* Posts by Charles 9

10418 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Who's behind the Kodi TV streaming stick crackdown?

Charles 9
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"The revolt is in the form of people choosing to still consume their products but shafting them for their arrogance. The movie industry has been dominated by 250 million dollar pictures that are unoriginal and aside from a big budget; leaving the audience longing for a better film."

If that were true, cinemas would be in decline, yet the box office numbers are bigger than ever.

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Microsoft's in-store Android looks desperate but can Google stop it?

Charles 9
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Re: Not the same...

But the Services App the proverbial Eye of Sauron. It's the biggest problem in your entire setup. Unless you can kill the Services app (permanently), Google CAN and WILL continue to spy on you, even if you have nothing else installed.

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Charles 9
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Re: It's dead, Jim

"UnaOS is reported to be released in April https://unaos.com/"

It was also funded by IndieGoGo. And their attitudes don't give a lot of people confidence in their ability to actually deliver (for example, they're reluctant to subject their code to scrutiny).

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Charles 9
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Re: Not the same...

"There's lots of OEMs who'd actually pay Google for the right to use the App Store in isolation, but for some reason, downloading and updating third-party software requires a phone that's running Google Docs and gMail too.. Google says everything is interconnected, which is odd, because the result of United States v. Microsoft said that this was a bullshit excuse nearly twenty years ago... and it's still a bullshit excuse today."

Except there actually IS one thing tying them all together inextricably: Google Play Services. Without it, NONE of Google's apps work, full stop, and it's so internally interconnected that trying to extricate the stuff that's needed to run the Play Store without taking excess baggage along for the ride would be like asking Microsoft to open-source Windows 7: you'd have better luck forecasting a blizzard in the inferno.

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Charles 9
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Re: windows 8.1 for mobile phones

I thought it was the snooping that earned it most of the black marks. It almost makes you want to go back to a virgin Windows 7 install.

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Charles 9
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Re: Sympathy for The Beast?

"Didn't they try to have an alternative Android stack to the Google stuff at one point? Didn't they have a good map application?"

Not really. While you could use OpenStreetMap and so on, no one has the sheer manpower Google does. Remember, they had real live people driving real live cars around the world to get their own internal map data. They have their own private fiber network and so on. IOW, Google is completely in control of a lot of private resources here, all acquired legally through their own hands. And with work on AOSP a pale shell of what it once was, it's rapidly becoming a Hobson's Choice: Take It Or Leave It, understanding that there's not much left should you leave.

What would you do if bending over was the only way to keep yourself (and likely your family) from starving?

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Charles 9
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Hmm...

Could force a decision over just who exactly owns what on a phone if it gets forced into a court.

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Charles 9
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Re: Android is less than desperate

Welcome to the vicious cycle known as a Captive Market.

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Europe to push new laws to access encrypted apps data

Charles 9
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Re: Meet the law, and defeat it.

The moment you do, the law will just download their own copy and break the system. The only way to ensure that is to make sure the law never gets a hold of the code, which can't be guaranteed due to the First Contact problem.

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Charles 9
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Re: and picture messaging will be banned

What about a COMPUTERIZED Panopticon, with humans reserved for the red flags? Think how casino security works, cranked up to eleven.

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Charles 9
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Re: The solution is obvious

WHY would it be so terribly difficult if there were ways to mangle stego and so on? Then it's down to code phrases and so on that require First Contact to establish, and those can be moled.

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Charles 9
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The fact you'll stand out like a sore thumb since your tweet has no legible text in it...

You not only have to prevent the plods from decrypting your message, but most of the time you also have to hide the fact you're communicating at all, or the plods simply track the tweet activity to nail you down.

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Firefox Quantum: BIG browser project, huh? I share your concern

Charles 9
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Re: I don't know about lynx and w3m

Thanks for pointing me to a Windows port. This seems to be the best of the lot compared to Links and OffByOne, especially when used together with Freenet, making it my browser of choice now for that purpose. Might also be a nice option for a Tor browser since it has internal proxy support.

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Charles 9
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But at the time, most smart phones were iPhones (Android only took over a few years ago), meaning that they would've preferred Safari, not Chrome.

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Charles 9
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Re: Surprised that speed is still an issue

"If I leave it running most of the day it can use over 1Gig of memory and regularly peg the CPU at over

70%"

IINM, that's mostly the websites' fault, not Firefox's, unless you can show the same thing leaving it open for a whole day using nothing but about:blank.

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Charles 9
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Re: VNC

Actually, it's BOTH of yours, as BOTH ends have to give and take. That's why there are data caps and peering agreements.

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DDR5 to jump off the drawing board in 2018

Charles 9
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Re: Persistence

Not really. Just treat memory like you would storage. If you're paranoid, destroy it down to the chips.

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Charles 9
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Re: That's AV ruined, then.

BIOS and EFI malate cam do that already. Then you have owned device firmware like BadUSB that are pre-book and nuke-proof.

That bus left the Depot some time ago.

