* Posts by Charles 9

11133 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Tech billionaire Khosla loses battle over public beach again – and still grants no access

Charles 9
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The implication it's the ONLY thoroughfare because the beach is actually a cove: enclosed. The Pacific coast can be pretty rocky. Ask anyone along Highway 1 there.

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Charles 9
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Is it corruption to protect you self and safeguard your potential campaign? Is it corruption for a hodunk politician to refuse to pass a critical piece of legislation without some compensation demanded of his/her constituents?

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Charles 9
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Re: The other guy

There's one thing worse than pissing off an average voter: pudding off a RICH voter, especially one rich enough to influence average voters. Trump is ONE of the rich, and he didn't really piss the rest of them off.

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Charles 9
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Re: @Kev99 Federal public lands law

Screw the laws, he has enough money to keep the courts tied up for years. Plus I have friends the mayor doesn't want to piss off with a gubernatorial election coming up.

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Charles 9
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Re: @Ian, close but no cigar... All you really need

Even from public property, you still can't Disturb The Peace. As for the city turning a blind eye, there could be phone calls. Remember the gubernatorial election coming up.

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Charles 9
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He'll just counter with Disturbing The Peace complaints, and this time he may have a case.

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Charles 9
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Re: @AC GET OFF MY LAWN

And since this is no skin off his nose, he also doesn't care if he gets stuck with a Vexatious Litigant declaration. He can pay the other side's legal fees just as easily and knows the mayor doesn't want to tick off the VERY influential residents with a gubernatorial election coming up. The mayor can't take the most direct action while they have him by the short-and-danglies.

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OpenAI bot bursts into the ring, humiliates top Dota 2 pro gamer in 'scary' one-on-one bout

Charles 9
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What do they do with people trained such that they can kill with just their hands and feet (lethal even when UNarmed, IOW)?

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Place your bets: How long will 1TFLOPS HPE box last in space without proper rad hardening

Charles 9
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What about computers at rest?

Now, yes, you're going to need some well-built stuff to use while in transit between Earth and Mars, but is this also true for computers at rest, powered down, and packed up? Can ionizing radiation have deliterious effects for data or even hardware that isn't operating yet but will be? I would think this to be an interesting question as well as most of the computing power one would take to Mars wouldn't be in use during the trip, only once one arrives.

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It's August 2017 and your Android gear can be pwned by, oh look, just patch the things

Charles 9
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Re: Stop the world I want to get off

Won't they just pwn you via the radio chips, which are universal to ALL phones, smart and feature?

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Charles 9
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Re: "manufacturers drop out of the market"

"That's just a typical savage capitalist argument, and it's bullshit. Companies might make their kit more expensive to cover extra costs (if their main competitors did the same), but they wouldn't pull out as it just leaves free space for their competition to move into."

Not if the cost of compliance bleeds out any chance for profit. Economics 101: if you can't make a profit, pull out of the market. And there is such a phrase as "strangled by red tape".

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Charles 9
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Re: which will post their own updates in time, hopefully.

Manufacturer's cruft, without which they would never have sold the phones in the first place, which in turn would've meant Apple would've become the lone player in the smartphone market. IOW, necessary evil.

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Charles 9
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Or you'll see no more phones (or support) as manufacturers drop out of the market (and the EU, to avoid the fines by way of sovereign immunity).

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Horsemen of the disk-drive apocalypse will ride upon 256TB SSDs

Charles 9
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"Disk density has increased by a factor of 1000 since that followup paper was written. If you want to ensure your hard drive is truely erased, take the platters out and heat them past their curie point, otherwise ATA secure erase is sufficient unless you're facing 3-letter agencies with 9-figure budgets - and they're more likely to use "monkey wrench" decryption when pressed anyway."

And if they're up against a masochist (HARDER! I'm so close...!)?

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Charles 9
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Then explain MIL SPEC erasure standards. The military historically doesn't respond to theoretical threats, and I'm pretty sure I've read of forensics labs able to recover data through their equipment that can work at the physical level.

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Charles 9
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Re: So for personal backup...

For now, your only hope is to use rust. USB drives or a personal NAS, RDX if you're richer and need a better assurance for cold storage.

