* Posts by Duncan Macdonald

453 posts • joined 20 Mar 2009

Page:

UK.gov calls on the Big Man – GOD – to boost rural broadband

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: I may be missing something

A directional radio link to a place with an existing high speed connection. If there is a line of sight then high speed links are easy and cheap (at least compared to laying miles of copper or fiber).

(An example - the Proxim Wireless QB-10150-LKL-WD has a range of over 10 miles and a speed of over 500 Mb/sec with a cost of under £5k for the hardware. (Not a user - this is just one of the first that popped up on a Google search.))

9
1

Apple to devs: Code for the iPhone X or nothing from April onwards

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Old iPhones ?

So developers can not produce apps for the old iphones or ipads (iphone 5 and earlier can not run ios 11).

Compare this to Android where developers are still free to produce an app for the antique version 2.3 if they want to.

0
1

Astro-boffinry world rocked to its very core: Shock as Andromeda found to be not much bigger than Milky Way

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: If the mass is 800 vs 700...

The escape velocity from an object is normally defined as the velocity required to escape starting from its surface. For two objects of the same mass but different densities, the denser one will be smaller so r in the term sqrt(2GM/r) will be less leading to a higher escape velocity.

6
0
Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: If the mass is 800 vs 700...

The escape velocity depends on the size of an object as well as its mass. The black hole left after the collapse of a giant star is so much smaller than the original star that the escape velocity increases from a few hundred kilometres per second to the speed of light. Less dense objects have a lower escape velocity than dense objects of the same mass.

11
5

Ghost in the DCL shell: OpenVMS, touted as ultra reliable, had a local root hole for 30 years

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: Wasn't VMS...

And NT versions up to 3.5 were quite reliable - in 3.51 (and all later versions) the graphics drivers were moved from being user mode programs to being kernel mode. Since then bugs in the graphics drivers can and do crash Windows. The NT kernel (without the graphics drivers) can be seen in the text mode displays that occur on boot when the system needs to do something critical like check the system disk for errors.

Moving the graphics drivers into the kernel increased speed but reduced reliability - the old tradeoff.

Of the many problems in Windows, few have been due to the NT kernel - most have been due to the mounds of crud (much of which is privileged) added over the years. (The NT kernel file ntoskrnl.exe is still only around 8MB in size - a tiny part of Windows as a whole.)

12
0

You're the IT worker in charge of securing the cloud for your company. Welcome to Hell

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

More than one way to copy and paste

If a users device can view the confidential information at home then the data can be copied by a camera pointed at the screen. This totally bypasses any copy/paste restrictions in the software.

Disgruntled employees with home access to confidential data is a certain route to the data being extracted.

Two possibilities.

One - no offsite data access

Two - treat your staff well enough that they do not want to steal data

With most management option 2 is far less likely than option 1.

7
0

You can't ignore Spectre. Look, it's pressing its nose against your screen

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

No shared CPUs

One way to mitigate the Spectre problem (at a cost) for public cloud providers - do not share CPUs between customers. If only one customers code runs on any CPU at a given time then the problem of Spectre allowing reading of data from other VMs is greatly reduced.

For big cloud jobs reserving a number of physical CPUs would not impose very much inefficiency but for small jobs that only need one or two cores reserving a whole CPU (with possibly over 10 cores and hyperthreading) would greatly affect the economics.

It would not surprise me to find Amazon and Microsoft adding the option (at a price) of having dedicated CPUs for customers that are concerned about data security. (Though that begs the question - WHY use a public cloud if you care about data security?)

18
3

Wanna design a chip that talks to silly-fast GDDR6? You'll have to talk to Rambus, too

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Not really a patent troll

Rambus does its own design work (like ARM). It is not one of the companies that buys patents from other companies then tries to license them,

How many man years did Rambus need to design and verify their GDDR6 PHY and how much would it cost for a user of GDDR6 to do their own design ?

This is the sort of IP that companies will readily license if the fees are not too high.

