* Posts by Charles 9

9714 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

DNS lookups can reveal every web page you visit, says German boffin

Charles 9
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Guess it's time for yet another use for a Raspberry Pi:

Use your raspberry Pi as a DNS cache to speed up your internet

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Charles 9
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Unless you're using a CGNAT...

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Charles 9
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Re: Simple fix

And if that's not possible (I can't on my R7000 because the latest versions still don't support WiFi)?

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Charles 9
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Re: Explanation please?

Yes. Most of the images don't come from wikipedia itself, for example, but from the Wikimedia Commons (another domain, another lookup). How many pictures does that one page contain compared to other pages on the 'Pedia? What distribution of 'Pedia/Commons requests are made?

Put simply, because of all these side requests, just one page can create a fingerprint that can be combined with other pages to create a distinct trail. And unlike what the article says, many of us have longer-term IP allocations (otherwise, home servers don't work so well). Worst part is that this sniffing is all done via basic Internet protocols; trying to mask them will require changing the protocols which may not be efficient or even possible.

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Confirmed: TSA bans gear bigger than phones from airplane cabins

Charles 9
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What I'm more concerned about is that OTHER directive: "No Lithium batteries allowed in checked luggage" which is there due to the fire risk and therefore won't be going away. Since most of the devices in question have lithium-based batteries, how can they get them on the plane at all given they're now barred in BOTH locations?

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Linux, not Microsoft, the real winner of Windows Server on ARM

Charles 9
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It's not the UI that's the real issue. It's the application support. And by that, I mean mainstream, first-string applications like one would buy at a store. This is especially true of games (one of the few genres where you really need a genuine PC in your room to get the best experience due to their performance demands). Put it this way: it's saying something that a company as big as Valve, running one of the strongest online gaming networks in Steam, and well aware of the creep threat Microsoft poses, STILL can't convince developers like Bethesda to rally behind Linux and free themselves from dependency on a single OS. Meanwhile, the other gaming network companies like Blizzard and EA treat Linux like it's an afterthought. Last I checked, neither WoW nor Overwatch can be played on Linux (not even with WINE). And that's just for starters.

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Charles 9
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Re: I presume the authour knows....

"...that Windows Desktop on Arm is already gearing up...and it runs the "normal" version of windows."

But does it run Crysis? Or Steam, for that matter?

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Charles 9
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"This is huge. SBSA is the real threat to Intel."

I will agree at least to that extent. For years, ARM has been a fixed-hardware architecture: hobbled for the most part by those vertically-integrated black boxes. To endorse and encourage the use of a general enumerated bus opens the way for ARM systems to be more general-purpose since ARM CPUs no longer have to, as the article notes, be bound to fixed hardware profiles.

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Charles 9
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AND many of those exclusive programs are performance intensive. That includes all the games that keep plenty of gamers pinned to Windows for better or for worse.

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Spammy Google Home spouts audio ads without warning – now throw yours in the trash

Charles 9
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Re: Easily fixed

"Already happening. Third Party Blobs."

I'm thinking worse: inlined right into the article in a way that can't be easily filtered (such as making the word "ADVERTISEMENT" into a PNG with a randomized name or something), and if the government throws a hissyfit, re-base in a country where such laws don't exist.

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Charles 9
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Re: @Charles 9 Easily fixed

"I use Adblock, and NoScript. So FB and Google don't see me."

Don't be so sure about that. FB in particular have become masters of finding ways to get their content loaded inline with the actual content whether you have blockers or not. And more and more sites are probably going to get proxies so that they're inline with the content, making them part and parcel. And while YOU may stop visiting them, what about being outvoted by nigh everyone else?

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Charles 9
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"Yeah you can, easily. They haven't yet come up with a way for a satellite to see through trees (just look at forestry in Google Earth - can you see the ground? No?"

No, but just because YOU can't see it doesn't mean someone else CAN see all the way to the ground AND is keeping it a secret. Always assume your adversary is more capable than they're letting on. After all, isn't the data center in Utah really just a cover for a working quantum computer busily cracking all the historic crypto that's being housed there?

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Charles 9
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Re: Amazon's customer's are actual people

Or simply the only part that Amazon WANTS to look like it's actually making money. The rest use AWS as a screen to avoid taxes and regulation.

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Charles 9
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Re: Illegal advertising to children in the room

But how do you know what they're doing when they're alone, given (by definition) no one's watching them?

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Charles 9
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Re: Too gay for words

"startpage for searching - it does a google search but strips out your identifiable data."

And how long before Google blocks Startpage or finds a way to tunnel through startpage to find the real user underneath?

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Charles 9
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If Star Trek can do it, why can't we is probably the mindset of most of the people targeted.

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Charles 9
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Basically, you can't afford to buy back your privacy. Not even a cabin in the woods can save you from aerial and satellite surveillance.

