* Posts by Charles 9

10427 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

It's a question worth asking: Why is the FCC boss being such a jerk?

Charles 9
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Re: Personally I have no strong opinions on it?

"You would think (democratically) that the needs of the many would automatically outweigh the wants of the few (especially since the ISPs do not actually "own" the internet, it's certainly not their turf that the 99% majority are accessing)."

Thing is, unlike with the roads, which were mostly built and owned by the government, most of the Internet is owned by private enterprises. If not the ISPs (AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon are all Tier 1 networks), then the providers those ISPs contract for their backhaul.

"I suppose so long as the marketplace is fractured & people have options, they will have to keep that in mind if their ISP isn't giving satisfactory service - and as long as all ISPs don't all start working together as an internet access bloc."

That's the concern here. ALL the major ISPs are colluding together as a cartel. Also note those companies above that ALSO control backhaul. They're the equivalent of the owners of the biggest Interstate highways in the country.

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Charles 9
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Re: @chuckufarley -- But these people aren't stupid

REAL real businesses don't compromise. They CONQUER.

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Charles 9
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"I would also suggest that removing net neutrality is against the very people Trump is supposed to be working for and that can't be argued by anyone. The establishment he is supposed to be working against will make great gains from being allowed to control the internet and charge extra money for preferential treatment."

Except you forget there are TWO establishments: the old guard and the new guard. And at this point, battle lines are drawn between them. The old guard represent the likes of Comcast, Time Warner, and Verizon: the old communications providers. On the other end you have the likes of Google, Netflix, and Amazon who work "over the top" of the communication providers. Since both sides are striving for the same thing (control over the flow of information), a "war" over it is inevitable, and the divide is pretty stark. The old guard don't want to be relegated to dumb pipes, and the new guard don't want to have to pay tolls on every junction.

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What is this bullsh*t, Google? Nexus phones starved of security fixes after just three years

Charles 9
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Re: Google to drop security fixes for old version of Android

Not even Android Pay, which ALSO blocks on unofficial ROMs?

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Charles 9
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Re: Actually...

As I understand it, Xposed has never been able to reliably block SafetyNet because it uses an external and secured connection (similar to a timing attack used to detect being in a VM--there's no real way to stop this). Only Google or the app maker knows the private key.

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Charles 9
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Re: Google to drop security fixes for old version of Android

A slim budget and a need to stay stock due to root-aware apps.

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Charles 9
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Re: Actually...

But how do you deal with increasing numbers of root-aware apps?

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Charles 9
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Re: The phone I want

You'll be chasing moonbeams, then, because HSPA and LTE were both made with mobile data in mind, and that means smartphones (because what else would a feature phone use with high-speed data; it has no apps, and the carriers would be pressuring the phone makers not to include tethering capabilities; Apple and Google are the only two companies strong enough to push back). As others have said, mobile hotspots have themselves been targeted, so you're screwed no matter what. Basically, if you don't want to be targeted, get off the Internet. That's your only real option now.

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European Court of Justice lays down the law on Kodipocalypse

Charles 9
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Couldn't they just construe that YOU are the REAL real buyer and they are just agents acting on your behalf? That's how they nail murder-for-hires.

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Charles 9
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Re: pre loaded

Pi's tend to struggle a bit at high-def, and I don't think they can do HEVC-encoded videos. I DID plunk down for an Android box once. Claims to be quad-core and all that, but it seems to chug a lot and the interface is rather clunky (that said, I only sank $25 into it, so I'm not out that much).

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Charles 9
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Re: Do you know what would deter pirates?

"Copyright infringement will always exist, but it can be greatly reduced if the content providers adapt."

You forget. Once their media's cut loose, they lose their repeat business which they need to continue existing. Plus these things cost money and they need to recoup it. Have you considered that your model may not be enough to get it back? Unless you can provide actual hard numbers to support this? And don't use the music industry as a basis since their overheads are much lower being they don't have to cater to eyes.

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Charles 9
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Re: Question about these pirate Kodi sticks

I think it's mainly the latter. Content management systems are getting hardened enough for the former to not be too feasible these days barring a hole.

