* Posts by Richard Plinston

2233 posts • joined 27 Apr 2009

Windows on ARM: It's nearly here (again)

Richard Plinston
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Re: Power

> Well Windows Server does tend to outperform say Linux in most benchmarks these days. Especially very high end requirements like dedicated low latency interconnects etc.

Which is obviously why there are so many supercomputer in the top 500 using Windows, given that interconnects are what they are all about. Oh wait, there are zero since 2015.

> And as far as I know you don't have options like SMB DIrect (SMB over RDMA) on Linux...

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samba_(software) SMB 3, which includes SMB over RDMA, was introduced in Samba 4.1 in October 2013.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Native code good, x86 emulation bad

> It's an order of magnitude easier to install Windows + IIS.

You think that it is easier than one command ?

https://www.storagecraft.com/blog/install-lamp-server-linux-mint-18-command/

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Native code good, x86 emulation bad

> Yawn. % of sites was always the figure quoted when Apache was leading. LOL @ strangely how now it's not good enough...

It is "not good enough" because Microsoft went on a campaign to wrought the figures by paying hosting sites to put all their parked domains onto Windows servers, probably with Microsoft supplying the server to put these on. This bumped up the "% of sites" to, as you say, 50%, but the vast majority had no content and no traffic.

> However Microsoft IIS also has a 10% share of the top 1 million busiest sites,

Down from 20% a decade ago, and falling.

Microsoft's market share of computers (as distinct from sites) has also halved in the last decade.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Native code good, x86 emulation bad

> According to Netcraft ~ 50% of Internet websites now run IIS on Windows so if there was a significant security issue I think we would have seen it by now!

"""While more than half of the websites in the survey are using Microsoft web server software, relatively few of these are active sites. Discounting link farms, domain holding pages and other automatically generated content, Microsoft accounts for only 7.3% of all active sites, while Apache leads with 44.9%, and nginx follows with 20.7%. Microsoft's active sites share has never exceeded Apache's, and ever since it peaked at 38% in early 2009, it has experienced a general decline."""

https://news.netcraft.com/archives/2017/09/11/september-2017-web-server-survey.html

IIS is the perfect webserver if you have no content and no visitors.

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Richard Plinston
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> or a arm box running windows native on a x86 emulator slowly

Note that the ARM x86 emulator will only run 32bit x86 and not AMDx86-64.

Some years ago Microsoft announced that there would be "no more 32bit versions of Windows". Of course they still do have 32bit versions, but many software companies switched entirely to 64bit only. Now, are they able and willing to revert to 32bit versions just to run on slow ARM emulation ?

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Windows Update borks elderly printers in typical Patch Tuesday style

Richard Plinston
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Re: NCR

> Time even before that there was actual carbon paper.

I wonder if anyone remembers decollators and bursters. My earliest time working with computers nearly 50 years ago included running these to separate the carbon paper from the multipart forms and then turning the invoices and statements from continuous paper into individual forms at the rate of hundreds per minute.

Some one else ran the envelope stuffer.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: backward compatibility NOT a thing with Micro-shaft

> That's because stubborn bastards in Finance and accounting departments refuse to join the 21st century.

It is nothing to do with 'Finance and Accounting". The dot matrix printers are in the warehouses to print out the legally required 4 part Hazardous materials forms, delivery dockets, manifests, customs forms and other necessary paperwork.

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Jet packs are REAL – and inventor just broke world speed record in it

Richard Plinston
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Re: Baffled

> A jet engine need not have a turbine.

It does unless there is some other mechanism to get it up to a few hundred kph*.

* Argus tubes (see V1) require about 200kph before they produce thrust, the V1 was fired from a ramp using steam or similar, or dropped from a plane. Ramjets need to be quite a bit faster than that before they work.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Duration?

"To stay aloft, you need to provide 9.8m/s^2 * the mass of the object to be kept aloft, of thrust. That's quite a bit."

> the vast majority of aircraft are incapable of that,

Actually, _every_ aircraft _must_ do that, otherwise it is not an aircraft. Most do so by using the wings as a pump that shifts air from above the craft to below it but somewhat behind. This requires the aircraft be at some particular speed or faster (depending on many factors). If it goes too slow the pumping action is inadequate and the craft becomes a groundcraft quite soon.

