* Posts by Charles 9

11155 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Virgin Media router security flap follows weak password expose

Charles 9
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Re: correct horse battery staple

But what about people whose memory is SO bad it comes back "donkeyenginepaperclipwrong" instead?

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Heaps of Windows 10 internal builds, private source code leak online

Charles 9
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Re: Even pro-Microsoftie Thurrott...

"HOWEVER, if we can manage to convince a few of the BIG BOYS (let's say Intel, AMD, Lenovo, Dell, and some of the others that will SELL HARDWARE AGAIN if a decent OS is available) that they need to invest in this kind of marketing, it MAY become practical enough that "it happens"."

It'll work AGAINST hardware companies since the odds are it will LOWER requirements instead of raise them. Plus, virtualization is not an option for everyone (like those with custom HARDWARE that can't be virtualized).

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Charles 9
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Re: Even pro-Microsoftie Thurrott...

But without the core, how will you run the windows APPS that are the main reason people stick to Windows? And no, substitutes aren't always available.

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Charles 9
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Too late. With BAD USB you can own machines with many different types of USB hardware, and since it works at the hardware level, it can work regardless of OS, making it nuke-proof.

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Charles 9
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Re: Wake up call

I think so. If it was an insider, they'd include the most important part: the kernel.

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Smart burglars will ride the surf of inter-connected hackability

Charles 9
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Re: Smart crims?

"This is why you are advised never to keep any identifying documents in your vehicle. You have seven days in which to produce them at any police station, not just one belonging to the constabulary who stopped you."

Depends on where you are. Most places you're expected to have them at hand or the police can give you immediate trouble (and not just registration; also proof of insurance and proof of current inspection). At best, they give you a ticket for not having the documents at hand (the "at hand" specifically required under most traffic codes); at worst they may think the car is stolen (that's Grand Theft Auto—a felony—meaning having to deal with jail in the process).

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Charles 9
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It's not stupid they reject. It's clunky. Vista's UAC was clunky, as was the CueCat that missed half the time. Used to have one and hacked with it, but the LED died on it.

Stupid can work if it's simple enough and popular enough. Look at Facebook and Twitter. Not to mention biometric and Bluetooth locks (tempted to play with one, only for low-security stuff, though). But it does pose that perennial challenge: combining high security with high stupidity.

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Charles 9
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Re: Smart crims?

Nice thing is (1) they're REQUIRED to be in the car ("License and registration, please.") And (2) they're required to be accurate BY LAW (you're required to inform Motor Vehicles if you move).

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Cisco's 'encrypted traffic fingerprinting' turned into a product

Charles 9
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Re: Everything-over-HTTPS

But it's still tricky. In disguising some tells, you can create others. It's extremely difficult to obfuscate your traffic completely. Not just packet sizes but timings, rates, destinations, etc. can all leave tells, and if you try to scrub all the tells, you may not be able to get through. After all, even an envelope needs an address, and that alone can be useful information.

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Charles 9
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Re: It's an old idea

"Yes, but since this is a packaged product, you can test it in your laboratory for as long as you want to."

You can test it in YOUR environment, but how well can anyone replicate replicate the real-world network conditions of an average enterprise which could be as different as night and day? If such a product needs environmental conditioning first, then the defense has an insider's edge.

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AES-256 keys sniffed in seconds using €200 of kit a few inches away

Charles 9
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Re: How well was the PC prepared?

Even a TEMPEST-rated case?

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Microsoft raises pistol, pulls the trigger on Windows 7, 8 updates for new Intel, AMD chips

Charles 9
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Re: Stupid

"So not "captive market". No market at all."

Microsoft still wins, then. They're the status quo.

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Charles 9
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Re: Two words - Linux Mint

""There will only ever be a market for maybe 6 computers"... "No one would ever want to send messages to no-one in particular" etc etc (paraphrased). Lots of people have said "the market isn't there", and the technology is now something most people use every day and take for granted."

WHEN were those statement said exactly? It's not like ""There will only ever be a market for maybe 6 computers" and then there were six million overnight. Many of these things take time, like the apocryphal 640KB statement. 1MB was a lot of memory back in the 1980's. It made sense THEN.