9
1

Electric cars to create new peak hour when they all need a charge

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: EVs pay more for electricity

Mileage ?

For the same size vehicles - how many miles for the $25 of electricity and how many miles for the $80 of fuel ? (No comparing a Tesla 3 with a SUV!!!)

14
0

'WHAT THE F*CK IS GOING ON?' Linus Torvalds explodes at Intel spinning Spectre fix as a security feature

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: "neither Meltdown or Spectre is much of a threat to a home user"

NoScript makes this a low level threat. If I used Edge or IE it might be more of a threat but I do not.

Also both Meltdown and Spectre are information disclosure bugs - on a reasonably set up home system there is not much sensitive data that can be extracted. (No banking credentials are stored on my PC - not even my PayPal login.)

8
25
Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

The bug is better than the buggy fix !!!

Until Intel get their act together and release stable fixes, I have disabled Windows Update on my home systems (neither Meltdown or Spectre is much of a threat to a home user). It is in my opinion safer to use a slightly out of date Windows 10 installation than an unstable one. (Edge / IE are not a problem on my system as they are disabled with the Norton firewall denying them internet access so their myriad of bugs do not matter.)

40
37

Google sinks cash into more submarine cables, plans more data centres

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge
Mushroom

Skynet

Google ensuring that Skynet has enough bandwidth for all its Terminator drones.

2
0

Third NAND dimension makes quad bit bucket cells feasible

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Endurance ?

The higher the number of bits per cell, the worse the endurance (number of write cycles per cell before it becomes unusable). This effect is readily visible with USB memory sticks that use TLC and have low numbers of total drive writes (often in the order of 100 DW) before the stick becomes unusable.

With QLC I wonder how many total drive writes will be possible before the performance drops.

I personally much prefer dependable memory rather than slightly cheaper memory. (My main system has a 960 Pro as the system drive!!)

5
1

Should SANs be patched to fix the Spectre and Meltdown bugs? Er ... yes and no

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Safe enough - IF no third party code

If there is no third party code on a computer system (including web access) then there is no need to patch for Spectre or Meltdown. A SAN appliance that is a separate computer with no third party code is safe against Spectre and Meltdown. A SAN appliance that has the capability to run third party code however is not safe.

20
0

Up, up and a-weigh! Boeing flies cargo drone with 225kg payload

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: Other uses

As it has 4 lifting points, it is not suitable for passenger use - the failure of any rotor or engine will send the craft out of control. At least 6 if not 8 separate lifting points are needed to be able to safely land after a failure.

0
9
Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Badlands delivery ?

Drones like this could be useful for cargo delivery in hostile areas (eg parts of Iraq and Afghanistan). At the moment a lot of US casualties occur as a result of IEDs targeting convoys. If some of the convoys can be replaced by drone deliveries then this could reduce the number of US casualties.

It could also be useful for deliveries in areas with poor communications (eg parts of Alaska).

7
3

CPU bug patch saga: Antivirus tools caught with their hands in the Windows cookie jar

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

What is difficult about setting a registry key ?

If the AV supplier does not want to add registry key setting to the main product, just spawn an administrator level command prompt that runs regedit to set the key.

As the key basically says "AV is ok for Meltdown and Spectre patches" - what concern is it of the AV supplier if the system has a third party incompatibility.

13
4

It gets worse: Microsoft’s Spectre-fixer wrecks some AMD PCs

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

How to delay windows 10 updates

If you do not want to be a guinea pig when new updates are released - disable the Windows Update service for a week or 2 after a new patch is announced to let others be the guinea pigs. Also for any major change - make sure that you take an offline backup.

6
0

Amazon: Intel Meltdown patch will slow down your AWS EC2 server

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

True - But

Optimization done carefully can often get better than order of magnitude improvements. Many years ago (on Oracle 7!!!) we had an isolated batch job that had to do calculations based on a 3 day period of a database with several years of data. The tables primary index included the date and time towards the end of the index definition, The initial implementation did selects and joins based on this large table - and it ran like a 1 legged dog - (over 6 hours per customer - and there were over 200 to process).

