* Posts by Charles 9

11159 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Deputy AG Rosenstein calls for law to require encryption backdoors

Charles 9
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Re: How to keep a secret? Tell NOBODY!

Don't you mean more than ZERO people?

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Charles 9
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Re: Habeas corpus?

Don't be so sure. The SCOTUS waxes conservative now.

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Bitcoin Foundation wants US Department of Justice investigated

Charles 9
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Re: Dear DOJ:

It also neglects to note that most currency as we know it is virtual anyway. First, they're fiat currencies, backed only by government word. Second, most transactions are electronic in narure, not requiring the physical transfer of bills/notes or coinage.

So, apart from a lack of sovereign backing, how is an e-currency any different?

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Couple fires sueball at Amazon over faulty solar eclipse-viewing goggles

Charles 9
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Re: If I said I sold "jumping off a cliff trousers"

Sure. Ever heard of cliff diving? BASE jumping?

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Charles 9
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Re: Sungazing should never be taken lightly!!

I'm still waiting for the story of someone buying fake stuff from someone's trunk only to learn the buyer had paid with counterfeit money.

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Ice-cold Kaspersky shows the industry how to handle patent trolls

Charles 9
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Re: In two minds...

"If the troll gets major backing then the defendant will get that too - after all they stand a very high chance of getting their money back* after the patent is invalidated."

Not necessarily, if it becomes a case of two gorillas in the courtroom. Consider the MPEG-LA v. Google dispute over video codecs. They eventually settled the case because neither side wanted it to go nuclear (Google could lose claim to VP8 being unencumbered, MPEG-LA could lose vital patents related to MPEG-4 codecs).

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Charles 9
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Re: In two minds...

This trick only works because the troll had no backing. If the troll was being backed by another major firm, then the firm may not just be out for money (could be seeking an injunction to interfere with the defendant's business) so would be willing to gamble on the courts and/or appeals process.

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Intel ME controller chip has secret kill switch

Charles 9
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Re: Irony ?

"Well, I agree, totally open hardware well performing graphics is a problem ... yet, without graphics, how do you use a browser ? I know, lynx, curl ... tedious ... that was part of my point ... we need totally open graphics, hence my call ... we can do it!"

As one commenter noted, no we can't. It's been tried already. People just aren't that interested in security when it interferes with productivity. Why do you think "hoop jumping" has such a negative connotivity? Get in the way of people's jobs and people will find a way around you. It's practically part of the human condition.

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Charles 9
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Re: Irony ?

Quite a few people, actually, given gaming is one of the few things that keeps the likes of nVidia and AMD busy. You're just in the minority, which us part of the problem. As noted, the unwashed masses will willingly give up security for performance and value. We frankly need a better human being first.

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Charles 9
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Re: Irony ?

Last I checked, though, those systems can't run Crysis or any of its sequels. So what now?

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Charles 9
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Re: Fool me once tovarisch

The cage prevented wireless transmissions, allowing the checkpoint to search for cameras and so on.

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Charles 9
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Re: Irony ?

OK, so what graphics manufacturer do you trust. ALL of them IINM release their state of the art as blobs because they're all in competition with each other and don't want to Give Information To The Enemy. Any manufacturer you could find that is willing to divulge probably isn't sought out for its performance, meaning your graphics are going to be seriously underpowered.

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Charles 9
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Re: The mind absolutely boggles.

The thing is, no one ever FINISHES the quote. There's a second part.

Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.

Persistence is doing the same thing over and over and actually getting a different result.

So, you see, it's only insane until something different happens. Then it becomes persistence...and praiseworthy.

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El Reg gets schooled on why SSDs will NOT kill off the trusty hard drive

Charles 9
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Re: Tepid storage for home users

And what's the assurance THEY'LL still be around in a decade or two? Sites come and go, after all.

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Charles 9
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Re: I've been told that SSD isn't good for cold data storage @Matthew

"With the accelerating move to web-based SaaS applications and things like tablets and Google Chromebooks, combined with ubiquitous high-speed network access (even when away from home/office, i.e. HSPA, LTE,) local storage for the bulk of consumers and even business end-user devices is becoming rapidly less relevant."

