* Posts by Charles 9

11158 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Pai guy not too privacy shy, says your caller ID can't block IP, so anons go bye

Charles 9
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Re: @Charles 9, re: fake info.

""We're sorry but the party you've called doesn't accept the call you're trying to make. Please leave a message & perhaps they'll call you back?""

Tried that. The lousiest of the lousy simply take advantage and fill your answering machine/voicemail with a lengthy ad message. And since some of the callers are international, they can sometimes use foreign sovereignty to avoid getting caught.

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Charles 9
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Instead of anonymous callers, what about "false ID" callers who use VoIP technology to misdirect caller recipients? Should be a way to force callers to reveal either their true source number or (with a legally-binding document) the number of their main office or (in the case of calling agents) the firm the caller represents.

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Retirement age must move as life expectancy grows, says WEF

Charles 9
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Re: So... we should do the opposite...

The biggest trouble with something like Basic Income is always the most overlooked:

How do you FUND such a thing?

Basically, you can't tax the beneficiaries as it's twice the work, which leaves people like employers who'd never play along. They'll cheat at best, bail out at worst.

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Charles 9
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Re: scrapping mandatory retirement would help

There's a bigger problem. 9 times out of 10, there are more potential workers than jobs to fill, which means someone will get shafted, sometimes through no fault of their own. Meanwhile they still have to earn their keep, and with demands for efficiency, the need for human labor is shrinking, not growing. It's a pretty hard problem overall, and no one wants to be the to tell people, "You lose. Game Over. Better luck next life," since things risk turning ugly.

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The nuclear launch button won't be pressed by a finger but by a bot

Charles 9
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Heinlein keeps getting read because he still has some interesting ideas, such as not being allowed to vote before making a significant contribution to the country first (though in his case that universally meant serving in the military). Goes back to the roots of the original voting restrictions to landowners (people with actual skin in the game).

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Charles 9
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Trouble comes when IT gets overruled by the executives.

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Charles 9
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"I seem to recall reading somewhere that Russia have a missile farm that can launch automatically with no human intervention if it detects certain things like a nuclear detonation over Moscow, seismic activity over a certain level which would denote same etc."

I think you're referring to the Dead Hand (aka Perimetr) system. No one really knows if it still exists or not since it's considered top secret by the Soviet and now Russian military.

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Charles 9
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Yet the film wasn't much like the original book as written by Stephen King under the pen name Richard Bachman.

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Charles 9
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WHOOSH! It was intentional, as a dark joke, since ducking and covering isn't going to do much against a direct hit, thus the kiss your ass goodbye part.

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Unpaid tech contractor: 'I have to support my family. I have no money for medicines'

Charles 9
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"So what do you say to the person that ignores this, spends every penny they earn and lives beyond their means so they can't make rent or pay for basic necessities as soon as the tiniest problem arises?"

You're assuming people have enough left over to squirrel away. That isn't true for many people. They're literally living paycheck-to-paycheck (if not day-to-day) because they can't ask for more out of the market without being turned down (the only thing worse than a penny pay is NO pay), and what they get is barely (or NOT) enough to accommodate even a Spartan living. It's tough to squirrel away when you're not even making the Cost of Living and can't negotiate for higher.

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Charles 9
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Re: hang on

"Reduce your expenses, earn more, or get a job that you can live from. If the first time you don't get paid puts on the brink of bankruptcy, your pretty much an idiot."

Or out of options. If you can't get any job that pays more than a Spartan living even if you dedicated most of your waking hours to it, and it's the best option for a significant radius, what was that adage about beggars and choice?

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Android apps punched out by Judy malware

Charles 9
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Re: malware missed a trick

Can't. That's an administrative privilege which triggers a special warning. Greenify uses this privilege in non-root mode to force-close battery-chuggers. Furthermore, ad agencies tend to discredit zombie clicks since they can't trust that actual eyes saw the ads.

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US laptops-on-planes ban may extend to flights from ALL nations

Charles 9
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"No, it isn't. If it really was then all similar devices would be banned from planes entirely, including checked luggage."

Until you realize too many people use such devices...ON the flights. IOW, a total ban would result in a total backlash, as it would be going TOO FAR. It's like with the liquids in the carry-ons (nitroglycerin threat). Ban all liquids from carry-ons and people would've rebelled for reasons of liquid medicines and so on.

