UK Snoopers' Charter gagging order drafted for London Internet Exchange directors

Charles 9
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Re: Virginia? Who lives in a place like this?

"One option would be to appoint willing canaries to the board. If they are suddenly unavailable for comment then conclusions can be drawn. I will not be putting my name forward, though."

Good thing, because those canaries would simply be compelled by court order to lie. That's always been the potential weakness of canaries: they can be compelled to sing...even if it means turning them into zombies first.

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Charles 9
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Re: High time to disconnect

Not necessarily. Think sensitive microphones, planes, and satellites. Bet you they can even Big Brother a total Luddite.

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Why I had to sue the FCC – VoIP granddaddy Dan Berninger

Charles 9
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Mushroom

Re: less gummint regulation is nearly always a good thing

I'm saying it's a possibility and not the only one. But I'm also saying that trying to get corruption out of any work of man is basically an intractable problem, and that has grave consequences for greater civilization (ANOTHER work of man).

And PS. No Joke Alert because I'm dead serious.

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Charles 9
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Re: We all lose

If that's so, why hasn't anyone gone the extra step of directly suing Comcast for deceptive trade practices? And for that matter, why hasn't anyone then attacked the FCC and FTC for failure to perform their duty? There ARE circumstances where US government bureaus can be sued for significant grievances.

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Charles 9
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Re: less gummint regulation is nearly always a good thing

I disagree. I say it SUPPORTS the supposition because ANY regulation, just like ANYTHING made by man, can be twisted and corrupted. Every form of government has fatal flaws. Even democracy can be corrupted by conning an unknowledgeable electorate.

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You know IoT security is bad when libertarians call for strict regulation

Charles 9
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Re: What kind of code

You're talking like an American...

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Charles 9
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Re: Your role in a movie is coming soon

I don't know about widows but consider the teen pregnancy rate.

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Charles 9
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Re: Former libertarian

"This however gets massively complex when we're discussing say, results from a scientific study done by a private university sponsored by government provided funding."

ESPECIALLY when the study was about sensitive stuff like potential dual-use biological agents, bringing up entirely-proper matters of sovereign security.

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FAKE BREWS: America rocked by 'craft beer' scandal allegations

Charles 9
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Re: Pomona ad astera re the heat

No, because ale tends to be stronger than a thin lager. That's what I said, just alcoholic enough that it doesn't aggravate the blood vessels yet at under 40 degrees quickly cools you down, which is what you need when you're already in a sweat (if what you say is true, it would do that with cold ANYTHING). Your body wouldn't counter this at this rate since it's already heading towards heat exhaustion territory. Thing is, thin lager may be f'n close to water, but it's NOT water. Plus remember one reason people tended to drink beer versus water: beer BOILS the water; sometimes you can't trust straight water.

OTOH, a full-bodied ale tends to better dilate your blood vessels (alcohol's a vasodilator), increasing blood flow and making you feel warmer. And since it's fermented and served at room temperature, you don't have the chilling effect that counters this. Thus why the English tend to stick to them given their colder climate.

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Charles 9
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Re: Pomona ad astera

Yeah, people are drinking them in hour climates and need BOTH the sedative effect of alcohol AND a way to beat the heat. That's why lagers are king in most of the US.

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BOFH: Password HELL. For you, mate, not for me

Charles 9
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And if they CALL BACK with an unblockable number?

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