Making a private copy of the main table that only had the desired date range (with the same indexes as the main table) and using that instead reduced the run time to under 5 minutes per customer.

My rules of optimization

1) Is the system fast enough as it is - if so do not optimize.

2) Would an affordable hardware improvement make it fast enough - if so then upgrade the hardware and leave the working software alone.

3) If you decide that optimization is necessary - start by instrumenting the system to find out where the bottlenecks are - there is a good chance that they are not where you thought,

4) If there are multiple bottlenecks - do not start optimizing - you probably need a system redesign first.

5) Give the optimization job to the best programmer that you have available - and make sure that the sources have all the optimizations explained well enough that the system can still be supported if the support is outsourced to a third world country.

18
0

You Wreck Me, Spotify: Tom Petty, Neil Young publisher launches $1.6bn copyright sueball

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Spotify seems one of the good guys!!

If it pays 60% of its revenues to the artists and 10% to songwriters then it is returning far more of the money to the people that make music than most RIAA members ever do.

8
1

Kernel-memory-leaking Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Intel playing bad boy again ?

According to HotHardware.com (see https://hothardware.com/news/intel-cpu-bug-kernel-memory-isolation-linux-windows-macos) the linux page table isolation is being applied to all x86 CPUs not just the intel ones with the problem - and according to the linux kernel diff log the patch was submitted by an Intel engineer (see https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git/commit/?id=c313ec66317d421fb5768d78c56abed2dc862264)

4
1

Nest's slick IoT burglar alarm catches crooks... while it eyes your wallet

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Way overpriced

For anyone who can read and follow basic instructions one of the many wireless alarm systems on eBay is much better value.

(For example "HOMSECUR Pet Friendly Wireless GSM Autodial Burglar Alarm System+720P IP Camera" at £197.49 has 4 PIR sensors, 9 window/door sensors, smoke sensor, video camera, inside and outside sirens and battery backup.)

7
0

Bit price drop + compute-storage closeness = enterprise flash use boom

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

NVMe bottleneck

Most PC systems are severely limited in the number of available PCIe lanes which limits the number of NVMe drives that can run at full speed. For an ordinary PC adding even one NVMe drive to the PCIe 3.0 bus limits the graphics card to x8 connectivity instead of x16 without NVMe

(EPYC, Threadripper and the more expensive Xeon chips do not have this problem with PCIe lanes. EPYC has 128 PCIe lanes, Threadripper has 64, higher end Xeons have 28-40.)

1
0

China may stick to its own DRAM memory soon – researchers

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: Self-sufficiency

It is not just the Chinese military. In my opinion China is (and has been for many years) considering the possibility that the US economy might collapse (see the US Debt Clock for reasons). China wants to continue even if the USA collapses. This requires that it does not depend on outside high tech suppliers that may well cease trading if there is a US economic collapse.

16
1

Social network smacks back: Accusers say it helps recruiters target age-groups in job ads

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Without Safe Harbor - then what

Without "Safe Harbor" or its equivalent, almost all social media would be impossible. Not just the giants like youtube and facebook but smaller sites such as the register forums would not dare operate due to the chance of being sued out of existence.

As Youtube has over 300 hours of video being uploaded every minute, it is unreasonable to expect that all illegal content be detected and removed immediately. Its processing algorithms are good and remove much but inevitably some gets through the automatic filters and is only removed when a complaint is made. (To have a human watch each of the Youtube videos for illegal content would require a full time staff of over 100,000 - and how many of them would still be sane after watching their 1000th cat video!!! ).

4
0

Merry Xmas, fellow code nerds: Avast open-sources decompiler

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Intel ME

How long until someone produces a full decompile of Intel's secret ME code (for the embedded god mode CPU in current x86 chips).

22
1

Brrr! It's a snow day and someone has pwned the chuffin' school heating

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Force disconnection from the internet

If the manufacturers wanted to there is an easy way to stop these devices from being connected to the internet - have them check periodically if it is possible to connect to Google - if so then the installation has been connected incorrectly so disable the network connection. This would require the system to be administered from its front panel but would stop malicious attackers on the web.

