* Posts by Charles 9

13319 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Grubby, tortuous, full of malware and deceit: Just call it Lionel because the internet is MESSY

Charles 9
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"They might be resistant to fire (or even feed on it) but are they resistant to a good hanging?"

An iron neck would make them hang- AND decapitation-proof. They'd probably break the rope first and revel in it. IOW, the worst thing you can do to someone crazy is to give them airtime. Problem is, the crazies are crazy enough to make NOT giving them airtime EVEN WORSE.

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When's a backdoor not a backdoor? When the Oz government says it isn't

Charles 9
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Re: This sounds like a really well thought out piece of legislation

But that's exactly the point where they get you: outside the envelope.

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Charles 9
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Re: Make it easy

Ever heard of, "Screw the Rules, We MAKE Them"?

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Charles 9
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Re: Who would pay?

Not even to a Utah-class data center and/or a secret quantum computer?

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Google keeps tracking you even when you specifically tell it not to: Maps, Search won't take no for an answer

Charles 9
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Re: What exactly did they do?

But Google Play Services is built into every vanilla Android phone, and it alone can send all it needs to Google via base station triangulation (and the only way to stop that is to turn off the radio, at which point it's practically a paperweight. Remove GPS is only possible by tripping various safeguards built into the phone which can cause apps to balk.

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Charles 9
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Re: My solution

And then you get locked out from root-aware apps, and since Marshmallow dm-verity is enforced and can be checked, too.

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You won't believe this but... everyone hates their cable company: Bombshell study lands

Charles 9
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Re: Well, I...

Surprised I haven't started seeing a serious "America sucks! Move to Canada!" campaign yet...

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Charles 9
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Re: "Broadcast TV fee" has not existed for decades

They'll just fire back even the strongest signal allowed by the FCC can do squat if you live in a concrete canyon. The physics of a city's structure tend to make radio signals difficult to handle. Ask any cell phone or GPS user. Under the FCC mandate, they're not obligated to reach a particular stretch of people (TV is not considered essential). In fact, the cable company could (theoretically) drop the local channel if it can't reach a certain area (the onus is on the cable company, not the broadcast network).

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Charles 9
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Re: Conspicuously Missing...

Well, as they say, things could be worse. Newspapers suffer the same issues, I hear. Most people only buy newspapers for one or two sections. Without all of them, though, they wouldn't have enough buyers to stay in business. So you may not speak Spanish but your neighbor may be Hispanic, yet without both your subscriptions, television can be a much sparser world.

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Charles 9
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Re: Out of pure spite to my "free market" cable provider

But even that smacks of cutting one's nose off to spite one's face. There are plenty of fish in the sea who simply cannot live without ESPN. Say no, and they'll reply You Might as Well Be Walking on the Sun.

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IPv6: It's only NAT-ural that network nerds are dragging their feet...

Charles 9
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Re: What we need is IPv7.

"So, yes, IPv4/IPv6 interworking is a mess, however the real problem is the seeming lack of progress on a global public IPv6 Internet to encourage people to take the migration seriously."

Problem is, a lot of people are in "If it ain't broke..." mode, and anything that's broke right now under the current regime, they probably don't need. Since people need an IPv4 address to stay visible on the Internet in general, people just keep trading in them. Who cares about the new market when everyone's still in the old one, IOW? Unless and until something essential seriously breaks stone cold dead, IPv4 will continue due to sheer momentum.

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Charles 9
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Re: "the world is clinging stubbornly to IPv4"

Because ANOTHER problem hit: with the IPv4 address drought, routing tables got complicated, and no matter how much you try, complicated routing tables introduce latency, especially at the upper-tier routers that have to churn through a ton of this stuff every second. The reason IPv6 went so big was so it could go sparse...and simplify the routing problem WITH plenty of room to grow. Now instead of complicated lookup tables you can work with much simpler binary rules.

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Charles 9
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Re: Adoption of IPv6 is inevitable.

What about taxes? Sure, you'd like to hold them off, too, but it tends to be more trouble than it's worth most of the time.

