* Posts by Charles 9

11159 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Internet hygiene still stinks despite botnet and ransomware flood

Charles 9
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Not crisis enough yet.

Serious action will only take place if, say, the entire Internet strains from the attack or it becomes directly attributable to significant loss of life. Until then, no one cares enough, especially of sovereign boundaries are in the way.

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Who will save us from voice recog foolery from scumbags? Magnetometer!

Charles 9
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Re: All for it! Best security ever!

I'm still waiting for a practical security system for people with terrible memories and a tendency to lose things.

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Charles 9
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Re: That's what beat "The Club".

Strawman since anything I personally post or any YouTube link I could post (serach for "freeze lock compressed air") or any Instructable I post you'll just call out as "fake". You're like those Christians looking through Galileo's telescope: unable to believe it even if happened before your very eyes.

As for the window, that's why they make Slim Jims.

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Charles 9
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Re: time for....

I mean if you demand something they KNOW, I respond with someone with a terrible memory, where "correcthorsebatterystaple" becomes "donkeyenginepaperclipwrong". As for something they HAVE, what about the person who's always late to everything because half the time he/she forgets the house or car keys?

And, I'm speaking from experience (not me but the people I have to help regularly).

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Charles 9
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Re: That's what beat "The Club".

Have you tried attacking the LOCK CYLINDER? Much smaller parts, hole traps the refrigerant, making it much faster than the hacksaw. And yes, cars ARE stolen intact, to fence, to high-demand foreign markets.

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Charles 9
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Re: ...how about a literal key?

Yes, the people I deal with regularly (a) couldn't remember 12345 to save their lives (it comes out 52431 or 32514 instead), (b) routinely lose their keys, too, (c) are too proud to ask for help, and (d) are family, and I dare not say no lest they consult things like their reunion plans and wills.

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Charles 9
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Twin-sockets (which are 2.5mm, BTW) are probably older planes that haven't been refitted lately. A charter flight makes me think the plane's of that type: low priority on the maintenance budget. I think I last saw the tube-types around 1991, and the twin 2.5mm jobbers around 1992. Since around 2006, every plane I flew in that had video in it had the 3.5mm jack. I know because I brought and used my own headphones (modestly-priced over-the-ear noise-canceling phones that make transoceanic flights a little less ear-wracking).

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Charles 9
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Re: time for....

And if you know and have NOTHING of value?

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Charles 9
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Re: That's what beat "The Club".

They prefer to destroy "The Club" because it leaves the steering wheel intact, raising its fence value. Anyway, the can's not THAT expensive and easy to buy in an auto parts store. Its covert factor makes it worth the buy unless you can find one of those smaller bolt cutters you can conceal in a jacket.

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Charles 9
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"Presumably some logistical reason for the change, surely can't have been cost?"

I think it WAS cost-related. Much easier to just install some wires and a bog-standard audio port in the armrest than a pair of tiny speakers. Plus by switching to the 3.5mm standard, more people brought their own, meaning fewer loaner headsets needed to be cycled in and out. Probably wasn't as practical early on, but once the Walkman craze hit (late 80's), ubiquity made things easier.

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Charles 9
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Re: Quad

"It's pointless research because biometrics can't be a security key!"

But what if the person in question has terrible memory, basically making biometrics the ONLY thing they can use?

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Charles 9
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Re: Not sure the hate is deserved

"But walking around with a large set of bolt cutters helps identify you as a bike thief with a high degree of certainty. It's a substantial risk you'd get caught."

A refrigerant can is a lot easier to conceal. That's what beat "The Club".

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Charles 9
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My first thought was to just use some kind of acoustic channel (like a tube) and position the phone further away.

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AWS launches celebrity-spotting-as-a-service: What a time to be alive

Charles 9
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Re: Will it return...

What about the celebs OTHERS pay to be recognizable?

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Charles 9
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Re: NSFW would help

But that person could have a butt fetish, so he may not find it bad at all.

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systemd-free Devuan Linux hits version 1.0.0

Charles 9
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I own a 1521. That particular model is pretty Linux-friendly (I easily ran Mint on it).

