* Posts by Charles 9

13890 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Boffins build blazing battery bonfire

Charles 9
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Re: More

I would think energy independence would've been a great political tool, ESPECIALLY during the Cold War (the old "You can't starve us out" argument), and it can still apply today to relieve realpolitik pressures.

Charles 9
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Please elaborate.

LG's beer-making bot singlehandedly sucks all fun, boffinry from home brewing

Charles 9
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Re: Jeffrey Bernard Is Unwell

Never say that in front of a whiskey aficionado. Different grains impart different qualities, thus whiskeys from different regions have different characteristics. A corn-based Bourbon will be different from a barley-based Scotch.

Charles 9
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Re: Why?

"I'm quite certain that unless they have some DMCA-type technology to only allow their own capsules to work, that some enterprising bods will find a way to reverse engineer the system and tweak the recipes / substitute their own capsules."

Or the machine requires a certain formulation of yeast or other compound...to which LG holds the patent (and no complaining this time as it's a real, physical thing here) so can sue any copycats to extinction.

The internet is going to hell and its creators want your help fixing it

Charles 9
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Re: There are some technical bugs we can certainly fix

So basically you're describing a variant on Virtual Network Computing or related protocols: a virtual desktop. Thing is, that probably won't fly with the providers because increased network traffic and server loads mean they foot the bill.

Charles 9
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No, because "Never Again" is usually the cause of many wars. Someone who gets jackbooted long enough or gets cornered finds no recourse but to retaliate, things escalate, and things get ugly. Worse, wars caused by oppression are the more likely to go to extremes, especially the kind of "Well, if that's the way you want it..." where MAD becomes an acceptable scenario.

Charles 9
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"We could also recognize that THE foundational freedom of liberal democracies, from which all other freedoms flow, is Freedom of Speech."

At the same time, we also have to recognize that this (and thus ANY) freedom has to have limits. That's why United States v. Schenck (the "fire in a crowded theater" decision) is cited so often. The problem comes from setting those limits because they're inherently subjective and impossible to fit for everyone.

Charles 9
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That's you, but for many others, just because something is there doesn't mean someone's going to intuit what you're supposed to do with it. Plus, even if the tool is at hand, there's the matter of knowing how to use it properly. For example, apply Murphy's Law to a simple hammer or slotted screwdriver.

Charles 9
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Re: Look to SciFi for inspiration

But you'll still need to convince people to actually use it. Or as they say in sales, "Style sells." You'll have to correct the human condition first. At which point, you probably wouldn't need a new Internet.

Charles 9
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Re: Look to SciFi for inspiration

If freenet has taught me anything, it's that there's no panacea. Mesh networks like freenet are going to exact their toll in some way, usually in the form of increased bandwidth usage (which will usually translate to higher fees). Plus, what's to stop the Other Internet from intruding on the Mesh Internet. It's not like you can say no...

For fax sake: NHS to be banned from buying archaic copy-flingers

Charles 9
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Re: The first rule...

Wonder what would've happened if the telephone exchanges had gone dead at the same time...

Charles 9
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Re: Sending a photo via SMS

I don't know about that. In the US there is Certified Mail and Registered Mail, both of which carry assurances of delivery (Registered moreso than Certified). I would think the Royal Mail would have counterparts to this. Plus, at the extreme, there are courier services.

Keen for much-hyped quantum computing to finally land? Don't expect it for a decade

Charles 9
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Re: Don't miss the point

I think part of the problem is that the time value of data is longer than most people assume, especially when put together with other data that creates trails that can "freshen" even stale data by making them more relevant.

Charles 9
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Re: They say never ask a question you don't already know the answer to

Not if the government orders them to stay hush and denies its existence, on penalty of endangering national security. Recall that the F-117 was "black" for quite some time. What's to say a working quantum computer wouldn't be kept hush-hush as well?

Charles 9
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"Google self driving cars are very clever, but they aren't AI. It'll weave its way through time square, but stick it in the middle of a cattle ranch or on the moon and it won't know what the hell to do, even though it's still basically the same job."

Stick a city slicker in the middle of nowhere, somewhere totally novel where none of their experience can really apply, and watch them struggle, too. It's the schadenfreude from the struggle that makes survivalist media so popular.

Charles 9
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"Landing safely in someone's garden wouldn't be that hard if the flying car has drone-like flying characteristics."

The thing is, probably the most-desired feature of a flying car is the ability to go (within fuel limits) between any two arbitrary points without having to deal with things like traffic and so on. So VTOL on a driveway or curbside is going to be an assumed goal.

Charles 9
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So IOW, the US probably already has a working quantum computer chruning away (probably under their Utah data center: perfect cover and source of material to decrypt all at once) and all this is just misdirection under top-secret government orders because the computer is a Black project.