> and Harrier was the first to be able to take off vertically without helicopter rotors.

No. Not even close: Ryan X-13, Short SC-1, Convair XFY-1 Pogo, P.1127, Kestrel, ...

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SCO vs. IBM case over who owns Linux comes back to life. Again

Richard Plinston
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Re: I thaught Novell owned the property

> I guess their chances of a major victory are slim since they do not own the copyright....

While The SCO Group, or their successors, did not obtain any copyrights from Novell when they bought the business of collecting licence fees that were to be passed to Novell (but stole them instead), any code written by the original SCO, or subsequently written by TSG in their copyright.

In the case of Project Monterey it is likely that any code written for the project would be owned and copyrighted by the company that employed the author and automatically cross licensed to the other(s).

It is false to claim that TSG does not own _any_ copyrights.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: s/SCO/TSG/g

> ISTR that TSG also paid them a lump-sum up front

Yes, they did. Not only to get BSF to act for them indefinitely, but also to prevent Novell getting paid for their win in in court.

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You can yacht be serious: Larry might be planning his own version of America’s Cup

Richard Plinston
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Re: Oooh, clever..

> It is named after the first boat to win the cup: the America.

Actually it is the "100 Guinea Cup" and was only called "America's Cup" after the America won it.

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Microsoft exec says ARM-powered Windows laptops have multi-day battery life

Richard Plinston
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Re: Please explain

> What allows a company such as AMD to create a complete 86/64 compatible CPU without being sued by Intel,

A licence.

AMD was licensed as a second source for x86 many decades ago. AMD then developed x86-64 which Intel later copied.

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Y'know CSS was to kill off HTML table layout? Well, second time's a charm: Meet CSS Grid

Richard Plinston
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Re: Finally!

> is also called "pound sign", "hash", "crosshatch" or "octothorpe".

Note that is "pound (weight) sign", a poorly scratched 'lb', and not UK currency, even though the UK keyboard has the currency sign on the '3' key where others have the hash.

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Raspberry Pi burning up? Microsoft's recipe can save it and AI

Richard Plinston
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Re: Why?

> there are win-10-nic versions

Just don't expect them to be 'Windows". There is no OS GUI, no command line, no multi-tasking. They can run a single program on boot-up and it must be a UWP if you want any output. Development must be done on a full desktop Win10, run is only on Pi3 (not Pi2 or PiZero).

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Google: This may shock you, but we also banked thousands of dollars to run Russian propaganda

Richard Plinston
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Re: "Democracy in danger"

> Trump's costs are harder to pin down since he mostly paid out of pocket

That was the real 'fake news'. Trump _lent_ the campaign some millions and then recovered some of it as donations came in. He eventually forgave some of those loans, probably around 50million.

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Microsoft's foray into phones was a bumbling, half-hearted fiasco, and Nadella always knew it

Richard Plinston
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Re: And yet

> others like LibreOffice (of course) and Gimp are holding out for political reasons

Or perhaps Microsoft won't allow competition to its own products.

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Moon trumps Mars in new US space policy

Richard Plinston
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Re: Direction is one thing...

> until it's backed up with sufficient funding

It isn't about funding, it is announcing what Musk will be doing anyway so that they can claim credit for it.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Given the nationalist language used...

> build a wall around space

I thought that Pence was a 'flat-earther' and thus there already was one that is called the firmament.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Is it hit by objects nowadays?

> so you'd be as likely to suffer an impact on a Moon base as you would in any particular city on Earth.

Most small objects falling towards the Earth burn up in the atmosphere before they get close to the ground (cf "falling stars"). On the Moon a small rock could be disastrous if it punctured a building.

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Microsoft Edge shock: Browser opts for Apple WebKit, Google Blink

Richard Plinston
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> without having to use the large collection of security holes that is Safari

Edge doesn't need those security holes, it sends all your browsing history directly to Microsoft without them.

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Geoboffins claim to find oldest trace of life in rocks 4bn years old

Richard Plinston
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Re: "...Canadian rocks 3.95 billion years ago..."

