* Posts by Charles 9

10428 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Reminder: Spies, cops don't need to crack WhatsApp. They'll just hack your smartphone

Charles 9
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Re: While better than a back door

Thing is, were the tools still in active use at the time or were they a couple generations out of use?

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Firefox doesn't need to be No 1 – and that's OK, 'cos it's falling off a cliff

Charles 9
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Re: Betamax myth again...

Quality was why Betamax won in the professional market. You could find Beta machines in plenty of TV studios for that reason. Price was less of an issue there while generational preservation was.

As for stereo, I recall VHS had an easier time getting Hi-Fidelity sound onto the tape (especially in NTSC recordings) which is why they got an edge in sound and another reason VHS won that generation's video war. By the time Beta had a suitable answer, the war had pretty much run its course.

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Charles 9
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Re: Bollocks

Funny. I keep FF up for weeks at a time without an issue (have to keep a window open to keep an obscure, slow-to-reload page active), and I only have 8GB and a Core i5. Oh, and it's only using 500MB, with two windows (one Private) and multiple tabs active. WITH numerous Add-ons active including NoScript and uBlock Origin. Does it matter that it's v54 (32-bit)? And as for the interface, I frankly don't see what all the fuss is about. I LIKE the Hamburger menu, I reload with the keyboard, and if I need the regular menus, a quick flick of Alt opens it right back up. Ever tried to print a webpage from Chrome? It doesn't use the OS-standard print dialogs.

And no, I'm not a shill or anything. I simply, honestly and truly, prefer Firefox to anything else. Nothing anyone else has said has convinced me otherwise.

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Charles 9
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Re: IMO It is an engineering fault for their failure...

And then they get flak for pwnings that occur BETWEEN the Patch Tuesdays, some of which are SO severe (and already in the wild) they're forced to scramble to issue an Out-of-Band patch. Putting you in a vice: break your machine or get pwned. And let's not forget all those people who wouldn't update even if it meant their lives (or livelihoods); they've demonstrated an inability to stay current, when self-preservation doesn't work, you're forced to use other means (and no, you can't use Darwin since that would bring with it collateral damage which could end up boomeranging back to YOU).

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Charles 9
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Re: yea we know

"It's a bit like helmets and seatbelts. I think they are a good idea and that everyone should wear one, but I also think you're all big kids and if you want to take a chance, it's your life."

NO, because no man is an island, and your life has an effect on everyone else, so disregard for oneself is by extension disregard for EVERYONE: bad for society.

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Adobe will kill Flash by 2020: No more updates, support, tears, pain...

Charles 9
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Re: Too little, too late

They can't because there ARE things for which high-ups will reply, "But it's the ONLY way we can administer our stuff!" because people like Cisco (Identity Services Engine) don't offer alternatives on their dime (and since this is high-end enterprise stuff, they're expensive, too). You'd be cornering these firms who got the stuff long ago in good faith; they can't use Flash in an environment where they MUST use Flash.

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Microsoft hits new low: Threatens to axe classic Paint from Windows 10

Charles 9
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Then what happens WHEN (not IF) a program you ABSOLUTELY need ONLY works on Windows (and let's say ONLY Windows 8 and up for "security reasons") and (due to its purpose) MUST be online? I mean, why can't game developers see the writing on the wall and code for a united flavor of Linux, for example (because for every working headliner example you can cite I can probably name at least two that won't and probably never will like Fallout 4).

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Charles 9
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Re: MS Paint

"Maybe Microsoft should try to write a report in Paint 3D and tell us how that felt."

And if they say they LOVED it and wouldn't use anything else?

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Source code unleashed for junk-blasting Internet of Things botnet

Charles 9
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Re: Companies entering this space need to think about longer term impact

They don't care about the long-term risks. If anything happens, they'll just play shell games, disappear and reappear as a new company.

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Charles 9
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Re: IoT devices uses default passwords

But what about people with bad memories who suddenly need to get into their routers and can't...because they forgot the password? The problem with your solution is that you have to account for stupid who will still complain if they can't get into the stuff they bought outright with their own hard-earned dollars tout suite.

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Sweden leaked every car owners' details last year, then tried to hush it up

Charles 9
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Re: Too Many Idiots in the Kitchen

That's just one application of the word, but in general an oxymoron is a description that is self-contradictory. Such as "a regular abnormality" (since something abnormal, by definition, can't be regular) or a "squared circle" (since a circle, by definition, has no corners).

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Al Capone was done for taxes. Now Microsoft's killing domain-squatters with trademark law

Charles 9
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Trademarks are meant to protect identity. Using a trademarked name in criticism is considered satire or complaint, both protected under the 1st Amendment.

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Judge uses 1st Amendment on Pokemon Go park ban. It's super effective!

Charles 9
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Re: Exercising my 1st amendment rights ...

There's no limitation on the right of free speech written in the 1st Amendment, either, yet the Schenck decision found one anyway, implied, in that you can't use speech to deny the rights of others (the "Fire in a Crowded Theater" test). Since ANY large assembly of people raises the inherent potential to wreak havoc (the more people there are, the less chance any one will own up), there are laws in place to control such assemblies: laws which have survived challenges due to the need to protect the freedoms and rights of non-assemblers.

