* Posts by Number6

2063 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

systemd'oh! DNS lib underscore bug bites everyone's favorite init tool, blanks Netflix

Number6
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Re: And this is why Linux will NEVER be a useable desktop OS

Fail - had it been Windows then there would have been an unexplained issue/bug until MS had gotten around to issuing a fix, no easy way to make it work until that time. The workaround to rebuild without libidn2 is a temporary fix for those who know how to do it, everyone else can wait for it to be patched next time they apply updates, exactly the same as with the other desktop OS.

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Number6
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Re: That what happens...

I blame them for including the resolver stuff in systemd rather than just giving users (or system packagers, more usually) the option of using whichever DNS program they want to do the job.

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Expect the Note 8 to break the bank (and your wallet)

Number6
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Bigger Pockets

In more than one sense of the phrase, too. I still have a Galaxy 4 because it fits in my pocket comfortably. The newer stuff is getting stupidly big, I want a phone, not a bloody tablet. It's sort of the opposite of when the pre smart-era phones were getting smaller and smaller.

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Number6
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Re: Extra buttons

Even with a touch screen for dialling purposes, it's been a long time since I used my Dictaphone.

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US vending machine firm plans employee chip implant scheme

Number6
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Re: Not a good plan?

For a limited value thing it's probably safe, but what about when it's worth the thieves mugging a person and chopping off the RFID-equipped hand to go get something worth a lot more? I remember El Reg doing an article on a Mercedes owner who lost a finger so the thieves could activate the scanner on his expensive Merc.

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Al Capone was done for taxes. Now Microsoft's killing domain-squatters with trademark law

Number6
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I think there's precedent for such things being allowed. It's clearly not attempting to masquerade as the trademark owner and I think courts have taken the view that it's a useful outlet for complaints. Some [...]sucks domains have been bought for lots of money by the trademark owners before now as the only way they could take them down.

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Disneyland to become wretched hive of scum and villainy

Number6
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Are you sure it's not the same tune with a bunch of bum notes each time?

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.. ..-. / -.-- --- ..- / -.-. .- -. / .-. . .- -.. / - .... .. ... then a US Navy fondleslab just put you out of a job

Number6
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However, it can be superior to other methods because it limits electronic emissions and can be used in an emergency systems crash or after an electromagnetic pulse event.

So what happens when the EMP takes out the fondleslab? A working hand/arm combination and Mk 1 eyeball coordinated with a human brain can still get something to work even after that.

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Jesus walks away after 7,000lb pipe van incident

Number6
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Talking of peculiar; a segment of a pipe is just a pipe, shirley ?

Depends on how long it is. A really short piece of pipe is usually called a washer.

And stop calling...

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Hey, remember that monkey selfie copyright drama a few years ago? Get this – It's just hit the US appeals courts

Number6
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Re: Just sayin'

It doesn't allow them to count as passengers in carpool lanes though.

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Ubuntu Linux now on Windows Store (for Insiders)

Number6
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"Aaah, MENSA"

That fraction of the population who are too stupid to understand what's wrong with the notion of an IQ.

No, it's that fraction that's daft enough to pay the membership fee. It's perfectly possible to have a 150+ IQ and not waste your money.

I do still remember Noel Edmonds taking the piss, starting a competing organisation he called DENSA for those who weren't smart enough, and then trying to persuade MENSA to offer a joint membership to him and his mate because the sum of their IQs was above the qualifying threshold.

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Guess who doesn't have to pay $1.3bn in back taxes? Of course it's fscking Google

Number6
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Re: Nowadays, they don't even pretend

HMRC owed me ten quid. They sent me a cheque :-)

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Number6
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I can't blame Google, the EU specifically structured its corporation tax laws to encourage tax competition between member states by allowing companies to funnel revenues in this way. The only way to solve it is for the politicians to stop generating hot air and get on with actually doing something about it.

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US engineer in the clink for wrecking ex-bosses' smart meter radio masts with Pink Floyd lyrics

Number6
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OK, at least five lager drinkers out there :-)

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Number6
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Remember, boys and girls, don't drink and hack when bitter.

Alternatively, don't drink bitter and hack. If you're going to piss around, use the appropriate beverage (lager).

