* Posts by the spectacularly refined chap

739 posts • joined 27 Dec 2008

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Google faces $10k-a-day fines if it defies court order to hand over folks' private overseas email

the spectacularly refined chap

Or 0.025% if you really can count, although traipsing out annual revenues and comparing them to quarterly profits like that is pretty much guaranteed to create confusion.

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ARM chip OG Steve Furber: Turing missed the mark on human intelligence

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: So ...

A bazillion of "cores" takes megawatts to run because each of them is incomparably more complex (and more active) than a neuron. Do neurons go "ping" billions of times per second? No? Well then.

Well done on completely mission the very point he was making. Of course neurons don't operate at those kind of speeds, the whole point is that throughput is achieved via parallelism instead of one big core running at unimaginable speed. His observation was that this isn't what happens, so why are we proceeding on that basis?

Furber is far smarter in this area than you or I will ever be. You do not arrive at some profound insight by calling him a dick, taking a tiny line of argument he uses, and then developing that line in the same way he himself proceeds.

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Elon Musk says Harry Potter and Bob the Builder will get SpaceX flying to Mars

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: "The Moon is harder because it has no atmosphere"

Wouldn't the mere fact that there is at least *some* atmosphere on the Mars-side of your suit/vehicle/etc, compared with the vacuum encountered on the Moon or in orbit, make the design of said suits/vehicles a bit easier thanks to them not needing to cope with such a steep pressure differential?

The Martian atmospheric pressure is roughly 1% that of Earth, or perhaps 3% of that of a reduced pressure space vehicle. Personally I would not be remotely comfortable in a vehicle so marginal in design that the difference makes any difference whatsoever.

On the other hand that thin atmosphere is still enough to need a heat shield, but not so great you can land on a sensibly sized parachute. The atmosphere is also held in place by considerably stronger gravity, all things that make getting there in the first place considerably more difficult.

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the spectacularly refined chap

Re: 14 days long nights on the moon?

Not so: days are endless and nights are endless, it just depends of where on the moon you are. [search for "moon tidal lock" on your favorite google ;)]

Err, no. The moon is tidally locked with respect to the Earth, not the Sun. You only need to look at the moon over the course of a few nights to see that specific points of the surface alternate between day and night as the phase changes.

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Star Wars: Big Euro cinema group can't handle demand for tickets to new flick

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: I would NOT be expecting that!

Or are you the only person in the entire universe who hasn't twigged that Henry is R2 in drag?

No, that would be Hetty, the one in pink. I've always been curious about her...

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It's high time we extend Freedom of Information Act to outsourcers

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Public Accountability for everything that affects the public. Period.

Actually the public has an inalienable (if not legal) right to know everything that any publicly influential entity is up to, whether it's government funded or not.

Bollocks, and it's precisely that sort of ill considered reaction that can easily mask any more reasonable proposal. An individual IS an "entity" so think about the implications: if I start a local campaign to save a library from closure should I sacrifice my privacy? Should you, when you report that dangerous pothole at the end of the road?

If you think this is fair or reasonable you are wrong. If you think demanding this is somehow an "inalienable" right you are wrong and wrong. If you don't this is exactly what you are demanding you are wrong, wrong and wrong.

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'Don't Google Google, Googling Google is wrong', says Google

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: re: Contacting someone implies you were successful;...

No, it sits directly on top of bare IP.

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the spectacularly refined chap

Re: re: Contacting someone implies you were successful;...

The TCP-IP context derives from the use of literal "pings" in ASDIC/SONAR in underwater warfare.

Ping is ICMP, not TCP...

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Pirate Bay digs itself a new hole: Mining alt-coin in slurper browsers

the spectacularly refined chap

15 posts in...

...and still no mention of El Reg's claim to be doing exactly this on 1 April. Should have got that patent after all.

