* Posts by Richard Plinston

2322 posts • joined 27 Apr 2009

Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?

Richard Plinston
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Re: Wedded to Intel

> MS was a multi-platform company right from the start.

As was the whole personal computer and microcomputer industry from the mid 70s.

> As was MS DOS:

MS-DOS was Intel 8086/8088* only. It could be used on many different architectures (as long as they used 8088 or 8086) because each OEM had to write their own MS-BIOS to deal with the actual I/O hardware. This mechanism was copied from DRI's CP/M. It wasn't "provided" for score of architectures, the OEMs had to do it.

> So different platforms have always been part of the MS programmer expectation, part of the culture.

That was true a couple of developer generations ago. MS Basic on 6502 and 6800 was 40 years or more ago. The last MS-DOS that ran on non-IBM-PC-Clones was 4.x. Sure, if you're a developer now retired or moved to management then you may have dim memories of a time before.

> So different platforms have always been part of the MS programmer expectation, part of the culture.

Not for the current generation of developer and users it isn't. They were confused by RT and failed to buy it in droves, and returned it when they did buy it. Windows is Windows, if it doesn't run program x, then it is a failure.

* There was MSX-DOS for MSX machines that ran on Z80 but it was a CP/M clone, not a version of MS-DOS. There was also MS-DOS 4.0 and 4.1 (not to be confused with the later 4.01) that was 80286 based but this was soon dumped.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: "is on course to become the world's default desktop OS over the next 2-3 y"

> are also more likely to invest in the Store app.

Software, especially Store apps, are _not_ an 'investment', they are a cost.

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Richard Plinston
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> What it really needs is the support of developers to actually support the target architecture to get native execution performance rather than just lazily expect that the emulation layer will take care of it for you

From the late 70s through the 80s and 90s I (and my clients) ran DRI multiuser operating systems from MP/M, Concurrent-DOS-386, DR-Multiuser-DOS to Systems Manager. These could run MS-DOS programs and actual Windows 3.11 (in fact could run several simultaneously). The major problems was that DOS developers would use 'keyhit()' to know when a key had been hit and this sat in a tight loop waiting for a keystroke and used up all the CPU cycles it could grab - not good for a multi-tasking and multi-user system. They probably still do that.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: "alleviated things somewhat."

> Emulation may be useful, but if and when always running everything under emulation, you start to ask why not use the native environment....

Windows 3.x on OS/2 was a real and full actual Windows 3.1. It also ran Microsoft's Win32s.DLL. What Microsoft did next was add a completely spurious memory access that was a greater address than 2 Gbytes. This did nothing useful except exceed OS/2's virtual memory limit and stop the latest versions being used. Then MS could break applications by requiring the latest version.

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Richard Plinston
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> The fact it could run a full (or seamless, akin to how XP mode works in 7) Windows 3.1 session

That was why it died. Developers could have developed for Windows 3.x or for OS/2 Presentation Manager, but when IBM added Win3.x to OS/2 then developers could target that and get their applications running on both Windows and OS/2. Then there was no point in having OS/2.

When Windows 10 adds an X server to its Linux compatibility then, maybe, developers will target Linux to get it running on Windows and the system that they use.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: .Net

> One of the reasons Windows Phone 8 required little resources and was snappier is ...

You are confused. Windows Phone 7 "required little resources". It ran using WinCE which was like the MS-DOS of phones: single task, no background tasks except a sort of TSR-like process and tombstoning. It was promoted as 'requiring little resources' because it couldn't handle more than one core, there was no point in giving it more. Windows 8 was "snappier", or appeared so, because it required a dual core and dedicated one core to the UI. This impacted on background tasks but most apps still did tombstoning anyway.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: .Net

> If you want to run on Intel or ARM on Windows or Linux, then Java is the obvious answer.

You seem to be hammered with down votes. Java is obviously _not_ the answer, or not the only answer, because I have a RaspberryPi alongside my other Linux machines and it has all the software that I need without it being written in Java.

