* Posts by Charles 9

11155 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Big question: Who gets the blame if a cyborg drops a kid on its head?

Charles 9
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Re: Can you trust this tech?

And then the plods will just resort to psychology to apply a subtler form of mind control that doesn't trip the "coercion" detectors, etc.

The problem with sieges is that the attacker usually has the advantage: usually in the form of a broader scope. Unlike the defenders, the attackers aren't bottled up.

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Charles 9
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Re: If you put a helpless human in a machine

"Fully autonomous machines need to hold the manufacturer responsible for clear mechanical failures and to provide a WORM audit log when the Luser does something daft."

But since that's going to be a while away, what about SEMI-autonomous stuff where the line between machine-controlled and human-controlled blurs. What if an accident occurs in that gray area? Is it the user's fault for giving an unintentionally "stupid" instruction, is it the machine's fault for not recognizing it as a "stupid" instruction, or did something unrelated intervene to turn an otherwise "sane" instruction "stupid"? We're heading into Book of Questions territory here, if you ask me, where a clear answer is going to be elusive.

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Five-eyes nations want comms providers to bust crypto for them

Charles 9
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Re: Breaking News: Water is wet

"The trouble here is that while machines are excellent at pattern recognition, they'll only ever find the precise thing you tell them to look for. Heuristic scanning is notoriously hit and miss, and even then, you still need to give the system a series of baseline behaviours to check against."

Fine enough. As long as it's the first line, it can winnow out the noise to leave less for the humans to skim.

"Too much signal tends to make your average Joe tune out."

That's the beauty of machines. They DON'T tire. In fact, given the right learning system, the more data the merrier for it.

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Charles 9
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Re: Breaking News: Water is wet

"Steganography has already been done."

But it gets trickier the more information you have to pass along at a time, especailly in a "low-shared-knowledge" situation where you and the target have little if any in common. Plus for many methods of steganography, there are ways to sanitize them. For example, hiding in whitespace can be defeated by sanitizing whitespace to minimum spacing standards, and so on. Nonsense messages like book codes will tend to stand out (as will outlandish sports predictions), images can be stretched, flattened, etc. There are limits.

PS. As for the idea the Panopticon will be Too Much Information, ever considered they could winnow the stuff through machines first? They do that already with large camera arrays like in casinos.

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Charles 9
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Re: More like

No, they're doing it on their own in pursuit of the almighty credit (replace with preferred currency). They figure cheating, covering up, and paying for the occasional bust is cheaper than playing honest.

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Charles 9
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If it isn't governments setting impossible timetables, it's private enterprise setting impossible timetables. Pick your poison.

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Charles 9
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Have the 5 eyes actually wised up and are demanding encrypted content be snagged OUTSIDE the envelopes, at points where the contents MUST be decrypted (such as when being read, since we don't have encrypted eyes)?

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London cops hunt for drone pilots who tried dropping drugs into jail

Charles 9
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Re: Time for Trebuchets!

"ahem. as a model aircrafft designer I can assure you that low noise is exactly high efficiency."

Oh? What about the fact that high-thrust rotors generate more wind (thrust is merely directed wind, after all), which (above a certain level) becomes audible?

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Robots will enable a sustainable grey economy

Charles 9
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Re: Dumb yanks

"Too many people going to the same places at the same times. The congestion problems would be solved by spreading out times and locations."

Trouble is you lose efficiency once there: less economies of scale.

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Charles 9
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Re: Hurrah we can work forever

"What should have happened was to start off, back when Lloyd George set up old age pensions, with a fraction of the money paid in being invested."

Question is, what fraction without either ticking off taxpayers with higher taxes or ticking off the elderly with lower benefits? It was almost untenable from the get-go except that penniless Gran dying while eating dog food was even less tenable. IOW, the least-worst option was almost unacceptable in itself.

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Charles 9
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Re: Other cars are available …

Perennial problem with public transportation is that for every stop you pick there are 10 that are too far away. And then there's that dreaded destination: "Out of Town" or even "Off the Beaten Path." For these or tasks too large for two hands, it's personal transport or bust.

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Don't panic, but Linux's Systemd can be pwned via an evil DNS query

Charles 9
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Re: what's fascinating is how the SystemD fanboys react

How about to do the things WE want, the WAY WE want them done. Otherwise are the machines slaves to us or us to the machine?

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Charles 9
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Re: If THIS isn't a reason to hate systemd...

"list all the software that has never had a bug."

What about seL4, which has a formal proof?

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America throws down gauntlet: Accept extra security checks or don't carry laptops on flights

Charles 9
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Because if they're not shown doing SOMETHING, they get voted out (or worse, recalled BEFORE their term).

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Charles 9
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Re: Laptop rental

Ok, Paranoia Mode, what about the CHIPS, which may also be in the laptop you own, can hook to whispernets or powering networking while you recharge, AND can trump any OS that can be applied?

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Charles 9
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Big Brother

"My guess is there simply is no threat and they just want an excuse to subject passengers to "expanded screening." What are you going to do, fly without a laptop? (In my case yes. Next time I leave the country, I'll be on a plane but my laptop is flying DHL.)"