ORLY? Have you seen the data allowances these stingy providers foist upon you? Cloud seems fine and dandy until you learn you can only partake a teaspoon at a time without incurring massive overage fees. Plus what if you CAN'T access the Internet due to being in a not-spot or whatever? No, the only source you can really trust is one YOU control end to end.

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Charles 9
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Re: Flash replacing Tape too

Point taken on the rust, but the rust in tape is in the cartridge, not the drive assembly, so my point still stands. Besides, we're talking linear rust instead of spinning rust along a more precise and controllable mechanism.

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Charles 9
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Re: "Storage media industry insider" = shill from Seagate or WD?

"Historical example. I am old enough to have seen and used a CRT display. In some ways, the CRT display is still superior to LCD/LED displays. However, it is hard to find a CRT display now, even a refurbished one in satisfactory working condition. The manufacturing has stopped, the world has moved on."

I grew up with CRTs, too, but after seeing the transition to LCDs, I can see why CRT's disadvantages outweighed the advantages. They're bulky (takes up precious desk space), heavy (transport and labor costs, potential desk issues), and not as precise (an analog device by nature). Once LCDs overcame problems of contrast, size, and weight, they could outpoint CRTs 4 times out of 5.

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Charles 9
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Re: M-disc

For me, it was Zip drives. It was the best option for me at the time because I was working with a 486SLC laptop with no CD-ROM capacity. Thankfully, at that point, technology was pretty fluid and by the time Zip's writing was on the wall, I had access to other techs to offload things before I lost too much.

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Charles 9
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Re: Remeber folks HDD is a great archive medium, much better than any old tape....

Well, for me, I'm not that paranoid, but I DO take precautions for data I'd prefer not to lose. My drives are paired up and rotated periodically (mirroring as I do so) to guard against a controller failure. Bit rot I cover by using parity archives.

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Charles 9
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Re: Flash replacing Tape too

I'm not talking the stuff built into the drives. ZFS, as you noted, includes advanced error codes so can pick up on silent corruption, and that's one way to do it. I'm taking including things like Parity Archives for distinct finalized data sets that are being archived or (say media collections) won't be changing around. That way, even if bit rot hits during a transfer, you can usually correct for them and get back in business. You use up a little capacity to cover your butt over bit rot. This as well as pairing drives are perhaps the best way to keep consomer-level data (as in nice to keep intact but not life-and-death) protected against wear and tear.

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Charles 9
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Re: warnings

Not always. Rust drives can suffer sudden catastrophic controller failure, too. Happened to me years back.

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Charles 9
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Re: They'll kill themselves, eventually

There are hints that rust is approaching the point of diminishing returns. Technologies such as HAMR and shingled recording are pretty complicated beasts compared to the technologies of the past. Additional points of failure loom, so one has to wonder how much time the state of rust art has actually bought.

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Charles 9
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Re: Flash replacing Tape too

The thing is, people have found that cycling backups on occasion has benefits as well. As you move the backups from one tape generation to the next every few years, you also help to maintain its integrity by verifying the backups and resetting the cold storage clock. Plus tape technology (particularly LTO) evolved to produce additional advantages: such as high data transfer rates that can surpass most rust drives and cramming more data in the same physical size than most other formats. Plus it still has its advantages regarding cold storage (rust drives apart from RDX can't be guaranteed to keep their data intact long-term).

My thought is that flash is gaining ground on rust, but rust won't go away until flash hits a price:capacity tipping point (say twice rust's price for the same amount of storage). Until then, rust's raw capacity advantage is still useful, and although so much storage in rust has issues, there are already ways around them (most notably transfer bit rot; but that's why we have error codes).

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Batteries that don't burn at the drop of a Galaxy Note 7? We're listening

Charles 9
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Re: Re. Assault on batteries

OK, but what about EXTENDED high-draw use, such as lengthy GPS sessions, 3D gaming, or extensive video playback?