GDPR USA? 'A year ago, hell no ... More people are open to it now' – House Rep says EU-like law may be mulled

Charles 9
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Re: Kudos to him

Reaching Across the Aisle...or Consorting with The Enemy?

Charles 9
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Re: Inquiring minds

But now you can have a sovereignty conflict. Suppose a site based in one country with NO laws regarding online behavior has to cater to users from one country where their laws REQUIRE you allow their content AND those from another country that FORBIDS the same content?

Whose policy applies, as each country is sovereign and has skin in the matter (one is hosting, the other two's citizens are involved)?

If you ever felt like you needed to carry 4TB of data around, Toshiba's got you covered

Charles 9
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Re: Who else was expecting an SD-card?

Fail in what way? As in you plug them in and they don't respond (even to reading) anymore? I know that SD cards and USB sticks have short write lives (they get the third- or fourth-string flash chips), and I have hammered a 16GB MicroSD to death before (in a dash cam), but apart from that?

Charles 9
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Re: Eggs. Basket.

Besides, my typical use cases tend to make the idea of unintentionally AND unknowingly deleting something an unlikely proposition. I tend to be a bit of a packrat and am reluctant to delete anything, so If I'm deleting something, I usually know what I'm deleting. If I realize I've made a mistake, I usually realize it right away, so I have local undelete utilities on hand as the first resort, followed by the other drive. Besides, the material I intend to back up to drives like these tend to be of the WIRE type (Write-Infrequently, Read-Extensively), so things going in usually stay that way unless I'm undergoing a preplanned update of specific materials.

Charles 9
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Re: Eggs. Basket.

A second copy of all the data stored in a separate location and not actively used, updated occasionally? Sounds like a backup to me, unless you're ready to provide some technical dictionary definition for the word. Plus in my scheme I sync and rotate the devices occasionally to deal with mechanical wear.

Charles 9
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Re: Who else was expecting an SD-card?

I would've settled for a USB stick, but I figured that was a long shot.

Charles 9
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Re: Eggs. Basket.

At the prices they're going these days (the 4TB WD easystore was only $80 on a Cyber Monday sale), you can get at least two and mirror and rotate them. If one dies, odds are still passing fair you can get a replacement and re-mirror before the other one goes since you only use one of them at a time (meaning they'll have differing wear patterns that reduce the odds of simultaneous failure).

Charles 9
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Re: This has been available for a while

The 4TB WD easydrive has been around for over a year now (I know; I bought a couple during a Cyber Monday sale and bought two more this year--for $20 less each than before). Having said that, these may not be 1TB/platter models, but in this case does it really matter?

And yes, Seagate and I have had bad experiences as well. I only use the ones I picked up for temporary storage these days since I've had most of them start to cut out on occasion.

OM5G... Qualcomm teases next Snapdragon chip for phones: The 855 with a fingerprint Sonic Screwdriver, er, Sensor

Charles 9
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Re: "Qualcomm teases next Snapdragon chip"

I think that's because the US analogue is to "kill" a product. Drop means "drop a hint".

Windows 10 security question: How do miscreants use these for post-hack persistence?

Charles 9
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You make it sound like it should require a license to use a computer: something normally used inside one's own home.

Holy moley! The amp, kelvin and kilogram will never be the same again

Charles 9
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Re: SI

Well, pick your poison. No one can just pick arbitrary times because they'll have to coordinate with everyone else: many of which are "locked in". When you get "oop north" in the winter, there just isn't enough daylight to go around, so you have to make a decision: favor it earlier so kids don't go to school in the dark (safety risks and concerned parents) or favor it later so people are more in a position to enjoy it (psychological issues).

Charles 9
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Re: My calculator is out of date

But will h STAY exactly 6.62607015 × 10^-34 J ⋅ s? Or will the increased use of Kibble balances reveal more significant digits that can result in a redefinition of h, which will in turn alter everything dependent on h?

Charles 9
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Re: I despair

"Would you accept a change from a 4 once chocolate to 3? From 100g to 90g?"

Wouldn't matter. They'll do whatever they damn well please. A half-gallon of ice cream in America isn't really a half-gallon (as in 64 fluid ounces) anymore, anyway (for years it's been as little as 48 and no more than 56).

Charles 9
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Re: yard/mile on our roads for some strange reason

I think one big stumbling block for changing temperature will be dealing with cookbooks. OLD cookbooks, especially large collections handed down through generations. I doubt there will be a service on hand to convert all the measurements and not that many people have a head for converting temperatures (especially over-boiling temperatures) on the fly.

Charles 9
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Re: SI

You can count 0-9 one one hand by simply staring with fist for zero, then raise the fingers in one direction for 1-5, then close them in the SAME direction to get 6-9 back to the fist. Because the raised fingers are on opposite ends of the hand, it's easy to distinguish a 2 from an 8. Meaning you can count from 0 to 99 using both hands. And I'm not being all that efficient. With a mastery of binary, one can go from 0 to 1023 using both hands.