OTOH, a 3521 might be trickier, given it was built for Windows 8+ and has Secure Boot, meaning it won't boot external media right away.

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Waymo waves off original Google Firefly driverless car

Charles 9
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Re: Vans? Minivans?

Minivans are like SUVs. Although normally built to carry people, they're not difficult to convert to cargo use (in this case, fold down or remove the back seats). They're also considerably less expensive than full-on vans which are probably overkill in this case, given how small the original Firefly was.

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Charles 9
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Re: Don't hold your breath..

Depot delivery. Pre-arranged receiving location where a receiver will be ready to open it up and unload. Robo-drivers wouldn't be used to deliver to the door (too irregular) but can handle the humdrum long hauls between depots.

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Charles 9
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Re: Self driving delivery vans?

Why don't they do it now with human-driven delivery vans? Corner the vehicle and hold the driver at gunpoint and you can do it now without waiting for a robot driver (who could well refuse to open its doors until it's at its destination--I'm not figuring this for to-the-door delivery but rather depot deliveries where a dedicated receiving area is expected).

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Buggy devices and lazy operators make VoLTE a security nightmare

Charles 9
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How much of that buggy functionality is built in the radio chips, meaning they're functionally obsolete now (Ka-CHING!)?

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Five Eyes nations stare menacingly at tech biz and its encryption

Charles 9
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Re: the genii has been out of the bottle for DECADES

"Gun control works. The facts are there to prove it."

You're confusing correlation with causation. Ask yourself. Are Americans shooting each other because there are more guns or are there more guns because Americans are shooting each other? What about defensive gun use? What about black market guns? Plans for building your own zip guns off the Internet. The fact there are several major gun manufacturers on American soil? What about violence in general, not just gun violence since two inches of steel from behind is as effective as a bullet?

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Charles 9
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Re: Sure, you can roll your own, and then...

"More insidious, though, will be the _next_ level of action, which will make it illegal to use any genuine form of encryption."

That's what I think will be next. If you make the MERE USE of encryption (outside of State-sanctioned schemes) a criminal act, then you reduce the possible outs to steganography, which can still be severely limited (as in you can only watch so many cat videos a day before it becomes suspicious, nonsense or outlandish posts will raise red flags, plus images, videos, and text can be mangled, bleached, and so on to reduce their steganographic usefulness).

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Charles 9
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Re: "that normally meek geeks will stand up is one that politicians must find terrifying."

"After all, if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear, right?"

And if a politician ACTUALLY ADHERES to that and say, "Fine by me."?

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Charles 9
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Re: This is bad for business.

"How many companies do you suppose are under contract to keep their data encrypted to protect their customers?"

Simple. No one's above THE LAW. If the law compels you to break the contract and takes precedence over contract law, guess who wins.

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Charles 9
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Re: @GrumpyKiwi - Open source?

"Oh and the terrorists will keep enjoying good quality encryption software they already have."

Which will thus stick out like sore thumbs since the State can't read them. AND there are ways to stymie steganography to make even that risky. The thing about encryption in the past was that it wasn't a risk back then to talk in code. Now the mere use of encryption can be very risky, possible to detect in flight (and thus trace), and so on. The trouble with "hiding in plain sight" comes when plain sight severely limits your options.

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Australian oppn. leader wants to do something about Bitcoin, because terrorism and crypto

Charles 9
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"It's 2017, we should have specific people in high level government / the cabinet with proven knowledge and preferably qualifications in Technology and only allow these people to talk about technology rather than allowing the 2 most senior politicians to sound like my Nan talking about "that infernal machine""

How would you go about forcing this into place AND keeping it in place given the political environment? You're trying to force intelligence on a body that PRIDES itself on being stupid.

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Boeing preps pilotless passenger flights – once it has solved the Sully problem, of course

Charles 9
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Re: Human Pilotless Plane? I don't think so, Tim.

"A human will keep trying up until the end. I would trust a human over a computer any day."