"Nah, I'm not doing something that would take half a second of thought or a few seconds with Google if the thought is to hard for you. There are a number of "mature" markets that died out virtually overnight when other technology replaced them."

Then NAME SOME. I'm not going to do your legwork. It's a matter of principle. If you did this tactic in a courtroom, you'd be laughed out. YOU threw the lure, YOU reel it in.

"and like saddle makers, if writers don't shift from a dying platform then they'll see custom reduced to nothing"

You may be interested to know that Muir & McDonald Leathers are still very much in business. Their specialty happens to be the very thick steer leather that's preferred by saddle makers.

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Waymo: We've got a hot smoking gun in Uber 'tech theft' brouhaha

Charles 9
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Re: How cute...

To which I reply, "All you have is a shovel and the sides are too soft. The only way out is to dig."

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F-Secure's Mikko Hypponen on IoT: If it uses electricity, it will go online

Charles 9
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Re: I'm not paying extra for that crap

"I won't even have to do that. My toaster is around 2 decades old and is not on the 'replace' list. If only IoT ones are available in the shops for some stupid reason then it will never be replaced."

Even if it melts down? What will you do then?

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Charles 9
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Re: I'm not paying extra for that crap

"There will always be a number of devices that fail without 'user tampering'. The more parts it has, the more functions, the more failures will occur and the warranty must cover that. The more warranty claims the more cost."

Unless they're the MOST reliable parts in the machine. Remember, the tech behind it was originally developed for outdoor sensor meshes: a "set-and-forget" setup that means you can't expect someone to come along to fix it if it goes wrong.

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Charles 9
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Re: Our Savior - the Third World?

If they're THAT backwater, they're probably still using washboards and the like, in which case it's like I said: back to the open flame and the icebox. If people are willing to go THAT far back in time, then you can say electricity is overrated at that point. Talk about cutting one's nose to spite one's face.

"Get the government to lend a hand?"

Two words: Big Brother. I'm sure the Nigerian and Cuban regimes would be keenly interested in something like that, especially if they're told the Russians and Chinese are trying the same thing (remember where Cuba takes its cues). Not so their opposition can stage a coup, but so they can prevent one happening, like how the Iranians squelched the Arab Spring through THEIR Big Brother control.

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Charles 9
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But what alternative is there to a refrigerator? Back to iceboxes and ice merchants?

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Charles 9
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Re: Save me from the evil "Things"!

Governments feel restrained. Even Germany wants in. Don't expect those Acts to stay up for long.

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Charles 9
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Without the cartel smothering them? One with the government's blessing? Don't be so sure.

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Charles 9
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Re: I'm not paying extra for that crap

Wanna bet? England wants it, France wants it, even Germany wants it. Roll that in your mind. The strongest country in the EU wants Big Brother.

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Charles 9
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Re: I'm not paying extra for that crap

No, they'll say the warranty is null and void because of user tampering (the radio chip and antenna would be non-user-serviceable parts). And since the government will be in on it, they'll be on the manufacturers' side.

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Charles 9
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Re: IoT vs Users

"What benefit is data on how often I use my toaster? None, and the cost of installing 5G components is > 0 as is the airtime for data comms and when it cuts into their margins they won't use it. Your illuminati-cartel isn't going to suborn every vendor into this vast conspiracy."

As long as it is sufficiently small, and if they get the money back by monetizing their data for use as potential shopping habits, then it can be justified as low enough to not worry much about it for a potential repeat return.

"And even if his practice becomes commonplace, I don't know where you get the idea of this perfect system of devices bricking if the user interferes. From what I can see 99% of vendors can't even implement basic security, which does cost them effectively nothing except for a dev pulling some crypto libraries and wrapping their protocols in them. Anything as complex as 5G connections, SIM cards, etc is not going to fly in the churn-and-burn cheapness of the IoT world."

Two words: Suicide circuit. It's not that hard to continually check for something's presence if it's electrical, and if it's electronic, there are ways to make it tough to spoof as well. They're also not that difficult to implement, even on the cheap.

"Oh, and as a final thing: GDPR."

It won't BE a thing for much longer. Hell, even frickin' Germany is getting in on the act. As a comic book journalist once touted, "Paranoids are just people with all the facts." Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean the world really IS out to get you. Just look at the United States.