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Microsoft taking CodePlex behind the shed and shooting it by Christmas

Charles 9
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Re: @Mage

"At the end of the day ISA cards are not rocket science, neither are the drivers that run them. A moderately clued up EE grad could port the control HW & SW across to something more contemporary, or you could track down middle aged PC geeks fed up of playing guess the required heap size today with JVMs..."

Not necessarily without ticking off the vendor and/or breaking contracts...

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Charles 9
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Re: @Mage

"Windows isn't special anymore, it's just another piece of legacy software."

Which is EXACTLY the problem. Think of the lathe that is controlled by an ISA card which means the computer that controls it MUST run Windows XP (because Vista dropped support for the ISA bus). It had been bought just a few years back and is designed to run for decades (thus it's being amortized for that long).

Meanwhile, I've seen plenty of custom-built apps from companies that no longer exist, yet they can't afford to have a new version made, so they're forced to keep spare parts and backups handy because if that software goes, so do they. Yes, it's living on the razor's edge, but that's just how some people are forced to live.

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Charles 9
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Re: @Mage

Some of them won't take no for an answer, and many business-critical applications ONLY run on Windows. Especially expensive, irreplaceable custom jobs.

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Head of US military kit-testing slams F-35, says it's scarcely fit to fly

Charles 9
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Re: You gotta know...

Actually, they DO know votes. And if you're representing a little hodunk desperate for federal money and your vote could mean life or death for the budget, what would you do?

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Charles 9
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Re: Boeing

It's all the pork that was pretty much required to get the votes needed to pass the budget. Otherwise they'd have likely been replaced in the next elections. It's a real dilemma.

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'Windows 10 destroyed our data!' Microsoft hauled into US court

Charles 9
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Re: Forget Micro$oft.

And if your software is Windows-ONLY, WINE-incompatible, and because of heavy 3D use or custom hardware, not VM-friendly, either?

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SpaceX wows world with a ho-hum launch of a reused rocket, landing it on a tiny boring barge

Charles 9
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Re: ULA

But the physics still favor the cargo plane. It's a more stable flier and it has a much larger carrying capacity (I'm pretty sure they can do plenty more than 50kg--airdrops in the tonnes are de rigeur).

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Charles 9
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Re: ULA

I was about to say. I think you might have more success with a rear-opening cargo plane than with a helicopter. Deploy a catch wire out the back as you fly past, snag it and reel it in. If you miss, circle around for another go (start from high enough and you should get several attempts).

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Charles 9
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Re: Amazing

And because Mars' atmosphere AND gravity differ, it would likely be impossible to design a glide lander capable of working on both planets.

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US ATM fraud surges despite EMV

Charles 9
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Re: Almost no US ATMs use EMV

You need to clarify. You mean a bank ATM at a bank because practically ALL ATMs are provided by banks, as their money underwrites their operation. It's just that the banks that run kiosk ATMs are not the kinds of banks you can just walk in.

Most of the kiosk ATMs are the in-and-out type unless it has Chip support, in which case the slot has a clamp. This is probably for maintenance reasons since kiosk ATMs are visited less frequently, making recourse in the event of a seized card more difficult (anyway, the ATM can just transmit a panic to the card's bank to lock the card and render it useless until the user contacts the bank).

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Charles 9
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Re: Almost no US ATMs use EMV

"on iphone need your fingerprint to unlock the phone before token is allowed to be used"

And Android Pay won't let you bonk until your device has a real lockscreen turned on (your choice, but none of that simple "Slide" business--fingerprints, PINs, patterns, or passwords, user entry is required).

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Charles 9
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Re: slow?

"It's much the same with chipcard adoption. It won't happen until the level of fraud rises even more, or until the banks are forced to indemnify customers from any fraud on their accounts."

And the banks usually don't have to because the credit card companies will usually indemnify customers if it's just the odd one-off (better that than tick them off and raise a defection).

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Charles 9
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"I just really don't understand why chip & PIN is such a problem in the US."

Because the US has A LOT of rural areas where you would be amazed to find they still use imprinters...because even access to a telephone is not guaranteed (heck, they may not even have electricity). Chip readers would be useless to them.

"...so why are their retail and banking industries so reluctant to use a technology that has been demonstrated to reduce fraud in Europe and elsewhere?"

Because fraud isn't really that big an issue in the US. Well before Chips, the US has had a robust chargeback system in place, and the credit card companies have ways to investigate frauds. Given the volume of activity in the US, the overall percentage of fraud is close to the noise level, and most of that is not of the type that Chips can help control (for example, e-tailer or CNP fraud).

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Charles 9
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"In 2004 US card fraud rate was 0.05 and Europe was 0.11, more than double. By 2010, EMV brought Europe down to a fraud rate of 0.06 while the US rose to 0.08."

And how much of that rise was due to e-tailer (CNP) fraud which Chips can't help?

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Charles 9
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Re: Almost no US ATMs use EMV

"Nearly 100% of US ATMs are magstripe-only. This, plus the widespread use of "skimming" devices on ATMs (see krebsonsecurity.com) make it very easy for fraudsters."

