* Posts by Charles 9

13686 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Alexa heard what you did last summer – and she knows what that was, too: AI recognizes activities from sound

Charles 9
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Re: Envision away Mr. Harrison.

Have you ever read Nineteen Eighty-Four. It's hard to subvert when they're everywhere.

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Charles 9
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Re: I really wonder what goes on inside these companies

"I would expect that to part of the overhaul of the system. Valuing parenthood is something 1st world countries should be doing."

But even parenting comes second to "a roof over their heads", as shelter tends to be a prerequisite, and the situation appears to be a crisis of a social rather than political nature. Consider that no one's willing to mention the O-word in public, and there's more than one form of overpopulation. And before you start with the whole "state of Texas" bit, I've heard of Stand on Zanzibar. Basically, when things get crowded, fuses get short, and that's an instinct thing more than anything else, so there's no way you can fix this without pushback.

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Charles 9
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Re: Failure of Understanding

"It does have the hardware. It doesn't use hardware to detect 'hello Alexa', it does that in software."

Care to conclusively PROVE that?

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Charles 9
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Re: Failure of Understanding

"Your standard household land-line telephone had an always-on microphone. Your cell phone has an always-on microphone. Your bluetooth headset has an always-on microphone."

Last I checked, the telephone's handset cradle switch is usually mechanical and opens the circuit for either the handset or the phone line (especially for dumb phones since they're powered by the phone line). Either way, an open circuit by definition turns the device off.

The bluetooth headset can't operate without power. Turn the power off or run the battery down and there's no power for the mic.

The cell phone I'll give you since we usually strive to keep it powered.

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Charles 9
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Re: Envision away Mr. Harrison.

"No, you just don't buy the useless fucking products anyway."

What makes you think you'll have a choice in the future? They'll either sneak it in or force you. Them what?

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Charles 9
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Re: Not before hell freezes over ...

A quote from Jeff Foxworthy stirs up words of caution: "And if she ain't happy long enough, you're gonna be unhappy with half your stuff."

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Charles 9
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Re: Envision away Mr. Harrison.

And if ALL of them do this? Do you throw up your hands and cry, "Stop the world! I wanna get off!"?

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Charles 9
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Re: Not before hell freezes over ...

Even if it belongs to your significant other and it houses something priceless to him/her, meaning percussive maintenance may well result in lawyers/solicitors?

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Charles 9
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Re: I really wonder what goes on inside these companies

So what do you propose instead...especially since the situation's deteriorating to the point neither parent can be counted to be home for any significant length of time (or else they go behind on the bills and lose their domicile).

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Apple to dump Intel CPUs from Macs for Arm – yup, the rumor that just won't die is back

Charles 9
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Re: My prediction

UPU seems to me more like patent-dodging. You have to think there's a reason CPUs and GPUs are kept on separate units, much as how computers and phones are kept as separate UI designs.

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Charles 9
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Re: My prediction

Why would they flip the bird at ARM? They already paid for and hold the legal license to build their own ARM-based silicon and have been doing so for years. Why throw out the baby with the bathwater?

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Charles 9
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Have to wonder, though, what happens when you have to run an unported x86 MacOS app that happens to be performance-intensive, like say a high-end MacOS game (which DO exist--since Steam has a MacOS version).

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Silent running: Computer sounds are so '90s

Charles 9
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Re: Bah!

Wonder what would've happened if the reply was instead, "F@#K NO! I have my rights, too! You don't like me, shoot me!" And you find out he's an ex-convict as well. I don't know if anyone's ready to face a murder charge over a ringtone.

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Charles 9
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Re: Umm.....

Never saw a photo and always heard Kanno addressed in the masculine. *shrugs*

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Charles 9
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Re: The Distaff Sound

And what about that segment whose clothes are too tight for pockets to be practical storage?

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Charles 9
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Much as I like the Yoko Kanno reference, I actually keep a better-known piece of his as a potential ringtone: "Tank!", a jazz piece he made with a group called The Seatbelts. I actually use different ring and notification tones to tell me the nature of the incoming transmission. My generic ringtone is the theme from Beavis and Butt-head (which is actually a nice-sounding smooth-paced piece of instrumental rock), and my notification tone the doorbell from Star Trek: The Next Generation (quick and easy to catch). If I hear something else, I can determine its nature quickly (work, acquaintance, app, etc.).

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Former Google X bloke's startup unveils 'self flying' electric air taxi

Charles 9
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Re: Not again!