But can you trust your laptop being out of your sight that long? DHL has American ties, you know (as it was founded in San Francisco)? And they could have ways to tracelessly rummage through your stuff the way MiniLuv did.

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Charles 9
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Re: Shelley Berman knew how to do it

Besides, profiling in America carries the R-card with it, making it unusable due to the Civil Rights Act.

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Charles 9
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Re: Anon

"They've already tried that. It turns out that it dulls the explosion and merely amuses bystanders."

In an airplane, though, you can TAKE IT OUT.

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Charles 9
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Re: Last I read...

"Does it matter if the container is tight enough to contain an explosion? In a tightly closed container, the fire would eventually go out because of lack of oxygen."

Odds are the initial blast will at least burst it open, leaving plenty for the subsequent fire.

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Charles 9
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Re: How about if we stop making more terrorists in the first place?

"A bit late for that, the damage has been done."

And no chance to REPAIR the damage?

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Charles 9
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Re: Laptop rental

Laptop has a 1TB HDD and is mostly full. External hard drives will receive scrutiny, too, IIRC.

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Charles 9
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Re: How about if we stop making more terrorists in the first place?

In other words, there are those for whom destroying the world is preferable to living in submission. How do you fight against an opponent for whom Mutual Assured Destruction is an acceptable scenario?

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Standards body warned SMS 2FA is insecure and nobody listened

Charles 9
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Re: Require Replies to SMS messages over shortcode

SS7 attack, maybe, but what about a SIM clone or other SIM-based attack, where the network's on the attacker's side?

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Charles 9
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Re: "the statement has had virtually no impact some six months after its announcement"

But that requires an Android phone. What if you have an iPhone or a feature phone?

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Blunder down under: self-driving Aussie cars still being thwarted by kangaroos

Charles 9
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"You would kind of think that the default logic would be that if a moving object was detected (or stationary) that it couldnt recognise it would reduce speed & engage avoidance by default...."

The problem comes when they don't recognize it until they're INSIDE the minimum (physical) stopping distance. Now you're in Trolley Problem territory.

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Sorry, Dave, I can't code that: AI's prejudice problem

Charles 9
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Re: Transparency...

In other words, logging wouldn't help you because the decisions involved are too technical, too inexact, or too numerous for the average person to follow.

Kinda makes me think of Farscape here. Translator Microbes are supposed to be able to grok most languages: even the highly-nuanced language of Pilots. But they can't translate Diagnosians, whose language is SO vast, meticulous, and detailed it puts Pilots to shame.

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Concorde without the cacophony: NASA thinks it's cracked quiet supersonic flight

Charles 9
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Re: Option 2:

Or how many have taken to positioning themselves on coasts and islands to reduce the odds.

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Charles 9
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Re: Next, apply the technology to ...

Depends on the bullet. Pistol rounds, for example, rarely go supersonic. Military and rifle rounds, yes, though.

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Researchers blind autonomous cars by tricking LIDAR

Charles 9
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"Otherwise you'll be the one telling the coppers "that kid just appeared out of nowhere" as the ambulance drives slowly off with its lights and sirens OFF."

Dude, Not Funny!

That's more real than you realize. Little kids can be smaller than the cars they hide behind and completely concealed by their bodies. They don't know what's out there, then suddenly jump A MERE THREE FEET in front of your car.

Physically unavoidable, and an emotional train wreck to boot. You CANNOT tell the grieving parents that you can't fight physics.

And PS. Parts of tree can drop pretty suddenly and without warning. Maybe not the while trunk, but think a very large and heavy overhead branch that picks that picks the wrong moment to drop fifteen feet in front of you on a crowded road (so no room to swerve). Yes, they CAN just drop. Frequent auto insurance claim, in fact.

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Charles 9
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They're shooting dazzlers at pilots now, why not drivers?

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Charles 9
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Re: Er ?

The point is, ANY kind of processing (say to winnow out false signals) is going to add reaction time, and in this case, added reaction time adds stopping distance. Now, according to my calculator, 60mph = 26.8224m/s. So a second lag time means you basically need half again as much distance. Even a realistic tenth of a second delay raises your minimum stopping distance by nearly 3 meters (about 9 feet). That's why the end of the article noted concerns around processing time.

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Charles 9
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You can beat a replay attack with a rolling code, which will also reduce the odds of a collision. But it's still not going to do much good in a twitch situation (say a tree suddenly falls across the road within the braking distance).

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Charles 9
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So the havoc-wreaker will simply dazzle ALL the systems at once using multiple spoofing systems. Even better, giving each one a different false reading will produce a logic bomb no matter what the judgment system used. After all, what kind of system would be able to figure out they're really traveling over black ice when one system tells them they're going 100mph, another 15mph, a third still 25mph sideways, etc.? Every sensor different and every sensor WRONG, too?

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Australian govt promises to push Five Eyes nations to break encryption

Charles 9
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Re: cannot even manage their own passwords ...

Not just in the UK. I know people who you try to drill "correcthorsebatterystaple" into them and they keep coming back "donkeyenginepaperclipwrong". Some of them can't even spell their own name correctly or even recall their birthday? No joke!

