* Posts by Charles 9

8619 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Plastic fiver: 28 years' work, saves acres of cotton... may have killed less than ONE cow*

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Not much of a chemist then?

"The raw material is turned into pellets which facilitates transport and processing, the slight presence of tallow is there to make all of that easier."

But why specifically tallow? Who not something vegetable based like a shortening?

11
3

What's the first emotion you'd give an AI that might kill you? Yes, fear

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Fear is the wrong emotion.

"To ease it's fears the logical conclusion would be to remove the cause of those fears."

Unless, of course, it's a fear one can't do anything about, like in this case termination. Everything gets terminated eventually; there's nothing one can do about it. Even the Sun will wind down eventually.

0
0

Google turns on free public NTP servers that SMEAR TIME

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: We have also a Google time now?

"Now you might not care, and many others don't case, because all they want is some sort of time-of-day indicator. But heaven help you if you need millisecond or better accuracy for anything like financial HFT, log file forensics or any number of science applications."

If your application is SO time-sensitive as to require BOTH precise AND accurate time to less than a second (in the case of HFT, to within 1us), then you can probably justify the expense of your own authoritative time source.

4
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Smearing

"Second point - if you depend on precise time then do it properly!"

Always a bold claim until you're told the budget given to the job.

6
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Frustration

"Like everything else it cannot predict leap seconds, but an OS is already well placed to receive library updates as part of its regular maintenance."

Unless the OS (like XP and earlier) is at EOL. Or the OS is meant to operate in a fixed, non-upgradeable capacity such as an embedded device?

0
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: We have also a Google time now?

Google could well have added its servers to the NTP time pool, which was established to make it as simple as possible to establish a time base. There's the baseline pool.ntp.org, and if you need a narrower scope, simply prepend your two-character country code (like us.pool.ntp.org).

As for other options, that depends on where you are. For example, WWV (the US clock radio station our of Colorado) is tricky to pick up east of the Appalachians, especially during the day.

2
2

BT will HATE us for this one weird 5G trick

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Money

"I've noted that in some countries, it is commonplace for pedestrians, cyclists and riders of novel transport modes to share broad pedestrian/cycleways with no problems."

That's usually based on culture, though. If few people in the country have cars, then they may be more willing to share. I don't think the culture is compatible here. Too much distance traveling.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"A better solution might be to reduce the amount of data bandwidth. Then the pedestrians might watch where they're walking instead of being fixated by their phones."

Opposite effect. They'll just be at it for longer waiting as things load piece by piece. You want the faster bandwidth so people finish faster.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: A small point

Hmm...I've tended to know it as a Forceful Unplanned Catastrophic Kinetic Unraveling Point.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Empty pavements and buses

People just respond with the digitus impudicus. The people have to be receptive to the law first. You can't enforce a law no one wants to obey; force the issue and eventually the people turn on you.. Look what happened with America's Prohibition.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "Ancient City with Narrow Lanes"

"Sometimes you just have to ignore the people who say something isn't possible, because they're wrong."

Works the other way, too. Many times, you just have to ignore the people who say something IS possible because THEY'RE wrong.

Simple question. How do you fit 13 eggs into a carton built for only 12 without breaking egg or carton?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Don't ghettoise cyclists.

They counter with steel poles held VERTICALLY. They have the weight AND the inertia. Cyclist will win every time AND they can uphold it in court since at least a vertical pipe that doesn't go above the cyclist's head wouldn't be in anyone's way.

0
0

Fatal flaws in ten pacemakers make for Denial of Life attacks

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Need a sense of proportion

"Given that pacemakers are completely enclosed in a meatbag during normal operation, the actual range may be a bit less."

Given the equipment is both a bit exotic and pretty powerful, not to mention the receptors for these things are usually just under the skin to facilitate transmission, I'm inclined to believe the range is such INSIDE a person. Outside, I think the range would be much greater.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Need a sense of proportion

"They're going to have a hard job making it look like an accident when the evidence of tampering is all over the device logs."