I write in Python and that is all good wherever I want to run it.

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Richard Plinston
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> Windows 8 x86/x64 != Windows 8 RT != Windows Mobile 8 (or whatever it was called)

You missed Windows 8 IOT (later there was Windows 10 IOT) which was completely different yet again.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Going from 32 to 64 bit was so simple nobody really noticed it happened

> Linux can be a PITA with lots of stuff still needing 32bit libraries.

In what way ? If you need 32bit libraries they are still there with most distros. Install a 32bit app from the repository and the appropriate libraries will automatically be installed.

> I wish MS well in getting everything moved to 64bit (I probably need to go and sit down in a darkened room). The hardware has been 64bit for at least 5 years now so it really should be time to pension off 32bit binaries.

And you complained about losing 20 year old 16bit stuff !!!

Actually, Microsoft is reviving 32 bit with its ARM/x86 hybrid that will only run 32bit x86. Users are going to be pissed when it won't run the software they use on their desktops.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: "so why removal of WOW16 and NTVDM? Dosbox works."

> Once again: AMD removed the Virtual86 mode from CPU in 64 bit mode.

While the _Intel_ 64 bit design also removed Virtual86 mode _and_ x86 32bit mode.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: "However it is really difficult for them to change"

> Windows users do expect compatibility at the binary level.

Most Windows users do not know that there are computers that are not x86. 'Binary incompatibility' is not a concept they are aware of. When Windows RT was available they expected to be able to run their existing applications on it. When Windows 10 IOT was announced for running on Raspberry Pi they thought they would be able to use a $35 computer to run a full desktop and Halo 5.

> The only problem came when AMD dropped the Virtual86 mode in 64 bit mode so Windows 64 bit could no longer run 16 bit applications outside a full virtual machine.

> It was an AMD decision, nor Microsoft nor Intel took it.

Intel and Microsoft were perfectly free to continue developing Itanium for their 64bit systems. Of course those didn't do Virtual86 either, and neither did it do x86 32bit (except by emulation).

> Going from 32 to 64 bit was so simple nobody really noticed it happened, but the availability of far more RAM.

That was directly the result of an _AMD_ decision !!! Microsoft and Intel had to change course from their 'Itanic' decision to follow AMD.

The instructions added to make x86 into AMD64 overlapped with some of the old 16bit instructions. This was a technical issue because the instruction set has a finite number of different operation codes. Thus the chip can _either_ do V86 _or_ AMD64.

The 8086 (and later) couldn't do 8080 or 8085 either*. That was an Intel decision. Old stuff gets dropped, get over it.

* actually the NEC V20 and V30 chips could do both 8086 and 8080.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Wedded to Intel

> Alpha was most successful, partly because DEC and Microsoft made the effort to keep the platform up to date, and partly because it included x86 emulation.

... and partly because DEC settled with Microsoft over Dave Cutler reusing design work he had done at DEC when implementing NT.

"""Rather than suing, Digital cut a deal with Microsoft. In the summer of 1995, Digital announced Affinity for OpenVMS, a program that required Microsoft to help train Digital NT technicians, help promote NT and Open-VMS as two pieces of a three-tiered client/server networking solution, and promise to maintain NT support for the Alpha processor. Microsoft also paid Digital between 65 million and 100 million dollars."""

http://www.itprotoday.com/management-mobility/windows-nt-and-vms-rest-story

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Microsoft's Windows 10 Workstation adds killer feature: No Candy Crush

Richard Plinston
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Re: I have a Fujitsu Celsius R650 workstation

> BTW, normal Win 10 Pro runs fine (well, as fine as it can be said for this POS OS) on my HP z840 with two 8 core/16 threads XEON E5's and 128GB RAM.

The real question is: will it continue to "run fine" after an update to some future version of "normal Win 10 Pro" ?

The Workstation edition will support up to 4 CPUs and lots of cores, but it will cost much more than a 'normal' edition.