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Mozilla dev and Curl inventor Daniel Stenberg denied travel to USA

Number6
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Bureaucratic cock-up and incompetence existed long before Trump turned up to make it the bestest in the world. He probably doesn't even get a refund on the ticket, either. Uncle Sam doesn't pay for his mistakes if he can avoid it.

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We'll drag Microsoft in front of Supremes over Irish email spat – DoJ

Number6
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We need a definitive and blunt statement from the Irish government that if such data is released from their country without going through their proper procedures, prosecution will result. Then we get to see who blinks first. Of course Microsoft is screwed either way because one side or the other will drag them through a courtroom, although I guess the way they could do it is dump all the stuff to tape in the Irish facility and get the Garda to confiscate the box (having been told in advance) so they can then say to the US government that what they want is now in the hands of the Irish government.

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Labour says it will vote against DUP's proposed TV Licence reforms

Number6
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I think the BBC probably try to balance the complaints, so if they get roughly equal number of complains about being too left-wing or too right-wing they assume they're in about the right place. Where their sense of balance is skewed is in giving equal time to crackpots and nutjobs who have plenty of hot air and very little credible backing (I'm not talking politics here, that would be too easy, more science).

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Number6
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American movies and sport are OK, you can just choose to go do something more productive or read a book. What you really don't want is the advertising. Dr Who on the BBC (as one example) is in a 50-minute slot. On BBC America it is in an hour slot, the extra ten minutes being adverts. Worse, the flow of the programme is totally disrupted by the interruptions every few minutes and it's not nearly as fun to watch. That's what you'd really stand to lose, the ability to go get lost in something on TV for a decent period without being interrupted by banal and stupid advertising, now often filled with someone trying to break the record for number of words spoken in a minute in order to get in all the legal disclaimers required by the lawyers.

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Number6
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They do, that's what helps subsidise the operation, especially selling their stuff overseas. I think turning them into an organisation that requires advertising income to survive would be a backward step, although I'm open to ideas on how else to fund it. I'm not sure the commercial TV stations would want to see it either, despite all the noise they make about uneven playing fields.

Of course, their licence PR could do with a bit of improvement, anyone who's had to deal with TVLO or whatever it's called now (Crapita?) knows that they assume anyone without a licence is a criminal. That's probably getting to be more true now they've widened the number of things for which you need a licence (they'll argue that if you have a phone or PC then you must occasionally be watching stuff that needs a licence), but back when it was a TV set or VCR, it was a bit much.

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Number6
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OK, so a TV licence costs £147, so just over twelve quid a month. If the BBC went subscription-only, how much would it charge? Then you'd have to pay 20% VAT on top of whatever they wanted. Look at what the subscription services charge for their stuff to see what people might end up paying for the BBC. OK, so the licence fee might not be the best way to fund the BBC, but turning it into a commercial enterprise where profit and cost savings are the most important things is not the way to go. Imagine the BBC with advertising, too. There's only a limited ad budget in the UK for TV< so if they suddenly pulled in a fair chunk of that, everyone else would get less money and would have to bump up their subscription fees to make up the gap, and you can bet it would cost more than the licence fee by the time they did that.

Be careful what you wish for, you might get it.

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Robocall spammers, you have one new voicemail message: CUT IT OUT!

Number6
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How about companies can leave such messages on my voicemail provided I get $10 plus another $2/minute of message in my account in advance of them leaving the message. That would adequately compensate me for my time in deleting the crap and encourage brevity on their part.

Or (b) just lock them all up.

At some point I'll figure out how to disable the voicemail on my phone which might also solve the problem.

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Florida Man to be fined $1.25 per robocall... all 96 million of them

Number6
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Re: @Number6

The problem is if the call comes from a SIP provider. (E.g. Vonage)

You just treat it as withheld if you don't trust the source. If the SIP provider has robust policies in place that make it very difficult to spoof a number then you allow their CID through. If they don't then you block it. For many years (it may still be true with more justification now) that was BT's excuse for not passing on international CID, that they couldn't guarantee its accuracy. We ended up in the situation that if a call entered the country on a BT-terminated cable then it would present as INTERNATIONAL, if it came in via Mercury (remember them?) then you'd get a proper international CID displayed.