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What is this – some kind of flashy, 3-bit consumer SSD? Eh, Seagate?

Charles 9
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Re: I like to apply the rule of...

More like fear of being unable to get it back. Given the ephemeral nature of all things Internet, some of us are of the nature we should hold on in case things start disappearing, much like those viral videos that then get cut off at the source. You know what what say; better by far to have something you don't need than to need something you don't have.

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Charles 9
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Getting closer.

Definitely worth considering if the original drive wasn't that big to begin with, but as mine is 1TB the price tag for a replacement my size is still probably going to be too high to tempt me. And that's just the main drive. Large program and/or program data collections are still going to have to hold out on rust for the time being.

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'Millions of IoT gizmos' wide open to hijackers after devs drop gSOAP

Charles 9
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Re: Requires an incentive

What law? If they're extraterritorial, they're not subject to your laws.

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Charles 9
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Re: Maybe I'm growing into a grumpy cynic but...

Sounds all nice until the real world butts in. You know the old saying, "Good, Quick, Cheap. Pick any TWO." Problem is, the bean counters and higher-ups usually call dibs on the Cheap and Quick, figuring paying for the occasional flub is less than doing it Good. Leaving you kinda backed into a corner.

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Charles 9
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Re: Requires an incentive

But then, how do you stop Amazon and eBay. If you try to push them, they could push back and tick off lots of customers (and by extension, constituents), causing them to complain to their governments for being heavy-handed.

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Charles 9
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Re: Requires an incentive

And if the retailer has no physical presence, either, because it's an E-tailer stationed out of the country?

Of if it's a gray market where the devices are obtained straight from a manufacturer website again out of the country?

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Charles 9
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Re: Maybe I'm growing into a grumpy cynic but...

Oh? What about formally proven software?

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Charles 9
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Re: Of course it won't happen anytime soon

Simple. A car can kill someone. DIRECTLY, as in run them over. Until common IoT things cam directly kill someone, legislatures won't jump in.

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China's 'future-proof' crypto: We talk to firm behind crazy quantum key distribution network

Charles 9
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Re: Misses the point

But how much value? Knowing the message is compromised probably won't mean much if someone else knows the compromised message and because of this can preempt your intended goals.

If you REALLY want to get the message without the target knowing, then you need to take the "outside the envelope" approach and simply snag the message in a phase where it MUST be decrypted.

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Charles 9
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Re: Misses the point

But they still won't hold a candle to rubber-hose cryptanalysis and obtaining the data "outside the envelope".

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Linus Torvalds may have damned systemd with faint praise

Charles 9
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Then perhaps you can explain why almost everyone's sick of SysVInit (noticing it was last or next-to-last in all but one of the votes). What about SysV doesn't adhere to KISS or "Do One Thing"?

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Charles 9
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Re: US Portions

"Please explain. After paying for food here over rather more decades than I care to think about it comes as something of a surprise to find I never owned it."

Think about the old adage about bad beer; you don't BUY it, you just RENT it for a while. Similarly for food you eat; you don't buy some of it it because most it doesn't stay inside: leaving eventually one way or the other.

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Charles 9
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Re: no systemd here

So what happens if there's only ONE way to fix something AND it REQUIRES breaking everything?

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Charles 9
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Re: It's a phase young programmers go through

"No chance, they'd merge. And we'd definitely need to shoot what staggered out."

More like nuking from orbit, and even then there's no guarantees. It could evolve radiation resistance like a tardigrade.

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Charles 9
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Re: replacing init with something "sane"

"I would argue that it wasn't "init" that needed replacing, it was "rc"."

I was going to say, replacing the idea of fixed numeric runlevels with names (which can still be numeric) could at least be seen as a gradual progression (nothing too different from what's being used now, after all) and would allow the introduction of configurable flexibility (more than 5 runlevels if need be, or less if you want to KISS the system some).

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Charles 9
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Re: no systemd here

IOW, gestalt faults (or gestfaults, for short). Things that never show up individually but crop up when put together (the whole is worse than the sum of its parts). And that's another potential fault point for a process chain: "trusting the welds", so to speak, since you can't be sure the two programs were built by the same teams with the same goals and same philosophies and expectations. If they don't, and they don't explain everything, an edge case can hit where the sender sends something the receiver doesn't expect.

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Charles 9
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Re: no systemd here

Well, if the UNIX philosophy is "Do one thing and do it well," two questions bug me. One, how can one be sure the one thing a program is doing is actually doing it RIGHT. Doing one thing but doing it WRONG presents weak links in a process chain. Second, explain busybox.

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Western Digital wins California court skirmish against Toshiba

Charles 9
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Re: A lesson to be learned here:

"Don't sign contracts based on the people you're dealing with at the moment."

Problem is, we're not prescient. I don't think anyone could figure Toshiba as a whole would get into so much financial trouble so quickly. It's sorta like finding out a millionaire had turned penniless overnight over something that seemed like a great idea at the time. Or a close teetotaler friend having just one night of drinking and suddenly ending up with a legal mess worse than the Gordian Knot, including a gruesome DUI-based Vehicular Homicide charge.