Not always. They could have a brain fart. Or panic. Do you really want a panic-prone meatbag with your life in his/her hands? Consider Air France 447 and Korean Air 801, both pretty much caused by incompetence in otherwise-highly-seasoned pilots. Plus consider all the stuff you pass through or use everyday that probably doesn't have a human at the controls. There are driverless trains now. If given that you STILL trust the human, then you're basically trusting your gut over your brain unless you can demonstrate a situation where a human WILL beat the computer, 100% (thus proving Boeing's goal impossible, a la Turing's Halting Problem proof).

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Charles 9
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Re: Automated pilots?

If there's no in-flight entertainment on a transoceanic flight, there's probably going to be a passenger revolt. There's a reason they haven't banned ALL liquids from flights.

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Charles 9
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Re: Human Pilotless Plane? I don't think so, Tim.

"Humans are erratic, prone to error and can break down at any time for any number of reasons, but a human with training and experience can think outside the box, and create solutions where a computerised system will find none."

They can also MAKE THINGS WORSE, have you considered? You keep thinking Steely-Eyed Missile Men. I keep seeing Barney Fife, and history indicates the latter's more likely than the former.

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Charles 9
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Re: No way

Have you ever thought that if this were true throughout the electronics industry (INCLUDING the avionics industry), there would be a LOT more air crashes today?

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Charles 9
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Re: Programming Otto for unforseen incidents.

But did they give some computerized "pilot" the same test to see what IT would've done? Your words seem to indicate that humans in general perform poorly when crap hits the fan and that successes like you describe are more down to luck than anything. Remember, you have United 232...and then you have Air France 447. Or maybe I should cite Korean Air Flight 801. Or any of a slew of others where pilot error was at least a significant if not the key factor.

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Charles 9
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Re: Automated pilots?

Just bring your own tablet. Selection much more to your tastes and under your control. That's the reason many airlines are abandoning the seat-back monitors in future refits (plus it makes the certification easier without so much electronics).

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Charles 9
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Re: I dont think

"They've been trying so hard to pack more and more people into a plane and subtracted more and more things such as meals and checked luggage that I am more than happy to drive 2,000 miles."

Fine. Show me how one can DRIVE from Los Angeles to Honolulu...AND BACK...in less than a month.

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Charles 9
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Re: I dont think

Not even if it made an otherwise-unaffordable flight affordable? After all, everyone has his price...

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Charles 9
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Re: There's something fundamentally important they're missing.

So, like I asked, if you had no choice, you'd sooner not fly even if your job depended on it?

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Charles 9
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Re: There's something fundamentally important they're missing.

So if you have to take a transoceanic flight and ALL the planes are robotic, you'd sooner quit your job?

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Who's behind the Kodi TV streaming stick crackdown?

Charles 9
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"The market for media is global, there is no room for notions of regions and exclusive distribution is just a tool to enable price fixing/discrimination which in other industries would be outright illigal."

Yes, there is, in fact. In some countries, content some would find entertaining or at least acceptable would be considered illegal if not subversive (and thus extremely troublemaking). As long as countries have laws which they will back up to the hilt, global distribution will not happen because they'd sooner see the world end first.

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Charles 9
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Re: Providers are largely responsible.

"No wonder people are happy to get their content from other sources. Sky, TVNZ et al, if you won't want to show a program then don't buy the rights to it, let someone who will show it have it."

Have you ever thought they bought it so that it won't be seen AT ALL? AND they're willing to outbid everyone else to keep it that way? For them, the price of keeping it bottled up is probably less than the losses they would incur if it ever got out.

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PCIe speed to double by 2019 to 128GB/s

Charles 9
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Re: Shoddy

Not really, as the slot design isn't long enough to make a 32-lane slot. GPUs are the traditional use case for something that needs all that bandwidth because the GPU chews through tons of data when running full out, so it's understood that the max bandwidth quoted is for a max-sized (16-lane) slot and provides a consistent metric. And while most network cards wouldn't need 16 lanes, an adapter for the emerging Ethernet standards probably would need it. Also, the trend in CPU and motherboard tech is to provide more of these lanes to accommodate more devices using them such as NVMe solid-state drives (these currently top out at 4x via the U.2 connector, but a future spec may expand this to improve performance).