"Undoubtedly some vendors will go down this route, just as some are currently selling boxes of fruit juice with DRM baked in. But that's only some, and only idiots buy their products. As has been shown time and time again, any form of DRM can and will be circumvented."

4K BluRay players haven't been cracked yet. Not have the XBox One and PS4 and their successors. A nigh-bulletproof end-to-end chain of trust complete with encryption keys is finally emerging, unique to each device, making breaking them so difficult as to be impractical (4K movies are coming from other sources, for example). Same with the newest iDevices and Androids. Haven't heard much about jailbreaking and rooting them as of late.

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Charles 9
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Re: IoT Jammer

Followed thereafter by a lot of "This device is not operable." messages. And before you reply with consumer backlash, I counter with a cartel with the government's blessing.

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Charles 9
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Re: I'm not paying extra for that crap

It won't be cheaper because the cost to add the tat will be practically nil. The technology already exists in remote sensor meshes.

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Charles 9
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Re: Lots of tinfoil-hattery going on here

But that was before compact battery-sipping radio tech for use in things like sensor meshes appeared. And IIRC 5G can use lower frequencies for greater range and don't need a lot of data usage: more akin to SMS.

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Charles 9
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Re: Typical snake oil salesman

"If he thinks vendors are going to make a "2 cent chip" with an integrated cellular radio he probably already owns Brooklyn Bridge so I won't need to sell it to him again."

Except they ALREADY EXIST for sensor meshes. And 5G will only make this easier.

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Charles 9
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Whispernets are more tolerant. If you can do SMS, a whispernet should be fine. 5G low-bandwidth can use lower frequencies for greater range.

The companies will act in cartel with the government's support. Any that try to break rank won't last long as that data represents repeat business, and there's no business like repeat business. Especially when the costs to add drops rapidly toward nil.

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Charles 9
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Re: "We can't avoid the IoT revolution by refusing to play part."

"It is amazing what a pair of side cutters and a sharp pointed scriber can do to help personal security."

It'll quickly become the most common way to brick your appliance AND void the warranty (on account of tampering).

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Charles 9
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Re: "We can't avoid the IoT revolution by refusing to play part."

"My other half won't let anything IoT in the house (useless toys) and won't let anything (other than telephone or laptop) into the house with a microphone."

So what happens when the inevitable happens and you need a new fridge and ALL of them are IoT-FORCED that brick if you disable or cage them?

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Charles 9
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Re: Save me from the evil "Things"!

Whispernets. Direct, unblockable connection. Try to cage them and they'll brick.

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Charles 9
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Re: Fire risk?

Probably. Also probably give it a valid reason for bricking.

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Charles 9
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Re: "We can't avoid the IoT revolution by refusing to play part."

"Er, my router, my firewall rules..."

BZZT! Their network chips, their rules, and they trump you because they're up the chain. And since it's a cartel up there, with plenty of network technologies covered by patents (and they're genuine hardware-based patents), good luck trying to roll your own network chips from scratch to get around them.

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Charles 9
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Re: Freedome will be illegal in the UK

Even if they're based OUTSIDE the UK? How will they get past sovereign immunity?

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Charles 9
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Re: Share and Enjoy!

Nope. They have connections. Try to put them up against the wall, they'll call in their friends and you'll have THEIR guns behind YOUR guns.

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Charles 9
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Re: IoT vs Users

Nothing. It's a cartel. You take it back and find out EVERY machine/toaster/microwave does the same thing. Plus they won't have to rely on your WiFi going forward as they'll use Whispernets, so they can connect without your ability to control it (like you say, they'll brick first if they can't get through, so forget about caging them or breaking their radio stuff). And the government isn't your friend there, as they WANT this to happen for their Big Brother campaign.

Better consider going back to open flames and wooden iceboxes.

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Charles 9
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Nothing new. Recall the original Amazon Kindle and its "Whispernet" which ran on top of the AT&T Wireless network? Same idea here. If it can reach the air, it can connect whether you like it or not, and you can bet these devices will brick if you try to Cage them or destroy their chips and/or antennae. And if ALL the manufacturers are doing it, you'll be left with a Hobson's Choice: either bend over or start living backwoods-style cooking with an open flame and storing cold stuff with a self-built icebox.

