* Posts by Charles 9

9966 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

For now, GNU GPL is an enforceable contract, says US federal judge

Charles 9
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I thought in the modern sense the Second World represented countries on the rise: having characteristics of BOTH First and Third World countries in terms of industrialization and domestic wealth but definitely on the track FROM Third TO First. For example, would one consider China and India First World (already heavily industrailized) or Second World (in progress)?

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Charles 9
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Re: That doesn't matter

Doesn't have to. The Berne Convention establishes common ground for copyright law, meaning in many ways South Korean and American copyright laws will coincide, and makes all signatories respect the copyrights of all other signatories. That's what makes licensing and transferring copyrighted works (such as movies and TV shows) from country to country so complicated.

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Charles 9
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Re: surely the GLP is, first and foremost, about copyright, not contracts

Except we're talking a publisher, a source of copies. Now the copyRIGHT in terms of what you can and can't do in terms of MAKING copies comes into play. The defendant is less a book OWNER than a book MAKER.

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Charles 9
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Re: That doesn't matter

But it would be unenforceable if the country in question didn't respect the other country's copyright law. Sovereign power overruling a foreign country's law.

But the thing is, South Korea IS signatory to the Berne Convention, MAKING it enforceable.

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74 countries hit by NSA-powered WannaCrypt ransomware backdoor: Emergency fixes emitted by Microsoft for WinXP+

Charles 9
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Re: GCHQ and Patches

Three words, repeated over and over:

Patches BREAK Things. Do you want the computer controlling the 6-to-7-figure MRI machine to be borked by a patch? Hard to believe, but a VERY real possibility.

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Charles 9
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Re: Executive summary

So if people have no choice but to use Windows due to contracts or exclusive software, the only option is to bend over?

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Charles 9
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Unless the BACKUPS got infected, too. That's a known tactic of sleeper malware.

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Charles 9
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Re: Every day is a learning day

"Yeah, we learned, yet again, that the internet is a playtoy which should be airgapped from critical systems."

Which is countered by the lesson that ANY air gap can be bridged or jumped, especially if someone wants it badly enough (in particular someone UP TOP).

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Charles 9
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Re: Is there any point in keeping GCHQ?

Yes, because any alternative could be FAR worse. Better the evil you know...

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Charles 9
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Re: Windows in the NHS

The problem lies when you prerequisite Linux...and get no offers.

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Charles 9
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Re: Mitigation against ransomware:

But IT doesn't control the budget, and the board doesn't like IT as they're a cost. So now what?

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Charles 9
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Re: Malwarebytes has a free desktop anti-ransomware available

But doesn't the malware simply target IT first before wreaking havoc. This one is noted to try to disable countermeasures.

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Charles 9
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Re: Social engineering?

Plus the last bit about not opening attachment from UNKNOWN sources. What if the infection is a spear-phish and the attachment actually comes from a KNOWN source, and in an expected format? Don't forget, infections through image files and PDFs are possible.

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Charles 9
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Re: Do we need attachments?

(Shakes head) Not practical because medical imagery is a routine attachment to medical e-mail, and some malcontents have been able to cause malware infections THROUGH graphics files. That's right. Files that aren't MEANT to have executable content (by their spec) get mangled to have and execute them anyway.

Now I'm just waiting for the malware that can pwn an e-mail program using nothing but embedded 7-bit ASCII code. Given the world we live in, I'm not holding out hope.

PS. HTML-based e-mail isn't necessarily a bad thing. A little formatting doesn't hurt, but the problem is that HTML e-mail clients throw in too much of the spec. If clients were to instead pare back their HTML e-mail parsers to a spartan subset of the language (basic formatting tags, table formatting, MAYBE support for attached graphics, and NO accessible or inline external links), then it wouldn't be such a big issue.

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Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

Charles 9
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Re: this is the best FB article Ive read in a long time

What about family whose ONLY connection to society is through Facebook because everything else costs money they can't afford (calls and SMS cost per, no e-mail, but FB free from the carrier)? And for some, cutting ties is not an option due to moral and social responsibility (a lot of the bespoke are Asians with very strong sense of family).