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Number6
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At some level it's the big company, receiving thousands of identical complaints, that can paint a picture clear enough for FCC to see and understand. I assume that most of the junk calls that hit my system are spoofed numbers, especially when it's the local area code, given that I only know one person with the same code as me and they would register as known. If the house phone rings then it's the job of the answering machine to take the call.

Of course, the real problem is that it is too easy to spoof a caller ID. Perhaps if that could be prevented, so that unverified stuff presented as withheld or out of area, a lot of the scammers would find it harder to reach real people.

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BOFH: Putting the commitment into committee

Number6
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I believe the logo had to be at an exact 23° angle. Heaven knows why.

Probably to compensate for the axial tilt of the Earth.

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UK and Ecuador working on Assange escape mechanism

Number6
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Can't they just agree to look the other way for 24 hours while he nips over to Heathrow or Gatwick and gets on a flight to Ecuador? Much cheaper and easier all round.

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The Internet of Flying Thing: Reg man returns with explicit shots

Number6
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Re: 844TB of data from 12 flight hours

It depends on what you're sampling. Cabin temperature changes fairly slowly so you'd probably sample that once a second at most. Engine performance may well be sampling lots of data points every millisecond. Fuel flow, fuel temperature, combustion temperature, exhaust temperature, pressure at various points in the engine, RPM. Then there's all the other flight parameters, other system parameters (battery volts, bus bolts, system load, hydraulic pressure etc). It wouldn't surprise me if there's not a video feed in there too, for modern aircraft.

Most of the time it isn't needed, but if something goes wrong, then having access to detailed data from the critical period leading up to the incident may be really useful.

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I still haven't found what I'm malloc()ing for: U2 tops poll of music today's devs code to

Number6
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I will add my +1 to the Bose QC comments. I had a different set of NC headphones for some time but finally decided to splash the cash and it was well worth it.

I find that having music I know helps take out the residual noise. My ears just lock on to that and require no more brain power to process what they already know, and I can be oblivious to nearby conversations and work much better.

When it comes to music choices, most of mine dates back to the 70s and early 80s: Queen, ELO, Bowie, Quo, plus some silly ones like Star Trekkin' to lighten the mood a bit.

There's a lot talked about Millennials working in shared space but when you look, they're all hunched over their screen to minimise visible distractions and all wearing headphones to take out the noise of everyone else nearby. So much for collaborative workspace, they'd probably be much happier in offices and not open plan.

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Discredit a journo? Easy, that'll be $55k. Fix an election? Oh, I can do that for just $400k

Number6
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Re: Whatever happened to...

Ethics is down near the bottom right corner, just above Kent and to the right of London.

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Number6
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Re: This is why you get those bogus 'friend' requests on Facebook

Maybe Facebook needs to add some detection to limit the number of outgoing friend requests you can make, or limit the ability of someone to create an account saying they're from Chicago when the incoming IP is halfway around the world.

Except my IP address currently claims I'm in London because I'm using a VPN that pops out there. When I get home it'll be a different IP address located elsewhere. If I fire up Google, for some reason it gives me google.hu.

Sites that insist on giving you a particular result based on where they think you are, and steadfastly ignore your attempt to correct them, are really annoying. It's only convenient if it's what you want to happen.

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Number6
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Re: I just filter everything through what Abe Lincoln said about the internet. . .

There's always this one...

http://www.collegehumor.com/post/6604189/lincoln-gives-fords-theater-review-on-yelp

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Windows 10 Creators Update preview: Lovin' for Edge and pen users, nowt much else

Number6
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Re: Fall Creators Update

What do you even need that still requires a local install? SAP, Oracle, Salesforce... all the business software is browser based and generally SaaS. There are a few outliers like Photoshop and IDEs, but they are working on it.

The performance of some of this stuff is dire, especially if someone has failed to put in enough bandwidth and someone in the office decides to download some large files (or puts a bunch of stuff on to Google Drive or Dropbox and everyone else's machine decides to synchronise content). A lot of technical stuff is still local, electrical tools such as OrCAD/Altium/Allegro, plus the mechanical stuff (Solidworks/Pro-E) because it's highly graphical and a browser is not going to cut it.