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AMD Ryzen beats Intel Core i7 as a heater (that's also a server)

the spectacularly refined chap

Supposedly the CS department at the Uni of Manchester (first purpose built CS dept in the country) was built with that in mind, simply recirculating the heat from the machine room. I can confirm while there in the mid nineties there appeared to be no functional heating to speak of - the implicit assumption was that computers would remain largely valve based.

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Kiwi prankster 'oinks' down cops' radio and sings Old MacDonald

the spectacularly refined chap

75MHz is still a line of sight frequency

Sure, which is why your FM radio doesn't work with a brick wall between you and the transmitter. Admitted, the FM band starts 13MHz higher and thus even less likely to get through solid objects but it's why you can never ever get a radio signal indoors.

Oh wait...

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So thoughtful. Uber says it won't track you after you leave their vehicles

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Pretty boring tracking me

My taxi company don't need no app to track me. I always ring up in person but I noticed from the call logs on my phone the other day the average call duration is nine seconds. The conversation proceeds at normal pace, just so much context is implied by routine I need only say how long it is before I want picking up from the pub.

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El Reg gets schooled on why SSDs will NOT kill off the trusty hard drive

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: I just replaced the HDD in my laptop with...

SSHD, i.e. a hybrid drive. The pricing for those is broadly comparable to the equivalent hard drive. About twelve months ago I got a 4Tb/8Gb flash hybrid, if memory serves it was around a fiver more than the equivalent purely mechanical drive.

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Uh oh, scientists know how those diamonds got in Uranus, and they're telling everyone!

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: 'high pressure can bond hydrogen and carbon atoms'?

Well, yes of course it can, but 'to create nanometre-wide "diamonds"'? When I last looked, there wasn't much hydrogen in a diamond.

Be careful, GCSE and A level chemistry tends to focus on the macromolecular bulk and ignore what happens at the edges of the crystal. You always do have impurities to fill up the otherwise unconnected bonds. The composition varies but hydrogen is one of the most common options. If you're talking about nanometre scale diamonds then the edges start to represent a much greater fraction of the diamond as a whole.

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Sofa-jockeys given crack at virtual Formula 1 world championship

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: What virtual F1 lacks

... is virtual Murray Walker commentary.

Already been done. I think it was Grand Prix 2 around 20 years ago. Genuine Walker commentary along with the authentic "insightful" comments. The one that comes to mind was when you rammed the car in front. It would lose its back wing. You would lose your front and quite often a wheel too. Virtual Murray would then remark

"That was almost certainly a collision there..."

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Re-identifying folks from anonymised data will be a crime in the UK

the spectacularly refined chap

Surely the real problem is at the other end of the line, with the person who claimed that the data was "anonymised" when it really wasn't, as a pretext for ignoring the normal restrictions on handling personal data.

This can happen quite easily if multiple sources are cross-referenced. Consider a trainee GP and to review their work as part of that training you have a document giving the date and time of consultation and anonymised clinical summary of the case. On the other you have financial and auditing records giving the date and time of consultation and the patient seen.

The first document holds sensitive information in anonymised form. The second holds PII but not of an overly sensitive nature - merely the fact someone went to see a doctor. However, put the two together and it is trivially easy to get back to "Mr X is suffering from erectile dysfunction."

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Linux kernel hardeners Grsecurity sue open source's Bruce Perens

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Perens has two shots at winning.

Expert witnesses don't have opinions in court, they give authoritative statements of fact under oath.

No, expert witnesses are in fact the only type allowed to express, the courts recognise that judgement is a key factor in many skilled occupations. For many areas of key importance to cases, psychology for example, there are no such things as facts, opinions are all you get. The courts recognise that which is the very reason they have expert witnesses. Someone dealing purely in fact is simply a witness, no matter how much expertise they have in the area.

No comment on the merits of the case, however. It raises a couple of interesting questions and it strikes me that those adopting vehement positions one way or the other are basing them on things other than the specifics of the case.

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Sun's core in a real spin, but you wouldn't know just by looking at it

the spectacularly refined chap

Younger. Time travels more slowly the further down a gravity well.

