* Posts by Pete 2

2618 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Compsci degrees aren't returning on investment for coders – research

Pete 2
Silver badge

More!

> Average student debt is now more than £50,000, according the Institute of Fiscal Studies

And when you factor in the 3 years the degree course takes, when you could have been earning instead of studying - and gaining experience, so at age 21 you have 3 years experience instead of none, the "loss" is even greater.

26
4

Yet more British military drones crash, this time into the Irish Sea

Pete 2
Silver badge

3 services in one

A Royal Artillery drone flies into the sea.

Is this a case of all three: army, air-force and navy pilots (drivers, game-players, supervisers, operators) trying to wrest the controls off each other?

2
0

Bespoke vending machine biz Bodega AI trips cultural landmine

Pete 2
Silver badge

No need to worry

> reassure people that it isn't out to kick mom-and-pop stores to the curb.

Just as soon as customers realise that the stuff they get from the vending machine is a ¢ or two cheaper, they'll do all the "kicking to the curb", themselves.

0
0

Regulate, says Musk – OK, but who writes the New Robot Rules?

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Liabilty? No difference!

> all our self driving cars will then start crawling through town at a snail's pace, just in case.

Which brings us nicely to the second part of the unfolding AV saga (part 3 would deal with: what crime has been commited, and where should the offence be prosecuted?).

But let's not get ahead of ourselves. Part 2. The ability of individuals to hold up traffic indefinitely would soon need to be addressed - within minutes of the first herd of AVs hitting the streets. We clearly cannot have pedestrians simply walking out to cross the road at will, safe in the knowledge that whatever they do, the AVs will be forced to bend to their will. So what will happen is that people will become subject to much more stringent "jay walking" regulations. Just to keep the traffic flowing.

So it will become illegal to walk in the road just because you feel like it. And just as illegal to cross except when the traffic lights permit. The AVs will enforce this law with their 360° cameras and the police's facial recognition systems.

2
0
Pete 2
Silver badge

Liabilty? No difference!

> “If an autonomous system acts to avoid a group of school children but then kills a single adult, did the system fail or perform well?”

This is a pretty simplistic situation as the answer is the same as it is for human driver/operators today: vehicles should not travel so fast that they cannot stop safely. If that means an AV needs to regulate its speed down to a crawl, then so be it. Since that is what a responsible human-driver would do.

And the same judgements regarding liability pertain to when someone runs out in front of a fast moving vehicle. If the act was unforeseeable then there can be no blame.

But AVs offer the possibility of having much more forensic quality information available to back up their case. Rather than "he said - she said" type disputes, there will be the ability to re-run all the recorded events leading up to an incident. There should therefore be far fewer cases of disputed liability. Though I am sure that to start with there will be many more cases of people trying to claim compo, fraudulently.

3
0

Linus Torvalds' lifestyle tips for hackers: Be like me, work in a bathrobe, no showers before noon

Pete 2
Silver badge

The money motive

> “Sometimes I get the feeling these smart people are doing bad things, but I wish they were on our side because they are so smart and they could help us.”

The problem is that writing code is "fun". It is easy to get people to do that.

Testing for faults, exploits and problems is boring. It is hard to get volunteers and amateurs to do that

Debuggering code is difficult. It is very difficult to get people who are "giving" their time to do that.

The main motivation, therefore, to look for problems is so that you can exploit them. That exploitation might be peer-recognition: "Look at me. I'm so clever. I found some holes in your system". Or they might be monetary: "Pssst! wanna buy a zero-day" or it could be anarchistic: "Let's use this to break things"

And this is the biggest weakness of much FOSS stuff - not just Linux. If people have the choice to to "fun" things, they will. But you cannot coerce them to do the boring stuff.

32
1

Everyone loves programming in Python! You disagree? But it's the fastest growing, says Stack Overflow

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Usefulness

> The poor fuckers who have to maintain your pile of shite code after you've been sacked, that's who!!!

Any "support" coder who is only able to understand software that is written in one particular way is never going have either the flexibility to understand that "there is more than one way to do it", nor would they be experienced enough to reliably do general purpose software support.

One trick ponies!

7
19
Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Usefulness

> But like any programming language there are areas that it sucks at.

Although I use it a lot, I cannot respect a language where white space is a critical part of the syntax.

Move a line of code in or out by a space or two and it either becomes part of a preceding conditional clause, or is removed from it.

