* Posts by Charles 9

10012 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Ex-FBI man spills on why hackers are winning the security game

Charles 9
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Re: Nice to Hear Some Truth

So? They're not gonna pay otherwise. And THEIR vulnerable systems can be used as stepping stones to other systems, including yours, or simply used in a DDoS attack.

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Charles 9
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Re: Nice to Hear Some Truth

"Since no solution is perfect, one really has to do all three; reduce the number of vulnerabilities through a more secure design, mitigate the impact of vulnerabilities through additional techniques, and keep current with the advantage hackers are taking of what's left."

One problem: end users who don't want to learn, meaning you have to make the whole mess as simple and turnkey as possible.

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Charles 9
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Re: Comfortable illusions about computer security

But people want things as simple as possible. KISS Principle, turnkey simplicity and all that. And they outnumber you.

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Despite the spiel, we're still some decades from true anti-malware AI

Charles 9
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Re: Um, sarcastic joking?

"Sad fact: we have nothing that passes Alan Turing's original test: how to tell a woman from a man pretending to be a woman."

I would think a nice stiff rod swing up at the groin between the legs from behind would make for a quick and effective test. From behind means it's unanticipated so no preparation techniques can be used.

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Charles 9
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I can see the overlap here. I see it more like a siege. Defenders necessarily have to fix many of their defenses, and attackers can learn these and work against them, leaving only the mobile defenses which are also necessarily limited, particularly by resource costs. In this scenario, the attackers have access to everything the defenders have and can use them against the defenders. This can include AI at some point. Meaning as long as they can out-resource the defender, it's basically only a matter of time.

Not even behavior-based detecting will work for long as the attackers learn to pace themselves and re-learn the arts of "smurfing" things under the radar and mimicking legitimate actions.

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Charles 9
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Re: What to protect? Nothing. The article is absolutely senseless.

"3. All programming languages and codes are soon over - AI speaks, understands and thinks using language, texts."

I believe you forgot the Joke Alert icon. I'll believe you when your supposed AI can survive the "This Sentence Is False" paradox. Or perhaps the "My Dog Has No Nose" routine Danger Mouse once used to defeat a "AI" computer.

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Strong non-backdoored encryption is vital – but the Feds should totally be able to crack it, say House committees

Charles 9
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Re: Summed Up Quite Well

Last I checked, the fingerprint code is in hardware and separate from the GPL stuff. Compartmentalized, IOW, so all the GPL software is clean but the fingerprints are added on top and in a way that can't be bypassed (thus why it's in hardware).

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New PayPal T&Cs prevents sellers trash-talking PayPal

Charles 9
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Re: Bad Mouthing

"This story also raises some VERY red flags. The companies involved are in Canada, not the United States, so why is Paypal applying American law on transactions taking place in a different country?"

Because PayPal is headquartered in the US (in San Jose, California). Technically, everything goes through there which means they go through the US and get subject to American laws. Therefore, their activities are subject to American law: particularly those involving the financial sector.

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Honeypots: Free psy-ops weapons that can protect your network before defences fail

Charles 9
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Re: " incident becomes SO common"

Seems to me more like it becomes "normal" and gets ignored. Most people want a decently good life, but if "normal" stuff happens to other people, it just becomes noise.

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Charles 9
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Re: "a great experiment to analyze the adversary's moral limits"

But what happens when a type of incident becomes SO common it's no longer newsworthy?

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Planned Espionage Act could jail journos and whistleblowers as spies

Charles 9
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Re: Two things...

"If I start to feel like a prisoner in public and cannot do anything about it, I would simply leave the country and go else where. Germany seems like a good bet since their constitution prohibits things like this, or so I am told."

One, they could prevent you from leaving (see China). Two, Constitutions are just ink on a page in the end.

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Grumpy Trump trumped, now he's got the hump: Muslim ban beaten back by appeals court

Charles 9
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Re: It's all a media conspiracy!

"Not sure what they'll do if when Sarah Palin becomes the ambassador to Canada."

Declare her persona non grata and send her home?

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Charles 9
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Re: as is usual in Trump article comments here...