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Charles 9
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Re: Careful!

"DuckDuckGo's ties to Yahoo are seriously unhealthy (do a search) and the results aren't as good either. Startpage is decent or even try Qwant or something else..."

Which will all just get taken over eventually. Because without the ad revenues, how do the search engines stay in the black? Essentially, they can't. Privacy costs but no one's willing to pay for it these days. Frankly, not too many people even care about their privacy (not even down there--consider flashers and streakers).

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Charles 9
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Re: Kill it with Fire

Oh? What if it SURVIVES?

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Charles 9
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Re: Illegal advertising to children in the room

How can they enforce it when children under 12 can pretty much watch any channel, which means practically any channel (which pretty much MUST carry advertisements due to the need to keep carrying fees down or cablecos will balk) can't carry ads at all (to say nothing of major broadcasters, who basically have nothing BUT ad revenues), meaning the entire television model breaks down?

And then about about radio, newspapers, and magazines, all of which can be seen by children under 12 AND are all plastered with ads?

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Charles 9
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Re: I sure hope the average person's response is similar

"If you don't want ads in your face, don't be stupid enough to use a product from a company that makes all its income from advertising. Especially don't be stupid enough to pay them for the privilege."

Pretty soon that won't be an option. Can you find an actual, non-Big-Brother TV in your local electronics department these days? I don't think so, which means if your TV breaks, you're not watching TV anymore if you want to avoid Big Brother.

And since you pretty much need a smartphone (because dump phones can have practical apps) to keep in touch (because it won't be via calls or SMS anymore), how are you going to avoid walking on the Sun?

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Charles 9
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Re: Google needs human customers

"With no real customers, they don't have a good option to start charging for services at an individual level. It's not how they gained their user base."

I think it's more a case where they couldn't charge a comparable rate compared to what they already get from the ad revenues. Kinda like how cable channels (which are PAID for; ask the cable companies) still post ads everywhere. It's the only way to keep the cable companies from balking at the actual costs to operate.

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Charles 9
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Re: Easily fixed

"This site cannot load" is becoming a LOT more common as well. Soon, it'll probably reach the point where it's open yourself up to spyware and malware or you can't surf the Internet. And many times it won't be the site owner who demands it but the host or proxy from which the site owner has to depend. Just you watch. Cloudflare is going to mainline ads straight into the HTML in the near future so you can't block them without blocking the actual content.

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US military's latest toy set: Record-breaking laser death star, er, truck

Charles 9
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Re: debris will still be a pretty effective kinetic weapon.

And most ballistic missiles AREN'T powered in their descents.

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Charles 9
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Re: HEMTT

No, they can't cross railway tracks because the railway crossings are all huge humps. Physically, American vehicles aren't that much different from their European counterparts. If a car can bottom out on a FLAT railroad crossing, It would probably become an instant YouTube sensation.

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Charles 9
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Re: Bah!

"As for keeping the beam on the target, that works against you all the way because in order for the turret motors to keep pace with the angular change in target position, you have to be far enough away to make the rate of change relatively slow"

Why? Shouldn't turning a mirror should be a heck of a lot easier than trying to turn a hypersonic missile and still maintain integrity and target fixation.

"What happens if you paint your missiles with the paint used for lining roads? Or cover it with cat's eye reflectors?"

Against a 60kW beam? They'd burn or melt tout suite.

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Charles 9
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Re: Still not seeing this

As I said before, they need to be tougher than is currently possible with manmade technology to be able to reflect a 60kW beam back for more than a split second. The moment the reflective surface warps in any way, it stops being reflective, which means it becomes absorptive, which means it's gonna melt PDQ. And if it only takes a momentary hit for things to get nasty, evasive maneuvers will only work so much as the laser would only have to be lucky a few times to start causing trouble. And since we're talking a mostly-solid-state weapon with near-zero lead time, it's probably going to be able to track an incoming projectile more easily than the projectile can dodge.

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Charles 9
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Re: OMFG this is an astonishing story.

Plus that .01% alone would be enough to warp the reflective coating, which will cause it's reflectivity to drop fast.

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Charles 9
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Re: Still not seeing this

That would add weight, which is a serious consideration for a missile. As for heat shielding, unless you can make a shield that can survive a trip through the Sun's corona, then the substance doesn't exist yet that can absorb all that energy concentrated for more than a split second. And once it's through, the laser only needs a split second to do some major damage to the delicate insides of a warhead.

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An under-appreciated threat to your privacy: Security software

Charles 9
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Re: Security as a service

And how would they do that and be sure they got it right? Not even formal proofs are universal.

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Charles 9
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Re: Security as a service

Security CAN'T be totally baked into the OS because it'll get in the way of productivity. And if you can't be productive, what's the whole bloody point of this exercise?

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I was authorized to trash my employer's network, sysadmin tells court

Charles 9
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Re: So what?

