* Posts by Charles 9

11114 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Facebook has its uses ...

And before that, there was Freenet as well. But there's always a catch. There's a reason there aren't a lot of genuine Bitcoin clients (as in they download the ledger) these days: bandwidth costs. Freenet, yacy, diaspora, all of them have that unfortunate side effect: they kill you on the data usage, many of which don't have the luxury.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Life without facebook is easy!

It gets much worse than that. Many realize the costs AND DON'T CARE. It's like risk takers and drug users. Who wants to live forever?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Just say NO to Social Media sites/apps

The problem comes when you realize NONE of the choices available are worth it. If you choices are down to a demon, a devil, and a mind flayer, people get desperate.

2
0

Amazing new boffinry breakthrough: Robots are eating our brains

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Humanity Optional

Even if the robot builders sent out robots to mine out the Solar System (starting with the asteroid belt, probably), they still wouldn't give. Why give out everything when you can use a bit to safeguard the rest against the proles? Like you, I feel there will come a point when the have-everythings will simply close off the walled garden, abandon the rest of us, and hash it out amongst themselves instead.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"This may all sound very much science fiction, but in reality think not! Most of what we are seeing today was pure science fiction just a few decades ago. Back in the 1960's when advanced computer systems were starting to show their presence these were an impressive advancement from what was in existence in the 1950's. The rate of advancement is exponential. Moor's Law which dictates the advancing rate of information being doubled."

Thing is, Sci-Fi can still MISS. We still haven't cracked the FTL problem, meaning we can't leave this dustball yet, plus Moore's Law is showing cracks as we reach the physical limits of the electron. And where's my cheap flying car, ubiquitous energy, and food synthesizer?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Ned Ludd is dead

But even assholes can be convinced to defect. If not an appeal to better sense, then perhaps blackmail or threats to things they hold dear (and even assholes will hold SOME things dear).

Machines are a lot more difficult to turn around, especially if they're restricted in methods of input.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "examines whether educational methods and institutions can keep pace"

But doesn't the Lamarckian model run into trouble in regards to improvements? Machines haven't yet made the significant leap towards self-improving (in the mechanical sense) machinery. Improvements at this point still take innovations and leaps of intuition still only possible in humans.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Ned Ludd is dead

"Yes, it would be nice for companies to wake up a bit to the fact that society is stable only as long as the underclass (99% of us) are fed and employed. We don't riot, we don't set fire to their houses and pull them out for a lynching."

And that's assuming the 1% don't simply respond with Terminators or automated massacre machines.

5
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Not sure what to make of this..

You assume anyone can just jump ahead of the curve. What do you tell the people who simply can't jump? "Tough luck, game over, better luck next life."?

9
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: A corporate tax on profits is not enough. We need a robot tax

Trouble is, the corporates control the governments. How do you intend to institute a productivity tax with them in control? Furthermore, since corporates aren't people, how do you prevent them simply passing it on to the consumers in the form of higher prices? That's always been the bug-a-boo about taxing businesses. There's nothing preventing them passing it on.

3
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "examines whether educational methods and institutions can keep pace"

When you get right down to it, the list of jobs that absolutely require a meatbag presence is pretty short and getting shorter. Most of them are liaison-type jobs like personal caregivers where any attempt at substitution runs afoul of Uncanny Valley. Others will probably involve "no two jobs the same" types where the versatility of the human body is still an advantage.

2
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The workforce of the future?

Everyone talks about this "post-scarcity" stuff when there's more than one thing that can be scarce. How about space to live? Or how about space needed to locate and extract all the resources all of us need to live? Does all that "post-scarcity" talk take all the other things we need into consideration?

3
1

After years of warnings, mobile network hackers exploit SS7 flaws to drain bank accounts

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Insider

"Overly broad statement.

Encryption done right would make whatever was grabbed of dubious use when compared to cost of acquisition, I would think."

Except if chips like the Motorola 68000 were considered state of the art at the time, not to mention pretty damn expensive (think about how much a Macintosh cost at its debut--it used a 68000), you kinda hit a technological wall. Even if the technology was available and ubiquitous at the time (I think the closest we had was encrypted satellite communications), the pace of technological advancement means security tech doesn't age very well.

