* Posts by Charles 9

9019 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Raspberry Pi Foundation releases operating system for PCs, Macs

Charles 9
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Re: So lightweight...

If it really brings convenience, then it's not really perceived. Why do people pay extra at the C-Store, after all? Because it beats going the extra mile to the supermarket or whatever. Especially in the middle of the knight when you suddenly discover your party-goers drank all your beer three hours early, despite your double-stocking the fridge.

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Charles 9
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Re: So lightweight...

Don't forget multitasking. We tend to have more things open now than we used to. Back then, if we pushed our luck, we started getting thrashing and BSOD's.

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Charles 9
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Re: Obligatory Dumbass Question

"And that's a huge market, isn't it, much bigger than the delivery of online advertising (formerly known as web browsing) and other such consumer-type activities. Or maybe not."

Or maybe SO because that's a PROFESSIONAL market, meaning big money involved. Once upon a time, professional software tried to protect itself with things like dongles, so if they're that paranoid, there must be serious money involved. And professionals don't need consumer-class tablets to view content. They need high-powered workstations to MAKE the content that people then view on their tablets. In other words, it's a whole other world. Same for serious gamers who need their high-res monitors, high-end video cards, and professional (and I do mean professional, there are televised leagues) keyboards and mice and so on. All that's serious money they're willing to plunk down. These are your "quality" customers who can make up for the "quantity" customers by their bigger payments.

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Charles 9
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Re: Obligatory Dumbass Question

Thumbing me down doesn't make it less true. Unless these systems can run the programs we REALLY need on an everyday basis, and most of that software is custom jobs locked onto one platform that doesn't happen to be Linux, the landscape of computers in general isn't going to change all that much. Sure, ARM-based portables are all the rage, but they still haven't taken over all the PC's useful functions, especially in the realms of performance demands and content creation. You can't NLE a movie very well on a tablet, for example.

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Google nukes ad-blocker AdNauseam, sweeps remains out of Chrome Web Store

Charles 9
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Re: you are the product

Simple. The ad doesn't get requested. The server always knows if a request goes through and if the connection completes fully since it can measure the transfer total (part of its job for reporting purposes). Basically, if the request isn't sent and the ad not sent in its entirety, the server can assume the ad wasn't sent and the impression not made. The only way to fool that is to load the ad out of sight, but that means you use up (for many, precious) data allowance.

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Charles 9
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Re: Maybe they should've thought the whole video ad thing over

"Perhaps one day your clients will take the hint - after all many of them are probably blocking ads too because, of course, this making people pay attention bit gets you the WRONG sort of attention - pissed off people are not going to be good customers."

Didn't you read? "Love me or hate me, as long as you KNOW me." Especially if I can smother the alternatives on the market and make it a Hobson's Choice. Now what will you do? Alternatives don't always exist, and it's not always possible to roll your own.

And, I'm no shill. I just know that ads are a fact of live, have been for over a century. Hell, even E. E. Smith wrote about advertising in First Lensman (which dates back to World War II) and about how they go to great lengths to get your attention.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ad blockers on Android

uBlock Origin works on mobile Firefox.

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Charles 9
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Re: Come on

Besides, I would think the ad people would start developing Turing Tests to tell the real clicks from the fake ones.

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San Francisco first US city to outlaw ISP lock-ins by landlords

Charles 9
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Re: For us in the UK...

"Being a major military power means the collapse may well be messy."

Messy enough that no one might survive it.

A man once said, "Better to strike a match than curse the darkness." Another countered, "Even if that match ignites the gas that blows you up?"

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Charles 9
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Re: @Charles... forget Satellite

Like you said, a last resort, but for many, the ONLY resort, too.

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Charles 9
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Unless he means HughesNet Gen4, a satellite-based provider. Though I suspect it's something else altogether, as I'm not fully knowledgeable of California ISPs.

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Charles 9
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Re: Bad Idea and hard to implement.