5
0

Disk drive fired 'Frisbees of death' across data centre after storage admin crossed his wires

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: What no-one has mentioned yet... - DRUMS

Less common than disks were drums - metal lumps about the size of washing machine drums coated with magnetic oxide and an array of fixed heads - one per track. They were faster than disks because there was no seek time.

Some of these could weigh 60lbs and rotate at 3000rpm. A story that I heard (but could not verify) was that on one of these a bearing failed and the drum departed from the mechanism at speed and left a trail of destruction before it finally came to rest.

10
0

Looking through walls, now easier than ever

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

At these frequencies a traditional faraday cage made of mesh will probably not be effective unless the mesh is very fine (under 0.5cm wire spacing). A cage made of sheet metal (eg aluminium foil) would be a better bet. Include some moving corner cube reflectors in the room to swamp the desired target (human) reflections with spurious reflections.

Of course if you want to keep something secret you need your own underground bunker - ten feet of damp earth will completely defeat this technique.

5
0

Lap-slabtop-mobes with Snapdragon Arm CPUs running Windows 10: We had a quick gander

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Overpriced

Between the high price of the machine, the typically high price of mobile data and the sluggish performance, it is difficult to see there being a large market. What does one of these systems get you that you could not get better with an iPad with a bluetooth keyboard or a secondhand laptop from ebay.

(For example a Lenovo Thinkpad X220 with I5, 8GB, 240 SSD, Win 7 Pro was £230 on the first ebay listing that I looked at.)

13
0

Google Chrome vows to carpet bomb meddling Windows antivirus tools

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: NoScript

Agreed. At the moment I am using an older version of Firefox so that I can have a usable NoScript. A working NoScript and an older Firefox is safer than a new Firefox without a working NoScript

6
0
Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Sanity ?

As NoScript, AdblockPlus, Spybot S&D and a good AV package are requirements for sane browing these days, any browser that does not allow these to run is unfit for use.

(For bad sites that need crap, I use a VM running a Linux live CD ISO - any downloaded crap is discarded when the VM is shut down.)

5
0

The End of Abandondroid? Treble might rescue Google from OTA Hell

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: Does it really matter?

Depends on the use - my phone is running 4.1 (which IS rather old!!) but for my use that does not matter - it gets used as a phone, bookreader and camera. There is NO banking use, no credit card details, no paypal details etc. Data is normally turned off and WiFi is only turned on at home when I want to load something onto the phone. My amazon account has no credit card linked to it (I use prepaid Amazon gift vouchers instead) so there is very little on the phone that any hacker could get.

Unlike the current youngsters whose life revolves around their phones, I just regard it as a useful tool that can be readily replaced.

(The phone is NOT used as a SatNav because the THL W8s has a bad GPS - it takes over 10 minutes to get a fix while standing in the open.)

1
0

'Break up Google and Facebook if you ever want innovation again'

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Andrew really hates Google

Can you think of ONE bit of positive reporting on Google by Andrew?

The big problem with innovation at the moment is that to be successful you need a big bank balance. A small company (or an individual) finds it very difficult to go from new idea to production due to the startup costs (which may well include patent lawyers). For many the best hope is to sell the idea to a larger company (eg Google) rather than lose their shirts trying to compete with the big boys.

(Note - this is not specific to computing but applies to most established industries.)

Only in a field with no big competitors does the small fry have much of a chance.

5
7

Chinese IT security bods accused of siphoning US GPS, biz blueprints

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Why bother ?

All that filing this case does is to make it sure that the accused will not visit the US. The chance that they will ever face a US court is only slightly higher than the chance that the US will have an honest government.

5
0

Big Cable's pillow talk with FCC to forbid US states from writing own net neutrality rules

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Infatuation - No - GREED YES

How big are the backhanders that Pai and the other FCC commissioners getting?