For another thing, there are those for whom money isn't as great an object when it comes to cracking stuff like this. Especially if backed by something like a hostile state (consider: the Cold War was still on at the time).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Well actually the reason was different

"This story actually highlights another problem, and that is that SMS is completely unencrypted, except for the last air interface from the tower to your mobile phone. It never should have been used for anything even remotely resembling security."

Given the age of the underlying technologies, security really couldn't be considered (too far back in time, too intensive and not advanced enough to be practical), nor can it be considered now without a complete top-to-bottom overhaul of the system, as there is basically NO system in use today that can't be compromised. Indeed, no system known to man can do much against an insider.

5
0

US copyright law shake-up: Days of flinging stuff on the web and waiting for a DMCA may be over

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Copyright duration

"Why should the latter be penalised because they didn't write a pot-boiler instead?"

The same things can be said of INVENTORS. Is it his or her fault for inventing something too far ahead of its time? Why don't they get the same luxury?

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

You can always LICENSE, which at least gives the author some power of revocation. To a big firm with no other options, it can become a case of "Better 10% of something than 100% of nothing."

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Copyright duration

Not really. Why should a work be protected for so long, especially if made early in life? It would perhaps be best if an author not be allowed to rest on his or her laurels. After all, inventors never got the same privilege.

6
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Any attempt at a watermark would be met with attempts to REMOVE the watermark. Plus copies can be intercepted before the watermark phase. Since a lot of work goes between filming and final encode, it can't be done in the filming phase for risk of being mangled in post.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

It used to be 20 years IIRC, and the pace of technology should force the terms to be reconsidered in that light, similar to patents. Also, copyrights and patents should be non-transferrable; they shouldn't be considered as assets but as protections similar to the freedom of speech. Consider them the limited freedom to write and the limited freedom to invent (both without being copycatted). If copyrights were shrunk back to a universal 20 years and nonphysical patents shrunk down to about 3 years, that should be a reasonable compromise (and relax, Disney, we're not touching trademarks, so you don't have to worry about Mickey Mouse).

12
0

Dark-web pedo jailed after FBI and co use vid trick to beat privacy tech

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: So the FBI ...

"Although if society wanted to protect children in the first place it would be actively screening for the warning signs and offering suitable treatment."

You assume treatment is a possibility. We can screen for sociopaths, but we really can't do much about them, though, because their behavior is innate and incorrigible. What if this is the same?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I don't agree with many

What if he turns out to be a "top" man, though?

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Unmasking

Or it could've just been DRM'd, causing the video player to send up to a honeypotted authentication server. The server probably rejects TOR'ed IPs, and many media players will take the most direct route it can because authentication servers are already touchy.

7
0

Booze stats confirm boring Britain is drying

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: This isn't because wine has suddenly become more potent

Do you have the equivalent of "bum wines" over in Europe? You know, cheap fortified wines that taste terrible but don't matter because their chief purpose was to simply get drunk (and maybe screw afterwards)? If you do, then stronger wines probably don't fit into the picture because people who just want to get drunk would just stick to the "bum wines".

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Here's one from comedian Bill Engvall:

"I just want a black coffee."

"You wanna try a biscotti? They're from Italy and they're considered a delicacy."

"Ever had one? They taste like a burnt cookie. Where I'm from that's considered a mistake."

3
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Because no good story ever started with "I went down to Costa and ordered a latte"."

Sure it can. Just add, "Nothing special. Just a latte, thank you." then see where you end up.

4
1

Unpaid tech contractor: 'I have to support my family. I have no money for medicines'

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: @Ian Michael Gumby -- @Alien ... no fear...

But it's hard to build a war chest when you're starting out and everything you take in JUST (and not always) covers all the expenses. Living literally paycheck-to-paycheck if not day-to-day is a lot more common than you think, and many of them have no hope of upward mobility, either.

3
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: New Icon please

No, a $cumbag in a $uit (I include the $ because they should also have $ in their eyes).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I lack sympathy, somewhat.

"there are always choices. fate is what you make it. your choices might be limited by circumstance, but you can always make a choice.

In the circumstances you describe, the RIGHT choice just might be "re-location" or a career change.'