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When can real-world laws invade augmented reality fantasies? A trial in Milwaukee will decide

Charles 9
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Re: Could you not argue rights of assembly?

Even the freedom of assembly can be restricted in the name of the greater good. That's why parades need to be organized and sanctioned. Even "impromptu" assemblies like picket lines usually are limited in where they can demonstrate. Fire codes impose occupancy limits for buildings to help prevent crushes in the event of an emergency, and so on.

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Charles 9
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Re: Difficult one

What about the aforementioned Eiffel Tower scenario where the owner demands a takedown?

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Tech can do a lot, Prime Minister, but it can't save the NHS

Charles 9
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Re: Money is the solution

"When you're in a hole, you don't keep digging. That applies to a lot of things in life..."

Sometimes, though, life throws you a googly (what Americans call a curveball). If the only thing you have is a SHOVEL, you figure out a way to dig UP.

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Infosec guru Schneier: Govts will intervene to regulate Internet of Sh!t

Charles 9
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Re: Local Network Security

"Which brings me to the next problem. Someone (even if it's google!) need to provide a secure centralised service for firmware / software updates that's completely agnostic to manufacturer's own support commitments."

HAH! ANYONE who tried would just be painting a big, fat bullseye on their backs!

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Charles 9
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Re: Legislation --> certification.

Don't be so sure. One, the whack-a-mole game means for every manufacturer black-marked, another will take its place. Two, free will is exactly how we got here. Buyers don't know better and sellers know to take advantage.

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Charles 9
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Re: Liability

Ever heard of Whack-a-MWhack-a-Manufacturer-Mole? Fly-by-Nights? Bribes at the highest levels?

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The internet may well be the root cause of today's problems… but not in the way you think

Charles 9
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Re: "The internet may well be the root cause of today's problems…"

"There was a time about 1996 that distributed news groups were the melting pot of discussions on all topics - both moderated and unmoderated. It was a jungle - especially the ALT groups. You quickly learned about your own comfort zone."

I guess I'm more used to Usenet as being the file sharing channel of choice before Napster appeared along with all the evolutions of P2P sharing. For me, the discussions were all realtime on IRC using Efnet and Dalnet servers.

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Charles 9
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"Human society would not function if that was the case."

What do you think's happening RIGHT NOW? With social structure strained, things are getting rather dicey.

"Humans function best in small groups. Introduce any pressure on environmental resources and there will be competition between groups."

Those "other tribes" become the "neighbours" I mentioned, so my argument still holds. When the basics aren't so hard to get (read: you don't have to hunt everyday just to have dinner), the necessary size of the "tribe" shrinks until it's down to family units (houses, neighbours, etc.). Especially when a larger social structure creates a disconnect between the top and the bottom. Instead of food and water, it's spouses, good schooling, connections, and so on. It's the same thing as the jungle, only structured a little differently.

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In detail: How we are all pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered – by online biz all day

Charles 9
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Re: And another thing

Actually, it's NO joke. There are ways to de-anonymize your through behavioural patterns that can pass through the VPN. Or they can just find a way to pwn the endpoint, OUTSIDE any proxy, rendering them moot.

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Say hello to Dvmap: The first Android malware with code injection

Charles 9
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Re: Rooting

I'm wondering if you've misread. It seems to me it's an UNrooter. If it encounters a rooted device, it UNroots it to prevent it being force-uninstalled. Meanwhile, it uses exploits of its own (temp-root stuff) to wedge itself in place.

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Pai guy not too privacy shy, says your caller ID can't block IP, so anons go bye

Charles 9
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Re: There are 2 parts of caller-ID

"So in your example the answer would be that it simply doesn't need to."

My two numbers would look IDENTICAL to the phone exchange (it never sees the dashes), so it can't tell which is which, and the two could be across the country. That's the main reason there are still some telephone number rules: to prevent such a scenario.

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