Trouble is, Acts ate subject to Constitutional scrutiny. The ban on religious discrimination is in the First Amendment, part of the Constitution itself and therefore takes precedence.

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Charles 9
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Re: Failure of our courts

"Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952."

An Act of Congress. Therefore, subject to be overruled by the First Amendment.

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Charles 9
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Re: Failure of our courts

"If our judges fail to uphold the constitutional laws our representatives have enacted in our names. Then they should be removed from the bench and never be allowed to serve in public office again."

Then convince your Congressman to impeach them.

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Charles 9
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Re: Overturned

"The constitution gives POTUS the authority to do what he did. Period."

Please cite the exact text of the Constitution where this is stated, then. Please note, also, that the Bill of Rights (where discrimination against religion is forbidden) was ratified AFTER the original Article II, therefore anything it says takes precedence as official Amendments.

And don't give us that bit about national security because if that were true, Saudi Arabia would be on that list (since the 9/11 hijackers and the Al Queda mastermind all came from there). Also the US would be banning ITSELF since homegrown terrorists have committed atrocities as well (Oklahoma City in particular).

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Charles 9
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Re: Oh dear...

Why doesn't the US look at ITSELF as well, since at least two known terrorist attacks were entirely domestic in nature, including the perpetrators?

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Charles 9
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Re: Trumped

"The infamous Ninth Circuit Court sided with him, the same circuit that has been overridden more than any other."

Tell me, how many unanimous appeals rulings were overturned by SCOTUS (remember, the decision has no dissent, meaning ALL THREE were in agreement)?

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Charles 9
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Re: Right wing hypocrisy.

That would mean the US would have to ban ITSELF. Oklahoma City and Bath Township were both committed by natural born white Americans.

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Charles 9
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Re: "SEE YOU IN COURT, THE SECURITY OF OUR NATION IS AT STAKE!"

"Trump can't be elected for more than two terms."

That's assuming they don't just tear up the Constitution and stage a coup. After all, laws in the end are just ink on a page.

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Charles 9
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Re: "SEE YOU IN COURT, THE SECURITY OF OUR NATION IS AT STAKE!"

"98 out of 100 of the top publications in the US were opposing trump. Just were do you think you can find even 'half-way neutral' reporting?"

You can't. He's a "for us or against us" type of guy. To him, there is no neutral.

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Oracle refuses to let Java copyright battle die – another appeal filed in war against Google

Charles 9
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"Y'know, Einstein said that doing the same thing over and over again while expecting a different result is a definition of insanity."

Didn't he ALSO say that doing the same thing over and over again and actually getting a different result is a definition of persistence?

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Who's behind the Kodi TV streaming stick crackdown?

Charles 9
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Re: @Charles 9

Well, it can fluctuate, but the point is that they DO tend to meet. The trick with illicit drugs is that there's a high demand for them overall: enough users keep the market going. The quantity is kept low due to legal interdiction, which raises the equilibrium price (by pushing the supply graph upward). Drug suppliers probably could care less if their drugs are legal or not; if illegal, they'll stick with their illicit connection, if legalized, they have a first-mover advantage to create legal supplies.

But if customer expectations are SO low for the price of something that the highest they're willing to pay is less than the cheapest it can be made (say a nearly nonexistent Q in the bottom-left corner while the P graph starts some distance to the right), then you can have a situation where people demand music but aren't willing to pay for it: a potentially unworkable market. Now is this REALLY Q? Can't say, but it's a possibility.

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Charles 9
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Re: Hmm

Are you SURE they inflate the prices? Or is it that the sports know they have an audience and are jacking up their prices due to the high demand? Can your cite where the sports are taking in less than the media companies are claiming?

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Charles 9
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Re: @Charles 9

"Free commerce certainly doesn't care about me, why should I care about it?"

Because without commerce, where would you get anything?

The other side of your argument is that regulations hamper business. Business can, have, and always will be out for themselves; it's part of the human condition, after all. And because of the way our laws are set up, no business can ever really be compelled to do anything. Worst comes to worst, they'll simply bail out. Remember that: people can and will walk away. Markets don't have to be fulfilled; in fact, if the supply and demand graphs never intersect, then that market CAN'T be fulfilled.