If all other choices lead to "death by starvation," then they can't really be considered choices owing to the survival instinct.

And moving and/or re-education presents a Catch-22. Basically, you need money to get a better job, but you need a better job to get the money you need. And many are already working every waking hour (and then some) just to make ends meet, and yet some of them STILL have to miss a few meals. Can you say, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy"?

4
0

What is this bullsh*t, Google? Nexus phones starved of security fixes after just three years

Charles 9
Silver badge

Any that do can't supply Google Play Services, many apps depend on it, and they'd get complaints soon enough.

In other words, unless you're catering to a market not used to Google Play Services anyway, it's practically suicide.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Giving up on smartphones

I still need something like a smartphone for on-the-spot research. Feature phones just don't cut it (I tried on an N95, thank you. Went to an Android phone and it was like night and day).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Google to drop security fixes for old version of Android

Not even Android Pay, which ALSO blocks on unofficial ROMs?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Actually...

As I understand it, Xposed has never been able to reliably block SafetyNet because it uses an external and secured connection (similar to a timing attack used to detect being in a VM--there's no real way to stop this). Only Google or the app maker knows the private key.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Google to drop security fixes for old version of Android

A slim budget and a need to stay stock due to root-aware apps.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Actually...

But how do you deal with increasing numbers of root-aware apps?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The phone I want

You'll be chasing moonbeams, then, because HSPA and LTE were both made with mobile data in mind, and that means smartphones (because what else would a feature phone use with high-speed data; it has no apps, and the carriers would be pressuring the phone makers not to include tethering capabilities; Apple and Google are the only two companies strong enough to push back). As others have said, mobile hotspots have themselves been targeted, so you're screwed no matter what. Basically, if you don't want to be targeted, get off the Internet. That's your only real option now.

0
0

Republicans go all Braveheart again with anti-net neutrality bill

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Optional

"A new free mobile/sat data service lets you connect to Google/Facebook/Amazon/Youtube for free."

But how can such a service afford to keep itself in operation? Especially if they use satellites that are unavoidably expensive to send into orbit?

Take the word "free" with a grain of salt these days. About the only place you'll find a genuinely free lunch is a charity kitchen.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Festering swamp rats!

So if there's a choice between getting things done so we don't look like inefficient idiots and looking good, we'd rather all be idiots.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Festering swamp rats!

"Well SCOTUS got it wrong, there is no need to change the constitution, it's only the interpretation that is wrong."

You forget the concept of judicial precedent. SCOTUS goes back to previous decisions to base more modern decisions. Plus the courts are usually conservative. Therefore, if tradition states that political speech should be protected for good or ill, the only way around it is to BREAK tradition, and if the courts represent tradition, it's up to the other two branches to break it (and by the Constitution, that usually falls to Congress by way of the Amendment process).

"And while some would argue that limiting contributions infringes on their free speech, it can also be argued that allowing unlimited contributions impinges on the free speech of those without the means to buy politicians."

But it's the politicians who can determine (by Bills and Acts) what is what. Vicious cycle. As for buying politicians, whatever happened to marches on Washington like in the 60's?

"Despite the second amendment, you can't go out and buy your own nukes, surface to air missiles etc."

Actually, the ONLY thing stopping you is the price tag, for the most part. People can and do own TANKS (maybe not the munitions, but that's another matter). And I do believe it is possible to acquire a Stinger (a man-portable SAM) after-market for five figures.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: If the Internet is not telecommunications...

Got it in one.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Festering swamp rats!

You forget most campaign donations are already INDIRECT and virtually impossible to pin down to any one candidate. If a campaign ads talks of nothing but issues, there's no legal way to pin the "donation" to anyone. Plus there's the non-cash donations and donations to parties and sympathizers. They've been playing the shell games for centuries and at the end can hide behind the First Amendment freedom of speech, which SCOTUS has repeatedly ruled that political speech has a particular emphasis (thus why campaign calls are immune from Do Not Call and why flag burning is protected).