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Charles 9
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Re: A decentralised facebook

Stuff like BitTorrent is selective. People only share what they're trying to collect and what they WANT to share. What you propose is more like Freenet, which demands you keep a certain amount of storage to share. This results in constant churn that eats into data caps. Doesn't BitMessage have the same issue?

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Charles 9
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Re: Remember

"Chiquita. Quite possibly the world's perfect food." I've seen ads for Del Monte bananas as well, covering most of the banana market.

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Charles 9
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And if they won't learn and they're too close to alienate (ex. How do you approach it if it's your MOTHER?)?

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Charles 9
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Re: It's a tool...just like a chainsaw!

They weren't REAL cyberbullies. The REAL ones would plunder FB for your NON-FB details and then assault you OUTSIDE FB, sometimes even to real life, using the Internet as a screen to avoid being nabbed by the plids.

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Charles 9
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Re: Everyone who uses Facebook is being emotionally monitored.

Besides, other users could be filtering the crap for Facebook, letting it know which info is real and which is not. But of course, it doesn't bother to tip its hand to anyone else.

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Charles 9
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Re: Remember

"What I mean is that despite how 'clever' these marketers are, you can always choose not to buy anything they advertise. For example and for various reasons (that I won't go into now - this isn't supposed to be a rant), I won't buy anything made by Sony, regardless of where and how their advertising appears."

Yes, but what happens when EVERY company that produces something you need advertises? You've just blacklisted yourself out of the entire market. For example, EVERY car company advertises. EVERY wire service advertises. Heck, it's hard to find a company that DOESN'T advertise, since the eyeball exposure is practically essential to stay in business, especially when starting out. About the only two areas where ads aren't needed are extremely generic stuff (like paperclips and staples) and extremely niche stuff where word of mouth is the primary advertising method.

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WannaCrypt ransomware snatches NSA exploit, fscks over Telefónica, other orgs in Spain

Charles 9
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Re: Does this mean

I've mentioned this dilemma before? You either get pwned by malware or you get pwned by Microsoft. And if your software has no non-Windows alternatives, it's down to pick your poison.

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Charles 9
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But what if they WANT to be part of breaking the Internet...or simply don't care?

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Charles 9
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Re: WTF ..., WT actual F ?????

So what happens when a patch for a Cat I vulnerability broke something critical in the process, creating a dilemma because the critical machine was inoperable either way?

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PC repair chap lets tech support scammer log on to his PC. His Linux PC

Charles 9
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Re: The beauty of virtual machines

It's called snapshotting. You store a specific state of virtual machine and simply revert to it each time you finish your session. Even VirtualBox has such a feature.

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Mozilla to Thunderbird: You can stay here and we may give you cash, but as a couple, it's over

Charles 9
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Re: It's the 21st Century: Outside of Work, Email is dead

"Sorry to hear that. I don't use Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp &c. Period. It's not a "youth thing," it's simple common sense."

The trouble lies with your last two words. They're an oxymoron.

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Charles 9
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Oh? If that were true, why is Gmail STILL so popular?

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Uber is a taxi company, not internet, European Court of Justice advised

Charles 9
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Do hire cars count as cabs for that law?

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Charles 9
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Oh... (blushes)

Turns out what I'm talking about is unique to my area.

But it DOES exist: http://www.appacab.us/

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Charles 9
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Re: Remind me again what the ex-labour cabinet are doing now?

"Rather like Turkey?

One of the better reasons for Brexit."

And that's why I say the laws in the end are just ink on a page. If you can amass enough power, you can ignore those laws and replace them with your own.

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Charles 9
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Re: Remind me again what the ex-labour cabinet are doing now?

Nah, you just end up with a coup as the people in power shoot the shooters and seize power to avoid being shot.

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Charles 9
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Re: Remind me again what the ex-labour cabinet are doing now? (@ Charles 9)

Isn't that an oxymoron, though, which is why it's never happened for very long in recorded history?