I've worked in a place which used SalesForce and it was hilarious watching the panic when it went down for a day a while back. I've worked in places which use on-line stuff that is painfully slow. I much prefer to run stuff locally, where outages and security breaches are entirely of local making.

That's right, I have never really embraced the cloud. My software is owned by me, in that I can keep using it (without upgrades, admittedly) without having to pay anyone else any more money, unlike all this SaaS stuff.

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Number6
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My Win10 machine keeps telling me it wants to schedule a reboot. Even when I've just done one. Given that it takes fifteen minutes before it becomes usable again, I am reluctant to sign up to its stupid game. I am giving serious thought to ripping out the hard drive for a fresh one and seeing if this machine will happily run Win7, then copy over the stuff I need.

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Number6
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Re: Fall Creators Update

Yeah ,like you buy a new car that is exactly the same as the old one?

I did once, upgraded because at the time the monthly payments required were cheaper than not doing so, assuming I wanted to keep owning a car. Old and new cars parked next to each other at handover, the sales chap said that at this point he was supposed to go over the controls on the new vehicle to make sure I knew where they all were. I just asked if they were all the same as the old one, he said yes and we agreed that he'd done the job.

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Number6
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Re: Fall Creators Update

One might suggest that as the world evolves, people who can't figure out how to become comfortable with a new version of Windows after 10 years might be headed down the same road as the dodo.

That only works if Windows 10 is the only way to survive. It may be that if enough people switch to alternatives, it'll be the ones who stuck with the evolutionary dead-end of Windows 10 that will go join the dodo. All it would take is for some of the major software houses to produce full-featured Linux versions of their packages and a lot of small business would seriously consider a switch. Windows still seems to be better for managing and controlling large numbers of devices centrally though, so one might expect large organisations to persist.

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DXC Technology puts reluctant office movers on naughty step

Number6
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Re: Good one...

If he's got a first class ticket then it's probably quite a comfortable way to travel, plus he can use his laptop to work. Beats driving from Hertfordshire to Kings Cross (almost) any day.

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Number6
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Re: Not getting this....

For most people covered by English employment law, place of work is a contractual provision and can't be changed on a whim.

There's often a relocation provision in there. A couple of miles isn't enough to trip any redundancy provision - had they moved to Coventry then yes, staff could have claimed redundancy rather than move.

As others have said, the new office may be dire, not near their clients, not have working IT. If you live somewhere with a train line to Blackfriers or Canon St then it's likely to be a much longer commute too.

Not having working IT is fine, turn up, get paid, spend your time complaining about how bad it is because the infrastructure is preventing you from working.

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Oh no, Silicon Valley! Failed startup CEO on fraud rap after allegedly bullsh*ting staff and refusing to pay them

Number6
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It can take longer occasionally. It's a much larger place and very often smaller banks and credit unions have an agreement with a larger organisation to act as a world-facing portal for them (potentially reduces the amount of infrastructure and staff you need), so there's an extra step. This may have changed in recent years, one place I use now manages same-day stuff when it used to take a couple so perhaps they've cut out the middleman.

Had I been an employee, I think at some point I would have looked around at what company assets I could remove, to be redeemed when the money arrived in my bank. However, if it was a building with a few desks and PCs then that probably wasn't a viable option.

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Axed from IBM for remote working? Don't go crying to HPE

Number6
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When I know I've got a long commute home, I tend to be out the door promptly as much as possible so as not to eat into my personal time. When I'm working from home, end time is a lot more relaxed, and the time I'd otherwise be spending unproductively sitting in a traffic jam I will often spend working. So, 8 hours in the office v 10 at home for the same money? Which one is likely to give more output?

Not that I'd ever seriously consider working for either IBM or HPE.

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Pai guy not too privacy shy, says your caller ID can't block IP, so anons go bye

Number6
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Re: To anyone outside the US this seems pretty strange

At least BT would validate your claimed CLI and default to something valid if you tried to spoof it. It would also tag on digital lines how much of the presented number it would vouch for. No idea if this is still the case.

