* Posts by Charles 9

10428 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

'Password rules are bullsh*t!' Stackoverflow Jeff's rage overflows

Charles 9
Silver badge

"Yes, anything you care about should be protected by a strong 2nd factor - but it's supposed to be precisely that a second factor. Something you know, and something you have. So the password is still very relevant."

But what if you don't HAVE a second factor: not even a cell phone, because you keep LOSING things? Or you don't trust cell phones? And as for those fobs, what was that RSA hack about again?

1
1

Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I'll pay the extra.

That assumes you get a choice in the matter...

6
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Won't past muster.

HIPAA is non-waivable much as ADA isn't, but this Act will create loopholes.

3
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Remind me again - the Republicans are the party that believes an individual should be free to live their life without interference from the state?"

And they're REMOVING state interference. They're doing nothing about PRIVATE interference, though.

6
2

MAC randomization: A massive failure that leaves iPhones, Android mobes open to tracking

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: MAC address changes are pointless because

And is that why RTS can't lie, because at some point the AP has to know the real MAC and there's no way in the spec to prevent it asking early?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

While even a class A network has the same 24-bit subnet limit, consider the Birthday Problem.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Is there a reason RTS isn't spoofed? Is there some requirement for this in wireless certification?

0
0

Sir Tim Berners-Lee refuses to be King Canute, approves DRM as Web standard

Charles 9
Silver badge

"I remember Adobe giving away Photoshop with breakfast cereals (almost) to ensure their market share and put down Digital Darkroom. IT doesn't seem to have done them any harm."

Are we talking the same Adobe whose key software is now subscribed instead of sold? Much like Office is now subscribed instead of sold? Sounds like what I've said: a movement from selling to leasing.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"The only way it could work is if the content delivery company encrypts a video feed to a secure monitor and that is not going to happen."

Have you tried looking up HDCP 2.0? The requirements for 4K BluRay players? Both require end-to-end encryption (from player to monitor), and PCs are completely locked out of this loop (exactly BECAUSE users have control of them). Plus, last I checked, trying to capture a raw 4Kx2K screen in realtime involves a pretty intense amount of bandwidth.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

That app tended to be Flash and Silverlight, which also meant Linux tends to get locked out of the loop. You really want to go back to stuff like that?

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

"They're doing that themselves. Seriously, £13 to see a film at the cinema? Plus the £1 extra for the extra 6 inches of legroom, and the £1 extra for the "Blockbuster surcharge" if it's the opening weekend... plus the £millions it costs for popcorn, sweets, drinks etc... it's a £20 trip each time."

And yet people are willing (yeah, even eager) to pay up. The latest Wolverine film Logan is ranked #4 among R-rated movies on opening weekend (the #1 in the US as of now happens to be another Marvel film: Deadpool). Sounds to me like we have less say than we think. People are voting with their wallets, and we're losing.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: And will this DRM realise its been run in a VM and is a chocolate teapot?

First, it's a TRANS-crypter, so the output is still encrypted.

Second, you need an HDMI 2.0-level output (which means HDCP-2.0+) to still receive 4K above film rate. Otherwise, it's downscaled (1.4 only has support for 4K at film rate). So you still have the same problem. Also, compared to 2.2, 2.0 is lossy (4:4:4 to 4:2:0). Plus they may block 1.4 down-conversion for protection reasons, only allowing 4K at 2.0 and up.

Third, have you seen the price tag?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Any Restriction Placed on the Internet

They said the same thing about photocopying bank notes. Guess what? They found a way through watermarking and then mandating detectors into the printing (or in the video case, encoder chip) logic.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Say bye bye to private infromation

"Starforce had the potential to be exploited in such a manner as to shift the balance in the control of information around the world, with Catastrophic results had it still existed in that format in today's political environment. Do we really want to hand that sort of control to our browsers?"

Trouble is, they'll insist and withhold content if they don't get their way. And remember, we're not the majority who willingly pay bookoo bucks to sit down in crowded, noisy cinemas and pay robber's fees for cheap junk food. If you're surrounded by idiots, you're basically outvoted. You lose.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Given the anarchy given by the IoT, a stateful Internet where anonymity is nigh-impossible will probably be the next step.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: All the whining in the world - 2

But then again, is it worth it? Is it really a jail if no one WANTS to leave? After all, the planet is pretty much a jail, too, since we can't live in space and we lack the tech or know-how to leave for the near future.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The stupid thing is....