> Thus we Canadians will be submitting our territorial claim for the entire planet.

Inuit ?

> So the rest of you have to leave.

'The rest' includes all those of European descent.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: More fake news

> The Jewish new year just came and went, and the year? 5778 according to the people who own and have preserved the language and the scriptures we're critiquing.

That dating mechanism was invented in 1178 CE by Maimonides. It has no more significance than Bishop Usher's pronouncements.

"""In 1178 CE, Maimonides wrote in the Mishneh Torah, Sanctification of the Moon (11.16), that he had chosen the epoch from which calculations of all dates should be as "the third day of Nisan in this present year ... which is the year 4938 of the creation of the world" (March 22, 1178)."""

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Patch alert! Easy-to-exploit flaw in Linux kernel rated 'high risk'

Richard Plinston
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Re: Please...

> and moans that Windows need a reboot after patching,

While Windows does need a reboot after an update that replaces or patches the kernel, it also needs a reboot because Windows cannot delete or replace a file that is open due to the way the file system is designed. As many library files are open on a running system then it almost always needs a reboot so that files can be deleted and replaced during start up and before they are opened.

Unix like systems using an inode file system can delete and replace files that are open because the file name is not directly linked to the data blocks but is done through the inode. An open file can continue to use the original inode while the update creates a new inode with its own set of data blocks and the file name is linked to the new inode. The old inode and its data is deleted when all processes have closed the old inode.

This means that the vast majority of updates do not require a reboot. Some systems will do in-flight kernel patching that also does not require a reboot.

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Python explosion blamed on pandas

Richard Plinston
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Re: Execution speed...

> What is often overlooked is that Python is a shell scripting language,

Python is a computer language. The most common implementation can be used as a 'shell scripting language', or as an application programming language, or as a statement evaluation tool. Other implementations can be used as an embedded language or can compile to various VMs and/or can use JIT compilation.

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Everyone loves programming in Python! You disagree? But it's the fastest growing, says Stack Overflow

Richard Plinston
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Re: Extinct

> In Python, if you write a = b and they are both integers you get a new variable a with the same value as b. If you write a = b and they are both compound objects, you get a new name for object b.

No, you are wrong. In Python 'b = 1' makes 'b' a reference to a PyIntObject that has ob_ival of 1. 'a = b' gives a new name to object 'b'. This is exactly the same as if they are any other type of object except that a number of int objects are precreated by the run time for performance reasons. So 'b = 1010' does create a new object but 'b = 1' does not.

> That's a dramatically hard bug to find in a large program that relies in any way on dynamic typing. And it's not going to happen in C because (a) you have to declare and type your variables explicitly and (b) that * tells you it's a reference, not a value.

No. In Python _everything_ is an object. There is no requirement to "tell you it's a reference, not a value" because there are no values.

https://www.laurentluce.com/posts/python-integer-objects-implementation/

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Extinct

> But in Python it's not particularly clear that what you're doing here is assigning an object reference so a and b apply to the same object (yes, once you're familiar with Python this is less surprising).

It has always been very clearly stated that is what happens and was always obvious to me.

> And indeed the ways of actually copying an array are all a bit weird.

a = copy(b), how weird is that ?

or you can create a new list from the existing list with list()

>>> a = [1,2,3]

>>> b = list(a)

>>> b[0] =9

>>> a

[1, 2, 3]

>>> b

[9, 2, 3]

Of course references to complex objects within the list are copied as another reference to the same object, deepcopy() creates copies of the objects too.

I don't know why you think any of this is "weird", it is just like other programming languages.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: The Right Tool for a Lot of Jobs

> I really do wish there was a better cross-platform GUI option for Python.

I found Glade/pygtk to be excellent with a designer for the interface that auto links to the code. I still have stuff that use EasyGUI which is really easy for dialog boxes. The real problem is that there are too many really good options.

https://wiki.python.org/moin/GuiProgramming

https://docs.python.org/3/faq/gui.html

https://wiki.python.org/moin/GUI%20Programming%20in%20Python

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Extinct

> Well, not really that clean.