It seems most likely that the changes in licensing are related primarily to sales of new machines and will be restrictive on OEMs. Computers with up to 4 core (probably on 1 CPU) can have 'normal' Win 10 Home or Pro installed, but if it has more than 4 cores, or more than 1 CPU, then it _must_ be sold with Workstation edition. This will increase revenue to Microsoft, which is always the aim of _any_ changes.

A clean install of a retail version may also limit the cores in use to 4 unless the Workstation edition is paid for.

Whether this can be applied to existing machines is a separate issue. It seems unlikely that an update would cripple a computer by only running on 4 of the cores, or stop altogether, until an additional licence is purchased, but it may nag you saying that your machine would be better by sending more money to MS. Also, if (or when) you have to start paying a monthly subscription then this may be based on the number of cores that the computer has, regardless of whether it is Pro or Workstation.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: A thought.

> a limit of 4 does seem reasonable (especially given they don't want this used on a server). Looks like server edition supports up to 64 sockets.

This is a pricing issue more than a technical one. The cost of a server licence can depend on the number of cores (not CPUs). The base price is for 16 cores. If you want to run more cores than you need to pay more. (you also needs CALs per client).

"""**Datacenter and Standard edition pricing is for 16 core licenses."""

For desktop and workstation, Microsoft will also, it seems, be charging based on the number of cores and/or CPUs basis. The 4 core (not CPU) will be the base price desktop OS, while systems with more cores (or more than 1 CPU) will have to pay more for the workstation licence.

"""One customer said he was told there could be a price increase of roughly $70 per operating system for use on systems with processors with four or fewer cores. For machines with Xeon processors with more than four cores, there could be a price increase of roughly $230 per operating system, I was told. """

"""Windows 10 Pro for Workstations is designed for high-end hardware with Fast I/O with persistent memory, fast file sharing, Resilient file system (ReFS) and up to four physical CPUs and 6 TB of memory. """

http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-may-have-price-increases-in-store-for-windows-10-pro-workstation-win-10-downgrade/

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Consumer refers to who's paying

> Consumer versions of Windows 10 are "free" and paid for by providing telemetry data.

You are confused. If you buy a computer from an OEM or retail and it has Windows installed then part of the price that you pay goes to Microsoft for the Windows licence. It may be bundled so that you don't see this component of the cost, but it is not free in any sense.

Certainly, if you had already paid for Windows 7 or 8.1, then Microsoft had, for a limited time, allow an upgrade to 10, but that was not free, it was just part of the price that you paid for the earlier version.

There have been versions of Windows that were free (of cost) such as 'Windows with Bing', and 'Windows 10S' may be free of cost (to the OEM) but these require the user paying Microsoft if they are to overcome the limitations, or if they want any useful software which they must buy from the store.

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NASA budget shock: Climate studies? GTFO. We're making the Moon great again, says Trump

Richard Plinston
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Re: Iron balloons

> An iron balloon with a vacuum inside would float very well indeed

Not at all. It would be crushed in a second. Take one 10 gallon metal gas can, or even a completely empty paint tin, boil some water in it for the steam to displace the air and seal the lid. When the steam condenses the tin implodes. The tin has a several magnitudes more strength to volume ratio than a steel balloon with sufficient lift.

If you fill it with hydrogen to eliminate the pressure problem then the hydrogen will simply leak through the iron and also make it brittle.

https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=RhGeBAAAQBAJ&pg=PT85&lpg=PT85&dq=copper+airship&source=bl&ots=1MwoSlV2lp&sig=C2UAgBSCxngjCtz7wry9aKnGLtE&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjuo9Ce1KjZAhUGl5QKHYGuACIQ6AEIXDAM#v=onepage&q=copper%20airship&f=false

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Moon? Mars? Moon! Mars!

> Trump will not doubt claim "people are saying it is the greatest speech ever delivered by any president", because the voices in his head will tell him so.

His cabinet will tell him so, their jobs depend on it.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: We don't need no education

> It makes you far less prone to being vulnerable to every flim-flam man that comes along.