"Getting government involved doesn't create more choices. Government limits choices-- that's what governing is. Given the penchant for government to poison everything it touches, it would be wise to have it touch as few things as humanly possible. The market has the means to deal with this on its own."

How does the market deal with sweetheart Hobson's deals made by 800-lb gorillas, then? Government can impose limits, yes, but those limits can also be applied to greedy companies trying to impose their own limits against the competition. That's the thing about anti-trust law. About bully tactics and so on. It's like what happens when Microsoft offers OEMs copies of Windows at a discount but ONLY if EVERY SINGLE MACHINE they sell comes with it.

I believe in organized crime circles they call such things "An Offer You Can't Refuse."

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Charles 9
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Re: So, everyone will be spread out and unprofitable..

Google's already pulling out of the project. Turns out running a utility is not all about "If you build it, they will come." Many times, it becomes more like, "Someone's gotta do it," as in it's not always for the money, which is why many times it falls to the State to step in.

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Charles 9
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Well, consider that, without those sweetheart deals, many places wouldn't have Internet access at all. For many, it was "Take It Or Leave It": a Hobson's Choice. Given the possibilities that communities could face people moving away (along with their tax money), it puts them (especially rural communities without the revenues to plunk down for the major infrastructure necessary) in a bind.

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Cancel! that! yacht! order! Marissa! – Verizon's! still! cold! on! Yahoo! gobble!

Charles 9
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Re: Topsy turvy world

"As to what Yahoo does that is worthy of any value, I am still scratching my head. If producing something of value in my universe was the criteria, they would be a penny stock."

But then again, by that perspective there are infinite universes. They just need to be valuable to enough of them for your assessment to not really matter.

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Apple sued by parents of girl killed by driver 'distracted by FaceTime'

Charles 9
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Re: So how?

"To ensure that anyone who is a passenger in a vehicle can use the app the dialog box has a "passenger" button. Of course the selection of this option is recorded. If you use it as a driver there is then evidence that you deliberately chose to over-ride the safety warning. This is not going to look good in court."

Unless, of course, you actually HAVE a passenger (even if he/she wasn't the one actually using it), giving you an alibi.

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Charles 9
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Re: Judgement call ...

And you can't help with the liability insurance because the have to account for Stupid. And as a comedian once said, "You can't fix Stupid."

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Charles 9
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Re: Didn't they see..

Plus it's easy to be the rearmost car AND boxed in with cars on either side of you. That's how accident fraudsters keep you from escaping: by putting a shield car opposite the center from you while the sacrifice car (picked for a very short brake distance) slams the brakes, leaving the usually-much-heavier mark with literally nowhere to go. Trying to swerve either way will result in a side-on or wrong-way "ghost driver" accident where the driver will be held liable if not criminally culpable.

PS. Reckless and intentional head-on accidents that leave pure victims are the reason you can't use a spike instead of an airbag.

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Charles 9
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Well then, how can the family of the bereaved sue for damages if the defendant is deceased, destitute, and disowned (IOW, dead, broke, and with no kin to go after)? Hard to squeeze blood out of a stone.

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Charles 9
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Re: Kind of see the point..

Thing is, it wouldn't take that much effort to produce some kind of prototype, appease the lawyers, and go on their way. Many already have prototypes, and for many the bar of "working model" is too high. Just look at medical patents.

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Charles 9
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Why is everyone in such a tizzy about this? Or is there evidence to show the family sued Apple to the exception of the driver instead of (much more logically, especially if demanded by insurance) in addition to the driver?

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Charles 9
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Re: Kind of see the point..

"Apple have publicly declared that they can stop this happening, and pretty much by doing so stopped anyone else trying to do it either...

But then haven't done it."

Because too many people pointed out that GPS and cameras have no way to tell the difference between an actual driver and a driver's-side passenger in the back seat. If a passenger was unable to do something and a death resulted (unable to report an accident or crime in progress, for example), Apple could get sued there, too. Dilemma: Damned if you do, damned if you don't.