One, the images can be watermarked to block camming (that's how Cinavia and the like work, they can be built into the encoder chips so they can't be circumvented--the codecs are under patent and can be licensed with conditions), and two, there's still a loss of quality involved crossing the analog gap this way, especially with stuff like 4K where details are important, and there's still the need for extraordinary conditions to ensure a consistent result (one good shake and your shot is...shot). That's why cams are almost always either a last resort or the realm of the impatient.

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "NOTHING beats FREE"

"Rubbish, Charles. CONVENIENCE beats free. Fandom and the desire to support your favourite content creators ALSO beats free. All an artist has to do is build a relationship with their fans, and provide their works in an easy to use, easy to transfer manner. Of course, that won't keep the coke train running for the increasingly-irrelevant middlemen. Tough shit for them."

Not necessarily. Haters gonna hate, and life on tour isn't what it used to be. Billy Joel's first #1 hit, "Piano Man," was based on the night he was just scraping doing playing in a bar. Many can't even get beyond that point and just fade into obscurity and you never hear about them. If you say tough shit for the middlemen (who you usually NEED to really get past the tour life due to their connections), you're basically saying tough shit for live music because that's life. Sometimes, the only way to make it is to make a deal with the devil; sad but true.

0
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: All the whining in the world...

"And what would ge the result? Well, nothing really. There will still be new content created and distributed. If you knew anything about history you'd know that there weren't even copyright laws back when the greatest creative geniuses the world has seen were creating wonderful art. Mozart, Shakespeare, Haydn, and Beethoven, for example: they all created great works anyway. No DRM, not even copyright."

Yes, but then the common people didn't have access to them. They were all commissioned...by the RICH. Want to go back to those days when art was only done by commission by the rich who could afford the artists' price demands?

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Because phones aren't general purpose computing devices despite all claims to the contrary? Secondly they're not as secure as you might think - keys *can* be retrieved from them if they were worth the effort."

But risky. Many of those keys are housed in suicide circuits (think FIPS-compliant modules) which wipe if you try to read them directly. And the effort clearly isn't worth the reward at this point since even new smartphones with the feature built-in (not to mention things like ARM's TrustZones) would make very attractive targets yet they haven't been broken. This may have to do with the most fundamental signature checks being against ROM, making them impossible to defeat without performing a preimage attack (and if you can pull off a preimage attack, there are government agencies that would like to talk to you).

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The stupid thing is....

"And go after the major profitable pirating organisations and leave the students alone."

Most of the pirating organizations live in countries hostile to the West, making apprehending them nigh-impossible (because those states are tacitly encouraging them).

"The reality of the medium is that its copyable. Learn to live with it. Copyright is, today, completely unenforceable. That is the lesson the music business had to learn with the demise of the 'studio album' bands."

4K BluRays can't be copied. They're encrypted end-to-end, including the player and the display. Unless they can break the end-to-end encryption used on many smartphones, DHCP 2.0 should remain strong for a while (yes, even the master key has a safeguard since many movie discs are serialized and require Internet registration). The 4K rips you see now come from WebRips, not BDRips.

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The stupid thing is....

They don't care about screeners there since most of the quality will be lost. They care about screeners in cinemas since it breaks their timetables.

0
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

"This isn't actually strictly true, and effective DRM isn't actually possible. It's just shit to put in browsers for the sake of putting it in. If it can be built it can be broken."

Oh? How come they can't do that with smartphones, then? There are still plenty of phones for which custom OS's are impossible because they use CPUs with mandated black-boxed encryption (the key is stored in the CPU and not accessible directly) that enforces signature checking and the like?

0
7
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Seriously, screw the media cartels."

You REALLY want to screw the media cartels? There's only one way they'll listen. Get lots of people to stop going to cinemas.

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: insanity

"What big content want is end-to-end control of the entire distribution channel. This includes them having the ability to run arbitrary code on your machines. No doubt they will also continue lobbying until they get the next piece of the puzzle: namely, being able to bring you to court if you try to circumvent these "protections" on devices that you and you alone own."

WRONG. They'll fix that by making it so you only LEASE them and make it a Hobson's Choice so you have no other option. If you REALLY want to make the movie companies pay attention, convince people to boycott cinemas and stop watching ANY movies in ANY form. Only when you can hit them in their most lucrative money stream will they notice you.

1
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Better than plugins

"That's an important distinction, and it costs us absolutely nothing, other than having to show a bit of backbone."

Except it's all hollow bravado. The content providers are the types who hear, "Over my dead body," and respond, "If you insist..."