That is why Trump and the Republicans want to eliminate this, they are the flim-flam men.

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No, Windows 10 hasn’t beaten Windows 7’s market share. Not for sure, anyway

Richard Plinston
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Re: StatCounter = irrelevant, amateurish

> It does not. It counts page views. http://gs.statcounter.com/faq#page-views-uniques

Yes, the statistics are based on page views, but the mechanism does identify individual machines and individual visitors.

"""When a visitor visits your webpage with the installed HTML and Javascript code, their anonymous details are sent to StatCounter to be recorded. Their details are gathered either from the counter the visitor loads from StatCounter, or an invisible image depending on your settings."""

http://statcounter.com/how-it-works/

"""Thanks to web trackers and their use of a random javascript number - your counter is forced to load each time and your visitor is tracked."""

http://statcounter.com/free-invisible-web-tracker/

The Javascript has a 'random javascript number' which is sent to Statcounter with the other details. Where there are multiple machines behind a gateway all the machines would have the same IP address (that of the gateway) recorded in the site server's web logs. There may be no way of differentiating several machines with the same OS in the logs. The 'random number' identifies these different machines.

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Richard Plinston
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> Also, how many of those user-agent strings have been fudged?

That is not how Statcounter works.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: So...

> Like IBM? Probably explains the 24 straight quarters of declining sales. That and trying to ignore Microsoft and promote Linux!

Typical RICHTO/TheVogon/AC flawed post. The last 12 quarters have shown _increasing_ sales.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: What about next year

> I under a year Windows 7 will have joined XP as unsupported.

That doesn't mean that it stops working.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: MS is not the one to worry here

> For business, you can also buy a PC without an OS license.

Anyone can buy a computer without an OS licence. The problem is that OEMs and retailers are contracted, by MS or via OEMs, to not sell a PC without an OS (except where a buyer already has site licences).

It is necessary to find electronics and computer parts businesses that will supply and assemble bare machines.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: StatCounter = irrelevant, amateurish

> 1. doesn't count unique users - let alone installations -, but page views

It identifies individual machines and may differentiate multiple logins on that machine. That is because it works by downloading Javascript from sites and this then communicates directly with Statcounter. The Javascript stores unique identifying information which is reused with later contact.

https://statcounter.com/how-it-works/

> 2. their statistics are not representative.

Quite right. The sites that are recorded be Statcounter are self-selected. They must register with them and add the Javascript to their pages. It may be, for example, that sites of interest to Windows users may be more likely to use Statcounter, or similar, while sites mostly visited by Linux users do not. This would skew the stats. Also, there are many blockers. My machines will not be in any of those stats at all.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: 50% of men and women are below average.

You are confusing 'median' and 'average'.

Example: 9 men have an IQ of 99, one has an IQ of 109. The average is 100. 90% are below average.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: "No in place updates for you!"

> MS can move from FAT to NTFS without formatting

There is a conversion process which rewrites the drive to NTFS without needing to reformat. This is a one-way process, it cannot be reverted and it cannot be done on a partition that is in use. A 'format' will write the sectors and interblock gaps onto a bare disk, the conversion will move stuff around on the existing sectors to get the new layout.

> I have no idea whether it's possible to go from NTFS to ReFS without a format.

There seems to be no conversion process to get ReFS, it needs a reformat.

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Biker nerfed by robo Chevy in San Francisco now lobs sueball at GM

Richard Plinston
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> It is only USA which has the grand idiocy of everyone driving in any lane at any speed they please and overtaking on both sides.

No. That statement is not true at all.

It is not "only USA". Other countries, such as the that I live in, does not ban passing in any lane where they are marked. This does not lead to any particular problems.

Most countries, especially the USA, certainly do not allow 'driving at any speed they please'.

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President Trump turns out the lights on solar panel imports into US

Richard Plinston
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Re: Maybe I don't understand how this works

> Remember: Renewable energy is a massively expensive solution that doesn't work to a problem that doesn't exist.

