* Posts by Charles 9

10423 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

New plastic banknote plans now upsetting environmental campaigners

Charles 9
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"Cotton has the highest requirement for pesticide inputs."

But you can counter simply asking if they want to go back to wool or linen undergarments, T-shirts, and so on. Because as far as I know, no one's managed to find anything even close to cotton in terms of its desirable qualities.

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Charles 9
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Re: Stupid....

Actually, last I checked, hooved animals don't really handle three legs all too well. At least with equines, loss of function in one leg is considered sufficient grounds for euthanasia.

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Charles 9
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What about cottonseed oil, a natural byproduct of the cotton industry, unless everyone wants to go back to wool and flax? Sunflower or safflower oil?

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Charles 9
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Just curious. How will other people complain if other oils were chosen instead?

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Is this a solution to Trump signing away your digital privacy? We give Invizbox Go a go

Charles 9
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Re: re: most people have little to fear

"No. It's the present regime of Trump and the heartless Republicans and selfish Libertarians that is feared. Of course May, Erdogan, Putin, Mugabe etc too. There could be no tomorrow after this lot."

Oh? What about a future regime the criminalizes all encryption not backed (and crackable) by the State? "Nothing to hide, nothing to fear" and all that? Never say things could get worse because in the end the law is just ink on a page.

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Firefox Quantum: BIG browser project, huh? I share your concern

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But at the time, most smart phones were iPhones (Android only took over a few years ago), meaning that they would've preferred Safari, not Chrome.

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Charles 9
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Re: Surprised that speed is still an issue

"If I leave it running most of the day it can use over 1Gig of memory and regularly peg the CPU at over

70%"

IINM, that's mostly the websites' fault, not Firefox's, unless you can show the same thing leaving it open for a whole day using nothing but about:blank.

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Charles 9
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Re: VNC

Actually, it's BOTH of yours, as BOTH ends have to give and take. That's why there are data caps and peering agreements.

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Charles 9
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"I just wish they'd go back to the drawing board and quit fucking with the UI."

Except it's the SAME UI Chrome used to steal most of Mozilla's users. Sounds to me like Google hit upon something we hate but MORE people LIKE.

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Charles 9
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Re: I don't know about lynx and w3m

Thinking about it, but I have an 8GB cap and regularly do some heavy work (media encoding, 3D, etc.). Currently keep an XP VM knocking around for legacy apps.

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Charles 9
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Re: Please don't F up the UI

"That is my main concern with Chrome--I hate the UI"

Your sentiment seems to be in the minority since Chrome is the dominant browser currently instead of Mozilla, which seems to be behind the proverbial 8-ball.

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Charles 9
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Re: I don't know about lynx and w3m

Linux is not an option because I use Steam, and most of my library is Windows-ONLY.

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Charles 9
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Re: I don't know about lynx and w3m

I don't want to have to deal with settings that could be reverted behind my back. Especially for stuff like TOR or Freenet where you're already strolling the dark web. I'll stick with Off By One and Links for the time being, but this is something that should seriously be addressed in the name of security: a browser with no capability to leak things because the potential leaks never exist (meaning there's no way to secretly turn them on, either).

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Charles 9
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Re: a bare-bones web browser that has no JavaScript

"It also returns a 404, meaning it's no longer maintained. As for Lynx, I need a graphical web browser, just a baseline one, so Lynx won't do it."

Updating my own post, which raises a curiosity. It may not be gone but rather so deprecated that modern browsers return a 404. If you browse to the same site using its own browser, it shows up. That said, one of the download mirrors is Gone.

UPDATE:

"True it hasn't been updated since 2006 but it can still be downloaded from the offbyone.com download links (hover your mouse over the middle links in the download links and you'll see, I just downloaded from all three)."

Link #1 returns "As of September 30, 2014, the Verizon Site Builder tool has been decommissioned and all online Personal Web Space pages have been deleted." #2 and #3 work, and I eventually got a working copy off Softpedia.

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Charles 9
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Re: a bare-bones web browser that has no JavaScript

"Off By One browser has no Javascript or plug-in support, just a bare-bones HTML 3.2 web browser. I only remembered this browser because it was included in Bart PE bootable environments."