'Fibre broadband' should mean glass wires poking into your router, reckons Brit survey

Charles 9
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Re: Here in Manila

That's the trouble with things like utilities. They tend naturally towards monopolies and oligopolies for two reasons: (1) High-upfront costs which require lengthy amortization to recoup, meaning any player has to have deep pockets and go for the long game. (2) The infrastructure can be an eyesore, raising NIMBY issues that keep the number of players low. That's why you don't see more than one water or sewage company in any given area: the populace wouldn't tolerate more than one network.

Talk about a cache flow problem: This JavaScript can snoop on other browser tabs to work out what you're visiting

Charles 9
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Re: JS - just for a change

"Fine by me -- that's what I've been doing for years anyway. Sites that are so poorly designed that they can't run without Javascript are sites that are so poorly designed that they don't deserve my attention."

Problem is, what if it's the ONLY way to access your money (because it's your bank, for which there are no local branches of ANY bank within a reasonable drive--and no, EVERY employer is forced to direct deposit for tax reasons--those who don't tend to get sniffed by la migra)?

Charles 9
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Re: Claims of spying are overblown

Yes, but the objective may be to pwn the VM which contains the browser, and for that you need a hypervisor attack (a Red Pill).

Tumblr resorts to AI in attempt to scrub itself clean from filth

Charles 9
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Re: Child porn

Not really. What about the deviance in their own heads?

You think you're hot bit: Seagate tests 16TB HAMR disk drive

Charles 9
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Physics gets in the way. That's why Quantum dropped the Bigfoot.

Charles 9
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Re: Amazing advances

That's assuming it was possible to do so originally. At one time, my source material came from a pre-FLAC age where 250MB was uncommon (as was a CPU strong enough to decode MP3 tealtime).

A rumble in Amazon's jungle: AWS now rents out homegrown 64-bit Arm server processors

Charles 9
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And for the record, the two more-powerful consoles on the market today are x86, NOT ARM (the Switch is Tegra, both the XB1 and PS4 are AMD x86). I'll believe ARM is ready for gaming prime time when it's used to run an intensive 4K game like the big boys.

Mobile networks are killing Wi-Fi for speed around the world

Charles 9
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Re: ...no mention anywhere of the impact on privacy....

0F F8 don't correspond to any magic numbers on my list, so I'll err cautious and assume it's encrypted content and block it. What is it really and why should I let it through? Because what could happen to the ISP if they assume the worst?

Charles 9
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Re: who really cares about speed?

Then perhaps not worst case but at least a suitably bad case. Isn't that the big goal of engineering: to achieve bad-case planning on an average-case budget?

Charles 9
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Re: who really cares about speed?

"How fast do you need a mobile network connection to be?"

As fast as you think it should be...times five.

Raise the factor if you have more than the average household, as everyone could easily be hammering the line at the same time...without anyone else knowing it. Plan for the worst case, not the average case.

Charles 9
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Re: ...no mention anywhere of the impact on privacy....

Except that you're incorrect. The LAN connection up to your hub IS private, but that's where it ends. Beyond that is not under your control any more than your wireless linkup (which can itself be hubbed up). Once the connection leaves your control, the ISP that provides your service can do all sorts of things to the connection: most of them beyond your control (and if you try to get around their control with encryption, which almost always can be detected--stego at this level is not guaranteed--well, they have ways to rain on that parade, too: ask the Chinese).

Charles 9
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Re: The report also says...

Even with a hub that supports 5GHz connections? I'd like to see the numbers there. Plus it might be best to compare the two when BOTH are suffering contention (which would be the case in rush hour and the like).

Windows XP? Pfff! Parts of the Royal Navy are running Win ME

Charles 9
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Re: No excuse

Acetone dissolves cyanoacrylate.

Microsoft menaced with GDPR mega-fines in Europe for 'large scale and covert' gathering of people's info via Office

Charles 9
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Re: Wrong approach

"...once a law is clear that's it."

That's the problem. With lawyers, it's NEVER that clear. Laws can be changed, reinterpreted. Even judicial precedent can be challenged in future.

Put it this way. I'll believe it when the courts can make the Hugh Jass fine final and binding with criminal culpability attached for good measure.

Charles 9
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Re: Wrong approach

You'll also have to make them lawyer-proof and make sure you don't trigger retaliatory actions (tit-for-tats).

Charles 9
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Re: Getting away with it

And who do you think runs the governments...or has the know-how to "grease the wheels"?

OnePlus 6T: Tasteful, powerful – and much cheaper than a flagship

Charles 9
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Honest question here. What's the best you can get these days with headphone jack, SD slot, and a user-replaceable battery?

Charles 9
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Re: Past meets future

Bluetooth-to-Aux adapters are easy to find. Some even plug direct into car power sockets. I use a Bluetooth FM transmitter as my car's tape deck is dead and is 2003 (pre-Aux).

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