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Charles 9
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Re: mmmmmmmmmm...

"One assumes, further, that it may become illegal to pass any directions as to where you can find the instructions on how to install such software."

Directly, probably, but that kind of information is also easier to pass along INdirectly.

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KickassTorrents kicked out again, this time by Australia

Charles 9
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Re: Oh my god

"No, it's not. If the movie is good then it will be seen by a lot of people making big bucks. If it's crap like the movies we've got for the last 5 years (all those pre/sequels, reboots, restarts, lego movies) then even $5 is too much."

Oh? If they're so crap, how come THEY'RE the ones making all the bucks?

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(You can't) buy one now! The flying car makes its perennial return

Charles 9
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Re: Rotors "powered by the wind"

"'Lack of wind' does not imply a vacuum. The air does not disappear because it is not moving."

The point is that air is a prerequisite for wind. A vacuum has no air. No air, no wind. No wind, your kite ain't going to get lifted up by it, end of. It's for the same reason a feather will fall as quickly as a pebble in a vacuum.

"Try flying a kite by running downwind!"

At that point, the kite is flying YOU instead.

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Charles 9
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Re: Cruise control

Actually, 3 dimensions makes the situation WORSE because now trouble can come from BELOW you as well. An additional two directions to move ALSO means two additional directions things can MOVE AT YOU. In other, more degrees of freedom = more degrees of Murphy.

An aircraft DOES have to accurate track a flight path without landmarks because another aircraft can be above, below, OR besides you (this is real-life stuff, which is why Air Traffic Control is so important).

Autopilot DOESN'T HELP in the event of exigencies, such as turbulence (distressingly common, take it from a frequent flier) or incursions (another bloody idiot pilot getting in YOUR way). And what happens with a sudden catastrophic failure? At least with the car it just comes to a halt and you can get out (in a hurry if need be). Coming to a halt is not ideal when you're a thousand feet in the air in an airframe nigh-inpossible to build for a dead-stick glide.

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Zeiss, ASML hit back at Nikon in chip-printing patent row

Charles 9
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Re: filing suit in three countries (the Netherlands, Germany, and Japan)

But hasn't the EU patent bureau been around long enough that any patent filed BEFORE they existed will have run its term by this point?

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Plan to kill net neutrality is the best thing/worst thing ever! EVER!!1

Charles 9
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But it STILL takes bandwidth they may have to pay for: regardless of the method unless they use courtesy couriers. Especially if they include the "alt." groups that are the REAL draw of Usenet these days.

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Charles 9
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Re: If US buggers up the net what happens to the rest of the world?

USED TO run well. Now with all the data it carries? Think how long it took to download a 650MB ISO over dialup. Now raise it about a hundred times.

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Charles 9
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They use bandwidth to mirror the newsgroups, though.

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Charles 9
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Re: Here we go again

4 million in a country with over 350 million people. Can you say "drop in a bucket"? Constituents mean nothing to them since even if they were to vote, the pliable plebs would simply outvote them. For those 4 million people to matter, they would have to have serious business weight behind them with something far stronger than a strong desire to have ISPs regulated. Unless they can threaten a mass defection of business (and jobs, tax revenues, and so on) to Canada or whatever, they're not going to really pay attention.

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Charles 9
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Not only that, cities can have another handicap: age. I can name two HUGE cities that both have some difficulties wiring up: New York and London. Why? Both are OLD cities full of built-up (and built-DOWN) infrastructure. Anything you want to build in those cities has to get around all that existing stuff first.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ug

Just because you don't know them doesn't mean they don't hate you. And part of the art of voting is convincing people to agree with you. If your stand doesn't have the proverbial leg to stand on, it is you who needs to re-evaluate your stance, even if it IS the right one to you (which is relative; that's why you can never win an argument with an irrational person). If you're the one hen in a house full of foxes, perhaps the best option is to bail the hen house.

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Charles 9
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Re: Well...

Because Canada's Internet access still stinks for the most part, especially if you go away from the densest parts to the south. Just go there and listen to all the complaints about the likes of Rogers.