For enough money, many people are prepared to look stupid.

26
0

BT boss: Yeah, making a business case for 5G is hard

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: queer - WRONG

ADSL is often run from street cabinets where the distance (and/or cable quality) make running ADSL from exchanges impractical (FTTC - fibre to the cabinet with ADSL for the last hop is not uncommon).

Depending on local conditions, connecting a mobile network mast by a fibre link in a nearby cabinet may be the most economic method. (As BT owns a lot of cabinets with fibre connections and also has a lot of mobile network masts, I would be surprised if they do not use this method on occasion.)

4
2

It's 2017 – and your Windows PC can be forced to run malware-stuffed Excel macros

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge
FAIL

IE and Edge

As MS written browsers have such a horrible security record, I have disabled their internet access on my systems (by using the program control feature of the firewall in Norton). I use Firefox with Noscript and AdBlockPlus instead - while not perfect it is better than the offerings from MS. I also went through the settings in IE and Edge to disable every feature that I could to try to reduce the damage if they somehow got internet access.

5
1

Firefox 57: Good news? It's nippy. Bad news? It'll also trash your add-ons

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge
Thumb Down

Required extensions

If AdBlockPlus, NoScript and Password Exporter are not all available then I will NOT be changing to Firefox 57. (I have just downloaded PaleMoon to give it a test.) I was already upset when a previous "upgrade" broke EPUBreader (the current version is far worse than the old version).

10
0

Where hackers haven't directly influenced polls, they've undermined our faith in democracy

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Georgia

Why would the current Republican rulers of the US state of Georgia want honest elections - the current electronic voting machines make it easy for them to stay in power.

11
4

OpenSSL patches, Apple bug fixes, Hilton's $700k hack bill, Kim Dotcom raid settlement, Signal desktop app, and more

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: I wonder what the Trump apologists' excuse will be this time?

If you were an enemy - would you prefer your opponent to be led by an incompetent blowhard or by a malevolent witch. Answer that question and you can see why Putin prefers Trump as US President.

11
1

El Reg assesses crypto of UK banks: Who gets to wear the dunce cap?

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge
Pint

Apps - Security ???

As most mobile phones are running old versions of software for which no upgrades are possible (eg my Android phone runs on 4.2.1), the platform is insecure. It does not matter how good the app is if something in the background can intercept every keystroke/finger tap. In my opinion mobile phones are unsuitable for banking. (To pay for apps on the Play Store, I use prepaid Play Store gift cards - there is no bank or credit card usage on my phone at all.)

An app running on a PC or MAC with the latest security updates and a good antivirus package MAY be secure, however I trust Firefox with Noscript and AdBlockPlus more than an app written by a bank that probably got its code written by the lowest bidder in India.

2
0
Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Nationwide

Looking at the detailed report - AES 256 encryption is used with everything that supports it (the significant exceptions were Android 2.3.7 and IE8 on XP which no sensible person should be using for online banking). TLS 1.3 is not supported but as the draft was only published in April 2017 this is not surprising. Diffie-Hellman key exchange was not used with any of the simulated browsers (RSA was used instead) so the fact that the server supports the DH key exchange does not have much impact on security.

0
0

New Optane disks appear on web shops' lists

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: Still not competitive with flash storage

The Tech Report SSD endurance test (http://techreport.com/review/27909/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-theyre-all-dead) indicates that the life of SSDs is considerably higher than the manufacturers claims.

The 960 pro uses V-NAND in MLC mode (2 bits/cell) and as V-NAND has larger feature sizes than planar NAND, the lifespan should be even higher than in the Tech Report test.

(The 256Gb 840 pro managed over 2PB written - just allowing for the larger flash array a 2TB 960 pro drive should manage over 16PB and allowing for the larger feature size of V-NAND would probably manage over 20PB written.)

How many enterprise hard disks ever have 8000 total drives writes during their working life?