That's why I'm waiting for something like the dildo bomb, where the government is forced to throw up its hands because nothing known to man can stop that without ending the airline industry as we know it, and such a shakeup of reliable quick travel (especially across oceans) can have severe consequences for western civilization since a lot of modern society is dependent on air transit.

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Charles 9
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Re: Who fights with aircraft security?

No, it really IS about the batteries. Recent intel indicates bomb makers are developing bombs that (1) are concealed inside actual working batteries, meaning they can be turned on and running to pass TSA-type checks, AND (b) can't be distinguished from real batteries even under an x-ray, presumably because they can use the battery material itself as a screen.

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Charles 9
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Re: Who fights with aircraft security?

Not even technology can fight physics. If you want to get work done and you're far from a source of power, you MUST take some with you. And bomb makers have now shown that they can make bombs out of practically ANYTHING portable AND make it such it can fool even x-rays. If it isn't laptop batteries, it'll be something else. They're even working on bombs IN people. Imagine the force of that one bomb in 2009 would've been if the bomber had been able to take it out first.

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Charles 9
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Re: FAIL!

No, what this REALLY means is that bomb-making each has reached the "nuclear" stage. By that I mean, to use siege warfare terminology, the inevitable endpoint has been reached: the more-flexible attackers now have the means (like say a Tactical Nuke) to overcome any possible defense the other side can possibly present. The technology has reached the point where no defense known to man can be even practically effective unless the attacker is stupid and/or incompetent. Either because the bomb can get through or the defenses that work come with so many strings attached as to be impractical (like x-rays--you either die from the bombs or die from the cancer: no-win situation).

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Charles 9
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"Also, how will they be able to tell if you are going international or domestic at screening and what you should or should not have?"

You show your boarding pass at the checkpoint AND at the gate. Both are potential gotcha points. Plus the reason many people insist on carry-on luggage is because they don't trust stuff to stay in the hold, and there's no way to ensure their security without risking another Lockerbie, so it's a no-win situation.

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Charles 9
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Re: Removable batteries

There's also a lot of commercial pressure to NOT have the batteries be replaceable, for the very reasons you describe. A phone that goes to the landfill means another phone to be sold which means KA-CHING for the phone maker (since phone sales are practically the ONLY way phone makers make money). Not to mention it stops aftermarket sales cold. And since every phone maker is in cutthroat competition with every OTHER phone maker, they won't agree on anything.

As for hiding bombs in things, you're noticing how ingenious bomb makers can be. The Lockerbie bomb, if you'll recall, was in a tape player. If they can't put it in a battery, they'll put it in the rest of the phone and keep moving around until they find something that can't be banned from the plane without making the flight lose its purpose. That's why I mentioned the dildo bomb. A woman kinky enough to wear a dildo bomb in a lower orifice pretty much represents no holds barred. The only ways you can reliably detect a women concealing a dildo bomb will render the whole air travel industry impractical. If someone wants to blow up a plane, they'll do it in spite of God, Man, or the Devil.

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Charles 9
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Re: Work time

One, no laptop to use it with (no assurance of acquiring one at the destination), and two, likely to be stolen, too.

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Charles 9
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Re: "a pressurized hold is crew-accessible so as to deal with live cargo"

Which is why airlines have a general "verboten" attitude to potential fire starters. That's why most aerosols aren't allowed (because of their hydrocarbon propellants and/or their actual contents being easy to set light). That's also why lithium batteries can't go in the hold unless in a special containment unit. At least in the cabin flight attendants can quickly see to thermal runaways. Which raises a prickly question to those who MUST take some kind of computing device with them because they can't trust devces or Internet access to be available at the destination.

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Charles 9
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Re: "a pressurized hold is crew-accessible so as to deal with live cargo"

I think the big thing is, due to the ban on fluorocarbons, most aerosols use hydrocarbon propellants. Hydrocarbons (like gasoline) ARE flammable, and flammable containers are generally prohibited on planes due to the fire risk. They only provide exemptions for stuff like toiletries, and even then they expect you to be reasonable (so no economy-sized canisters).