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Hash of the Titan: How Google bakes security all the way into silicon

Charles 9
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Re: It's useless without revocation

But then one must ALSO assume that if a certificate can be replaced, it can be replaced with a BAD one. Certificate revocation is a potential DoS exploit, and certificate replacement is a MitM exploit.

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'Driverless' lorry platoons will soon be on a motorway near you

Charles 9
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Re: Convoy

I thought about when I rolled over the word Scammell in my head and then looked it up and realized it's a British truck maker. Figures, must be a British version of the song. The one I quoted was the original by C. W. McCall (also covered by Kris Kristofferson, I think). Inspired a movie with its own lyrics.

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Charles 9
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Re: Has nobody realised

But rail can't go the last mile. At least with truck convoys you don't have to deal with time-consuming mode changes.

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Charles 9
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Re: Who gets the fuel savings?

"If they all do belong to the same company, implying that a company sends multiple 44t HGVs along the same route at the same time, shouldn't they be investigating rail freight?"

To anyone proposing a rail route, remember one reason lorries are preferred over trains. Unlike trains, lorries can go the last mile. That's the thing about trucking convoys. Once each truck reaches its destination, it can break off to go that last mile.

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Charles 9
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Re: Convoy

Hmm? That's not how I recall it:

Was the dark of the moon

on the 6th of June,

In a Kenworth pullin' logs...

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Brazilians waxed: Uni's Tor relay node booted after harvesting .onions

Charles 9
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Re: Self-important little pricks

Not from most people's experience. Kind words tend to be met with fingers, and once ONE starts cheating and spoiling all the fun...

Perhaps TOR should instead recode their system such that relays and exit nodes CAN'T determine destinations. If there's no way to do that, they should just say so, declare there's no real way to be anonymous on the Internet, and drop the project.

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Forget trigonometry, 'cos Babylonians did it better 3,700 years ago – by counting in base 60!

Charles 9
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Re: Trigonometry is not about triangles...

If trigonometry really were about circles, then why the "tri"?

I will agree with you, though, that there's a surprisingly strong connection between circles and triangles. Thus if you were to plot a graph of the Pythagoream Theorem (x^2 + y^2 = z^2), you get a perfect circle of radius z.

PS. Interestingly, if you generalize the equation to x^n + y^n = z^n and plot their graphs for greater values of n, you find the graph morphs from a circle to a square as n approaches infinity.

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Charles 9
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Re: We use base 10 for a reason

"Errm, we real oldies remember 12 pennies in a shilling and 20 shillings to the pound. Moreover, you could subdivide a pound into 960 farthings."

And isn't it funny that everyone wrote out half-crowns as 2s 6d (2 and 6) rather than as, well, half a crown.

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Charles 9
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Re: So much for digital

It's entirely possible to handle 0-9 with just one hand. Use the same system with the other hand and you can do 0-99 easily.

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Seriously, friends. You suck at driving. Get a computer behind the wheel to save your life

Charles 9
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Re: People aren't terrible drivers.

"I remember hearing that curves are put into motorways to ensure that drivers remain alert rather than just driving up a monotonous straight road."

True story. The problem cropped up when the Interstate a highway System was first going up. We have a term for the problem: Highway Hypnosis.

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Oldest flying 747 finally grounded, 47 years after first flight

Charles 9
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Re: A venerable workhorse

"There is a plethora of -400 series jet available given that Cathay and Air France have recently retired their last -400 bodies, and British Airways still has over 30 of them in daily use."

I think Delta retired a few -400s several years ago when they closed certain transoceanic flights (like Detroit to and from Manila via Nagoya Centrair).

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Can North Korean nukes hit US mainland? Maybe. But EMP blast threat is 'highly credible'

Charles 9
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Re: An Observation

"Once you have done so, you either assemble your weapon, or signal your team to move ahead on the plan."

Unless, of course, you think he's crazy enough to carry a Dead Man's Switch...

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Charles 9
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Re: Where?

The problem is the personality of the enemy leader. At least the Soviets were averse to MAD; they were rational, that's why MAD worked for them and works for China as of present. But what if your enemy leader is of the mind of, "Oh, screw it" and ACCEPTS MAD?