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Charles 9
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Re: suing God

Ray Stevens already has a song not specifically about this but about crazy lawsuits. Look up "No Lawyers in Heaven."

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Charles 9
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Re: It probably *is* possible to detect a driver...

"You could presumably also detect whether the driver was on the left of right of the vehicle by the angle of the phone w.r.t travel direction or by recognising."

What if the user is the passenger situated behind the driver in the back seat? Since the car is moving, both you and driver can occupy the same spot of land, making this too risky for false positives.

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Charles 9
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Re: Never an individuals fault

No, slaughter implies nonhumans; thus a slaughterhouse.

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Charles 9
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Which is interesting because the THIRD DWI in Texas is a felony (as is any DWI where a person is hurt or killed or one with a child on board), which has severe consequences even after serving (I know most places won't hire convicted felons---trust issues).

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Charles 9
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"But unfortunately I can't sympathize with this family when it comes to their lawsuit because I consider that it to be plain out ridiculous. What's next? Sue a beer brand when a person has been drinking too much? If they would have targeted their anger at the moron behind the wheel, the one who killed their daughter then they would definitely have my sympathy, but not with this. This doesn't sound like a call for justice to me."

They probably have in this case, but many times suing the driver of such an accident is impossible...because they're DEAD.

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Charles 9
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Re: Didn't they see..

Those rules go out the window in a gridlock because everyone will be cramming for every inch of space. Leave that much space and someone will move into it. And you can't trust the shoulder since it could be soft or have an embankment or ditch, creating an "out of the frying pan, into the fire" situation.

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Charles 9
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Re: Didn't they see..

Given they were in a gridlock at the time due to an accident, they were basically cornered. If they released the brakes, they'd just crash into the vehicle ahead of them, creating a sandwich situation which could likely be even worse than just getting rear-ended (an impact from two points at once is more likely to compromise the passenger cabin, and the rear impact alone was enough here).

In any event, the main reason disablers aren't automatic is because there's no way to tell if the user is the driver or a passenger (even with more accurate geolocation, the passenger can be behind the driver in the back seat--no way to tell the difference). The passenger is under no obligation to pay attention to the road so does not need any kind of reminder. Plus, the passenger may wish to call police on accidents as they pass, aiding those who do get into a crash.

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Routine jobs vanishing and it's all technology's fault? Hold it there, sport

Charles 9
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Re: The elephant in the room--The "O" word.

But still, the world is finite. There's only so much room, and a lot of the planet isn't what one could consider habitable, arable, or otherwise exploitable (not to mention these can also be run dry, too), so don't try the "everyone can squeeze into Nigeria or Texas" bit.

As for the imbalances bit, agreed to a point, but I bet you that, even when you take shortages into consideration, even if you just crammed unemployed into the wanted slots to remove them, you'll still have an overall worker glut, creating the worst kind of imbalance: one with no easy solution, like trying to right a crane that fell over because something massively heavy suddenly fell on its boom. THAT is Overpopulation with a capital O. Since humans tend to want to defend themselves and look down on those who kill others for all but the most desperate reasons, how do you deal with a massive human surplus that's only getting worse as more work is becoming redundant?

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Charles 9
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The elephant in the room--The "O" word.

It really must be a bad word in our society: so bad that for a politician to mention it would probably be suicide (both political and biological):

OVERPOPULATION

Thanks to automation and streamlining, it simply doesn't require that many people to do the work we need these days. And in the cutthroat global economy, barring slave labor, there's no way to compete with this.

The entire world is basically harboring a massive worker glut. Rational economists would say the only solution is to trim the supply. But then the obvious retort hits: "Care to be first?" You have twelve parched people in the middle of the desert but only one little bottle of water, yet everyone insists they MUST get home to save the world.

So tell me: how do you deal with a massive human surplus that won't willingly step aside and will take up arms if attempted by force? Will it actually take a war (that the human race may not survive) to finally resolve the imbalance?