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Charles 9
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That's an unacceptable tradeoff, though. There are only three techs powerful enough to get through the meat and water of a human body, and they ALL have strings attached. One of them (high-energy EMR like x-rays) is unavoidably carcinogenic (strong enough to penetrate tissue is also strong enough to mutate tissue: part and parcel). That's why it's only really used in prisons. Another (ultrasound) suffers from a terribly short range: particularly through air. The last (EM fields rather than radiation) is too unwieldy, not to mention dangerous for people with legitimate metallic things in their bodies (joint replacements, bone pins, metal skull plates, pacemakers).

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Charles 9
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Re: Work time

"Better to not take a laptop at all and buy a disposable device at the other end. Maybe they are working with Google and Microsoft to get people to buy Chromebooks / Windows 10 S devices, once they land."

And if you're landing going to a not-zone, meaning you MUST have a local copy?

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Charles 9
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Re: "a pressurized hold is crew-accessible so as to deal with live cargo"

Last I checked, pressurized stuff like aerosols are already banned from the hold, specifically since there's no assurance checked baggage will always be pressurized. Temperature-sensitive stuff is not recommended for the same reason.

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Charles 9
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Re: Not a Chartered/Certifies Engineer or engineer but

But an unpressurized hold is hypoxic, poor fire conditions, whole a pressurized hold is crew-accessible so as to deal with live cargo.

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Charles 9
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No, they're meant to detect bombs ON a person. The human body I a a natural EM absorber, and IIRC the tech WAS in place when the a-hole bomber struck.

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Charles 9
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I'm still waiting for one of them to realize that a bomb small enough to be concealed inside a working laptop battery is also small enough to be put in something like a dildo. Meaning they can conceal the bomb from practically any scanner simply by being kinky enough to conceal it INSIDE themselves.

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Intel gives the world a Core i9 desktop CPU to play with

Charles 9
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Re: Dangling unpleasantly.

Not that useful if the back of the unit's covered with ribs and air vents. Anything sticky's likely to melt off.

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Lexmark patent racket busted by Supremes

Charles 9
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Re: Lexmark loses twice?

What about photographs, though, especially ones which you'd prefer to keep in confidence?

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Charles 9
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Re: Lexmark, are they still a thing?

As an injet printer maker, no, Lexmark isn't a thing anymore, which is a good thing.

That said, Lexmark is still very much in business in the enterprise world where their strength (toner-based products like copiers and laser printers) keeps them going, even if in rebadged forms (many Dell laser printers, for example, are rebadged Lexmarks).

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Charles 9
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Re: Lexmark loses twice?

Make a distinction. Lexmark inkjet printers are crap, yes, always have been, but Lexmark laser printers are still frequently used in enterprises (sometimes rebadged like Dell printers), but I still see them all over the place with few complaints.

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Charles 9
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They ALREADY do that with laser toner cartridges, especially for enterprises. Look up "Return Program Cartridges".

As for Impression, can't they just sue Lexmark to get the costs back?

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Charles 9
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Re: What about other measures?

The trick is if it is possible to bypass or reset the chip. I think at least some companies use public-key cryptography to thwart this, as the communications part of the cartridge is black-boxed and unique to each cartridge. If the printer will ONLY accept encrypted communications coming from such chips, things get tricky. But as noted this is a technological obstacle, not a legal one, and pretty much in line with what the article is noting (a trend towards self-destructing authenticated consumables to block aftermarket sales). It's nothing new as it's been happening since about the fourth generation of gaming consoles.

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Defend yourself against ISP tracking in an Trump-era free-for-all

Charles 9
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Re: What is metadata, exactly?

Oh? What about SNI?

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Charles 9
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Re: Good ideas, but...

Sanctioned VPNs with key escrow, then.

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Charles 9
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Re: I think the battle has been lost

"Or use some other person's computer and let them get bombarded with the porn ads later on."

No, because of home LANs, they've found ways to distinguish two or more users using the same external IP, using things like behavioral analysis.

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Tech firms send Congress checklist of surveillance reforms

Charles 9
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Re: Scurrilously off-topic

It can go down to the similar question, "Who owns the telephone conversation?" since it takes two to talk, so to speak.