As for "pythonic"? In my book, if the code works, it works. Who cares whether it conforms to the "right" way of doing it.

16
20

Whoosh, there it is: Toshiba bods say 14TB helium-filled disk is coming soon

Pete 2
Silver badge

Need to check if it's any use for A/V storage

> helium-filled disk is coming soon

Does it make all the voices on audio tracks sound squeaky?

8
0

Retail serfs to vanish, all thanks to automation

Pete 2
Silver badge

Not all bad

> 63 per cent of jobs in sales are at risk of disappearing, thanks to increasingly capable automated systems

However, that will be more than made up for by the rise in demand for call centre operators. People to answer calls complaining that they were sold the wrong thing, that it doesn't do what they thought it should, that it doesn't work with the other gizmos they have or that the instructions are gibberish.

The problem (well known to owners of HiFi shops since at least the 1980's) is that customers go to "posh" shops to ask about stuff, see it demonstrated, decide which one they like, then bugger off to get it cheaper from a discounter or online outlet.

4
0

We experienced Windows Mixed Reality. Results: Well, mixed

Pete 2
Silver badge

The Penzance train will not be stopping at Land's End

> ... What about wearing the headset conferencing on the train?

as you glide serenely past your stop, totally immersed in the joys of last months sales report from the northern Kamchatka region.

13
0

Kill animals and destroy property before hurting humans, Germany tells future self-driving cars

Pete 2
Silver badge

Lost in translation?

> Ultimately, drivers will still bear responsibility if their autonomous charabanc crashes, unless it was caused by a system failure

A system can either be autonomous, or it can have someone in control (possibly one or the other at different times). But to say that a person is responsible for an autonomous vehicle, or that a vehicle is autonomous if it has a "driver" is contradictory.

26
0

Can North Korean nukes hit US mainland? Maybe. But EMP blast threat is 'highly credible'

Pete 2
Silver badge

Diversionary tactics?

What does everyone do at a fireworks display? They look at the pretty rockets.

But what if the space-based delivery system is just there for show? Is it not possible that KJU is only developing them because he wants to be the envy of every other major government (that *ahem* does not have the ability or will to lob their own products spaceward).

Might the plan for the nukes be to sell them to some well-financed quasi-national group - maybe one that is currently losing it's war - and saying "There ya go. Have some fun with one of these"

So while the USAians are focusing all their attentions on NK launched "research" rockets, the actual nukes are headed off in an entirely different direction, towards some other western destination.

Whatever you hit, call that the target

10
2

Disbanding your security team may not be an entirely dumb idea

Pete 2
Silver badge

Stovepipes!

The problem with relegating "security" to various other teams within IT operations (though really, security holes are primarily a software design - and possibly implementation - problem) is that each team will simply try to push a problem onto another team.

I have worked in many organisations that have assigned specific and rigid roles to their various teams, they all spend significant amounts of time and effort trying to convince all and sundry in management that a particular problem is not their responsibility: either to take the blame for, or to resolve. I can see security issues being just another political football that gets kicked around for days, weeks, months, while the hackers hack away, merrily.

It seems to me that this is the biggest failing of all the many business accreditation and "quality" initiatives that companies get suckered into. They all attempt to set out who is responsible for what, but cannot deal with issues that are multi-disciplinary in their nature, unforeseen, urgent and exceptional. By using this sort of approach, each team merely has a narrow view of the corporate "sky", through their particular "pipe" and fails to see the big picture: to do business and make money in an efficient, legal, safe and secure organisation.

So sure, devolve responsibility for "security" amongst the IT teams. But at the same time ensure there is someone very high up who then has absolute power to cut through org-charts and charters, to tell anyone in any of those teams to stop what they are doing and FIX THAT SECURITY PROBLEM. NOW!

15
0

Elon Musk among 116 AI types calling on UN to nobble robo-weapons before they go all Skynet

Pete 2
Silver badge

Not smart weapons

> “As companies building the technologies in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics that may be repurposed to develop autonomous weapons

The problem with autonomous weapons isn't that they use AI. it is that they aren't smart enough. A truly smart and autonomous weapon would recognise that wars are only started by people - those ones who decide to go to war (although the concept of "declaring" war is as obsolete as red uniforms and cavalry) or to initiate hostilities.

A truly smart weapons system would therefore recognise that the most efficient way to end a war, with the lowest possible casualty count, would be to target the combative leaders. Not the troops on the ground nor any strategic assets or civilian targets.