The TL;DR version: Interfere with commerce and commerce starts disappearing.

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Charles 9
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Re: Said it before, will say it again (@ AC)

"On the other hand, till media companies find a way to collaborate, illegal Kody sticks will retain the Maillot Jaune in the foreseeable future. Oh, closely followed by torrents. And file hosting services. And the Dark Net. And Sneakernet. And..."

And frankly, while they bitch and moan because it's a cost they want to control, considering the networks are still up and running and still fishing out for new shows, I wonder if it's really eating seriously into their revenues. After all, they ultimately have to answer to owners and investors.

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Charles 9
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Re: Copyright Terms

"Frand should apply and no limitation on retail."

FRAND only applies to PATENTS, and usually only standard-essential patents (SEPs) at that. Otherwise, you're interfering with free commerce.

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Charles 9
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But none of the networks want to give money to the enemy. They don't want to cooperate. They want to conquer. Plus they don't trust third parties to not go into the business themselves and try to usurp (like Apple, Amazon, and Netflix).

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Charles 9
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Re: Be reasonable

Besides, I don't think Sky or any other TV provider has much of a choice in the matter. Take the US. Most of the channels available today are owned by one of a few media conglomerates. For example, the premiere sports channel in the US (ESPN) is owned by Disney, which in turn owns multiple channels AND the major broadcaster ABC. In America, if you're a TV provider and you don't pack ESPN in your basic package, you're basically not a TV provider, and Disney knows this, so they always make it a Hobson's Choice. In order to get ESPN, they have to buy rights to the entire block: take it or leave it. And since they basically dare TV companies to Walk on the Sun, guess what the TV providers do in turn.

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Charles 9
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Re: Be reasonable

Actually, grocery shops CAN stock exclusive stuff if they wish. That's how boutique shops work. It's just not the basic model for supermarkets which depend more on location than selection.

Exclusives are tricky to regulate because it boils down to a simple matter of commerce, and commerce tends to flow better when it's not as fettered.

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Charles 9
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Re: Satellite or Cable?

"Digital content should be available to purchase on media (or download to storage) and stream, forever once published. No distribution platform should have any exclusivity (Sky was forced to allow Virgin cable to buy re-distribution rights). Content should be universally available simultaneously, the cost of film prints for cinema should no longer apply."

But copyright still applies, and copyright licensing CAN (and is legally allowed, thus why rental houses could exist at all) impose terms. It's a Hobson's Choice, basically: Take It Or Leave It. You either plunk down or Walk on the Sun.

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Charles 9
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What could a fiver buy you back when an album was a fiver? Always consider inflation when comparing prices.

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Charles 9
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Re: I'm worried they'll outlaw Kodi in some unenforceable way...

"Please note also that West Midlands police shut down (permanently) pretty much every hydroponics shop in the area in the last couple of years."

Just curious. Why? Marijuana concerns?

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Cattle that fail, not pets that purr – the future of servers

Charles 9
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Even if your pets are old and sickly and there's no budget to get a new pet?

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Charles 9
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Re: What if your requirement is for a Cat not a Cow

The pet's not the software; that the job. The animal is the beast that RUNS the job. You either have a "pet" as in a personally-raised-and-maintained machine, or you hire a cow (a cloud server) to do it for you.

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Charles 9
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Re: "on-premise" !?

So you agree with me since you used a double negative, turning it into a right (wronging a wrong).

"Show me a building which occupies no land.."

A FLYING building, of which such concepts are being developed (like a floating warehouse). Plus what about space stations? Meanwhile, I've demonstrated the fact of land with no building.

And yes, one CAN change another's opinion. It's called drilling it continuously from all angles until you give up.

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Charles 9
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Not necessarily. With fewer servers on site sucking up the juice and making your HVAC work its compressors off, your electric bill would drop. Depending on the other things you wouldn't have to pay (because you may not need to lease so much space and so on), it could more than offset the cloud costs. It depends.

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Charles 9
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Re: "on-premise" !?

And before you start with legless undergarments like panties, English is inconsistent. Deal with it. After all, why "houses" instead of "hice"?