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Charles 9
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Is that command certified to work on SSDs that have their own internal logic, meaning you can't be sure an erase to a sector isn't going to another part of the drive, including parts that may have been set aside for redundancy? Now, granted, drives with internal encryption are very easy to securely erase, but what about the rest of the lot?

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Charles 9
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If only we had an affordable alternative to rust for consumer-level packrats.

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Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

Charles 9
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Offered to send him a screenshot to PROVE it's not there?

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Charles 9
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Then you HEAR the beeping as the space gets rejected, and you then find out someone ELSE changed the software in your absence.

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Charles 9
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Re: Supposedly a true story

Then, of course, "That can't be right. I'M Phillip Smith!"

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Charles 9
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Re: Hilarious!

Oh, what if the arguer happens to be the guy who wrote the RFC that REVISED the original RFC? IOW, the v1.0 man trying to talk to the v1.1 man.

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Charles 9
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I wonder if anything like this has happened.

Someone calls support, claiming something is working. Now, we have your Bob scenario:

"I know for a fact what you say is wrong. You see, I WROTE the specs."

But then:

"Funny that. You see, I REVISED the specs."

Now what?

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Revealed: The naughty tricks used by web ads to bypass blockers

Charles 9
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Not quite. Servers always know if something gets sent or not. They can inspect the network. They're also gatekeepers of the content: serving ONLY by their leave. Combine them and you realize they possess ultimate say. All they have to do is deny access unless and until the ads are served. And if their content happens to be exclusive...

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Charles 9
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Re: The easy way to get around this* (*most of the time)

I wouldn't be too surprised if a site like that hid all the content with white-on-white text collapsed by a CSS tag which only opens when the same JavaScript that enables the ads us enabled. Found something like that on a site. Tried removing the "screen" only to be left with a blank page.

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Charles 9
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Re: Dumb will as dumb does

Guess you never watch free TV, then. ALL ads are forced there, and then there's Product Placement which is part and parcel with the content.

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Charles 9
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Re: Remember... I still pay for the bandwidth

They respond, "So do we, and unlike you, we don't get the buffet deal."

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Charles 9
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Re: The Solution is Simple

And I think it not so plausible. Otherwise, it would've already appeared. Instead, you have the opposite: "bulletproof" providers who provide legal protection and plausible deniability.

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Charles 9
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Re: On the other hand...

I don't trust HOSTS files that much. I've run into too many false positives. One list blocked my credit union.

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Charles 9
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Re: Now why do you think the advertising industry doesn't try to sell that solution instead?

And given how much of a killing they make, they seem to have a very salient point.

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Charles 9
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Re: Why doesn't someone

Still saps your data allowance and bandwidth, and for some, one or both are at a premium. Plus, many ads tie themselves well into the article itself, meaning trying to cut out the ads will probably result in getting part of the content cut as well.

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Charles 9
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Re: The Solution is Simple

There's ALWAYS a limit, as matter and energy are still finite. And in this case, there are the infrastructure costs. Think about it. What happened to Tripod and GeoCities? Pretty sure sooner or later ANY user-generated content will HAVE to go through some money-grubber because there will be no other free self-publish sites anymore. Then what?

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Charles 9
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Re: The Solution is Simple

Problem is, you could LOSE the war, and EVERYTHING can end up behind walls or full of ads too tightly coupled to the content (think Product Placement) to safely remove. Will people start abandoning the Internet and go back to international robocalls, non-returnable junk mail, and billboards?

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Charles 9
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Trouble is, those systems usually run afoul of false positives and "ostriching". Eventually, ad men will make ads that fall below the noise floor and can't be distinguished from actual content (think product placement in TV shows).

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Hey America! Your internet is going to be so much better this January

Charles 9
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Utilities are a notoriously high-upfront-cost market. Meaning naturally high barriers of entry. Rights of way, digging or rigging, laying down the physical infrastructure, and they all scale with distance. Geography matters. Is it a coincidence the most-wired and fastest countries in the world happen to be among the smallest? That's why utilities tend to be natural monopolies. Meaning wiring to the sticks is going to involve some seriously outlay simply due to the distances involved, no dodging that.