7
0

Q: How many drones are we bombing ISIS with? A: That's secret, mmkay

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Interesting stuff

> Does it matter if we are using unmanned (piloted by a person or people still) drone, or a more traditional aircraft?

The way it was explained to me is that some groups have a concern that using drones lowers the bar for armed interventions. With piloted aircraft, we have some "skin" in the game. There is risk (both to the aircrew and the politicians) of "our side" sustaining casualties. That makes people in command think twice about committing forces. Add to that, a manned operation is a dam' sight more expensive.

But with drones, the operation is conducted from an office environment, thousands of miles away. There is nothing at risk except the cost of the drone. That makes the decision of when and where to intervene merely an accounting exercise. And therefore the prosecution of war becomes much more likely.

16
0
Pete 2
Silver badge

Most likely answers

> trying to find out how many British Reaper drones are being used for warlike missions in the Middle East.

Given the reluctance, it is reasonable to assume the answer is one of the following MoD responses:

None. We're thinking about building the drone-craft carrier for them. It should be ready by 2050

One. Yeeeeees, of course we have drones! We have lots of drones. So many that it's a secret. Look! here's a photo.

We don't know. Well, we bought a load of them. Some have been delivered. Some will arrive next month. We've crashed a few, Some don't work. We haven't got the right batteries for some (they do use batteries, don't they? The Minister of Defence's son has one, that's got batteries). And some are in Afghanistan - or is it Syria or Iraq? I get terribly confused with all these foreign names.

34
0

Hell desk to user: 'I know you're wrong. I wrote the software. And the protocol it runs on'

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Possible or easy?

> It would be ridiculous to expect developers to document every technically possible use case for something, especially one's they'd never envisioned.

I think we all understand that is clearly not needed. But two things that ARE needed, depending on where the person wishing to use an application is coming from, are functional documentation - what the available functions of a piece of code actually do, and application documentation - why you would want to use any given function.

One without the other is useless: what is the point of telling someone how to use a keyhole if there is nothing to tell them why they would want to open the door? What is the point of telling them which door to open if you haven't told them how to unlock it?

Without telling users what they can do and how they can do it, writing a piece of software that is intended for other people is a waste of your time, an exercise in futility.

15
0
Pete 2
Silver badge

Possible or easy?

I have no doubt that Bob was correct, what he suggested was possible.

However the woman who called seems to have asked the wrong question(s). Instead of saying "Gopher can't do that", her real issue was that she did not know that Gopher could do what she wanted.

That isn't a failure of the software wot Bob wrote. But it could easily be a failure of the accompanying documentation. Without having the specifics it is impossible to say.

And this seems to be an early example of what fuels so many "support" forums and websites now. While lots of people write software and freely give it to the community, it is clearly the case that authors provide precious little information on what it can do and how you can do it. We all know that writing software is "fun" but writing documentation is a chore and fixing bugs is an absolute PITA. As for testing? so tedious that few ever do any: to compile is to run!

48
12

To truly stay anonymous online, make sure your writing is as dull as the dullest conference call you can imagine

Pete 2
Silver badge

Style? We don' need no steeeekin' style!

You can easily obsfucate your writing style by translating your words into another language, then back again.

So: from English to Croatian to Italian to English:

You can easily blur the writing style translate their words into another language and then again.

And if the result is gibberish (frfljanje - yes, really!) then it doesn't matter. Nobody ever reads this stuff, anyway.

3
0

Ofcom: Blighty has devolved into a nation of unwashed binge-streaming mole people

Pete 2
Silver badge

The death of the channel

TV only evolved the way it did because of the scarcity of VHF broadcast bandwidth. It was necessary to cram an entire nation's viewing into a small band of frequencies and a handful of channels. So there was an inevitable "rationing" of content: one (programme) for you, one for me, one for the children, one for the clever people, one for the food-fetishists, one for the sports-geeks - and so on.

Satellite TV eliminated that scarcity. In fact, with over 10,000 channels available int he UK from various satellites, the problem was more one of discovery than of rarity: which channel on which satellite is showing the football - with a commentary in my language? Which channel is showing the latest summer block-buster? Which 200-300 are showing Friends, or NCIS or whatever other american series?

But with box-sets (a piece of marketing genius: imagine being able to collect together a load of old repeats and get people to actually pay again to watch them?) and streaming and a small number of premium content providers, those problems are a thing of the past. The difficulty now is one of moderating your behaviour and having the self-discipline to put down the remote and walk away.