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Ruh-roh! Rick Ruhl rolled out of Ham Radio Deluxe in software kill-switch aftermath

Charles 9
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Re: Don't forget this is optional software

I hate it when people keep saying, "Choice is good." Ever heard of "information overload" or "indecision paralysis"? And it only takes TWO choices to trigger either one: see the recent US elections.

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Lenovo shows off 'Microsoft-friendly' VR cosplay at CES

Charles 9
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So why is no one really doing it? They have to break the vicious cycle somehow, or is it more viable for them to just bend the knee?

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Charles 9
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I meant to say in the enterprise PC world lifecycles are stretching out. It just hit me about how long such machines are left out when I read that the Virginia Lottery is just re-signed GTECH (a company that specializes in machines for lotteries) is for a generalized upgrade of equipment for their equipment. The current machines out there have been around for just over ten years. These are machines that run 800MHz AMD processors (1.4GHz if you're lucky), MontaVista Linux, and Macromedia Flash; that's how old the current machines are. And many machines had refreshes several years ago, right when the Intel Core i-series came out, and there hasn't been a whole lot of improvement since that time; diminishing returns is kicking in.

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Charles 9
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The problem is that it may not be five years. It could be longer: past the point of diminishing returns. Let's face it. PC tech is reaching the "good enough" point for all but the most-demanding users. A mini-tower with 4GB and a recent OS will handle just about anything the casual user can throw at it. Basic and hobby gamers? As long as the CPU's pretty recent, 8GB and a video card less than two years old should handle the job for them, even up to 1080p. Not to mention because console tech is hitting a plateau, demands aren't rising as much as before; in fact some would say visual quality took an overall dip last year.

IOW, the market's probably approaching saturation in general. There will still be performance demands, but it won't drive the market in general the way it used to. Even in the PC world, product lifecycles are stretching out. In this world, five years is more likely to stretch out to seven, maybe even ten. Most PC makers can't afford to wait that long.

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Charles 9
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Re: Major Problem

That's tactile feedback, a more physical research into VR. I'm talking more where you can feel and touch things in the virtual world without your physical body moving: disconnecting the brain from the motor functions, basically. That's the kind of VR we see in fiction now.

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Charles 9
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Re: Major Problem

Most VR in fiction seem to separate the virtual sensations in your brain from the physical sensations coming from your body, allowing you the freedom to move, react, and feel without physically moving. That's raised the bar and VR tech may need to go that far before it'll gain mass adoption.

Has there been any medical advancements in virtual sensation? Especially of the type where the body doesn't move in response?

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Mattel's parenting takeover continues with Alexa-like dystopia

Charles 9
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Re: Perfect

So what do you propose: a legal license to raise children with mandatory procedures and penalties for failure to comply? Because that's frankly the only way you'll force parents to do their kids right in a world where they feel it's their business (because in the long run it's not; families DO NOT live in isolation; NO ONE does in a society; things done even in private can affect society as a whole).

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Sneaky chat app Signal deploys decoy domains to deny despots

Charles 9
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Re: Agreed

And if the states are THAT paranoid, they probably wouldn't care. Better the users stay home. Look at China.

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Verizon boss: Yahoo! email hack 'is a big deal to us', we'll decide new price next month

Charles 9
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Joke

Re: We should

And then the fundraiser finishes and you end up with, what, £240.

Oh...

Who's up for an all nighter?

(Based on an LA show I watched featuring a fundraiser to supposedly save their show that ended at about $150. The host finally went, "Who's up for Vegas?")

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Strong non-backdoored encryption is vital – but the Feds should totally be able to crack it, say House committees

Charles 9
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Re: Government is as government does.

"No data is safe from a sufficiently funded and knowledgeable "hack"."

What about one-time pads owned by wimps or masochists?