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Charles 9
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Re: Overly complicated

"They have made IPv6 overly complicated, it's like you have to know more or less everything, before you start with the stuff, otherwise you'll end up having a network which might work, but you don't know why - and if you connect it to the internet you can't hide behind a NAT'd firewall - which is really really bad."

Well...there's a problem right there. Why does it have to be a NAT'd firewall. Why can't it be a straight-up firewall?

"And don't get me started on the notation, I've entered thousands of IPv4 address on my keyboard, on a numeric keyboard everything is there 0..9, and a '.' - everything which is needed."

IPv6 addresses CAN be entered in decimal, too, WITH the standard period notation. That's why the bracket notation: it helps to distinguish which is which. Hex notation is simply easier to read for the longer addresses and allows for the double-colon shorthand, but the spec DOES accommodate.

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Charles 9
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Re: "the world is clinging stubbornly to IPv4"

"This is because when IPv6 was first published it was DELIBERATELY made incompatible with IPv4 a little fact that was pointed out to the committee who came with IPv6 and not only ignored but smug at."

Do we have PROOF of this...or proof of the fact that because IPv4 is not forward-compatible (it was designed DECADES ago in an age when RAM and CPU power were at a premium) that if you're going to break the mold, might as well start fresh?

"All that was needed was an extra 2 octets on the addressing, that's all."

Riddle me this, Batman. How do you transport 18 eggs in an egg carton only build for 12 without breaking something? Because that's basically what you're proposing. You CANNOT add octets to IPv4 (which has a FIXED 32-bit address limt--it's in the spec) without breaking something. PROVE us wrong WITHOUT adding anything in between or changing likely-unchangable firmware.

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Charles 9
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Re: Mobile devices / 4G networks

Confirmed. I'm on T-Mobile and The IPv6 Test Site says it's native IPv6. And that was at least two years ago.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ipv4 origins

In addition, IINM there are special allocations set aside for setups that don't easily fit into a geographic or otherwise sane structure (like perhaps a pan-global company with multiple external gateways in multiple countries). IOW, part of the reason for 128 bits is to (unlike last time) try to take everything into consideration.

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Charles 9
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Re: Obvious need for..

UNLESS even the smallest change breaks the mold. That's the problem with IPv4. It was designed (DECADES ago) for fast processing on limited memory and computing power. Ergo, it was designed with a fixed (meaning impossible to adjust) packet structure. It wasn't designed with forward compatibility in mind, and without that, there's no way you can make an extended IPv4 work without breaking something. Otherwise, how does one cram 13 eggs in a carton only built for 12 without breaking something along the way? And no, something like EzIP won't work very well without the same kind of infrastructures you would need in IPv6 anyway (special edge routers et al--guess what NAT46 and NAT64 routers do).

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You can't always trust those mobile payment gadgets as far as you can throw them – bugs found by infosec duo

Charles 9
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Re: And when the payment is actually sought?

That's what's happening here. Another scenario descried was telling the customer the transaction was declined when it wasn't, triggering double charges.

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Sitting pretty in IPv4 land? Look, you're gonna have to talk to IPv6 at some stage

Charles 9
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Re: Never!

Wouldn't really matter either way. It's just that using RFC1918 addresses makes it that much more likely the packet stays inside.

And I've got a better one for you. Why don't you prove it actually happens in real life by describing the means to do it using a spare home router, meaning one can easily do it at home using actual physical devices and wires?

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Surprise, surprise. Here comes Big Cable to slay another rule that helps small ISPs compete

Charles 9
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Re: Time for Pai to hold out for some more stock options from Big Cable

"If a gummint official EVER profits from his position like that..."

...he probably has enough resources to make the problem go away, too.

Money talks. All else walks.

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Charles 9
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Re: How to lie with statistics?

"Donn, there is no such thing as a free market. I can't set up a telco; I can't afford it. It isn't free.