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Charles 9
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Re: End to Banking

End to banking? What did banks do before computers? Or before the telegraph?

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Charles 9
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I thought it was NP-complete. As in solve it in P and you prove P=NP.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ahmed the Terrifying Terrorist

But very little at that. Reduce the information flow to a trickle and you make it riskier to send since if you push things too hard you can reveal yourself. Plus you can't be sure WHICH methods are being used, and some methods can squelch methods others don't.

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Charles 9
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Re: Why the focus on point-to-point communications?

It stands out when the government decrypts the message with their cipher and it still comes out garbage. Now Alice and Bob are suspicious. You not only have to conceal your communications, but you also have to conceal that you're communicating as well.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ahmed the Terrifying Terrorist

Except the moment the picture reaches the social network, the image can (and usually does for the very reason you describe) get resized, flattened, and otherwise mangled to squelch any steganography you may have put into the image. About the only way you could convey a message that's mangle-resistant is to make it part of the image itself (which (a) requires previous coordination which may have been moled, and (b) may stand out enough for the plods to realize it for what it is).

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Charles 9
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Except since a working quantum computer would be "black" tech (meaning they'll deny it even exists), we can't predict how far ahead they really are, plus as noted while post-quantum algorithms exists, none have been judged sound enough that it couldn't be attacked better than brute force (all so far have had serious flaws found).

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Charles 9
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Re: Oh wow!

Possibly. Think a "Black"-classified working quantum computer.

If they can hide the existence of stealth aircraft for several decades, keeping secret a working quantum computer hidden under a data center in Utah is possible, too.

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Charles 9
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Re: Bwahahahahahaha!

Not even throw you in prison for 20 years for terrorism?

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Despite high-profile hires, Apple's TV plans are doomed

Charles 9
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Re: Apple Games

Games are a no-go. Market is too mature. Microsoft had to leverage heavily to buy in, and they're playing second fiddle to Sony, who has too many media connections (they're a genuine media conglomerate--movies, music, TV, media, the works) for any upstart to topple. Nintendo survives with its franchises and by playing outside the box.

Just how would Apple compete in such a market.

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Heaps of Windows 10 internal builds, private source code leak online

Charles 9
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Re: So how'd they get it?

"Yes, a lot of games don't run on systems they're not designed for. As to your "need high end gaming", maybe you "need" to re-think some of your life if gaming actually is a "need"? There's a great world outside, with incredible graphics and animations that don't stop or stutter. Sticking to gaming can lead to depression, social anxiety, and all sorts of other problems that are not in the least "fun". This I am writing from personal experience. Don't let it happen to you (and apols if I am reading your meaning wrong)"

Guess you never heard of smog, muggers, or Major League Gaming.

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Microsoft admits to disabling third-party antivirus code if Win 10 doesn't like it

Charles 9
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Re: '34 years of development - Windows 10 is the result'

"Pro-tip : Most people don't give a stuff about the gaming you constantly harp on about."

PRO-Pro-tip: PLENTY of people give A LOT of crap about gaming. Gamers are still trailblazers for PC tech; otherwise, we'd have plateaued years back. Steam, Battle.net, Origin, and so on numbers seem to indicate there are more people who care about gaming than you care to research. After all, what do you think professional gamers use (you know, those that do it for a living)? And no, we're not interested in consoles (you can't play WoW on a console).

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Charles 9
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If you're that paranoid, should you not be concerned that your drive firmwares were infected at the factory from which there is no escape?

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Researchers solve screen glare nightmare with 'moth-eye' antireflective film

Charles 9
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10% versus WHAT, though? From 1.0% to 0.2% can be considered an 80% and by your standard quite noticeable.

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Charles 9
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Re: Confused?

Actually, they'd help solar panels. See, if the light gets reflected, it goes UP and AWAY from the business part of the solar panels. Light that gets scattered has a better chance of going DOWN to where you want it.

PS. To whomever suggested mounting the moth-eye film away from fingers, that won't work. For it to work, it has to FACE the light in order to properly refract it. As noted, it creates a dilemma. Smooth surfaces are more oleophobic but more reflective. Matte-like surfaces (the moth-eye film can be considered this) reflect less light but DUE to their rough surface are more oleophilic. I think the previous attempts at anti-glare try to find a happy medium: oleophobically smooth yet able to prevent reflections to a good extent.

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UK Parliament hack: Really, a brute-force attack? Really?

Charles 9
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FAIL

Re: horse & door

In other words, who pays for surge capacity when it's never used?

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Virgin Media router security flap follows weak password expose

Charles 9
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Re: Erm....

"If you don't have your own router, change the WiFi AND admin passwords - which should be standard OpSec anyway. It wouldn't be that hard for device manufacturers to trap all web traffic when the thing is in "default" mode and force passwords to change, before letting it go fully operational...."

Unless people are so used to "plug and play" that they plug it in and keep complaining that instead of the Web they get these weird gibberish screens. MUST BE BROKEN! SEND IT BACK!

It's hard to deal with BOTH security AND stupidity, and recall that consumer-level tech has to deal with LOTS of stupid.

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