That is obviously coal and oil industry dogma and propaganda.

In this country most of our electricity comes from renewable hydro and geothermal power. It works fine and isn't as expensive as the small number of gas plants that we have. There are also some wind farms - built because they produce electricity much cheaper and the hydro can take over if the wind drops.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: That’s just one example

> Every tariff only punishes the local population not the intended target.

It will be the same with 'the wall'. The Orange Buffoon as suggested putting a tariff of stuff from Mexico as he thinks that this will 'make Mexico pay for the wall'. The only result is that prices in the US will go up as it is the importer that pays the tariff and they pass it on the the [US] consumer.

Meanwhile Solar Farms will bypass this tariff and will build their farms in Mexico and then export the electricity to the US.

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PowerShell comes to MacOS and Linux. Oh and Windows too

Richard Plinston
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> Linux is already running on the Windows kernel via Ubuntu on Windows 10.

No. Wrong. 'Linux' is the kernel. That is _not_ running on Windows 10. What is running on W10 is GNU software: bash and many utilities; plus other FOSS software, but _not_ 'Linux'.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: binary pipelines

> I could write a cmdlet called `stat` for Windows very easily that would do exactly the same. For ANY given example of a script I can create a program that will do that.

Maybe, but for Linux there is usually no need to because programs have been there for years or decades.

> Using a program like stat does not illustrate text mangling.

No, it illustrates that text mangling is [often] not required.

> I'm comparing text mangling vs. objects not whether a sequence of pipelines can be replaced by a program.

Maybe, but you are ignoring objects vs. existing program where piping and mangling is not required.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Poor old MS

> Microsoft are still developing Windows 10 mobile.

We know that you only live to evangelise Microsoft but do try and keep up:

https://www.rte.ie/news/technology/2017/1010/911243-microsoft-to-stop-developing-windows-10-mobile/

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Richard Plinston
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Re: PowerShell?

> Command Line has historically been a notable differentiator between GNU/Linux and Windows.

Mainly because Microsoft spent decades denigrating 'command line' and deliberately crippling their own. For example 20 years ago in Windows 95 they included a command line editor, doskey, but it wasn't available by default and wasn't documented. The initial development version of Windows 98 did not even include a DOS box or a command line (that had to be fixed).

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SCO vs. IBM case over who owns Linux comes back to life. Again

Richard Plinston
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> if they somehow pull off this IBM AIX Lawsuit is that they could end up with enough money on the side to go after every UNIX out there today.

You seem to know nothing about the various cases around 'The SCO Group'.

That horse has already bolted a long time ago. The courts have found that TSG has no standing on Unix or AIX. The case against IBM is completely different and based on a specific contract for joint development.

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And we return to Munich's migration back to Windows - it's going to cost what now?! €100m!

Richard Plinston
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Re: Stupid or Corrupt

> LibreOffice started as the Sun office suite in the eighties

And, before Sun bought it, it was StarOffice from Star Division. Star Division had developed a GUI framework called StarView, for MS-DOS, Windows, OS/2, Mac and others, that it was trying to sell. StarView, and the demo version (which I had obtained), included example programs among which were a word processor and a spreadsheet. Star decided that it was going to make more money from selling software, such as StarOffice which had been developed from the examples, than it was from StarView.

Sun bought Star Division because it was cheaper to buy this and distribute StarOffice to all its employees than it was to buy licences for MS Office.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: 'Most research is sponsored by proprietary software companies, and as such might be biased'

> "It was also produced by a microsoft sponsored company."

> It was produced by HP. Hardly "a Microsoft sponsored company"

While HP is not 'sponsored' by Microsoft beyond the usual 'loyalty discounts' and 'sponsored advertising' which are used to lock in the OEMs, the report produced by HP on Munich was entirely paid for by Microsoft.