IOW, sometimes you have to pick your fights. And since people still flock to cinemas, we wouldn't win that fight. The average joe wouldn't be able to tell the difference and frankly wouldn't give a rodent's donkey about whether or not it's an open standard or not. Gimme my movie is all they want, which is why Netflix is making a killing, too, IN SPITE of proprietary standards.

1
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "NOTHING beats FREE"

Tell that to World of Goo. He released a game cheap as chips and people STILL pirated it, EXTENSIVELY. And he had proof of it, too.

2
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Yes, they do. They ONLY cede those rights when the copyright expires. That's why their name is attached. And we're talking about how new releases which are MEANT to be within copyright's purview.

2
5

FBI boss: 'Memories are not absolutely private in America'

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: There is a four word answer to all this.

Prohibition can work. You just have to make the penalty too steep for lawbreakers to accept the risk. Going to jail for making moonshine is one thing. What if you were shot on sight instead?

0
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Anyone can be compelled

Unless, of course, someone comes along who has a nuke and is not afraid to use it. When civilization runs into overwhelming force, it doesn't exactly turn out pretty, as many coups have demonstrated.

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Anyone can be compelled

And what if they decide to bugger YOU with it instead? After all, in the final analysis, the law is just ink on a page...

1
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Er ...

Until you're faced with a perjury charge. Remember the oath you must take before you testify: the truth, the WHOLE truth, and NOTHING BUT the truth. You lie (outright or by omission--half the truth, twice the lie as they say) at your own peril because they could have ways to back up their claims that don't necessarily involve you.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Damned right, Comey!! Widespread encryption is Snowden's fault!!

Weren't women's tongues chopped off, among other things, in the distant past?

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Not really. More a logical extension. Civilization is overrated given the natural human tendency.

3
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Trust your government?

"Come back and talk to me when you've repealed the 1st, 5th and 14th amendments. Then maybe I can introduce you to the 2nd."

They could just ignore the whole bloody think as "ink on a page". As for the 2nd, they'll see your guns and raise you a few nukes.

2
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Er ...

What about the Fourth Amendment that prohibits unreasonable search and seizure?

10
0

One IP address, multiple SSL sites? Beating the great IPv4 squeeze

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: End to end is a myth

Here's a VERY simple test for you. Run a VirtualBox VM on your machine, with network add-ons included. The virtual machine can reach your machine and vice versa, this IN SPITE of both machines carrying different RFC1918 IPs in different subnets (yours is usually in the 192. range, VB uses the 10. range). This means, as long as you know how to route it (and the ISP would know how since you subnet to them), they can reach you if something doesn't get in the way first, and NAT doesn't get in the way here.

0
2

Windows Server ported to Qualcomm's ARM server chip. Repeat, Windows Server ported to ARM server chip

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: u-boot

"You also must worry, can you trust the compiler you are using (i.e. Ken Thompson's Reflections on Trusting Trust) Someone built the GCC version you are using, and if you use it to recompile GCC from clean source, that's no guarantee the result isn't compromised."

There are ways to deal with that, too. There's been a rebuttal to that paper that describes a way to use cross-compiling to detect a rogue compiler. But again, a rogue compiler is the least of your worries if you have to deal with compromised but patented high-performance hardware (meaning no alternative suppliers available) forced upon us by hostile sovereign state actors. At this point, it's not possible to have a completely-open high-performance system design (which you need often in servers). Too much of the low-level stuff is still protected.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Open BIOS? - why ?

Except we're talking below that. As in what boots u-boot? That's the kind of thing I'm referring. In the PC world, the power-on points the CPU to the BIOS or EFI which usually takes care of the initial boot. Thus why splash screens and so on. As I understand, in most ARM setups, the initial boot target works somewhat similarly, aiming for a mapped memory location: a specific region of memory usually linked to a ROM to provide the first-stage bootloader which goes from there. It's a sort of "Your Mileage May Vary" thing, but it's enough to point out that there's a different set of legacy baggage with ARM systems than with x86 systems.

4
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Open BIOS?

Since ARM systems come from a whole different ecosystem, one based on memory maps and fixed hardware designs, basic operations and enumerated buses are likely to be approached from a whole other angle, one that may see something completely different from a BIOS like x86 does. After all, PC-based Macs didn't have to wrestle with that kind of stuff and went straight to EFI, just to name an example.

Having said that, you can't be sure there isn't some kind of uber-root mode hidden in ANY kind of system, regardless of the architecture. Indeed, they may reside in an even lower level than that: say in the network chips.