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Charles 9
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Re: "on-premise" !?

Pants count for two LEGS which encompass most of the material so are treated as pairs. It doesn't apply to shirts since most of their material are for the torso instead of the arms.

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Charles 9
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Re: Standardisation

It's a two-edged sword. A common base means lots of experience dealing with problems when they arise, but it also means when a problem arises, it's likely to hit more of them at once. Sort of the difference between repairing a stock, mass-produced car and a custom-built one.

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Charles 9
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Re: "on-premise" !?

"WTF is "on premise"?"

It means on one, a single, property. Premises, a plural, should properly point to multiple properties. Language changes over time, and the use of the singular is an evolution of the term, which originally refers to the collective of the land and the buildings, but the logic falls apart for a empty tract of land (thus nothing BUT the land, a singular; you wouldn't use a plural noun for an individual thing now, would you?). The term "on premise" (meaning on the same property on which it was sold) has been written into state laws concerning alcohol consumption for some time now, so it has legal precedent attached.

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Microsoft's DRM can expose Windows-on-Tor users' IP address

Charles 9
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The situation between Blizzard and Valve is the same as the situation between say BT and Sky: both are competing for the same audience and want to conquer the other. To them, sharing is surrendering. Blizzard knows they have hits with WoW and now Overwatch. People willingly pay bookoo bucks each month for the former, so they have proven natural draw and really don't need a third party to help them.

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Charles 9
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Re: transparent proxy

Actually, IPv6 actually supports and encourages the use of NAT. What it doesn't like is one-to-many NAT, but it's entirely cool with one-to-one NAT, including ephemeral NATs for outgoing connections (so that they can't be back-hacked) as well as topology-scrambling NATs for incoming connections (so no one can figure out how your network is structured).

Just remember it's not the NAT that keeps your internal LAN safe but the firewall, which BTW is still encouraged in the IPv6 world.

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Charles 9
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"Just don't use bloody Windows. it's not difficult to do. If you're serious, don't use it."

Unless you're a serious gamer who happens to do some serious WoW and/or Overwatch or other PC-exclusive top-end game that simply won't run on Linux. So if you're serious about security AND gaming, you can only pick one or the other.

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Charles 9
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Re: You are explicitly told....

Not if it's same-domained and the site requires a script to run. Part and parcel problem.

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3D printer blueprints for TSA luggage-unlocking master keys leak online

Charles 9
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Re: Likely to have reverse engineered them?

But they can go all Nineteen Eighty-Four on you and replace the indicator.

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ITU-T wants video sizes to halve again by 2020

Charles 9
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Like a suitcase.

The suitcase is only so big and can only weigh so much. Eventually, you really can't cram further without losing too much. Is there a way to tell how close we are to that limit?

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Hilton hotels' email so much like phishing it fooled its own techies

Charles 9
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Re: We can do better.....

"And THAT is why they invented percussive education.."

And then they discovered masochists...

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NASA's Curiosity puts cat among the climate pigeons: Lack of CO2 sinks water theory

Charles 9
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It would not only have to be much thicker but also contain lots of greenhouse gases (in order to take the surface temperature above freezing of 273K, a very consistent quality concerning ice). Catch is, most greenhouse gases we know like carbon dioxide and methane contain carbon in them, which would then be dissolved in the water to produce carbonates, which as the article notes are conspicuously missing. There aren't that many alternatives, perhaps ozone and dinitrogen monoxide. There's also the question of what happened to...whatever they were.

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Charles 9
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The catch is that the air pressure on the surface of Mars is only around 600 Pa. That's near water's Triple Point of 273K & 611Pa. And since the surface temperature of Mars right now is well below 273K, and that the surface temperature has mostly gone UP over history, this would suggest no possibility of liquid water being on Mars (below the Triple Point pressure-wise, a substance would sublimate and deposit directly between solid and vapor as temperature varied). This isn't just a matter of temperature but of pressure as well. In order for liquid water to have existed on the surface of Mars, the atmospheric pressure down there MUST have exceeded 611 Pa at some point. When if ever was it that way, and what were the component gasses that weighed down and provided that pressure?

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