"Taking his money and destroying his reputation so he can't get another job is far more cost effective."

But riskier since he may be able to find SOMEONE to hire him who (a) doesn't know about him or (b) doesn't care. Attaching the criminal record (especially if a felony) tends to stop a lot of job vetters cold.

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Dad of student slain in Paris terror massacre sues Google, Twitter, Facebook for their 'material support' of ISIS

Charles 9
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Re: "MTB"

"Didn't the merkans use them in WWII? (MTB = Motor Torpedo Boat)"

Mostly in the Pacific Theater, IINM, and Americans called them PT (for Patrol Torpedo) boats.

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Bloke cuffed after 'You deserve a seizure' GIF tweet gave epileptic a fit

Charles 9
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Actually, flashy ads ARE discouraged after the Electric Soldier Porygon incident. If a news article features flashes and so on, they do tend to note "This segment contains flash photography/flashing images". The idea is to avoid strobing, but if you gotta, give fair warning.

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Charles 9
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Re: Trivial fix

"First, premeditated murder requires clear intent and a reasonable likelihood it could actually result in death. Giving someone seizures can lead to death, but as even this case demonstrated -- it doesn't necessarily."

So does poisoning someone. Doesn't always work, either. But as the seized computer evidence shows, murderous intent was clear at the time (Quote, "let's see if he dies", unquote).

As for fixing this stuff, you have to realize that, for many people, strobe effects are desired. At least games that flash give a fair warning to photosensitive epileptics (either on the cabinet or in the manual). It's a case of you can't win 'em all. That's why Japanese TV, while it discourages strobe effects, doesn't outright ban them. Instead, an advisory comes up at the beginning of these kinds of shows: basically, sit further from the TV and turn on the lights. And BTW, it wasn't Pikachu that caused the fits in the 90's but Porygon, which is why that one episode never went stateside.

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Charles 9
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Re: Attempted manslaughter?

It all depends on the circumstances. Manslaighter can be "intentional" as in it was started by a deliberate act, but the act itself was not meant to kill. That would be a First Degree Manslaughter: committed by a deliberate act but not one with murderous intent. Meanwhile, a death that occurs accidentally but during the commission of a serious crime like a violent felony can be considered either First Degree Murder or Felony Murder: either way, it's among the lowest of the low because it's considered wanton disregard of innocent life during a deliberate violation of the rules of society: basically, willful and even eager defiance of society.

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Charles 9
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Re: Attempted manslaughter?

If it's premeditated, then it can actually be attempted MURDER.

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San Francisco reveals latest #Resist effort – resisting sub-gigabit internet access

Charles 9
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Re: San Francisco is old enough

Wind damage is no strawman, and you don't need a hurricane to pull it off. January 8, 1997. Windstorm damages houses. Utility poles specifically mentioned in the Los Angeles Times. Damage compared to Northridge. Just two months ago, two storms in quick succession cause severe damage in San Diego. Again, downed utility poles specifically mentioned (along with trees).

And earthquake damage to utility poles seem serious enough that the state government plans for such an eventuality.

And since you mentioned already-compromised poles, you have to assume EVERY pole in the area is compromised in some way if there's no budget to replace them. Which means they're at risk of toppling at the next local or major disaster. Meaning they can't be trusted. However, since you're in an earthquake zone, burial is risky, too (since they become more prone to seismic effects).

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Charles 9
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Re: San Francisco is old enough

Then you've never seen pictures of the aftermath of the 1906 earthquake. Plenty of damaged or fallen telephone poles then. There's a reason California instituted earthquake-resistant building codes after the 1971 Sylmar quake, and subsequent earthquakes (Loma Prieta, North Ridge) have resulted in adjustments to account for better research.

And you don't even have to look that far back to see how telephone poles can be a problem in an earthquake. Look at this picture courtesy of the Daily Mail. This took place in Kathmandu following the earthquake that hit there in 2015.

Heck, I've lived in plenty of places where, even with fiberglass and concrete reinforcement, poles can still have difficulties handling strong hurricanes/typhoons/cyclones.

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Charles 9
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Re: Aah, the myth of the more efficient and flexible private sector

"A myth perpetuated wholly by those who have been careful not to observe that the private sector exists to make a profit for its shareholders."

That condition can exist, but it tends to require a lack of competition: either through a monopoly or through cartel behavior. Thing is, utilities tend to have high up-front costs (you can't run your utility until you can reach your customers; that means laying down those lines), so there is a natural tendency towards monopolies and oligopolies. Otherwise, honest competition would force all sides to be honest to prevent one side poaching from the other.

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One IP address, multiple SSL sites? Beating the great IPv4 squeeze

Charles 9
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Re: End to end is a myth

"There is no way to route back to an rfc 1918 address across the internet without NAT or a vpn."