> b = [1,2,3]

> a = b

> a[1] = 9

> b[1] = 10

How is that different from other languages ?

int a[3] = {1,2,3};

int * b = a;

a[1] = 9;

b[1] = 10;

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Richard Plinston
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> it's totally at odds with real languages and what the real world uses..

The "real world" is increasingly using Python.

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Windows 10 Creators Update will add app-level privacy controls

Richard Plinston
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Re: Take a Stand...

> That means all my games and all my photo editing software.

> Until then it's just a toy OS for me to play with occasionally.

You don't seem to see the irony in using Windows to play games and then accusing Linux of being a 'toy'.

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Monkey selfie case settles for a quarter of future royalties

Richard Plinston
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Re: Repulsed by adjective 'nonhuman'

> It seems to imply that 'Humans' are 'animals'. We are NOT!

Some of you might be vegetables!!!

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Richard Plinston
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> Slater doesn't own the copyright either. If he does, he shouldn't. US copyright law requires the creator be human, and the monkey took the photo, for all that it was Slater's equipment. Therefore public domain.

You are wrong. Copyright law does require the copyright holder to be a human, but says nothing about 'the creator'. There is an element of agency in the copyright law, and also one of 'work for hire'. If you work for a company as a cameraman then the film or photos you take, no matter how creative you are, are not yours, they belong to the company. Even if your employment is not directly that of a photographer and you are asked to use a company camera to take a photo then you are acting as an agent and the ownership of the copyright goes to the person or organization that owns the media (film or SD card).

Do you think that if you are on a street and ask a stranger to take a photo of you and your friends that he could sue you if you put the photo on facebook ?

The answer is no because the stranger is acting as an unpaid agent. In this case the monkey was an unpaid and voluntary agent, the copyright ownership goes to the owner of the media.

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Microsoft extends free Windows 10 S to Win 10 Pro upgrade offer

Richard Plinston
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Re: "Linux is also easy to develop for"

> Linux never had tools comparable to Visual Basic or Delphi which made developing even complex GUI applications easy enough also for single developers or small teams

I completely disagree. There is for example Glade. When this is used with Python it makes developing desktop GUI applications extremely easy. It is also cross platform, my developments ran on Linux, Windows and Nokia N800 with exactly the same code and no changes.

The main difference is that VB and Delphi are fully integrated with the language and Windows only while Linux tools are modular so almost any language can be used with Glade, Wx or QT developer. This is flexible but means that the community is dispersed amongst many language and GUI groups, while VB was locked into the 'one true path' (except when Microsoft brings out a new incompatible version).

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Being forced to use Bing can easily scare any propesctive buyers

> BT runs a free hosting service for community groups under some community obligation. Google doesn't find these sites

I just highlighted "BT runs a free hosting service for community groups" from your message, right clicked and hit 'Search Google for ..". It gave me a page of links to those sites.

You are a liar.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: "Slurp tries to compete with ChromeOS and back peddles"

> in the case of MS, peddling is probably right here...

What are you saying?: "peddling in back alleys, where the passing of brown envelopes won't be seen" ?

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NYPD head of IT doubles down on Windows smartphone idiocy

Richard Plinston
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> Really simple things, like being able to take a photo and email it (rather than have to wait for someone with a camera to arrive, take it back to the station, download and then email), can make an officer dramatically more efficient.

Sorry, but it is no longer 2010.

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Richard Plinston
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> the UK forces are switching to Windows Phone right now.

Sorry, but it is no longer 2014.

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Richard Plinston
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> Android was (and still is) a pig to develop for, as its always changing.

You appear to be defending MS mobile device development methods as if there was ever some sort of consistency between the several very different platforms they have had since 2000 or so. It started as PocketPC, went through various Windows Mobile and then was replaced by the completely incompatible Windows Phone. And then there was Zune and Kin. Even Windows Phone 7 was dumped, along with XNA, when WP8 came out which was very different. Windows 10 Mobile was different again and rewrites to UWP were required.

On the other hand Android 2.3 apps still run on the latest versions.

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Microsoft president exits US govt's digital advisory board as tech leaders quit over Trump

Richard Plinston
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Re: That virtue signaling!