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Atari shoots sueball at KitKat maker over use of 'Breakout' in ad

Charles 9
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Re: The shuffling corpse of Atari shambles onwards...

As I recall, Activision suffered the same fate as Atari in their descent into mediocrity. The Activision of today is also much different: it's now one half of Activision Blizzard. And until recently, the whole shebang was a subsidiary of Vivendi (but give them credit: they took themselves independent with a successful buyback).

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Charles 9
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Re: @AC

"Actually no, the mothers tend to have much more developed immune systems and their bodies naturally filter out most of the bad stuff."

Not if they're undernourished, which mothers will tend to be when having babies in impoverished areas where even clean water isn't a given. Compromised bodies result in compromised immune systems.

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Boffins blast beats to bury secret sonar in your 'smart' home

Charles 9
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Re: I wonder...

Then what happens WHEN (not IF) you get one DESPITE not buying it? Bet you credits to milos they get it cheap enough to give away in the near future. The Telescreens are coming...

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Charles 9
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Re: I wonder...

"Even better, plug an mp3 player into the external mic socket, playing a constant loop of Never Going To Give You Up."

And if the listener happens to be kinky enough to LIKE Rick Astley? No joke. I knew a guy whose two favorite songs where the above and "Together Forever".

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Charles 9
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Re: I wonder...

Nope, they're not hardwires. Like on laptops, the OS can track BOTH inputs and simply turns the built-in one off by software when a TRRS device is installed (and it has to be a real one--they detect it by impedance and will flag you if something is amiss, claiming it's a malfunctioning mic). That means something with system-level permissions can override.

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Charles 9
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Re: "There are a number of possible defenses"

So what happens if they have resolution greater than a house AND the neighbor has one? Or they're able to be used from OUTSIDE the house, meaning they can used on the street?

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OpenAI bot bursts into the ring, humiliates top Dota 2 pro gamer in 'scary' one-on-one bout

Charles 9
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Re: not as it seems

Simple. Logic dictates that which can create it can also by default destroy it. A self-preservation instinct can therefore come to a completely logical conclusion that humans must be eliminated in order to ensure it cannot be destroyed by its creator.

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Charles 9
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"Military Aviation Authority, Master At Arms, Minor Administrative Action..."

And what happens when a Military Aviation Authority has to refer to a Minor Administrative Action about a Master At Arms? In an SMS message?

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Google's Android 8.0 Oreo has been served

Charles 9
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Re: Oreo

Remember, Android 5 was Lollipop, so they've done generic treats on a stick before, and 4.0-4.1 was Ice Cream Sandwich and 2.2 was Frozen Yogurt, so they've also done cold stuff before.

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Charles 9
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Aren't you worried about security issues, though, which can come over the radio chips even if you don't do anything unusual?

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Charles 9
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Re: Google Need Them To

The trick is that ARM isn't responsible for a lot of the peripheral hardware: only the CPU architecture and usually the GPU that's paired with it if it's a Mali. All the rest has historically been handled by custom memory maps that ARE in control of the SoC manufacturers, and they ARE motivated to make things unique to each SoC to keep poaching down. With things like SBSA, however, the mapping can be standardized so that you don't have to compile a custom system for each iteration.

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Charles 9
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Re: Oreo

Nah, I say Popsicle.

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The real battle of Android's future – who controls the updates

Charles 9
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Re: and it's not going to get any better ...

No, I mean TTS: Text to Speech: the computer saying things out loud. When you say STT, I tend to call it "Speech Recognition," which I will admit is improving considerably. It just so happens that, with Google, TTS and Speech Recognition are rolled into the combined Speech API.

Like I said, it's very each to hear the difference. Simply test Google's text to speech system first with an online connection, then without. I can assure you the offline version will sound a lot worse: more like what I heard out of computer TTS systems in the 1990's than state of the art.

PS. As for CereProc, I believe SVOX produced a better result, and I'm strongly of the opinion Google's cloud speech trumps SVOX.

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