"You get the same effect with "Lindbergh was the first to fly the Atlantic" - he was around 57th."

Do you include the important qualifications of "solo" and "nonstop"?

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Charles 9
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Re: "Fully electric"..."Emissions free"

Or how dense your population. I mean, how many people total are there in the South Island? The biggest city they have down there is Christchurch, and it's still smaller than the likes of Wellington and especially Auckland on the North Island. If you want to prove the worthiness of renewable power, you need to be able to handle even the worst cases, and frankly, even Auckland isn't a real challenge compared to the major metropolises across the water in Australia: Perth, Brisbane, and especially Melbourne and Sydney.

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AI's next battlefield is literally the battlefield: In 20 years, bots will fight our wars – Army boffin

Charles 9
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I thought I heard that the best offense is a good defense because it's the offense that has to exert itself in dislodging you. Then, when they tire, you see the opening and counterattack.

In truth, it's not absolute either way. Sieges can go either way so you have to assess things from your perspective as you go. Is the offense tiring so you can counterattack? Or are they just biding time before reinforcements come in?

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Charles 9
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Re: AI ? We don't need no steenking AI.

Plus it's designed to be mounted. Sitting them in front of boulders or trees was recommended IINM.

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Charles 9
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Re: Can I ask

But their temporal cost is the pits, and wars tend to run shorter than that.

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Charles 9
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Alongside development of EMP-hardening, which has been ongoing since the Cold War.

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Charles 9
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Re: In 20 years, US bots will fight wars against whom?

"So what mutual destruction risk is there?"

As individual nations, perhaps. But what about as a bloc?

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Sure, Europe. Here's our Android suite without Search, Chrome apps. Now pay the Google tax

Charles 9
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Re: Good for Google...

You assume there IS a choice for most. If they app they need is ONLY with Android, or they're forced by their (or ALL) employers...what's that idiom about being up the proverbial creek?

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Charles 9
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Re: Ignore and continue as usual

Plus, avoiding legal consequences is one of the jobs of corporate lawyers and bean counters. If the threat of a percentage fine looms, they'll just find a way to hide the amount that calculates the percentage, for example...

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Charles 9
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Funny. I think in America the equivalent phrase would be, "The Scotch Tape came of my Bic..." the Hoover part would be the same, though.

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Charles 9
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Re: Be careful what you ask for...

"I'm from the government, and I'm here to help you" is a very dangerous phrase.

Any less dangerous than "I'm from Big Business and I'm here to help you"? Meanwhile, I would think the former would be welcome words to disaster victims.

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Charles 9
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Re: @1 hr //DLBL SYSRES

They don't have to be "secret" things. The whole "Give me six lines" bit...

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Charles 9
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Re: Sailfish ahoy

As for changing banks, many only have ONE bank, if any, in town, meaning it's take their crummy app or do even more hoop jumping on payday than you would with the bank.

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Charles 9
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IOW Google's achieved that ultimate of brand status: it's become a generic term, a la Xerox for photocopies.

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I've seen the future of consumer AI, and it doesn't have one

Charles 9
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Re: Security Anyone?

I don't know about that. Renting means the product never changes hands. Meaning WHEN (not IF) there's a serious problem like a security breach, then the manufacturer retains responsibility and liability (which likely can't be signed away by contracts due to consumer protection laws).

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Remember when Apple's FaceTime stopped working years ago? Yeah, that was deliberate

Charles 9
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Re: iOS7 was when I jumped ship

Unless that Windows-ONLY software ALSO runs custom (read: unable to be virtualized) hardware, too. Read the notes about the computer-controlled lathe forced to stay on XP because it runs a custom proprietary card on an ISA bus (ISA dropped with Vista, and custom card can't be virtualized) yet MUST be accessible from a network AND the computer can't be replaced without replacing the entire six-figure machine (which was still shortly into its amortization).

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Samsung’s flexible phone: Expect an expensive, half-bendy clamshell

Charles 9
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Re: Unworthy patent

"I'll just keep wondering how come all these big corporation do not feel ashamed for filing such patents."

There IS no shame in Corporate Cutthroat. First In Wins, everyone else deserves their fate. Law of the Jungle, simple as that.

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Charles 9
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Re: Obvious

Then they'll just patent the same thing in a cylindrical or semispheric shape and work around you. The best weapon against a patent is another patent if you have the resources to survive the siege of a patent war. That's how Google survived the assault of MPEG-LA with its VP codecs intact.