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Charles 9
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Well, when it comes to broadband, geography matters. It's not like any country bigger than the US is doing any better rolling out to the sticks. The ROI simply isn't there without a sweetener.

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In the red corner: Malware-breeding AI. And in the blue corner: The AI trying to stop it

Charles 9
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Re: The only winning move is not to play.

You forget things like Return-Oriented Programming where malware can simply use other programs (who are MEANT to access the places it needs) to do its dirty work FOR them.

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Google, Mozilla both say they sped up the web today. One by blocking ads. One with ads

Charles 9
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Re: Targeted ads

"What makes a viewer sure that an irritating ad is actually from the (apparent) sponsor?"

Trademarks. All brand names are trademarked as a matter of course. Rivals can't use someone else's trademark without permission or they'll get railed in court for Trademark Infringement.

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Core-blimey! Intel's Core i9 18-core monster – the numbers

Charles 9
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Re: Yes and no

Your clients probably aren't so interested in overall quality, so they're willing to sacrifice quality for speed (and thus turnover). OTOH, if you were say a BluRay mastering firm with a more generous time budget, you'd probably take a different approach.

Also, historically, GPUs are less suited for a job like video encoding because the balance of quality and speed produces workloads that are less conducive to parallelization (think divergent decision making that can hammer memory or spike the workload).

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Charles 9
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Re: Nice L3 cache you've got there

Even with EFI-based systems?

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Charles 9
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Re: Gamers?

Doesn't the support chipset provide additional lanes for lower-priority stuff?

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Oxford Uni boffins say internet filters probably won't protect teens

Charles 9
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Re: Anon for reasons - Basically to avoid the SJW'ers

"Porn is an industry built on niches and targeted appeal. No matter what your taste, there exists a site somewhere that will fill it. It is simply that violence and degradation are popular subjects, and so made in corresponding quantity. If you put a little effort into searching you will have no trouble finding something a bit more acceptable."

IOW, to quote a sleazy pimp in Transmetropolitan: "If it ain't kind of creepy and dirty and mysterious and forbidden, guys don't get off."

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To truly stay anonymous online, make sure your writing is as dull as the dullest conference call you can imagine

Charles 9
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Re: Vary Your Style

But the way you vary the style also becomes a signature. Variances are PART of a signature. IOW, trying to obfuscate your writing may have just the opposite effect.

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No chips for you! Toshiba takes flash off the menu for WDC

Charles 9
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Replace plane with train or bus. Happy now?

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Hotspot Shield VPN throws your privacy in the fire, injects ads, JS into browsers – claim

Charles 9
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Re: Defense in depth

You'll also be slower than molasses. And people wonder why surfing through TOR (or using Freenet) is so frickin' SLOW.

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Charles 9
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But if you assume full DTA mode, isn't it prudent to assume ANY server hosting provider would have the capacity to snoop on your session, no matter how it's set up, simply because it's the host and happens to control a point outside the encryption envelope? That not even countries with privacy protections written into the law can be considered safe (because they may engage in extrajudicial activity on the sly)?

IOW, if you must assume DTA mode, wouldn't your best bet be to simply get off the Internet altogether?

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Dems fightin' words! FCC's net neutrality murder plot torn apart

Charles 9
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Re: "Taking direction from president Trump"

But you also have to consider geography. The US is a big Country with lots of sparse population. If a small country like England has trouble rolling out to the sticks, consider I think the third largest country in terms of land area with people scattered all over the place.

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Charles 9
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Re: As the originator of net neutrality

Not if they're vertically integrated like say AT&T, a Tier 1 and endpoint provider.

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Charles 9
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Re: Not for profit

Two things, though.

One, no one expects ANYTHING run by the government to be efficient and well-maintained. Name one where private, profit-driven enterprise can't do any better.

Two, that smacks of Socialism, and in America, Socialism might as well be a four-letter word.

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Charles 9
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Re: Huzzah

But that brings up the subject of "bullhorning," where one uses his or her freedom of speech to drown out everyone else's. That's why we have the "Fire in a Crowded Theater" test for rights that otherwise have no restrictions (none are explicitly listed in the 1st Amendment): there is ALWAYS the implicit restriction that one's rights can't be used to suppress the rights of others.

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