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Charles 9
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"Are uber drivers beholden to uber or can they also work for lyft? (I don't know) If they can, then they would be economically independent from Uber."

The point being if they use the Uber app, they ARE beholden to Uber. They may be able to switch apps, but the paychecks come from the provider, NOT from the passenger. The fare rates come from the app, NOT from the drivers. If the passenger paid the driver directly at a mutually-agreed rate, and then Uber and Lyft were to BILL them for services rendered in matchmaking, that would be a whole other story, and I believe this is true for apps that legitimate cab companies use (like App-A-Cab) to matchmake.

" is that different from any employment agency going out to market via its website and saying, "I know of a network admin you can have at $x/day. Let me know if you want me to send him for an interview and I'll take a cut of the final payments"?"

Thing is, the temporary or contracted employee normally has to already comply with whatever regulations are attendant with his/her position. Employment agencies can't just pluck any old Tom, Dick, and Harry out of the street and farm them out as network admins or constructions workers or whatever.

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Charles 9
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Re: Remind me again what the ex-labour cabinet are doing now?

Then how do they find proper candidates without interfering with their lives? Pulling a farmer from his fields or some other worker from the job he/she depends on to sustain a living is generally seen as a Bad Thing. What options do you have when the ONLY people willing to take on the job ARE those who seek public office?

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Oz MP flies crypto-kite, wants backdoors without backdoors

Charles 9
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Re: Explain it sloooooooowly...

That's the RED Pill. The Blue Pill commits you back into the Matrix.

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Charles 9
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Re: Explain it sloooooooowly...

And if they STILL don't get it, nor does anyone else you can conceivably elect?

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Could US appeals court save us all from 10 years of net neutrality yelling?

Charles 9
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Re: "reduce the American life expectancy"

But there's a delicate balance. TOO MANY and you end up with dead-enders, and dead-enders, desperate for bread on the table, turn to crime. That means you need more police presence, which cost money you can't squeeze from the unemployed. Plus police may get honest streaks and turn on you. If you don't increase police presence, you're likely to get more riots and the attendant damages. Not to mention reputation problems if the crime gets more organized. Gang issues are already rampant in parts of the country; no one feels like a return to the Roarin' 20's. And then there's the whole welfare issue. That's why I mentioned Social Security.

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Charles 9
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If you read Article V, you will find it would take a two-thirds majority in BOTH houses to pass a Joint Resolution supporting this. THEN you would need three-fourths of the State Legislatures to pass the same resolution. The last time that happened was 50 years ago with the 26th Amendment, which was fast-tracked due to student protests over the Vietnam War (it lowered the voting age to 18; before then, people were old enough to be drafted to die but not old enough to vote for the people making those decisions). The Congressional environment then was nothing like it is now. A hyper-partisan Congress agreeing on such a divisive topic would be less likely than the Inferno freezing. Frankly, if we DID have the power to Amend the Constitution, there'd be A LOT more than just Net Neutrality we'd codify.

PS. The 27th Amendment doesn't count, as that one actually passed Congress around the same time as the Bill of Rights but never given the state legislature ratification until 25 years ago--long story.

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Rich professionals could be replaced by AI, shrieks Gartner

Charles 9
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Re: AI - No such thing,... yet

Then again, can you expect the same from a meatbag lawyer? That same question could stymie them unless they OWN such a vehicle. Remember, career specialists tend to be one-trick ponies. Some lawyers and doctors can't handle computers decently, so keep that in mind.

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Charles 9
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Re: In five years we could have Triage AI

"Yes, but courtroom action only accounts for a small fraction of the law. "

It may be a small fraction, but it's considered the most sensitive (and by some standards the most important) as well. After all, even the highest court in the land runs on advocacy. As I recall, those are also the highest-paid positions because those jobs are less algorithm and more artistry.

Not arguing all the rest because I agree with you. All the humdrum paralegal work can be taken up by computers and expert systems, but for the time being AIs can't do charisma or get past Uncanny Valley, so the lawyers who work in the courts are still safe. Just as the surgeons are still safe because their degree of training, skill, and judgment is not yet attainable by machines. Can't say the same about the first-liners, though.