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Charles 9
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Re: Can't imagine this will last long

"And how many conductors are we talking? Four four headphones, maybe a dozen or two for scanners and printers? It's a long way from a bendy screen."

Couldn't you say the same thing about laptop designs that need to carry video signals and usually audio because the speakers are on the display half? If there are antennae on the display half, those wires would need to be included, too.

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Charles 9
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"Even if some sand gets in there, there isn't any force pressing it agaivsts the screen."

Not even the other half of the clamshell?

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Charles 9
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Re: I still think a bifold device will be a market failure

"The most profitable tablets, iPads, are squarer than video's 16:9."

Because they're usually held vertically (in portrait configuration), and the aspect ratio an iPad uses is closer to that of paper, making it a better tool for reading. Since you don't see landscape-designed (horizontal) iPads, it's supposedly what works, whereas Android tablets can vary considerably in their aspects and orientations.

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Mobe networks battle to bring comms back after Hurricane Michael smashes US Gulf Coast

Charles 9
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Re: "Underground means either cut'n'cover"

Microtrenching will work for optical cables and the like, but if you're going to trench an area, the most important stuff to trench would be the power cables, which require special handling and are tougher to fix when broken while buried. Temember, part of the panhandle's problem was that everything was knocked down: including the power.

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Charles 9
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Re: "Underground means either cut'n'cover"

But this is a coastal area, meaning a high water table. Always a risk of an underwater access flooding in such a place, plus some stuff like transformers have to stay above ground (speak from experience -- Pacific island prone to typhoons; trenched cables out of necessity, yet there can still be outages).

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The march of Amazon Business has resellers quaking in their booties

Charles 9
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Re: Can only get worse

You can't do that with transnationals. They'll just threaten to pull up stakes, meaning no more taxes from them. If they still need to do business in the EU, they'll finagle some splinter company that isn't connected to the mother company to be a go-between with almost no turnover, meaning trying to squeeze blood out of a stone. The problem any country faces is that a transnational can simply relocate their operations outside their sovereign influence.

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Charles 9
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Re: So I guess WALL-E was a documentary?

But can you count on a repeat performance this time, or are the citizenry too dulled to care anymore?

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Charles 9
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I would think for many it was a choice between sell out or cease to exist. Hard to play poker against an opponent with enough on the table to bury you several times over.

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Charles 9
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Re: So I guess WALL-E was a documentary?

I think Buy-N-Large was modeled more on Walmart than Amazon (note the hypermart references), but in the end it's just capitalism at work; sooner or later, you're going to have a winner with enough influence to set even governments aside (see the Gilded Age).

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Charles 9
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Re: Shut it down

It's simple. Transnationals like Amazon can play countries against each other. You see the same thing with big oil. Not even sovereign governments can get much play on them because they can threaten to move their operations to another country (small ones like Ireland that have low upkeep costs), taking away their tax bases and leaving governments with a dilemma: do you settle for 10% of something or risk 100% of nothing?

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Voice assistants are always listening. So why won't they call police if they hear a crime?

Charles 9
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Re: Not just listening...

You can swap it out, but are you sure it's completely turned off? Some system apps (like the default home app) can't be disabled, not even with the App Settings.

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Hunt for Red Bugtober: US military's weapon systems riddled with security holes – auditors

Charles 9
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There's really only one way to force the government to pay attention. It happened in the 70's. Just tell them if they don't shape up by yesterday, they'll lose World War III and the US will cease to exist.

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Time to ditch the front door key? Nest's new wireless smart lock is surprisingly convenient

Charles 9
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What would've happened if they turned up a place with your door setup AND burglar bars?

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Charles 9
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Re: Rental properties

If you're that concerned, get a lock cylinder which you can rekey by yourself. That way, you can just change the keyset after each tenant. Even IF they copy the key, it won't work anymore.

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Charles 9
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Re: High security?

"Setting aside the usual 'elephant in the room' of really secure doors (the glass in the windows)"

Which itself sets aside the usual solution for places where the windows are targeted (burglar bars set into studs or concrete--the only quick solution would, like those doors, be VERY destructive)...

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Punkt: A minimalist Android for the paranoid

Charles 9
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Re: Justified

Did they dump the rest of their phones? Because last I checked, those countries in question made an ultimatum: their citizens' data in their country or no sales ever again. And since they're sovereign and hold the keys, that put them in a Hobson's Choice (Take It Or Leave It), and if they left it, odds are someone else would've stepped in and bent over, putting everyone in the same leaky boat.

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