> Society 282 has gone on a veritable purge of Alt Right and Dissident Right content on cyberspace...

America may have free speech but:

a) I have the right to not listen to it

b) publishers have the right to not publish it.

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Core-blimey! Intel's Core i9 18-core monster – the numbers

Richard Plinston
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Re: Nobody needs more than 640K of RAM.

> "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers."

Yes, he did say that. Given the cost of building those computers in 1943 and the number of companies and governments that could afford it at that time he was correct.

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Windows Subsystem for Linux to debut in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

Richard Plinston
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Re: Standardisation is always welcome

> Backslash was used to maintain compatibility with the 1.x option delimiter.

And the MS-DOS 1.x option indicator ('/') came from CP/M which MS-DOS is a clone of, and that came from CP/M's origins, being written on DEC machines with RT-11 or similar.

When MS tried to make a 'family' of operating systems with Xenix and MS-DOS 2.0 they had to cope with the conflicts between DEC originated systems (CP/M, MS-DOS) and Unix, and did that poorly.

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Latest Windows 10 preview lets users link an Android to their PC

Richard Plinston
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Could Microsoft one day launch its own Android phone

It already did. Originally they were Nokia-X but became Microsoft-X when they bought the business.

https://www.theverge.com/2014/2/24/5440498/nokia-x-android-phone-hands-on

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Q. What's today's top language? A. Python... no, wait, Java... no, C

Richard Plinston
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>> The code could then surely APPEAR to mean one thing, but in fact means something completely different.

> With C, the rule is that if the conditional has no braces, then the first line after the condition is in the block and nothing else.

Exactly. That is why my example in C was illustrating that "the code could then surely APPEAR to mean one thing [according to the indent], but in fact means something completely different."

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Richard Plinston
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> Trying to post some Python code somewhere that does not allow indenting ...

That is not the fault of the language, but of the site. This site recognises <code> and <pre> tags but fails to implement them in a useful way.

> What happens if somehow you end up with source that contains spaces and tabs?

You fire the programmer and/or get better tools and/or use how to configure them.

> The code could then surely APPEAR to mean one thing, but in fact means something completely different.

Like in C:

total=0;

j=0;

for (int i=0; i<10; i++)

....total+=i;

....j++;

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Richard Plinston
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Re: anything but python

> c and Perl have always made the most sense to me.

Python 3 does have differences from Python 2, but Perl has been through several rewrites, each of which were incompatible which previous version source code. If Perl makes "most sense" then you obviously never used Perl4 and haven't looked at Perl6 because these are quite different languages.

https://docs.perl6.org/language/5to6-nutshell

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Richard Plinston
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Re: anything but python

> Yes, but by & large they have backward compatibility.

Yes, but it is only "by and large". When moving from one version of C++ or Java to the next there will always be some issues which need resolving, except in trivial code.

Python3 is a new version of the language designed to be a significant improvement. Python2 is still developed and supported and has 'futures' and other tools to ease the transition to the new language. This has been done by numerous languages: extreme examples are: Pascal to Modula2; VisualBasic - numerous times;

Python3 vs. Python2 should be compared to Kotlin vs. Java. Kotlin is designed to make Java into a modern language and drop 22 years of baggage that it still carries. C++ has 36 years of baggage.

> "You can write K&R C in any language" (including C++ last time I checked)

Actually you can't. K&R C (edition 1) was replaced by ANSI C and few modern C/C++ compilers support the original K&R (though gcc may still do so). And that is hardly "any language".

And I don't know that anyone said that; what they did say was "You can write FORTRAN programs in any language", which is quite a different thing.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Note that there were "popular" shitty languages in the past

> "I can write that in Python" when it SHOULD be done as a C utility, at least for efficiency.

Not all C programs are efficient. I wrote a text merge program in C. It was quite slow due to the str..() library, in particular strcat() having to scan along the strings to get the length. A rewrite in Python was 10 times faster.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: anything but python

> Plus there's no such thing as Python. There's Python 2, and then there's Python 3.

What's your point? There is Java [1], Java 2, Java 3, ..., Java 8; C++ 3, C++ 11, C++ 14, C++ 17.

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