We should consider ourselves lucky that no channel is streaming Eastenders from end-to-end, all day every day.

2
0

Thought your divorce was ugly? Bloke sues wife for wiretapping – 'cos she read his email

Pete 2
Silver badge

It's a shame they're splitting up ...

... because it means that in the future they will make 2 more people unhappy. Instead of inflicting their personalities on each other.

1
4

Revised 'Broadband 2.0' report: 6.7m Brits suffer 'sub-10Mbps' speeds

Pete 2
Silver badge

How many meg?

> 6.7 million people may not receive speeds above 10Mbps.

Well, if he wanted to go the "full hysterical" why not yell that 30m brits cannot get more than 30MBit/s?

I would suspect there are many ISP customers who do not feel the need to stream multiple HD video channels simultaneously and are therefore quite satisfied with < 10MBps.

Bandwidth costs money. If you are never going to use it, why pay for it?

6
6

Sysadmin jeered in staff cafeteria as he climbed ladder to fix PC

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: "So he edited its autoexec.bat file"

> “I had to find a 20' stepladder, clamber up into the dusty roof, plug in a keyboard and mouse, get the damn thing going and then fix the share security

So why not just edit it back and reboot the machine remotely?

ISTM this guy caused his own humiliation.

2
32

NASA lights humongous rocket that goes nowhere ... until 2019

Pete 2
Silver badge

Lawn-laying instructions?

Hopefully there is a large arrow painted on the side of the rocket motor. Under it will be the words "this way up".

Best not to take chances

12
0

User filed fake trouble tickets to take helpful sysadmin to lunches

Pete 2
Silver badge

Saying thank-you never hurt anyone

> Has a customer ever apologised to you? Or offered you a tasty thanks for your services?

Many years ago, on two separate occasions I was called in to deal with "issues" that a distributor had concerning systems they had installed in Westminster.

On both occasions, after a speedy resolution, I received handwritten notes of thanks from the end-user (though nothing from the disti in question). One on House of Commons headed paper, the other from the Lords.

I didn't get lunch, but the prestige within my company got me a very nice pay-rise. A benefit that kept on giving, year after year (and was pensionable!).

33
0

Stop all news – it's time for us plebs to be told about BBC paycheques!

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Don't blame the stars for low pay

> Women don't learn what's out there to be had, so they accept what they're offered, and agents want to sell cheaper talent.

Which puts them in exactly the same situation as the men - who will be equally oblivious to who gets paid what. Unless you are going to try to convince me that there is a cabal of agents (who only have male clients) that share rates of pay between themselves - but who never give out that information to others.

And the original solution still applies: if you don't think your agent is getting you the best deal, change them.

3
0
Pete 2
Silver badge

Don't blame the stars for low pay

> “But isn’t it quite embarrassing that two-thirds of those paid more than £150,000 are men?”

I would expect that all these "stars" would have agents. People who negotiate their terms and conditions of employment. So if one "star" earns less than another, it can only be because that is what the agent negotiated and what they decided to accept.

If women "stars" are being paid less than men, they should either stop accepting low-ball offers or get themselves better agents.

A more reasonable value for money measure would be to calculate each "stars" £££s per viewer-hour rate. Take their pay and divide it by the number of viewers multiplied by the amount of time the viewers are forced to endure them watch or listen to them.

8
7

Hey, remember that monkey selfie copyright drama a few years ago? Get this – It's just hit the US appeals courts

Pete 2
Silver badge

Tear the whole system down

We all know the law is an ass. I suggest that someone should find that ass and (being the owner or embodiment of "law") either feed it all the law books in existence and see what comes out, or ask it if it is happy for it to represent "the law" in its entirety.

Unless the ass specifically says yes, I cannot see how the law could claim any basis to continue. In which case the only solution would be to tear it all up and start again.

Possibly starting with the statement:

These laws govern the human inhabitants of planet Earth only.

0
0

Multics resurrected: Proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Anything we should steal ?

> Does Multics have any useful features that are not present in modern OSes

There was the "cookie" program. It would seize control of your terminal and type write I wanna cookie and wouldn't let you continue with your work (or play) until you typed "cookie".

The original virus?

15
0

One thought equivalent to less than a single proton in mass

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Original thought

> Would it have to be an original thought to have mass?