IOW, some things you just CAN'T anticipate or you'd go insane.

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Viking storms storage monastery wielding 50TB SAS SSD

Charles 9
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Re: SOHO needs these capacities + replacement for RAID

RAID will still be needed because there remains a risk of a sudden catastrophic failure (like a controller failure). Erasure codes are meant for bit rot, not catastrophic failures.

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Charles 9
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Re: No pricing...

Maybe it's simply a case of, "If you have to ask, you can't afford it."

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Charles 9
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Re: Nice

But their reliability when they're mothballed can be hit or miss. Sometimes you spin up a drive that hasn't been used in a while and it...doesn't. Solid state drives can't suffer mechanical failures the way rust drives can, and controller failures can happen to ANY drive, so it's a wash there. One good question is the rate of bit rot between them. I try to address this by keeping error codes with my backups to deal with it if it pops up on occasion.

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Rimini Street: Dispute with Oracle is contract law, not copyright

Charles 9
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That probably wouldn't count as that would be considered two different formats of the same thing. One not intended for permanent storage.

OTOH, most programs MUST be stored to be usable. It's like with Microsoft and Windows in the past. HOW you got the copy wasn't as important as whether or not the KEY you have is legit.

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Charles 9
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Not quite. Each downloaded already had a license direct from the source, meaning they were LEGALLY entitled to a copy. Does it matter from where the copy comes?

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AI vans are real – but they'll make us suck at driving, warn boffins

Charles 9
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The manufacturer AND the programmer? Double dip?

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Charles 9
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Re: Complete or not at all...

Proportion doesn't matter so much if it's a matter of low incidence but high consequence.

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Charles 9
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That's still savings in labor costs. Now it's just a bottom-rung handler, not a tested, certified commercial driver.

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Two-factor FAIL: Chap gets pwned after 'AT&T falls for hacker tricks'

Charles 9
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Re: Yubikey + U2F

And it doesn't support NFC either? Many older phones lack the NFC capability.

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Charles 9
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Re: That's why NIST deprecated SMS authentication

Why the thing against forced password rotations (which IIRC are meant to close and/or detect any unknown breaches)?

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Charles 9
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Re: Yubikey + U2F

Assuming your phone takes USB OTG. This isn't a given. Remember the phone with the non-standard port?

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Charles 9
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Re: Yubikey + U2F

How do you use a YubiKey on your phone which has no USB ports?

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JavaScript spec gets strung out on padding

Charles 9
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Re: broken by design?

"I think JavaScript strings are UTF-16 internally. I don't think it could be done any other way."

Agreed. It's unfortunate, but not everything can be of uniform length. It's up to the user to handle edge cases accordingly. For example, if the string is expected to use mainly CJK characters, pad with the Idoegraphic Space (U+3000) which is meant for CJK typography. As for RTL languages, the main thing needed is consistency. As long as you keep the text uniform, just use the appropriate padding function. As for combining characters, Unicode already includes many precomposed characters, so this doesn't crop up as often as you think.

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While USA is distracted by its President's antics, China is busy breaking another fusion record

Charles 9
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Re: Flat Earth

"So really that argument would be that the Earth were flat if the commonly perceived 3 dimensions were, in fact, only two :)"

Which two, then, given we can physically measure three?

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Russia, China vow to kill off VPNs, Tor browser

Charles 9
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Re: The cause of the next world war

And then the nukes come down...

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Former GCHQ boss backs end-to-end encryption

Charles 9
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Re: Meanwhile ...

Yes, but what if your opposition is LOOKING for strange messages on the assumption they're up to no good? IOW, you not only have to hide the contents of the message but also the fact you're sending a clandestine message. There are only so many ways you can mangle the language in a public medium (and it's difficult to use extensive steganography, especially for a detailed message in a medium not under your control) before people start wondering. At least in WW2 there were codes being sent everywhere, including from overt official sources. Not as easy in a covert campaign.

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Web inventor Sir Tim sizes up handcuffs for his creation – and world has 2 weeks to appeal

Charles 9
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Re: Capture system... between PC and monitor.

Not necessarily the USER. The user's DEVICE, yes, but not the user him/herself, and that's significant because the user may not necessarily have access to his/her own device (particularly the internals, think a black-box cryptoprocessor). The material is there, and the algorithm is known, but if the key is not presented in a way that the user can easily reach, then it's still a pretty tight system: like a peep show (look but don't touch).

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Charles 9
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Re: Consumer choice

But that makes a Hobson's Choice when the ONLY version of a product available is a DRM product: Take It Or Leave It. problem is, the Leaves are in the clear minority.

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Charles 9
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Re: Capture system... between PC and monitor.

Don't bother trying it with a 4K disc, though. IIRC they updated the standards so PC drives can't read the keys, only dedicated players can read them and all links on the chain (including the display) must use encrypted buses and protected data paths. They're really tying these things tighter than a miser's purse this time.

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