It also returns a 404, meaning it's no longer maintained. As for Lynx, I need a graphical web browser, just a baseline one, so Lynx won't do it.

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Charles 9
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Re: I don't know about lynx and w3m

If the content is a video, a Flash video, or an externally-retrieved piece of JavaScript, it's going to be hard to view the source of the thing that'll nail you. Plus with EME endorsed, this is only going to get harder. And all this bloat is spreading like a plague, making the entire Web much harder to accept. My feel is that if you don't trust their dedicated and legally-liable app, you don't trust the company and shouldn't be doing business with them at all. At some point, you have to jump.

"I bet you're a massive hypocrite (anti-javascript types *always* are), and have all sorts of shitware installed on your android or iOS device."

Not really. Most of my stuff comes from F-Droid. Plus with explicit apps, I have more control over them since I can prune.

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Charles 9
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Re: a bare-bones web browser that has no JavaScript

And someone or something can secretly turn them back on behind my back and then LIE to me. No, the only real way to make sure you can't run JavaScript and so on is to not have the functionality to begin with. Last I checked, a browser isn't able to run JavaScript without a JavaScript engine built into it, and that's what I want. Not to mention it seriously cuts the memory use.

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Charles 9
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Re: I don't know about lynx and w3m

BTW, can anyone point me in the direction of a bare-bones web browser that has absolutely no capacity for interactive stuff like JavaScript that I can download for Windows. It would make both a good test browser for web work as well as a safer browser to use with alternative nets like Tor and Freenet.

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Charles 9
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I don't know about lynx and w3m

But if weren't for the fact the Web as we know it is being controlled by uncaring corporate interests, perhaps it's time to rethink how the WWW is working and take a few steps back to what it once was: a more-passive protocol that wasn't about cramming everything including the kitchen sink into it and more about simply conveying information.

I mean, when you think about it, why is it that we ended up with an interactive WWW protocol rather than delegating this interactivity to other, more-dedicated protocols like VNC?

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Europe to push new laws to access encrypted apps data

Charles 9
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Re: "you stand out like a sore thumb"

But you have to assume the law will demand the back door be EASY for law enforcement to implement, meaning they can probably screen the stuff near-realtime and anything that comes out STILL encrypted, like I said, sticks out.

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Charles 9
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Re: and picture messaging will be banned

"Assuming you can meet up in person at least once without being bugged/spied on, it's trivial to pre-arrange this sort of thing and no amount of technology or anti-encryption laws can defeat it."

But as I've mentioned, THERE'S your problem: The First Contact problem. How can you be sure you aren't being moled?

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Charles 9
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Re: Back to the future

Code systems STILL need some kind of exchange to establish it, which puts you squarely in the First Contact problem (meaning you can be moled). Unless you can demonstrate a means to establish a code system without actually meeting in person?

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Charles 9
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Re: No 6...

That wasn't due to masochism, though. More due to having a Gorean (male-supremacist) mindset which means women can get offended.

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Charles 9
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Re: Strong encryption exists, and is "in the wild".

But it's not necessarily torture if it's "Think of the Children!" or "Do It or the Earth Explodes!" Plus you can just say, "He's lying!" and support your case by replacing one of his legitimate files that's frequently accessed.

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Charles 9
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Re: No 6...

Thing is, with rubberhose cryptanalysis, you run the risk of encountering a wimp or a masochist. Wimps are too soft and faint at the mere threat; you can't keep them coherent enough to talk. Meanwhile, masochists get off on pain so just beg for more.

As for threatening family, they could also be estranged or black sheep, meaning they counter, "Never liked them anyway."

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Charles 9
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Re: Terrorists (and other bad people) abide by laws don't they....

But the moment you do, in a world where all other systems are Ementaller, you stand out like a sore thumb, and if you try to stego your way past, you're likely to get your message mangled.

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Charles 9
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Re: and picture messaging will be banned

Mangle pictures in transit and most stego gets squashed. Who cares if you can't detect it if you make it practically useless for "The Bad Guys"? You're still coming out ahead.

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Charles 9
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Especially when the ACTUAL risk of an existential threat is constantly rising. By definition, no one can survive such a threat, so you can never defuse that kind of fear without encouraging suicide.

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Charles 9
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Re: Back to the future

But with a greater chance of a Panopticon, the odds of a dead drop being watched or a First Contact being moled are greater.