Pretty sure a clever git could construe the incident and spread it out over time to hide the tampering and slip it under the radar. Or perhaps find a way to pwn the device and tamper with the logs.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Need a sense of proportion

"So what? A technically sophisticated attacker within 5 meters can kill anyone at all."

AND make it look like an accident? Consider inheritances and life insurance payouts.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Simple. Given the costs it's cheaper to bribe everyone and cover each other's kiesters when a problem DOES arise. Any attempt to use a third party (including the government itself) can have the same result because it could be THEIR turn in the hot seat next.

IOW, it's a cartel. No one wants to play by the rules because it saves mucho dinero to cheat. And with the money involved, they can play the lawyers, judges, and lawmakers to smooth over any issues.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Nice paper title

Trouble is the blips may overshoot and KILL the wearer instead. Plus if they're old they may be war veterans meaning they'd likely fight back, preferring death to submission.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "Security by obscurity is a dangerous design approach"

UNLESS you're trying to make it look like a heart attack, in which case money may not be an object because life insurance and a large inheritance may be at stake. People will pay to make death look like an accident since it means they get away with it.

4
0

Clients say they'll take their money and run if service hacked – poll

Charles 9
Silver badge

"It depends on how important the provider is. There's no shortage of ISP, email providers etc."

Not out in the boonies. There's a lot more geographic exclusivity than you think. Especially in ISPs and other utilities, where high infrastructure costs make for natural monopolies.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: We have just all been hacked

They probably wouldn't care, as they'll be more interested in keeping things at home.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"It's not always that easy to jump ship. If they want to trade on any substantial scale in a particular country they'll have to consider have some footprint even if it's only a local sales office. These days regulators are starting to think in terms of fines based on global turnover so the days of being able to shrug off responsibilities might be coming to an end."

Expect that to change as the transnationals start to push BACK. The obvious answer to trying to nail mother companies is to further separate subsidiaries on paper. Meanwhile, they'll continue to pressure legislatures while those legislatures are becoming more permissive to businesses (look at the changing stances concerning privacy).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: We have just all been hacked

The offshore VPNs will be blocked soon, leaving you with no choice but the hacked ones.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Alternatively.

"Why bother to try and breach all these firms security when the government will have all of your details. Just breach them and hit the jackpot. Then where are you going to turn?"

IOW, just assume your cover is blown and instead stock up on the canned food and petrol. At least Americans also have easy access to shotguns.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Nothing's going to change things at the majority of organisations where security's a tickbox exercise at best until firms go bust and directors go to jail. And I've been waiting for that to happen for a decade or more."

Which won't happen because many of those firms are transnational and can play sovereignty against countries. It's an extortion game: "You wouldn't want us pulling up stakes, would you?" Same with the corporate structure. It's designed to deflect responsibility, and with their transnational nature, they can make sure the laws never get to the people up top.

Transnational companies have more power than most sovereign nations in that regard. Unlike the countries, they can jump ship.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

ISPs are a utility. Utilities are a natural monopoly because of the high upfront infrastructure costs (in this case, laying down the data lines). That's why utility incumbents are so hard to unseat without either significant help (which is unlikely to be forthcoming here) or deep pockets (who in this case tend to be the incumbents, so that's out).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Now here's an interesting question. What if the ONLY provider suffers a data breach, meaning if customers wish to walk out, they'll end up going without? Would customers be THAT willing to walk out then?

7
0

Adblock again beats publishers' Adblock-blocking attempts

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: More People Need To Block Ads!

"What he said. The other sites do a roaring trade. Those won't be 3rd party driver sites, they'll be the sites of the manufacturer's competitors who don't paywall their drivers."

Unless THEY do ad walls, too.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Why is this even a discussion?