Actually, an increasing number of ATMs support Chips. You can tell because they'll ask you to leave your card in, clamp on them, and won't let go until you're about to get your cash.

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Banking group denied access to iPhones' NFC chips for alt.Apple.Pay

Charles 9
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And as another commenter noted, the courts have no power to do so. Push came to shove, Apple could just pull out altogether. If the playground is too hostile, just don't play in it.

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New plastic banknote plans now upsetting environmental campaigners

Charles 9
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Re: Missing a trick

"Allergy to celery is a common problem for those who grow it. The workers harvesting the crop usually "only" suffer contact dermatitis (rashes, swollen lips and throat and such that you get from excess histamine) but anaphaleptic shock is not unknown."

Mangos are another product for which you develop reverse tolerance, meaning it gets worse as you keep eating them.

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Charles 9
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"Traditionally, linen bedsheets were handed down through a family, something that could hardly be said of even the best quality cotton bedsheets."

And as I mentioned, those are typically woven, not knit as in a T-shirt. Every knit linen garment I've found falls squarely under "delicates".

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Charles 9
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Re: We need to stop paying attention

Except they won't take no for an answer. That's why we have eco-terrorism: because they know at SOME point we HAVE to respond.

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Charles 9
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I think so. I think we call it lard in other animals, especially pigs.

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Charles 9
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Re: How long does an animal have to be dead to satisfy Vegans?

If they're petrochemical-based, yes, but what about if the plastic is plant-based?

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Charles 9
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Re: Missing a trick

You could perhaps FAKE some of it. Put in the worst offenders (lard, tallow, peanuts, tree nuts, gluten, dried milk) to put "NOT Kosher, Allergen-free, or whatever!" on the front of your bar and and simply put on the back of the label "May contain one of the more of the following:" and list off all the fad ingredients of the month. Much easier to change the label than change the product. And it's not like you're going to mass-product the things.

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Charles 9
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"Hemp and linen are both well-suited to substitute for cotton in all but one respect: cost*"

As I understand it, while linen can be used as an all-weather clothing, it's better used in weaves, where its ability to take a pattern really shines. Knit bast fibers (linen, hemp, etc.) tend to fall on the delicate side of the care scale along with silks (they don't seem to be as hardy and are more vulnerable to various substances), making their uses in things like T-shirts and undergarments not as affordable.

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Charles 9
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"Cotton has the highest requirement for pesticide inputs."

But you can counter simply asking if they want to go back to wool or linen undergarments, T-shirts, and so on. Because as far as I know, no one's managed to find anything even close to cotton in terms of its desirable qualities.

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One IP address, multiple SSL sites? Beating the great IPv4 squeeze

Charles 9
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Re: End to end is a myth

"The traffic is routed to your destination wan ip regardless of its source ip. ISP's should drop it as no one can route back to the rfc 1918 addressing. It was more of an issue when bandwidth was low but now not so much. When troubleshooting and checking logs It's useful to know traffic is routing through but the NAT isn't configured properly."

But they DON'T. That's what I'm saying. Otherwise, I should not be seeing a 24-bit RFC1918 source address (first octet 10) in my logs (since as you say, they should not be routed or routable) as I use a 16-bit RFC1918 subnet (first octet 192). Which means something's amiss here, and basic knowledge of routing isn't going to do squat when nothing's ever that neat and simple.

IOW PS. It isn't paranoia if they really ARE out to get you.

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Y'know CSS was to kill off HTML table layout? Well, second time's a charm: Meet CSS Grid

Charles 9
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CSS splits layout from content, making pages EASIER to read. Plus tables are still there for actual online tables.

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Charles 9
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Oh? Tell that to someone with a screen reader.

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Charles 9
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"We collectively have the power to stop recommending and start refusing to use Microsoft products."

Unless, of course, the one who insists on Microsoft signs your paychecks .

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Charles 9
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Re: What's new?

The difference is using rows and columns for inline tabular data and using rows and columns for fundamental website layout.

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Is this a solution to Trump signing away your digital privacy? We give Invizbox Go a go

Charles 9
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Re: there's always another way

What if they force all HTTPS traffic through their own proxies a la enterprise proxies that user their own certificates and everything?

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Charles 9
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Re: So who's worried about the browser vendors?

The whole problem is a matter of trust, and at its ultimate level, the problem is intractable; there's no way to ensure that whom you trust hasn't been subverted without your knowledge. It ultimately amounts to a Leap of Faith that you have to place your trust SOMEWHERE to get things done at all.

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Charles 9
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Re: re: most people have little to fear

"No. It's the present regime of Trump and the heartless Republicans and selfish Libertarians that is feared. Of course May, Erdogan, Putin, Mugabe etc too. There could be no tomorrow after this lot."

Oh? What about a future regime the criminalizes all encryption not backed (and crackable) by the State? "Nothing to hide, nothing to fear" and all that? Never say things could get worse because in the end the law is just ink on a page.

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