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Charles 9
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Re: Strong encryption exists, and is "in the wild".

Which allows the perfect blackmail. Slip a block of pure random data into a user's computer and then tell Scotland Yard the victim is a pedo. No way to prove the block isn't his, absolutely impossible to decrypt (because it was never encrypted to begin with), you tell the news about it, and it's Game Over.

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Charles 9
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Re: Strong encryption exists, and is "in the wild".

"There is absolutely nothing that any .gov can do to change this."

Yes, there is. Simply ban the use of any and all encryption that cannot be cracked by the state. Declare it an act of TERRORISM or whatever that means if you're caught, you and anything associated with you are basically ruined forever.

Then you just have to deal with stego, which has its own limitations, especially for improvised messages. mandating media mangling would probably be a good start there.

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Robo-AI jobs doomsday may, er... not actually happen, say boffins

Charles 9
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Re: Displaced not redundant

That can only apply if the cost of living is really, really LOW (say, Third World low). Otherwise, it increasingly becomes a case of living wage or no wage. People who work two jobs deprive more people of work, exacerbating the issue. Meanwhile, like with horses, there are upkeep issues with human labor, plus you need multiple laborers to cover the 24-hour day, inconsistencies, etc. It's not like the Sprawl where people are born and raised in the company and are thus totally loyal to it, etc.

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Charles 9
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Re: Displaced not redundant

"Food is cheaper now than it has ever been, more people eat out more of the time, even on minimum wage life has never been better in this (or any other non-war torn) country."

Care to back that up? Sure, some things are cheaper, but they're the small fry on the average budget. Plus we're currently in the middle of a soft spot in fuel prices. If we took numbers post-Katrina when fuel prices were 50-100% higher, that changes the outlook.

http://www.mybudget360.com/cost-of-living-compare-1975-2015-inflation-price-changes-history/

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Charles 9
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Re: Inverting the pyramid

Not perfectly, but it still seriously reduces manpower. Instead of a line of workers, you have one or two line supervisors, and when things breaks, you bring in an on-call contractor only as and when needed.

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Charles 9
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Re: Displaced not redundant

Probllem there is that the cost of living hasn't fallen as quickly as the average wage, plus inflation affects the cost of living harder than the average wage. End result, cheaper goods are STILL out of reach for people locked into pittance jobs that pay EVEN LESS.

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Charles 9
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Re: Inverting the pyramid

And as for having people with the money to pay for your goods, the robot masters can simply cater to each other.

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Charles 9
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Re: How about the jobs that those robots create ?

"Unless we start creating robots to create and maintain those other robots...

Then its robots all the way down !"

No, you route them into a loop. If Robot A can service Robot B and Robot B can service Robot A (or at some point in the chain, the robot or robots can circle back to service the first robot in the loop), then you solve the "Who Services the Service Robots?" with "One of the other Robots."

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Robo-Uber T-boned, rolls onto side, self-driving rides halted

Charles 9
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Re: Learning to deal with shitty drivers

"Not only could they have an emergency that I'm unaware of, but it also makes for less stress and it's better to have people like that in front where you can see them then behind you which requires you to take your eyes off the traffic to check."

In the US, there's a more practical reason, too. We call it "letting the rabbit run." Letting a speeder pass means it's the car the cops spot first (and will subsequently stop), meaning you can play looser. I've also heard rumors of trucking convoys employing a "rabbit" car at the head of the convoy that lets the whole convoy drive faster, figuring if the cops act, it'll be on the rabbit, and the time they save is worth more than the speeding ticket.

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Charles 9
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Re: I'll give

"A short browsing of YouTube reveals a vast range of human drivers in various countries all around the world doing some very dimwitted things behind the wheel of a car."

I ALSO hear stories of drivers who act out of reflex, and because of it avoid an accident. They don't even know HOW or WHY they did it, indicating they acted SUBconsciously, intuitively. It's hard to teach intuition because we don't even KNOW how our intuition works: it all works reflexively, without our conscious thought.

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Charles 9
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Re: SRIMECH

I always preferred bots that didn't need SRM's...because they could still operate upside-down.