I suspect thoughts are entangled, which is how the same one can appear to be in many places at the same time. If so, there are only original thoughts.

2
0

Why, Robot? Understanding AI ethics

Pete 2
Silver badge

Different people?

> sentient and can handle any problem you throw at it, as a human would

You must know some incredibly smart people. The majority of individuals I know can't even spell, do basic arithmetic or operate household appliances - past pressing a button and turning a dial.

14
0

One-third of Brit IT projects on track to fail

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Definition of fail

> What does failure mean

Well, that's the key.

As far as the client goes, failure should mean not doing what it says on the tin, OR costing more than was expected. But in the real world a project is really only a failure if the IT director gets sacked or misses their bonus.

But to the contractor it only means not getting paid. Whereas success means upselling a whole load more stuff that the client didn't know they wanted until a salesperson told them so. A variant on that is getting another contract to fix all the problems in the original piece of work.

11
0

NASA: Bring on the asteroid, so we can chuck a fridge at it

Pete 2
Silver badge

How many points does NASA get for that?

From "The Book"

There was one inhabited planet in the seventh dimension that got used as a ball in a game of intergalactic bar billiards. It got potted straight into a black hole, killing ten billion people.

It only scored thirty points.

I wonder if they can arrange a canon off it's larger twin?

6
0

NATO: 'Cyber' is a military domain

Pete 2
Silver badge

Filling the void

> NATO is “in the process of establishing cyber as a military domain

While this is clearly totally incorrect (since most cyber attacks are against economic or personal targets - and if the military is stupid enough to place unprotected "assets" in the public space, they should expect to have them busted). But it does indicate that the military is recognising it's own lack of relevance in the direction the world is moving and this power grab is their way of trying to reassert their usefulness.

The worry is that the military approach is singularly inappropriate to deal with commercial threats. You can't put a gun to every workers' head and demand they change their password every month. And you can't threaten to invade (say) the NHS if it doesn't upgrade the patches on its servers every tuesday.

What we will find is that this approach will change the military. No longer will they be a "force", but more a source of resources. If that means the defence budget gets diverted from buying ineffective weapons that will never be used, and instead put into protecting (another form of defence) important and ubiquitous parts of our infrastructure, that really should be nowhere near any form of public access or shared communications, then let's do that. But we shouldn't call it "miilitary".

2
2

The 'DUP' joins El Reg’s illustrious online standards converter

Pete 2
Silver badge

The inverse DUP

Can I propose a variation on the theme. A unit for the amount of money you thought you had spare (or saved), but when you actually try to access it, you find it's gone.

For obvious reasons. this would be the PUD

2
0

In the week Uber blew up, Netflix restates 'No brilliant jerks' policy

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: I'd consider paying for Netflix but

> I have a bigger collection of DVDs than it has films available to watch

It's not the number that matters (OK, it is to some extent) but the quality. Many years ago we took out a subscription to an online video service. They advertised the thousands of films they had available as being a major draw. It probably was if you were willing to waste your life on the sort of dross that is available from Sky Movies. However, going through a significant proportion of the list we discovered that only 4% of their films sparked any interest at all.

Given that a person will only accumulate DVDs they like, or choose, I'd want any online service today to offer at least 25 times as many movies as we have DVDs. And that would only get them to parity. The sad thing is that there probably aren't enough (good) films made in a year to supply 1 a week that we'd actually want to spend time watching.

5
0
Pete 2
Silver badge

developing developers development

> “that brilliant people are also capable of decent human interactions, and we insist upon that.”

I wonder if they would be willing to apply their non-jerk attitude to management and administrative roles, too?

5
0

Elon Musk reveals Mars colony rocket capable of bringing pizza joints to the red planet

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Hmmmn.. pizza!

: I can just see the Dominos app trying to keep up with your nearest branch ... "place order from

> London ... Reading ... Bristol ... ... ... New York ..."

No, no, no. If Musk can sent a pizza joint (mmm, two of my favourite things) to Mars, he can dam' well put them in LEO. Have a network, like with GPS satellites and you can literally "drop ship" the pizza. With some intelligent packaging it could (probably) land in your yard. And the heat of re-entry will keep it hot, too.

4
0

Report estimates cost of disruption to GPS in UK would be £1bn per day

Pete 2
Silver badge

> Looking on the bright side, a world without GPS is a world without Uber.

Not really. Uber would still have come about since traditional taxi services are so utterly crap.