Then how come I see addresses like 10.0.16.154 in the logs when I don't use a Class-A RFC1918 subnet? SOMETHING must be letting them through.

And as for iOS getting hacked, I hear plenty of stories of them getting hacked. They do it through the APPS.

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Charles 9
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Re: End to end is a myth

But you don't NEED NAT to connect to a session that DOES exist on the LAN and can be routed through directly via your ISP through a preconstructed route that could be arranged by an insider or the law enforcement, and if the ISP can do that, they can connect that route to the outside via another route.

All without touching the NAT. If it's AT ALL possible, then you have to assume someone WILL use it at some point without your knowledge. Remember, we're one scandal from a DTA world.

Owen Bytheway, I've seen logs with RFC1918 source addresses trying to link up, so don't say they're non-routable. You can't trust all the links on the Internet to obey all the rules.

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Charles 9
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Re: End to end is a myth

"If you don't want an opportunist hacker scanning random ip ranges deciding to hack your home NAT will fully protect you against that."

NO, it's the firewall that protects you against that, and that doesn't go away with IPv6. Besides, opportunist hackers know about firewalls and the like and use techniques like drive-bys that rely on the USER initiating the connection, meaning the firewall LETS it through. It also happens to penetrate NAT, thus why it's a key tool of LAN intrusions. Well, that and the fact that, as the comedian said, "You can't fix Stupid."

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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans

Charles 9
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Re: @Matt Bryant

"In socialized medicine you get sick, put on a waiting list, then you die because your appointment has not come up yet.

Many pots are better than one big corrupt pot!"

But at least you have a shot. Without it, you basically let down everyone that depends on you. Widows, orphans, etc.

And one big pot is a single point of failure, it's also a single point of repair, too. Lot easier to repair or even rebuild one big pot than a number of small ones. Thus why modern airliners have two honking big engines instead of four smaller ones.

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Charles 9
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Re: @Ian Michael Gumby

And LOVED by all those who couldn't get healthcare coverage any other way.

Seems, as they say, you can't please everyone. And the families of those who DIE tend to sue.

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Autonomous cars are about to do to transport what the internet did to information

Charles 9
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Re: Wrong Problem

"If you can get a wheelchair in the pod you can surely get one of those trolleys grans use to wheel their groceries around in the pod too:"

But how about the wheelchair AND the trolley. And that's assuming their shopping is that small, which I've described appears to be the exception rather than the norm.

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Charles 9
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Re: Wrong Problem

"So.. All those millions of people around the world who go shopping, move house etc etc etc who don't own cars actually don't exist?"

But then they have to rent TRUCKS. And that means someone has to OWN the trucks those people rent. And for their business to be practical, they have to be able to rent those trucks more often.

"Have you ever tried moving house as anythign more than a teenager/student with nothing more than just a car? How'd you move your fridge? Couch? Bed? Can't be done, guess you just have to stay put."

No couch, and the bed was provided. Fridge was the little cube job. You could do it if only one or two people went. I speak from firsthand experience. Plus it happens at specific times of the year which means they come in surges.

"Daily I see people using public transport, pedal power and even just plain old walking for their trips to the supermarket and so on. A bag of groceries doesn't need a bloody supertanker to move it."

I see the opposite: full parking lots at the big-box stores, and inside full shopping carts and bills in the $200+ range being the norm rather than the exception (thus why they don't use the self checkouts).

"Oh, and I'd wager that most private vehicle trips are the daily commute. Something semi-private that is no more expensive than your car and solves the parking problem would be welcomed by a lot of people.And no, everyone doesn't have to take a truckload of stuff around with them every day despite your claims."

But more than you think. What's one of the most common joke setups? "Oh, and honey, on your way home..."

"If the old lady up the street can figure out how to get her shopping through her various appointments and then home safely every week, I'm sure others can."

That's not a certainty. That's why many of them have caregivers.

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Petya ransomware returns, wrapped in extra VX nastiness

Charles 9
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Re: Priorities

Except they have to be attached at some point to CREATE the backup. A sneaky malware can just corrupt the backup at the point of creation.

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More Brits' IDs stolen than ever before

Charles 9
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Re: Time to trash your own credit score!

"Who needs credit anyway - pay upfront with cash, that's my motto."

Except it produces dilemmas.

How can you make money to buy a car if the only job you can find requires you to buy a car?

How can you make enough money to buy a home if you have to give all your money to the rent every month?

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Dark matter drought hits older galaxies: Boffins are, rightly, baffled

Charles 9
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Re: Dark Matter? WTF?

"Unless Dark Matter is just a modern term for God!"

Not so much as an acknowledgement that, "We're still rather in the dark about this." Calling it "dark" makes it more or less a placeholder, and I would think they would welcome plausible replacements for dark matter and dark energy. Just be sure to tick all the boxes in so doing.

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