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Microsoft admits to disabling third-party antivirus code if Win 10 doesn't like it

Charles 9
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Re: '34 years of development - Windows 10 is the result'

What about Blizzard? They don't seem to be jumping up and down for Linux support, either, and they're the poster child for successful multiplayer gaming with WoW (which people PAY--per month--to play) and Overwatch (the new multiplayer fad that's now incorprated into professional gaming circuits--you know, the ones where real money gets involved).

Look, until the headliners (where the REAL money is made) make the jump (and you can throw in ZeniMax--Fallout 4 is NOT going to Linux unless subsidiary Bethesda are convinced/coerced into changing their minds), until you can get the professional gaming circuits to drop Windows (again, REAL money here), I still say gaming is not ready for prime time on Linux.

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Charles 9
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Re: '34 years of development - Windows 10 is the result'

"As to Linux support, how similar is it to BSD which a variant of is well supported."

Not very, particularly in the multimedia and graphics aspects which are key to gaming.

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Charles 9
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Re: Linux "pushers" again

Well, either that or say Overwatch (natively, you can get banned for using WINE on Battle.net), enough to steal a professional gaming sponsorship or two.

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Charles 9
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That level of paranoia would mean you couldn't trust ANY software EVER because it can be subverted any number of ways. That includes open-source software which can be either subtly subverted or simply usurped.

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Charles 9
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Re: '34 years of development - Windows 10 is the result'

And then you have the serious gamer set, for which consoles are a casual toy and no other OS compares to Windows for lineup and support, especially for headliners which would be the purview of professional gamers. Gamers (and especially professionals) won't jump to Linux unless someone is willing to back them up, and not even Valve's support is enough in this regard.

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Tesla death smash probe: Neither driver nor autopilot saw the truck

Charles 9
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"Rules, advise and laws all exist, doesn't mean everyone will obey them."

But what happens when it reaches the point that NONE obey them, giving you a situation like Prohibition where everyone broke the law because they felt it was an ass?

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Charles 9
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Re: They still call it Autopilot?

"It's been many years since dead man switch mechanisms have been mandatory in locomotives - all over the world - and it wouldn't be hard to implement this in some form in of road vehicle that is designed drive without constant human attention - perhaps a warning every five minutes, with a second warning after 30 seconds if no action is taken on the first warning and automatic pull over and stop if no response to the second warning."

Except people have become rather ingenious at mindlessly dealing with nuisances such as vigilance controls. I think there have been instances where crashes occurred with vigilance controls and it turns out the driver was so numb to the routine he was doing it in a zombie-like state without even thinking about it.

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Charles 9
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Re: Right, $50 of bars will stop a 4000lb car going 74mph.

What about ride height issues, especially in places like the US where trailers have to roll over railroad track bumps where they can get caught?

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Google, Mozilla both say they sped up the web today. One by blocking ads. One with ads

Charles 9
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Re: I switch off ad blocking once...

Why do you think more ads are UNSKIPPABLE because they're INLINE with the content?

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Charles 9
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Re: Why use this over a blocking plugin?

Chrome-type plugins. Android Firefox can actually use ublock Origin.

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'OK, everyone. Stop typing, this software is DONE,' said no one ever

Charles 9
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Re: CentOS 6 is in production phase 3

It's even worse business to leave customers culberable to pwning, especially since that can get you in legal trouble, leading to suits, fines, maybe even injunctions. UNhappy medium. So...who are you going to tick off today?

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Charles 9
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Re: I was all set to agree but

"Or we need to retouch the paint and they've replaced the colour with a new shade that is just a fraction different (over and above batch variations)."

I thought most paints these days were tinted to order. Just bring a scrap of the color you want and they can mix you a quart of gallon to match it.

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Charles 9
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Correct me if I'm mistaken, but I believe you mean when "regular" leaded fuel was phased out because of pollution concerns, forcing some cars to get some serious work done to deal with the different fuel.

Question: Were some models forced into retirement because they couldn't handle unleaded fuel? This was during my childhood so it was all fuzzy to me, though I do know all the cars my family had required unleaded fuel. I'm just wondering if there were cars that required leaded fuel.

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