Methinks VoIP gateways should be required to properly validate credentials before putting calls onto the wired telephone system, and perhaps the SIP (and other) protocols need to be updated to have a secure key exchange to allow verification of the caller ID. You can choose to omit the verification if you want, but then you'll come through as withheld. Any gateway with the power to inject CLI would have to meet the standards, and any that didn't would be assigned the default gateway number or at least a number from the valid range assigned to that gateway rather than any number the caller felt like using.

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Number6
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Re: Phones and cars

How strict they are varies. In one city I worked in the fire inspector used to come around and make us unplug any power strips that were plugged into other power strips.

Having seen how dodgy US electrics can be, I'm not surprised. Having said that, even in the UK they'll pull you up for chaining power strips, which I always thought was overkill given the number of fuses protecting against overload in a UK set-up. Perhaps check the fuse ratings though, too many 13A fuses where they should be 3A or 5A.

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Gay Dutch vultures become dads

Number6
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Re: It's about birds?

Nope. I was thinking the same thing, a report of a happy event from the El Reg Amsterdam office.

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First-day-on-the-job dev: I accidentally nuked production database, was instantly fired

Number6
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Since this should be a controlled document...

That's assuming a lot. Given the general level of competence demonstrated, either it was controlled inasmuch as it was written and never revised, so there was never a need to do change management, or their control process was along the lines of "use the document in this directory, it should be the latest version", which happened to have global write privilege.

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Number6
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Re: So....restore from backup

Rule 3 - never lets Devs have access to stuff. Like small children, they *will* break stuff..

In a controlled environment this is good. If the Dev breaks something before the users do, it can be patched to prevent anyone else from doing the same. My unofficial CV has 'breaking things' as a skill, which dates back to using BASIC at school and being unable to resist entering '6' when asked to enter a number from 1 to 5, just to see what happened.

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Google to give 6 months' warning for 2018 Chrome adblockalypse – report

Number6
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Re: It really is like a war ...

They could embed content server side, then you'd have to identify the ads from the content of the ads.

I wouldn't mind that so much. If it's done server-side then they're not running potentially malicious code on my machine. I block adverts because of all the JavaScript and the fact that malware can arrive by that route, it's a security issue at least as much as an ad issue. The problem with embedding it server side is that it means the server has to work harder and it scales less well on a busy site. If they call in adverts from a different host then they'll still get blocked by some means because there will be something with which to identify the ads, so they have to host the whole thing on the same server as the content.

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'My PC needs to lose weight' says user with FAT filesystem

Number6
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Re: SQL => Sequel

Working on radar systems back in the days when secretaries still did typing for their bosses, we had a new one make reference to a microwave sauce.

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Number6
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Re: "Simple Mail Transfer People"

Is that a song or is it a REM statement?

(a basic question ... s'hell here)

You need to be careful with comments like that, or people will bash you.

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Social media vetting for US visas go live

Number6
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Re: @AC - company email addresses

As for the travel log, they're really going to be looking at places like Iraq or suspiciously long visits to jumping off points to ISIS like Turkey.

Hmmm... I've travelled extensively to a country with a fair bit of gun violence and a repressive police force that will often shoot first and (doesn't) ask questions later. I wonder if they'd use that against me?

As for recording travel, when I had to compile such a list I just went through the stamps in my current and expired passports. I approve of countries that give both an entry and exit stamp, makes the job so much easier.

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Number6
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Re: @Number6 I also assign everyone a unique email address

@Pat O'Ban

Probably more disappointed than surprised at the number that leak. Some of them are interesting, such as the one I used only to talk to a former ISP, who really ought to know better. I subscribe to the "Have I been pwned" list so I know a couple more addresses went this week. Fortunately the ones I use with my bank and credit cards appear to be intact so far.

My spam filter will bounce some stuff with "Address no longer in use due to spam", I thought that was a worthwhile tweak to let people know they need to contact me some other way.

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Number6
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I think I'd be inclined to create ten thousand new email addresses (easy when you own the domain) and list them for good measure. I already use several hundred, in that when a website asks for an address I create a new one for them to track spam, so a few more ought to be OK. I bet they're not expecting people to have more than a couple, one for work and one for home.

ETA: OK, I guessed wrong, they've got space for six.

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