6
0

RadioShack bankruptcy savior to file for, you guessed it, bankruptcy

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Aw. Nothing like the smell of hot solder --

Unless you happen to be OUT and you need an EXACT match.

Or you run out of solder or flux.

Or your soldering iron dies out.

Don't expect stuff of that sort at your local Walmart or Best Buy. And the nearest dedicated electrical parts store other than RS has eclectic hours and is a half-hour drive minimum. Come to think of it, I don't even know if it's still around. Been so long.

PS. And around here, guaranteed delivery costs 10 times more than the part. Better to pay the sales tax.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Aw. Nothing like the smell of hot solder --

Unless, of course, it's the day off and you're doing a rush repair job that needs a little component and you can't wait on an overnight (because then you're back at work and the spouse will get mad). When it comes to something that absolutely MUST be done by the end of the day, you can't beat brick-and-mortar places.

1
0

Ex penetrated us almost 700 times through secret backdoor, biz alleges

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Temptation is a terrible thing...

""Anger is a wind that blows out the lamp of the mind" - Robert Ingersoll."

Ah, but wind doesn't always blow out a flame. Sometimes it stokes it instead. After all, wind is a bane to firefighters, not a boon.

0
1

Scammers hired hundreds of 'staff' to defraud TalkTalk customers

Charles 9
Silver badge

But according to the article, they sometimes DO use actual stolen account information.

0
0

YouTube TV will be huge. Apple must respond

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Once you have accustomed people to watch things for free...

What if it turns people off instead? I for one don't like being pushed. The best products sell themselves, after all.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Nice advert you have there.

It still may be worth it to plenty. I know plenty of people who aren't team-loyal but simply watch what's available. I'm one of them, and what I want from sports is a close contest; it doesn't matter who's playing. As for the other channels, people may be able to live without the likes of Animal Planet, and while the unbundled Internet price goes up another $10, that's more than offset by the fact that $50/month is the bare minimum price for just local channels and a few essentials like CNN. The usual cable TV bill is closer to the $100 range as I've said, especially now that cable TV's all digital which means cable-ready TVs really aren't anymore, meaning box rentals of nearly $10/month per TV (and most households have at least two because the spouse doesn't want to be held hostage over channel choice). Then there's the additional $10/month charge if you want to record shows (more if you want more at a time), taxes, extra fees, etc. Trust me, I took a long and hard look at all those associated fees just last month because I was restructuring my subscription in a bid to save money. Jumping wasn't practical because the two other providers in my neighborhood have basically settled into a cartel with the first, and their overall rates aren't different enough. In my particular case I wouldn't want YouTube TV because I like to personally record my shows (at least by sticking I have access to an unencrypted HD stream I can run to a PVR box), but not everyone's in the same boat.

0
0

Wearables aren't dead but apps on wearables might be

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Most classes of useless products fail quietly

"For example 3d on an LG 4k OLED is the best version of the tech yet, but by the time it was available, the industry was about to give up on 3D and now it's been canned, so nobody gets to enjoy it."

But the odds are the fad would just fade anyway. It's not what people really wanted, which is lightfield 3D voxels a la The Jetsons where you didn't need glasses (problematic if you already wear them) or particular positioning (which kills lenticulars like Nintendo's 3DS) to work. Sure, there are fans, but there were plenty of detractors, too. I'm among them since watching Avatar through those polarized glasses was underwhelming and gave me a headache.

0
0

BONG! Lasers crack Big Ben frequency riddle BONG! No idea what to do with this info BONG!

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Puzzled why they went up the tower steps

"Pah! They've been bouncing lasers off reflectors on the moon since the 1970's. And IIRC measured moonquakes with them too."

But to what level of precision? I believe the precision needed with the Big Ben experiment was on the scale of sub-millimeters. Could they measure the deflection of the lunar surface during a moonquake to the micrometer?

0
0

Autonomous cars are about to do to transport what the internet did to information

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Wrong Problem

No, because you still need the same amount of road infrastructure as you would now, simply because the roads you use now are the SAME roads bulk transportation needs to get everything everyWHERE. That's the weak link with trains: they can't go the last mile. That includes to your driveway or mailbox.

0
1

Li-ion king Goodenough creates battery he says really is... good enough

Charles 9
Silver badge

The problem with the tech is that it's not very energy-dense. Thus why you have to use honking big containers. It's rather cumbersome for anything below distribution-level storage. It's also rather temperature-sensitive and not very useful in potentially-cold climates (below 10°C) because you suffer crystallization that cold.

0
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017