As others have noted, other kinds of skills still favor humans: particularly skills that require versatility and/or dexterity. Site repair work (plumbers, electricians, etc.) rarely involves the same actions from one job to the next and often require working in contorted positions you wouldn't think was possible for a human to make. And as noted with court lawyers, human-to-human interaction will remain critical for some time to come, meaning a robot caregiver for the elderly is pretty much off the cards.

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Charles 9
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Re: In five years we could have Triage AI

Taste is often associated with smell, and a bad smell or taste that emits from inside a body may be a clue to something. Don't count it out.

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Charles 9
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Re: In five years we could have Triage AI

"But I'd still wager than within a handful of years AI diagnosis will be at least as good as the last three GPs I've seen, none of whom inspired the slightest confidence that they had done a better job than me+internet."

I am going to agree that if computers and "AI" are going to make headway in these highly-skilled professions, it'll be in the lowest rungs of the ladder: triage and first-line medicine (where expert systems can help to sort out incoming patients) and basic paralegal work (humdrum lookup stuff). Surgeons won't be going away because their work is too delicate and too specialized (and can frequently need ALL of the surgeon's senses to avoid mistakes). Meanwhile, court lawyers (or barristers in the English system) engage in human-to-human interaction: between judges, juries, etc. Uncanny Valley prevents any non-human from being effective there.

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Unpaid tech contractor: 'I have to support my family. I have no money for medicines'

Charles 9
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That's assuming you HAVE a war chest? What if you get hit hard right out of the gate or due to market pressures have to spend all you earn just to maintain, meaning there's nothing left to build a war chest and you can't negotiate for higher rates because then you get undercut and end up with NOTHING?

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Just 99.5 million nuisance calls... and KeurBOOM! A £400K megafine

Charles 9
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Re: Can't pay?

Trouble is, those with the money also know how to keep their money: mostly by finding ways around the regulations and rules. Such as changing identities or fleeing to a different sovereignty.

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There be dragons? Why net neutrality groups won't go to Congress

Charles 9
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Re: just wait till midterms

Except that the 2018 Senate elections are heavily weighted against Democrats. 25 Democrats face re-election compared to 8 Republicans, and the latter are more Republican-loyal than the former Democrat-loyal. It's impossible for Democrats to win a Cloture majority and hard to win an outright one while the Republicans could easily improve their majority to Cloture and could even on an outside change get it all the way to Override (two-thirds, which is also the majority needed to pass a proposed Amendment).

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Crooks can nick Brits' identities just by picking up the phone and lying

Charles 9
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Re: Bank security is a complete joke

"If your password was guessed and you don't know it, then a malicious actor has already done whatever they're going to do to you."

Not necessarily. Consider APTs. By going a little at a time, over a longer period, they could smurf you and slip under your notice. Furthermore, what if your account is but a stepping stone to a higher-level account? Again, that could take time to crack, so ongoing access would be important for them. Thing is, they can't alert you to the fact they can access you, so they can't change your credentials, so what if you force the issue?

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Charles 9
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Re: Bank security is a complete joke

But the thing is, what if your password was guessed and you don't know that? Periodic password changes help to deal with such unknown compromises: either by closing the door or making you aware of it. Can you think of a better way, especially for people with bad memories?

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Android O-mg. Google won't kill screen hijack nasties on Android 6, 7 until the summer

Charles 9
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Re: Most users...

You overestimate the intelligence of the average Android user. Think VTR clocks even in the age of clock signals on the telly, and they can't even do THAT right half the time. Yes, sometimes even a few simply touches is beyond them.

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Take a sneak peek at Google's Android replacement, Fuchsia

Charles 9
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Re: Itanium??

The correct term these days is x86-64, or x64 for short.

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Charles 9
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Re: Silky smooth?

You talk as if everyone uses the same 10% of the OS everyday. If that were true, productivity apps wouldn't be as wide-ranging as they are now, including LibreOffice.

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