The only difference is that Uber cars would get lost a lot more often. But since many Uber drivers seem to be incapable of following GPS-driven driving instructions, it would make little difference.

1
0

Samsung releases 49-inch desktop monitor with 32:9 aspect ratio

Pete 2
Silver badge

code word

> Samsung's built the monitor for gamers,

Whenever I see any word that means game, gamer, gaming, I automatically assume it is like "organic" - meaning more expensive but with no discernible improvement. So a "gaming" mouse is just a mouse - but at 3 times the price. A "gamers" mouse mat is just a mouse mat, but by costing anything up to £60 (yes, really!) they are somehow better, make you more proficient, or just give you something to brag about.

The same applies to everything else that is meant for "gamers". Just like aficionados of high quality audio are targetted with oxygen-free cables and gold plated power switches and many other things that do not matter.

But relieving such people of their money is no bad thing. If buying overpriced stuff pleases them then fair enough. And for the rest of us, the words act as a warning.

21
3

My unpopular career in writing computer reviews? It's a gift

Pete 2
Silver badge

Orange glove guy

It would appear you have found your USP for all future reviews. Just specialise in reviewing hand-held stuff and your fame will become legendary. Viewers will be so transfixed by the bright orange hands that they won't pay any attention to what you are reviewing (a reviewers dream, surely?) but your "brand recognition" will have marketeers falling over themselves to send you swag.

1
0

Operators and vendors agree that Europe is falling behind in 5G

Pete 2
Silver badge

Is 5G the new Vista?

XP was good enough. it did most things that most people wanted, well enough.

And so with 3G and 4G. Is there really any need for more features, speed, or whatever the hell 5G is supposed to offer?

I can see that from the phone and mobile operators point of view it's a good thing. Hey it's 5! that makes it better than 4 and that is all the marketing people need to know. And it's probably all that they will sell it on, too.

2
0

Now you can 'roam like at home' within the EU, but what's the catch?

Pete 2
Silver badge

tourists virtually touring

> while on hols rather than looking at the sights

Meh! all the sights are freely available for viewing on the internet. Maybe that is what the holidaymakers are looking at?

Or could they be scoping out next year's holiday, instead? 'tis better to travel in hope than to arrive.

0
0

BT's Ryan Reynolds helicopter Wi-Fi ads 'misleading', thunders ad watchdog

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: Max power - more spread, less security

and a signal that "goes further" just makes your wifi more susceptible to hacking.

5
3

Hyperloop One teases idea of 50-minute London-Edinburgh ride

Pete 2
Silver badge

Hyperloop sucks

A hyperloop tunnel is basically just a giant vacuum cleaner. Rather than sending people on journeys, couldn't Londoners use this to send all their garbage up to Scotland?

Before the train gets sucked into the tunnel, just toss a few black bags of rubbish in, ahead of it.

The only problem might be if the Scots start sending their rubbish back down.

2
0
Pete 2
Silver badge

Total travel time?

> a good proportion of the routes have no obvious high volume traffic potential

Yes, and the places that do, are already served by airlines. Given that LHR - EDI only takes 1h15m it is questionable how much people would be prepared to spend to shave half an hour off that time. Especially when it is not obvious there would be any actual saving, once travel to/from the terminal, check-in, security scans and all the other inevitable delays are factored in.

I reckon the main use of this would be for freight, not people.

2
0

IBM: ALL travel must be approved now, and shut up about the copter

Pete 2
Silver badge

What did you call me?

> To get approval the delivery project executive (DPE) must get approval in writing

I wonder for how long they were called Delivery of Project Executives, before someone noticed

[ and yes, I know there is a Dilbert cartoon along very similar lines ]

2
0

IBM CEO Ginni flouts £75 travel crackdown, rides Big Blue chopper

Pete 2
Silver badge

Re: 50 years ?

> Is that calendar years or IBM years?

Neither, it's years billed to the customer (the guy is actually only 29, but he does a hell of a lot of overtime)

1
0

Google can't spare 113 seconds of revenue to compile data on its gender pay gap

Pete 2
Silver badge

The actuarial solution

And they have probably factored in the cost of the settlement AND the cost of the punitive damages and fines.

After that they calculate the lawyers fees and the odds of winning and take a gambler's decision that the chances of not having to pay (hey, we're GOOGLE, we're too big for your puny fines) are worth the risk.

4
1

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2017