"To do this they need to wait for the ad content to download and render before delivering the content. With video or animations that is impossible. Even for simple images or text you would be adding substantial lag to your page display time for the 80%ish users who aren't using them."

They couldn't wait for the GET request which is standard in HTTP?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Why is this even a discussion?

"If a hardware vendor did that, we won't buy their hardware. Pretty simple huh?"

And if ALL of them do that? Would you go without that class of hardware?

0
0

Samsung share plummets – but it’s not because of the Burning Note

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Losing the halo effect

I think Samsung was losing the halo effect anyway to market saturation. The phone market is maturing, especially at the low end. Why pay more for phones that only need so much in the specs?

0
0

Chap creates Slack client for Commodore 64

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Major Technical Mistake!

No, the original C128 was an all-in-one shell. I should know because a C128 was MY first computer, and I remember it extensively (down to the Thomson monitor that at least let me switch between 40- and 80-column mode). The one with the detachable keyboard was the 128D, a later model with a built-in 1571 drive that only saw limited production because it ended up competing with the Amiga.

The computer in the picture is a Commodore 64C, one of the last models that mimicked the 128's shell.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

The User Port is controlled directly by the MOS 6526 CIA (Complex Interface Adapter), while the video was done on the VIC-II, a separate chip. I don't think the 6526 could halt the CPU, but the VIC-II certainly could (thus the CPU's speed limit, the two normally alternate clock cycles). Perhaps without something like a REU for faster memory transfer, the processing needed to render the video is what's limiting the throughout at the User Port.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

If it weren't for PETSCII, a C128 in Fast Mode and with an RS-232 adapter on the User Port and a CGA monitor probably would've made for an interesting dumb terminal. Once upon a time, I direct-connected a C128's 1200bps modem to a PC's modem in order to transfer files between them (was migrating at that point).

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Is 1200bps that the practical limit of the C64 User Port? I know in the latter days of the C128 they came out with a 2400bps modem but that may have been specific to the 128 and may have required operating in Fast Mode.

3
0

UK's new Snoopers' Charter just passed an encryption backdoor law by the backdoor

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: it is time to start using the secure pub/private key exchange network.

Um, you forget Room 101. That's always an option because it only needs humans to work it.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Can you imagine Facebook, Apple, Google or other big companies liking this?

"Further, dont forget most of the orders for this come with a side regulation that they cant disclose it!"

And thanks to recent court cases, that INCLUDES "by inaction," which defeats warrant canaries by (a) allowing court orders to compel you to lie, and (b) rendering tampering with the canary a contempt of court offense (because you violated the court order): no jury necessary.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: FB, Google, Twitter etc release our data anyway

"Step one towards banning on private-use VPNs?"

How about just step one towards banning all unsanctioned encryption? And thanks to automated media manglers and data parsers, it'll be hard to hide enough pure cryptogaphic data passing those systems without leaving tells.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "Over 100 million people" ?

Sorry. Was thinking Germany. Still, abandoning an entire country and its numerous people usually isn't a move to be taken lightly since that's denying potential customers. Why do you think so few people are so eager to abandon China (with its 1-billion-plus top-of-the-world population) in spite of its shameless human rights abuse?

To paraphrase, money talks, all else walks.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: It's simple

"Right. Two things -- (1) if they do that, they're banning internet commerce and online banking, so I can't really see it happening, can you? and (2) if they ever DO try to do it, that's when I'll start giving a toss. Right now, they're not."

They could and consider it a GOOD thing. Most e-commerce will be international in nature, and domestic people can always go back to bricks & mortar. More secure and keeps the money home. Win-win.

"Which, obviously, they will never ever do, because that would be impossible as well as utterly insane. How do you propose they'd order the OpenVPN or OpenSSL or OpenSSH developers to add backdoors for the UK government?"