The problem is intractable. You can't remove the bullhorns without running afoul of the Constitution. The only practical solution will throw up specters of the S-word and take us back to the Red Scare (in a country founded on DIStrust of government but also aware of things like the Gilded Age and The Jungle). It would also require an Amendment.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Self-aggrandizement Central

Only one problem. 33 seats are at stake in 2018. Only 8 are held by Republicans. 25 are held by Democrats. The risk surface for them is MUCH higher for the Democrats.

As for the potential Supreme Court vacancies, most of the retiring seats are conservatives. Kennedy's already making noises about stepping down. Odds are they'll all retire during the current Congress to ensure conservative replacements.

3
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Optional

Google already has a private network. Thing is, they have to connect to the Internet SOMEWHERE, and that's where the ISPs will nail them (and some of them like AT&T and Sprint are Tier 1 networks that form the backbone of the Internet—practically unavoidable).

1
0

It's a question worth asking: Why is the FCC boss being such a jerk?

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Personally I have no strong opinions on it?

"You would think (democratically) that the needs of the many would automatically outweigh the wants of the few (especially since the ISPs do not actually "own" the internet, it's certainly not their turf that the 99% majority are accessing)."

Thing is, unlike with the roads, which were mostly built and owned by the government, most of the Internet is owned by private enterprises. If not the ISPs (AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon are all Tier 1 networks), then the providers those ISPs contract for their backhaul.

"I suppose so long as the marketplace is fractured & people have options, they will have to keep that in mind if their ISP isn't giving satisfactory service - and as long as all ISPs don't all start working together as an internet access bloc."

That's the concern here. ALL the major ISPs are colluding together as a cartel. Also note those companies above that ALSO control backhaul. They're the equivalent of the owners of the biggest Interstate highways in the country.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: @chuckufarley -- But these people aren't stupid

REAL real businesses don't compromise. They CONQUER.

0
0

European Court of Justice lays down the law on Kodipocalypse

Charles 9
Silver badge

Couldn't they just construe that YOU are the REAL real buyer and they are just agents acting on your behalf? That's how they nail murder-for-hires.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: pre loaded

Pi's tend to struggle a bit at high-def, and I don't think they can do HEVC-encoded videos. I DID plunk down for an Android box once. Claims to be quad-core and all that, but it seems to chug a lot and the interface is rather clunky (that said, I only sank $25 into it, so I'm not out that much).

0
0

KickassTorrents kicked out again, this time by Australia

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Oh my god

"No, it's not. If the movie is good then it will be seen by a lot of people making big bucks. If it's crap like the movies we've got for the last 5 years (all those pre/sequels, reboots, restarts, lego movies) then even $5 is too much."

Oh? If they're so crap, how come THEY'RE the ones making all the bucks?

0
0

(You can't) buy one now! The flying car makes its perennial return

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Rotors "powered by the wind"

"'Lack of wind' does not imply a vacuum. The air does not disappear because it is not moving."

The point is that air is a prerequisite for wind. A vacuum has no air. No air, no wind. No wind, your kite ain't going to get lifted up by it, end of. It's for the same reason a feather will fall as quickly as a pebble in a vacuum.

"Try flying a kite by running downwind!"

At that point, the kite is flying YOU instead.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Cruise control

Actually, 3 dimensions makes the situation WORSE because now trouble can come from BELOW you as well. An additional two directions to move ALSO means two additional directions things can MOVE AT YOU. In other, more degrees of freedom = more degrees of Murphy.

An aircraft DOES have to accurate track a flight path without landmarks because another aircraft can be above, below, OR besides you (this is real-life stuff, which is why Air Traffic Control is so important).

Autopilot DOESN'T HELP in the event of exigencies, such as turbulence (distressingly common, take it from a frequent flier) or incursions (another bloody idiot pilot getting in YOUR way). And what happens with a sudden catastrophic failure? At least with the car it just comes to a halt and you can get out (in a hurry if need be). Coming to a halt is not ideal when you're a thousand feet in the air in an airframe nigh-inpossible to build for a dead-stick glide.

0
1

Zeiss, ASML hit back at Nikon in chip-printing patent row

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: filing suit in three countries (the Netherlands, Germany, and Japan)

But hasn't the EU patent bureau been around long enough that any patent filed BEFORE they existed will have run its term by this point?

1
0

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017