4
0

Phone crypto shut FBI out of 7,000 devices, complains chief g-man

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Open source encryption

There are good open source encryption programs (eg AESCrypt, GnuPG, 7-Zip) that make "rubber hose" decryption the only way of recovering the data if the user has been careful.

For transmitting a message to another person without leaving the usual traces, USENET can be used. There are several newsgroups that often have encrypted ZIP or RAR files. If a message is placed in one of those groups, it will be replicated to servers across the world. It would be difficult to determine who had read the message (as against just downloading all the new messages on a newsgroup).

For the AES key - use a known part of a 7-zip encrypted jpeg (The password for 7-zip can be something easy to remember, the jpeg being an innocent file can be carried through customs on an SD card in a camera or phone or be a known image on a website.) Example encrypt a file "swimwear.jpg" with 7-zip using password "beach party" then take bytes 5001 to 5032 of the zip as the AES 256 bit key. Without knowing which jpeg, 7-zip password and offset into the 7-zip encrypted file is used to generate the AES 256 bit key there is no real way to decrypt the message. (The offset should change each day so that breaking one message does not allow others to be broken.)

The encryption and decryption should be done on a standalone system (no internet connection or hard disk) that boots a version of Linux from a DVD. All data transfers to and from this system should be done by a SD card or USB memory stick that is destroyed after use.

(For real paranoia - do the encryption and decryption in an underground Faraday cage to reduce any possibility of sniffing the data by radio methods.)

2
0
Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: Let them have the password

And if you want to be nasty - have a few dozen micro SD cards with really toxic contents (such as episodes of X factor or Emmerdale) to distract the G-men while keeping the secure data elsewhere in an encrypted file on a cloud server.

3
0

Do fear the Reaper: Huge army of webcams, routers raised from 'one million' hacked orgs

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Safe home router ?

Are there ANY home routers that do not have security holes that could allow them to be taken over as part of a botnet? If so please name them.

12
0

Beware the GDPR 'no win, no fee ambulance chasers' – experts

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: The Lawyers Are Coming - caseload

Filing a lawsuit is one thing - getting it heard may be another. If there are too many GDPR cases filed then it could take a long time for them to be heard by the courts. (Most courts already have large caseloads and there are complaints about too many cases and too few judges.) Unlike PPI where most cases were straightforward and well documented there will be a lot of variation between GDPR cases and judges will have to decide in each case whether there was a significant breach and what (if anything) is the correct amount of the penalty.

(Crudely - having and releasing private details on all the UK population has a maximum penalty of £20m or 4% so what is the correct level of penalty if data on only 100 people is involved. That is a matter for the judge to decide depending on the circumstances. Also either side could appeal which would result in even more court backlogs.)

1
0
Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Re: In the recruitment industry the panic is just starting to set in.

Unless the CRM system is completely stupid it will be able to do database exports and imports. If so then (if there is no better way) the deleted data can be removed by exporting the non-deleted records then dropping the database tables and recreating them from the exported records.

Another possible alternative (depending on the database structure and the CRM programs) would be to overwrite the data in the "deleted" records - replace all the text with a load of XXXXXXXXXXX , change all personal names to "John Smith", change all NI numbers to "VV123456Z", change all company names to "Fake Company", change all phone numbers to "0123456789" and change all addresses to "House of Commons London SW1A 0AA" - this should remove the personal information.

4
0

Magic hash maths: Dedupe does not have to mean high compute. Wait, what?

Duncan Macdonald
Silver badge

Hashes and duplicates

For a dedupe hash to be useful it needs to be smaller than the data block (otherwise the data block itself would be a better index). This implies that there will be hash clashes where two or more different data block have the same hash value. Because of this a dedupe tool has to compare the data blocks when there is a hash match to avoid losing or corrupting data. Using an easier hashing algorithm may increase the number of duplicates but will reduce the time spent calculating the hash. (Eg using a 64 bit CRC as the hash instead of a SHA-512 will slightly increase the number of hash collisions but will require less effort to compute.)

7
0

Page:

Forums

Biting the hand that feeds IT © 1998–2018