The existing big telcos inherited most of their cable runs. Many of the rest were subsidised by the gummint they now despise. I can't inherit anything (and I can't afford to bribe a congressman/senator - they're not free, either)."

It's like I said: Barriers of Entry. A high barrier of entry tends an industry towards monopolies and cartels because it's easy for incumbents to keep upstarts out. Utilities have high upfront costs (utilities have a high capital prerequisite; they require lots of infrastructure to operate) and thus a naturally high barrier of entry (as in it's a trait of the industry itself, not of any particular part of it, and thus hard if not impossible to skimp).

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Charles 9
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Re: How to lie with statistics?

You forget about Barriers of Entry. Utilities, especially rural ones, are notorious for a combination of high initial cost (capital outlay for infrastructure) and NIMBY issues that make them among the most likely to form natural monopolies.

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Charles 9
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There was never an opportunity. Rollout to rural areas involves so much capital investment that providers would've refused to roll out AT ALL without sweetheart deals. When rural communities desperate to keep residents are stuck with a Hobson's Choice, it's literally a matter of Take It or Leave It.

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Microsoft devises new way of making you feel old: Windows NT is 25

Charles 9
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Re: Long live the dinosaur

So why couldn't those apps be shunted into VMs and be done with them?

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ZX Spectrum Vega+ blows a FUSE: It runs open-source emulator

Charles 9
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"Pi is halfway there. The problem is nobody is selling games for them in the shops."

Pi software won't be sold on high street until Pis are sold on high street. The bundling effect on which high street relies tends to require they have all the piece on hand.

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Encryption doesn't stop him or her or you... from working out what Thing 1 is up to

Charles 9
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Re: Not to defend IoT security but...

Except you don't have to physically be present to figure this out. Plant your bug during the day while everyone's at work/school/shopping, then you can peek in from the privacy of your own place.

As for chaff, one problem is if you have limited power, meaning you're caught in the middle of the scale of efficiency versus obscurity, unable to achieve both yet forced to do it anyway (because you don't want your traffic sniffed BUT you can't waste power either).

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For all the excitement, Pie may be Android's most minimal makeover yet – thankfully

Charles 9
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Re: Who's at fault?

But the software may complain. More and more apps won't work without a "pristine" environment (sort of like the "Warranty VOID if removed" sticker), and that usually also includes the bootloader.

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Charles 9
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I've been told the ADB backup system is not that reliable, not compatible with many devices, and hard to determine if the backup actually worked. Holo Backup has been abandoned on those grounds (couldn't trust the underlying system, no alternatives).

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Charles 9
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And is there any reason the Android system STILL doesn't have a local backup facility, to include application data, in case of problems? It would remove one reason I wish for a root but can't due to root-aware apps I use (that and Knox).

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The age of hard drives is over as Samsung cranks out consumer QLC SSDs

Charles 9
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"Whereas I suspect that for the cost of these 4TB SSDs you will be able to fill a 5 bay nas with 4TB mechanical hard drives and still have some change"

Hmm, I'd like to see some numbers. 4TB rust drives run about $100 or so each depending on the specs, then there's the NAS box itself (which has about a $100 baseline, too) where price and quality vary considerably from device to device. So that's a minimum $600 right there.

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Charles 9
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Re: No story here

"Tape is dead?"

It is in the consumer sphere. When was the last time you saw a tape drive at the local Best Buy? At least when QIC drives were around, consumers with a bit of cash could use them. No such analogue exists today, much as I wish there was, as we could really use some reliable way to archive a few TB at a time of stuff. As of now, the closest solution out there is rotating external hard drives.

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Charles 9
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Re: Maybe, maybe not.

"Already has with MDISC - a bit pricey but worth it imo."

Meh...pricey AND the capacity sucks. We need something like M-DISC but with capacities in the multi-TB range. I don't mind if it's slow (I once used a floppy-bus QIC tape drive), just to be able to reliably archive lots of stuff, and there isn't one in the consumer sphere at this time.

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Charles 9
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"It will be a VERY long time before the durability and price of SSDs even comes close to that of a mechanical hard drive."