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Charles 9
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"So would any Americans who support this view explain why Europe with its 'excessive and burdomsome' regulation has better internet connections and more competition over providers than you?"

Simple: they're SMALLER. When it comes to networks, geography matters because of the infrastructure costs, and it's worth nothing that the only countries LARGER than the US have WORSE Internet access.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ug

But that just puts you in the UNHAPPY medium where EVERYONE ELSE hates (and out votes you).

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'I feel violated': Engineer who pointed out traffic signals flaw fined for 'unlicensed engineering'

Charles 9
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Re: Landgrab again

If you're talking a MEDICAL Doctor, that means M.D. usually, and those are only available at post-graduate medical institutions like certain universities. There's also the requirement to pass a state-mandated test to be able to practice your trade in that state (Lawyers have the same issues, their law degrees are also post-grad and lawyers must pass a Bar exam in order to practice law in a state, thus the term "passing the Bar").

PS. D.D.Sc (or just D.D.S.) actually qualifies as one of those specific degrees. It's the one you need to become a professional dentist.

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Charles 9
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"This is the same state that's so nanny they don't let you pump your own gas."

What about New Jersey? Aren't they Full Service by law as well?

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Charles 9
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Re: Casey Jones (1863–1900)

With all things, there's a long story behind this.

The whole business goes back to Latin. In this case, ingenium, from which we get the modern English word "genius", which both makes a good synonym and applies to a person with said mental acuity.

We basically have two origins for the word "engineer", both valid but both different. One is the "design" engineer, where the definition comes from the application of genius in designs (in these days of a practical nature). The other comes from the operating of the machines we call engines (the word uses the root word in a different way—engine as in "a work of genius").

So they can both apply, so they really need to be qualified for clarification.

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A switch with just 49 ns latency? What strange magic is this?

Charles 9
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Re: You say HFT I say automated man-in-middle attack

You ever thought those parasites STARTED on the trading floor and simply found ways to get around them? It's like anything in human competition: anything for an edge, even if it means getting around the rules. If you think applying rules will change anything, you don't realize the lengths people will go when the stakes get that high.

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Charles 9
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Re: The future...

Then the traders will go back to the old method: bribery, as far up as needed.

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Charles 9
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Re: The future...

"HFT shows that the financial system is broken and working against the needs of Society. If the financial system was an audio amplifier, then HFT would be ultrasonic ringing, and the designer would insert a low-pass filter to improve the amplifier's performance. Instead, the HFT traders throw money at increasing the problem, because it makes them more money."

Your analogy is broken here because the HFT people WANT the ultrasonic ringing, as it gives them a money edge. That's why they're willing to throw money at it, because they get MORE money in return. It goes to basic human behavior, so you likely can't fix something like this without fixing the human being.

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Charles 9
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Re: The future...

But that was the FIRST thing they did. All the prime real estate's assumed to already be taken, including space WITHIN the exchange if at all possible. Now, due to the crazy demand, prime real estate commands prices too high for RoI to be worth it anymore. Which means time for Plan B: quicker turnaround at junction points because everything else is basically hampered by the speed of light in medium and the speed of electricity.

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Sneaky 'fileless' malware flung at Israeli targets via booby-trapped Word docs

Charles 9
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Re: BIOS

There's been talks about infecting persistent EFI storage and USB controller chips (BadUSB, remember?). The idea is to bypass software and go straight to the hardware which is OS-agnostic.

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Charles 9
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Re: Well, we'll look for the house with no numbers.

It probably hides itself as a child process of something else running or finds a way to completely conceal itself so it doesn't appear at all.

What I'm wondering is if the next step is to use a memory-only malware to leapfrog past files and go straight to firmware so that it can make itself nuke-resistant if not nuke-proof.

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It's time for humanity to embrace SEX ROBOTS. For, uh, science, of course

Charles 9
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Re: Since we're "going there"...

It would be defeated by peer pressure and the old saying, "Ain't nothin' like the real thing, baby."

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Just delete the internet – pr0n-blocking legislation receives Royal Assent

Charles 9
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Headmaster

Re: No sex please, we're British.

That's TWO sentences.