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Charles 9
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Re: Learning to deal with shitty drivers

Plus the minimum margin of safety is greater than the maximum margin before someone cuts you. You need at least two car lengths, yet you'll be cut at only one car length.

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Robots are killing jobs after all, apparently: One droid equals 5.6 workers

Charles 9
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Re: Analysis?

"Besides, we ALL know that cheap labor in China (and other places) is taking away the low-skill domestic manufacturing jobs anyway. I'd just as soon see robots do that level of work, with domestic employees building (and/or maintaining) the robots (at a higher wage)."

One, what's to stop them using cheapER robots in China, and using local help (and less of it) at lower wages?

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Charles 9
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Re: Globalisation

"A shift will take place that focuses building efficient, functional and useful stuff that complements human labor."

COMPLEMENT...or REPLACE? Isn't that why industrial robots were made? What about the shift to container shipping? The next industrial transformation (and I'm going to take a guess it'll be road freight--it meshes well with containerization) is as likely as not to take more (squishy, error-prone) humans out of the equation.

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Charles 9
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Re: Major Rethink...

Another problem is cultural in nature: and I'm talking ANCIENT cultural, as in "earning your keep" all the way back to "hunt/gather or DIE" ancient. I dare say it's just about instinct, meaning it'll be nigh-impossible to teach away. It's one reason crime won't go away, either, because what one sees as crime another sees as "I survive and you don't."

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Charles 9
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Re: jobs aren't entitlements

And before you counter that adding robots means jobs handling the robots, industrial robots are designed to be low-maintenance. What would've taken an assembly line of people to do now just needs one or two technicos monitoring the whole line to make sure nothing's going wrong and the occasional contractor to come by when something does go wrong.

It's like how shipping changes drastically with the move to container shipping, as someone noted in a previous related article.

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Charles 9
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"How they raise wages, however? They will raise *total* income, because rising productivity implies that much - but as far as I can see, approximately all of that income will go to the people owning the robots. So they will - buy more robots, I guess?"

Worst comes to worst, the robot masters can just cater to each other and seal off the walled garden.

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Charles 9
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Re: Analysis?

"Does anyone pity the poor "buggy whip" makers, when the automobile displaced the horse? Or livery stable operators? Or how about when computers took over BANKING, and you no longer needed rooms full of 'calculators' with adding machines? Yeah, it's a lot like THAT."

As a matter of fact, I do. Because you have to consider the knock on effects of displacing breadwinners with little prospect for starting over. Children, families, whole communities can be left in the lurch. And you know what they say about the desperate.

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Dishwasher has directory traversal bug

Charles 9
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"Nobody with a healthy brain would buy such focking washing machine with wireless/ethernet/whatever!"

Unless, of course, the ONLY choices of sustenance left available to you are manure, dung, and crap. What are you going to do if you're starving?

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Cheap, flimsy, breakable and replaceable – yup, Ikea, you'll be right at home in the IoT world

Charles 9
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Re: Why?

"Do you really believe crooks are so stupid they fear some light bulbs on? There are several creative and simple techniques they employ to know if someone is really at home or not. CCTV cameras and alarm systems are more effective - if they work correctly and don't become another issue themselves."

Many crooks lack the tools to make effective checks. They're just lightning-raid burglars out for a quick score. You can't rely on the phone because many people screen calls through the answering machine first (so won't answer in any event). Knocking and any other physical test runs the risk of drawing attention of the neighbors.

"In case of emergency, you may *not want* to turn on all the lamps. In some situations, could be better to cut off the main power and activate specific emergency lights, which won't create more issues."

Those are infrequent, and in any event, just about anything that could make the mains dangerous could make the emergency lights dangerous, too (because they're also electric). The main reason you want the lights on is because it may be night or otherwise hard to see, and the main goal in these situations is to just get the heck outta there, which may be difficult in low-light conditions.

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Charles 9
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Re: Lightswitches...

A presence switch that works with modern lights? I don't think you'll get it that cheap. The reason being presence switches work like dimmers, and many modern lights don't work well with dimmers (thus the label "non-dimmable"). You either need dimmable bulbs or presence switches designed for use with non-dimmable lights (those tend to be industrial-grade for use with fluorescent office lights--more expensive).

PS. As for being able to get up and flick a switch. there are handicapped people out there who CAN'T.

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