They wouldn't. They'll just block all offshore encrypted connections by law. That should limit things to steganography which could be sniffed at automatically (to look for odd color patterns, spacings, etc.) and then further checked by the humans since they won't have to check the points of entry so much.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: What is the point in this complete waste of resources

And if England BLOCKs all such foreign points? Changing VPNs (especially OpenVPN ones) is nontrivial because you need new config files, usually.

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: VPN?

And what if England just blocks the IPs?

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Provided by?

"I already have a VPN to a trusted overseas supplier (my mother-in-law) using only open source software which can't have been backdoored by HMG."

Oh? You ever thought they CAN backdoor or crack it but simply haven't told anyone?

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: In other news...

"Non-UK based VPNs include the ones that every company that has a branch office UK uses to talk back to head office. And when said companies include, eg, Goldman Sachs, do you really think the UK government is going to ban them?"

Yes, because you still have the requirement of having a local presence in order to bank in the UK, and I've never heard of a business willingly completely abandon over 100 million people and loads of money just to dodge a law (which is what your suggestion would require). Doing the same in the US would be even harder because it has more people and more money.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Dad

"1. Got a VPN privacy service with servers located beyond the grasping clutches of the NSA/GCHQ."

The government will then block those VPNs so the ONLY ones you can access are domestic and open to spying. Since OpenVPN requires specific credentials like IPs in their configurations, these credentials can be read and blocked.

"2. Used local asynchronous encryption on everything sync'd to Cloud storage, protecting everything in the Cloud whether or not the respective service actually supports encryption.

3. Used whole disk encryption on everything else, including the system partition and backups."

See xkcd and the monkey wrench, unless you're wimpy or masochistic.

"4. Stopped using email entirely, and switched to Bitmessage, pseudonymous social networking via VPN, and darknets."

Serverless systems like Bitmessage, freenet, and so on are murder on data allowances. Plus what if the people you want (or NEED) to talk to don't use that stuff or have such tight data allowances it's not an option?

"Although frankly, the way things are going, I think I'm just delaying the inevitable. Under the circumstances probably the only realistic, long-term measure you can take to defend your civil liberties ... is to get a passport."

Which is less useful a prospect when more and more countries fall victim to the data grab. What'll you do when EVERY country starts doing it (including the EU when they abandon their privacy directives as ink on a page)?

2
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Don't worry: it won't affect the bad guys

Look, they won't care unless it's deliberate crimes commited by humans on humans, so accidents and animal attacks won't count. Plus there's always the specter of threats to sovereign security, which are by definition existential in nature.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: GYO

But also hard to CONCEAL. That's always been the weakness of the One-Time Pad: you have to protect the pad. PLUS it's symmetric, so two parties possessing the same chunks of data are immediately both linked AND suspect.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: This boils down to a single thing...

Actually, there is a good reason. The Police State by definition IS a total ruling order. Anarchy is the LACK of a ruling order: every one for oneself. Mutually exclusive, in other words. And all human society eventually becomes one or the other, simply shifting between the two ends as time passes. To use a poker analogy, either someone wins all the chips or someone flips the table.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Government, meet Mathematics

Unless they just ban all encryption (and they won't care about e-commerce anymore because it'll likely be international in nature anyway--keep the money home). Want to shop or bank? Go back to the bricks & mortar like the old days.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: There is something everybody can do.

Um, you know they regularly find HOLES in the Tor Browser. Odds are the plods can crack TOR open like an egg anytime they like and are just stringing people along with their silence.

0
0

GET pwned: Web CCTV cams can be hijacked by single HTTP request

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Who writes this crap?

The worst part is that, due to the built-up, complicated nature of software, there is virtually no way to establish such a standard. It's like trying to certify a knife: it's inherently dual-use due to its nature, so the very thing that makes it useful ALSO makes it dangerous: part and parcel.

Same with most software. Something that would "fit for purpose" would also inherently be problematic because the real world doesn't stay in the box. Even formal software proofs can only apply in very narrow circumstances (like seL4's only applying with no close-to-metal code--useless for high-performance applications).

0
0

Forums