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Charles 9
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Re: The Ruling Class

Ah, but China has shown a way to deal with VPNs. Just restrict ALL encrypted traffic that can't be decoded by the State. And if your system is able to parse other formats, you can also put a pinch on steganography. Control the points of ingress and egress, and you can prevent "conspirator" routers from helping as well.

Unlike with Prohibition, the borders CAN be patrolled pretty effectively if the State really got around to it.

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Charles 9
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Re: Police state

That wasn't a novel. It was a short story called, "The Pedestrian." The man was taking a walk outside when everyone else was home watching TV. An automated police car happened upon him, questioned him, and demanded he climb inside to be taken for psychiatric evaluation.

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Charles 9
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Re: There's another way to deal with Royalty

The problem with pitchforks and flaming torches is what if you're countered with the likes of tanks? Think of the Chinese solution to uprisings.

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Charles 9
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Re: Democracy for the majority

"Maybe instead, when they ask for prawns to be banned, the techies should just say "No." Don't try to reason, just stonewall."

But the problem with recalcitrance is that, eventually, people go, "Sod this!" and go around you. Even a coast-to-coast stonewall can be bypassed by sea. The risk of stonewalling is that they simply ignore you and you get no input in the final solution.

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Charles 9
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Hollywood has access to the cinemas, and cinemas are Hollywood's #1 revenue stream, which is why they get first cracks at movies. Plus they're torrent-resistant. The porn industry doesn't have something resembling that kind of revenue stream.

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Charles 9
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Re: Age verification

Most of them aren't considered valid for online shopping and will be rejected. The credit card companies know which are which and don't want to get caught up in money laundering investigations.

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Charles 9
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Re: Hardly surprising

"The worst form of government except for all the others."

Doesn't prevent democracy from being insufficient in and of itself, though.

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US Navy runs into snags with aircraft carrier's electric plane-slingshot

Charles 9
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Re: A rocket can't

I think that was before multistatic radar became en vogue. Multistatic radar is practically stealth-proof. The only way to beat that would be to develop an actual omni-directional transmissive electromagnetic cloak, and scientists right now don't have the foggiest idea where to begin on such a thing (or we'd have holographic video already, it can work on similar principles).

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TVs are now tablet computers without a touchscreen

Charles 9
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Re: Hubba! Hubba!

HEVC would be handy for low-bandwidth streams that can still show some quality, but high-def porn requires proper camera techniques because that level of detail can start creating Too Much Information problems (basically, do we really need to see the dirty at that level of detail?).

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Charles 9
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Re: Analogue TV

Interesting story that. It was around the same time that Multichannel TV Sound (MTS) was added to the NTSC standard, achieving the same feat in the States and other NTSC-using countries.

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Charles 9
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"I don't suppose the set manufacturers were happy about that. The new business model is much better."

They couldn't use today's model yesterday because televisions were much more expensive relatively speaking, even for mid-range products and were seen more as longer-term investments into keep up with the world, since back then there weren't that many channels to choose from and stuff like cable television was in its infancy. We're talking the days when "Cable-Ready Remote Control Color TV" was a selling point.

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Charles 9
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Re: All I want is the screen

"They exist, just look under 'Monitors' rather than 'TVs'."

Not quite. TVs stick to the standard resolutions while monitors tend to cater to users who need resolution more than anything. Beyond say 23 inches you go beyond 1080p resolution which tends to be overkill for most. Depending on the brand, monitors around the 30 inch range are 4K resolution. And I don't think they make monitors in home theater size. And let's not get started on the prices, as these tend to be classed as professional equipment.

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Charles 9
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Re: The road ends eventually.

"Similarly, when DVD first launched, PCs at the time needed an MPEG-2 add-on card as the required decoding wasn't possible in software-only due to the limits on CPUs grunt at the time."

And they weren't cheap, either. Anyone remember the RealMAGICs and Jazz VGA piggyback cards? I ended up getting one (used) because I learned firsthand that a 300MHz CPU (no cheapie for the late 90's) was a bit on the underpowered side. It took the P3 generation to make it doable in software, just as it took the P1 generation to be able to do MPEG-1 VideoCDs in software.

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