It thus said what Microsoft wanted it to say. In order to allege that the costs were higher than Munich claimed HP added such costs as replacement computers when Munich actually recycled existing computers.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: A Bavarian Rhapsody

@ RICHTO / TheVogon / AC

> However much of that bill was footed by IBM to try and screw Microsoft.

No. That is just your anti-IBM, anti-Linux, Microsoft-loving dogma that fuels your conspiracy theory on how much it cost.

IBM has spent many millions on developing Linux, but that has been for its mainframes and POWER systems and none went to Munich.

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Richard Plinston
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> And that doesn't include the costs ..

Those figures also don't show the _savings_ that were made: the saving in licence costs and the saving in hardware costs.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: "in-house" "custom" of course it's difficult to support

> Similarly with the office suite, Softmaker maybe?

Neither WPS nor Softmaker were options at the time. Those two also _only_ work with Microsoft formats. The decision was made to use an open standard, and Microsoft was not, and still isn't.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Update cycle...

> How often does anyone think this "in-house custom version" has been updated?

Limux is based on Ubuntu. It is relatively easy to make a custom version that continues to take updates from the base version. In fact _most_ distros do this. They choose a major distribution: Debian, Red Hat, Ubuntu, .. and then add their own customisations. Custom software and configurations is held in the local repository while updates are taken from the upstream host.

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Richard Plinston
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> I think its just a knee jerk reaction cos you kind of indirectly called open source bad.

It is the Richto/TheVogan dogma that Munich cost an extra 100m to go to Linux because a HP report paid for by Microsoft gave some completely spurious figures, such as the costs of computers that Munich did not buy, while not balancing these with the costs that would have applied had they stayed with Microsoft, where they would have had to buy new computers. Also he adds in the total cost that IBM spent on developing Linux even though that was for their mainframes and nothing to do with Munich.

In spite of posting as AC, his posts are easily recognisable.

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Watt? You thought the wireless charging war was over? It ain't even begun

Richard Plinston
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Re: Surely unidirectional wireless is an incredibly inefficient approach to transmitting energy?

> This is so inefficient (laws of Physics and all that...)

It is easy to raise the efficiency: just buy more lots more devices and scatter them about the room, as shown in the illustration. Of course this raises the company's revenue enormously too: a win-win for all (except the consumer).

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Don't just grab your CPU bug updates – there's a nasty hole in Office, too

Richard Plinston
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Re: Is this Movie

> (Most likely, the source used a different version of Word than the person I forwarded it to - but still!)

The main cause of differences is that there are different fonts. Even within implementations of a particular font there may be tiny differences that accumulate to push a word, for example, onto the next line which then completely changes the layout.

If you want a document to look the same on different devices then use PDF.

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Astroboffins say our Solar System could have – wait, stop, what... the US govt found UFOs?

Richard Plinston
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Re: Seriously, the god stuff?

> evolution was nonsense ... . I was the one making that statement.

That you cannot make sense of evolution tells me more about you than it does of evolution.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Alien UFO's are Real - True / False...

> religion was the most effective method of keeping humans organized, and socialized.

Added to which: those who weren't with you were against you. Anyone who didn't worship and pray to the 'dear leader' was banished, or worse. This still happens in many parts of the world: North Korea, 'Islamic State', parts of southern USA ;-), ...

While the religious today mostly regard the term 'god' or 'gods' to refer to supernatural beings, there is no reason to think that is what people a few thousand years ago thought. In recent times some religions had 'gods' that they could see in the street: Herohito, Rastas, Phil the Greek, Kim Jong x, Trump, Jesus, ... There is no reason to think that this is not how it was in the past: Exodus 25:8 has Jehovah require that temples be built 'so that I may dwell amongst you'. He wanted palaces in each town so he didn't have to be put up in some shack when he went visiting.

'Gods' are either entirely fictional, as some most likely are or were, or are or were just tribal leaders: Pharaohs, Emperors, Kings, Warlords (ie The Lord as in 'House of Lords').