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Charles 9
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Re: They're Not Wrong

Wouldn't they just reply, "Oh? By what law can you compel us?"

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Bitcoin exchange Coinbase crashes after Asian buying frenzy

Charles 9
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That's up to you, but privacy-conscious service providers like Scandinavian VPNs readily accept Bitcoin to create a degree of separation between buyer and seller (since the plods can't compel someone to divulge something about which they have zero knowledge). And more and more e-tailers will accept Bitcoin for payment. Even Steam takes Bitcoin.

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Charles 9
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Re: Naive

Those countries permit Bitcoin trading because they also regulate the ways they are exchanged. As long as they know the exchange transactions, they're no different from other currency exchanges. The US tolerates Bitcoin as well because they have means of managing the exchanges.

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Charles 9
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Since I used to use Counbase, last I checked they don't really care until it passes a floor value. Otherwise, Counbase would be obligated to submit a tax form (1099-B, I think) for you (Counbase is a registered exchange in the US, permitting them access to banks).

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Charles 9
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Ah, but keep receipts. Above certain levels, these kinds of transactions become taxable events. And Coinbase is registered to various governments.

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LastPass now supports 2FA auth, completely undermines 2FA auth

Charles 9
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Re: The other side of the argument

But because all the eggs are in one basket, so to speak, someone could be motivated enough to try to break LastPass's system so as to get at the motherlode. Look at the attack on RSA for the level of motivation available to a determined hacker.

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Facebook is abusive. It's time to divorce it

Charles 9
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Re: this is the best FB article Ive read in a long time

Snail mail costs money, e-mail requires Internet access, which costs money. Facebook for them is NOT through the Internet.

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UK ministers to push anti-encryption laws after election

Charles 9
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Re: Plugins

Two problems:

One, the qualifications for being a politician are essentially at odds with the qualifications for being in the sciences. The latter requires a relatively objective look at things while the former is almost entirely SUBjective, owing to the fact politicians essentially are playing with other people. Essentially, in general, great scientists make poor politicians and vice versa.

Two, it goes to the general population. The average person doesn't want to know this stuff. They just want to get through their day, enjoy themselves afterward, have the occasional day off, and repeat ad nauseum. Worse, any attempt to install an academic or some other meritocratic qualification for being an actual citizen WILL (not may) get corrupted in some way.

Frankly, you have to wonder if the human race really is cut out for this kind of civilization.

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Charles 9
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Re: So basically...

Not enlightened enough, I'd say, to realize some will believe their own words and will refuse to listen to reason. IOW, to them, his demonstration was simply him not trying hard enough. Some fights you just cannot win; an argument against an irrational person is one of them.

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Life is... pushing all the right buttons on the wrong remote control

Charles 9
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Re: Home made solution

Once thought of that, then remembered some of the devices have inconsistent reaction times. Like the TV, which like I said can't switch inputs on a single press. No, you have to press a button, press up and/or down a few times (and it sometimes doesn't react), then press ENTER when it's just right before it overshoots.

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Charles 9
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Re: For the older ones

"Do you remember the time when you had actually to walk to the TV set to change the program to one of the three available channels?"

"And if the President was on, your night was shot, too." — Jeff Foxworthy

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Sergey Brin building humanitarian blimp for lifesaving leisure

Charles 9
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Perhaps because the truth lies somewhere in between. Distribution is a tug-of-war between different transport costs. Too small an area and like you say you have goods scattered all over the place; however, too LARGE an area and you end up with lengthy in and/or out transportation costs as you reach too far. It's really quite complicated as you try to optimize the two legs of your distribution chain: the incoming and the outgoing. That's why locally-sourced products are a boon (they reduce the incoming transportation costs) as is location close to population centers (to reduce and average out the outgoing costs).

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Init freedom declared as systemd-free Devuan hits stable 1.0.0 status

Charles 9
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Re: John Sanders you are Poettering

Except when it comes to modern sound renderers, that's TOO simple. Too raw. It's basically exclusive mode to a sound device, and we left that kind of sound world back in the 90's. You're going to need some kind of audio compositing layer on top of OSS to handle the more intricate matters of multiple streams, multiple targets, and so on. If PulseAudio isn't to everyone's liking, then we need an alternative.

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