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Why don't people secure their IoT gadgets? 'It's not my problem'

Charles 9
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Re: Users = Idiots

Users = Idiots is the reason Microsoft and the like are taking over so much of people's computers, because they OBVIOUSLY can't do it themselves and can't trust anyone else to do that.

Do you really want that kind of world? Or is it a matter that we don't have a choice anymore?

What does the market do when the customers demand unicorns and jump at the first horse with a horn glued on they spot?

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Charles 9
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Re: because consumers are gullible idiots

"Also, anyone who things that the general public are computer savvy just because they can switch on a PC and use Word or use a farcebook (sic) app on their smart phone must also believe in life on Mars and the Moon is made from cheese."

Isn't Mars where...you know...the MARTIANS come from?

And BTW, there IS a product out there called literally "Moon Cheese" (INMTU).

IOW, don't encourage them.

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Blue sky basic income thinking is b****cks

Charles 9
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Because the wealthy know how to conceal their wealth. So there's always less wealth apparent and available than there really is.

So soon you end up in a situation of twelve starving men on an island with only three coconuts (or rather twelve able workers in a world with only three jobs). In Sci-Fi the term for this situation is "The Cold Equation," and it entrails that, no matter how you try to split it, things won't end well.

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Charles 9
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Re: Er..

"How about an actual 'Free Market'.. just saying.."

You can't have a free market with labor because labor has illogical factors aggravating it: the destitute are desperate for their daily bread (creating a captive market) and everyone is looking out for their own skin (which aggravates surpluses because no one will be willing to just up and DIE).

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Those online ads driving you bonkers are virtually 'worthless for brands'

Charles 9
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Re: Advertising in general is useless...

The problem is that the best products advertise themselves and the worst products poison everything around them with there mere presence. That leaves no work for ad men who know nothing else, and they've been at this for well over a century. So they simply find work with everything in between: not good enough to advertise themselves yet not irksome enough to become self-averting.

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Charles 9
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Re: All the bad ads

"Someone above noted that he needs "half a dozen plugins" to get rid of all the ads. That's not true: You only need one - a whitelist JavaScript blocker such as NoScript (firefox) or ScriptSafe (chrome) is all I use - no ABP. The nice thing about this is that HTML-only adverts, which are almost always non-intrusive, display just fine"

Two things. One, HTML5 supports video without JavaScript. Two, many of the ads are keyed to the site or sit on the site itself, so blocking the ad blocks the site, too. And for some of us, the sites have no alternatives (like driver sites, third parties are a security risk).

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Firefox to give all extensions their own process in January

Charles 9
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Re: I dream..

The thing is, how does the junior dev survive to become the bad senior dev unless he knows someone high up (like someone on the board) who can protect him from the pruning process?

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Amazon files patent for 'Death Star' flying warehouse

Charles 9
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"Yeah... No! If anything they should use this BEELLIONS to further Mechanize thier outfit, and sack the last useless Meatsack standing. Like MickyD's have been doing with those Touchscreen Order Pads that some Stores have now."

Now, behind-the-scenes stuff there's little one can do to stop automation since none of the customers really see what goes on there, but in point-of-sale people really prefer to talk to a face, if anything because most people's orders aren't all that simple ("And hey, can I have the cone first? I want to be able to eat it while I wait for everything else."). Given the choice between a touchscreen and a person, prices being equal, customers will focus on the person. So what will happen when they see their business at the touchscreen locations drop versus person locations? Will they be forced to start closing locations altogether?

I haven't seen the touchscreens at my place yet, but this may be because they're trying something different: order by app, which offsets the lack of a person two ways: you're not there yet (so you're not expected to talk to a face), and you're ordering ahead (so you save time, especially if you're re-ordering a favorite menu).

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Meet the Internet of big, lethal Things

Charles 9
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Re: bug free software

That's the specialty of injury lawyers. They're masters of finding ways to make everyone pay: even manufacturers for allowing the bad modification to happen, regardless of hold faultless clauses. They have to know the tricks since most work on contingency: they don't win, they don't get paid.

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