Exclude or slaughter those who don't worship and pretty soon they all seem to conform. Do the same to local communities who have a different religion/leader (eg the Midianites, Canaanites, Cathars, Huguenots) and you soon have a majority religion.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Seriously, the god stuff?

> Would Raymond Damadian do for a start?

He is not a biologist. He is a "physician, medical practitioner", that is not a biologist.

> I also mentioned Francis Collins

Accordig to Wikipedia, he "advocates the perspective that belief in Christianity can be reconciled with acceptance of evolution and science". So he certainly does not think that evolution is nonsense.

That is 2 failures.

> And I'm pretty sure I did not say that any of them claimed evolution was nonsense

>>> who'll tell you that creationism fits the evidence far better than this evolution nonsense.

Your message had it that they would tell me it is nonsense.

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Richard Plinston
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> and then they undo it all to take the roads back to exactly as they were before

Did they do that? No, I think they left it pretty much alone except they did remove the barriers and the pits. Certainly they took away the chicane and the racing curbs. Maybe they put the traffic islands back at some point later. After all they may have wanted another race the next year.

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Richard Plinston
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> they do all that re-aligning and surfacing and changing the road markings etc etc, all in a day or so

I am not sure why you think it had to be done in a day*. They had months to prepare the course a section at a time, just like they do for normal road maintenance. The could remove traffic islands, realign curbs, resurface, design and build the required barriers (which also realign the road) and pits. Of course they needed to repaint the road markings - they were still being used as roads before the race day. The day before they only needed to install the pre-built barriers.

* Perhaps it is because of your belief in late bronze age myths.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Seriously, the god stuff?

> Really? Biologists are not scientists?

Name one _respected_ biologist that says that evolution is nonsense.

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Richard Plinston
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> Really? Everyone came out ok; no accidents, near-misses, surprises or anything like that, but it wasn't safe? No "pucker moments", no evasive braking or steering, nothing. Not safe?

That you survived is not proof that it was 'safe'.

> And yet, again, we have street races that top those speeds.

And the crashes indicate that these are not 'safe'.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXAqCBYgAbM

https://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/news/85423069/it-got-away-on-me--driver-tells-of-surviving-167kmh-crash-during-targa-rally

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doLRUWNvJZs

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=targa+rally+crash&client=firefox-b&dcr=0&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjZ25vr6LXYAhXEjZQKHbA-DmUQsAQIQw&biw=1147&bih=632

> You somehow think I have travelled at over 180k in unsafe and uncontrolled conditions.

I have not speculated on what conditions you have travelled in, I stated that 180kph is unsafe on NZ roads.

> However, we have many tight, winding gravel roads that have a posted limit of 100k.

No they do not have "posted limit of 100kph". That would be done with a disk with 100 in in. What they may have is a white disk with a diagonal black stripe which is the end of the current posted speed limit, the so called 'open road limit'. It is true that the maximum speed that can be driven is 100kph, but just because there is no 'posted limit' does not mean it is rated for 100kph.

http://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/about-limits/speed-limits/

> Set on the condition of the road? Try driving on NZ roads and see if you can honestly say that!

Does the last 50 years count?

> Re-align several Wellington streets, re-surface them

Actually that was in reference to the Hamilton race. See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXAqCBYgAbM at the one minute mark, do you think that striped line is a normal road marking? Are the barriers usually there ?

> 7 by my count (though after much hunting (not much in the way of reliable sources) only 2 may currently have that limit), them being :

You are imagining things again. There are _2_ with that new limit only just come into force. There are several other areas being _considered_, but none announced. Most of these are new sections, some not yet completed, some only planned.

> Southern Motorway (Bombay to Takanini) > Not unless you count 1970s as "new"

The section under consideration for 110kph will be available after around 2020.

"2018–2019 – Planning and design work to enable construction"

http://www.nzta.govt.nz/projects/sh1-papakura-to-bombay

You didn't search very hard.

> you have made assumptions about my driving experience and history which you got wrong.

You are imagining things again. Show me _anywhere_ that I made an assumption about your driving experience.

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