Price I'll give you, but didn't MTBF ratings for SSDs leapfrog rust drives a few years back because of the lack of moving parts?

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Charles 9
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"Then you aren't buying the right laptops or desktops."

OR we're using older, "good enough" kit that was bought in an era when M.2 didn't exist yet.

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Charles 9
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Or compensate for theme with things like error codes. This isn't cutting edge stuff.

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Charles 9
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Re: QLC? It's not the one for me

Another issue with SSDs right now is sudden catastrophic controller failure. Has this been addressed, also?

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Charles 9
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Re: 4Tb ... of what?

Tell that to someone with a serious media or Steam collection.

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Charles 9
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Fat lot of good when your laptop ONLY takes SATA (M2 pretty much has to be built into laptops). And desktops will have a hard time using an add on when the only slot that can carry it runs the GPU.

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Charles 9
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Re: A SSD on a Sata III...

But for many of us, that's all we have to work with...

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Bank on it: It's either legal to port-scan someone without consent or it's not, fumes researcher

Charles 9
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Re: I tend to agree this is less than a good idea

"If it is reasonable to do a portscan at all it should be part of the login process. The Halifax comment saying that they want to protect customers is fine, except you are not just protecting customers."

The can MUST be done BEFORE the login. Any point after is Too Damn Late; the malware can already read your credentials.

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Charles 9
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That can easily backfire. The key about loopback is that it's always there. No other interface is guaranteed, especially if it's transitory like a WiFi connection.

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Charles 9
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Re: "the scanning is done with Javascript running locally"

But what if the port scan script IS the login script: part and parcel?

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Charles 9
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Re: Where does it end?

Cleartext FTP is port 21. Secure Shell (encrypted Telnet) is port 22. Cleartext Telnet is port 23.

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Cracking the passwords of some WPA2 Wi-Fi networks just got easier

Charles 9
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Re: Quick Countermeasure

Just impersonate one of the whitelisted MACs. Plenty of network devices out there allow you to set a custom MAC.

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BlackBerry claims it can do to ransomware what Apple did to its phones

Charles 9
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Sounds a bit like file versioning, something tried in various older file systems but noted to have overhead issues. It would have to be root-proof, though, or a privilege-escalating malware will simply find a way to wipe the versions as well.

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Game over for Google: Fortnite snubs Play Store, keeps its 30%, sparks security fears

Charles 9
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"Instead of putting safety tape and bandaids on a razor blade, how about don't give the kids the razor blade in the first place ?"

And what's to stop the kid from FINDING the razor blade on his own? Or the loose porno mag tossed over the fence? It's not like yours is the only one in existence. And I can speak from firsthand experience about chance encounters outside of any parents' possible purview (albeit the chance find for me was a perfectly ordinary fantasy novel that drew my interest in the author).

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OpenAI bots thrash team of Dota 2 semi-pros, set eyes on mega-tourney

Charles 9
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Removing what you describe removes the real-time aspect of the game (it's a derivative of RTS), meaning you'd need to consider another genre altogether. Removing the reaction time handicap pretty much means the game has to have a controlled pace, such as a turn-based system like 4X.

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Charles 9
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Re: How about

"Watch the screen, use a controller ..far easier for bot to know what is going on when data presented to it digitally - give it the much harder task of decoding the visual data as presented on a screen."

Based on what I've read, they're working their way towards a reasonable facsimile (having no more information than would be visible on an average player's screen). There's no need for the computer to have to read the information in the same way as humans can (as humans carry evolutionary advantages of their own re: processing visual information), just limit the amount of information available at hand and you're already a lot closer to information parity. As for input methods and so on, the reaction time helps in this regard. Professional players use dedicated hardware of their own for maximum throughout and are well-coached in team communication so that offsets the inherent efficiencies of the computer team.

I think the article itself comes off as very fair in its assessment. It won, but there were still conditions. It'll be interesting to see what happens at The International. And then we'll see what happens going forward.

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