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Microsoft's new Surface laptop defeats teardown – with glue

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Nonsense

So wrong and you don't even understand why.

I'm writing this on the laptop for which I had a new LCD installed a few weeks back after many years of prior use. It's still going strong. Why should it be replaced?

Fine. So what? Do you want us to be impressed by your resourcefulness or canniness? I'm not, I've followed the same approach. That doesn't make anyone who wants anything different wrong. Too many people here complain they can't dismantle things or replace parts, or don't have the portage they want in one thread, and then engage in techo-masturbation over a device that's 1mm thinner or half an ounce lighter in another. They work largely work against each other so a choice has to be made. Make whatever choice you want - I don't care. I do object to the selfish attitude - "It isn't what I want, so no-one else should be allowed to buy one either."

A fairly comparable situation came up over the last few months with my mother and myself. We were both looking for new desktops, both decided in favour of SFF systems. Both expect a system to last 5-10 years. My own would fit what I suspect many here would go for - made out of standard off the shelf components I can easily replace any component whenever I like. Cost about £250, not overly powerful but good enough and hell, I can replace the ITX board with a new one in 2 or 3 years for another £100.

My Mum's not going to do that. At most her system may get a memory upgrade during its life. She also wanted a name brand - you can argue about that but it is what she wanted. Cost of her new HP - about £450. To be fair you can dismantle it but the components are generally non-standard so forget any notion of a mid life update - upgrading memory or SSD, or replacing the ODD are about your limit. Yes, it was £200 more expensive but it's a lot more powerful - I suggested that spec for her bearing in mind it would have to last a decent period without upgrades. I knew about the limited scope for replacement parts before I suggested it, but it doesn't change the fact that it's the right machine for her. Why should she be forced to buy something less suitable based on your preferences?

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Tech can do a lot, Prime Minister, but it can't save the NHS

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: First of all

It's the same for GP's, all on different systems. Centralise IT at least and half these problems will go away, surely?

GPs will be on one of four clinical systems. EMIS has over half the market. Add SystmOne and you are over 90%. The other two are fighting over the scraps. Regardless, that's hardly "all different systems" and yes, they all interoperate to a greater or lesser extent.

Having seen this at health authority and at national level I concluded most of the problems are cultural rather than technological, in particular the obsession with confidentiality.

GPs can't directly see the spine entries for their own patients, they can't even look up their NHS numbers for themselves but are instead dependant on the health authority or primary care support services.

Even then, up until around the millennium NHS numbers were not national at all but allocated independently by each local health authority. Move between authorities and you'd get a new NHS number. Even now, with "national" NHS numbers and at the level of national administration, those within NHS England can't see the records of NHS Scotland and vice versa and so on.

All this adds up to a lot of scope for data mismatches and duplicate accounts: it is a wonder systems like GP2GP (which transfers computer records between practices) work at all.

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'My PC needs to lose weight' says user with FAT filesystem

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: FAT is still used widely

"32 Gb USB key"

These days we generally call that a 4GB USB key. Very few people measire in bits...

Apart from the entire comms industry. With all these mock stories of paper tape and 8" floppies it's easy to forget that the real mark of a noob is to assume that a byte must somehow invariably be eight bits long.

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Retirement age must move as life expectancy grows, says WEF

the spectacularly refined chap

If we are that much more productive - how come we dont get fridays off?

Your hours have gone down. Slowly, over generations so you don't necessarily notice. I recall reading something about the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway c.1900 who were regarded as a model employer because of the sheer generosity of their terms. Working hours for clerical staff: 8-6 Mon-Sat. A very generous three days paid leave and the option of another three unpaid allowing an entire week off.

That was a long time ago, but look at similar terms even the postwar period and they will still surprise you. You already have it easy. Nothing will ever be good enough for the chronic slacker.

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PayPal peed off about Pandora's 'P' being mistaken for its 'PP'

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: P is for PayPoint

Be careful when being pedantic because there is always the risk of coming across as a self important knob if it is yourself in the wrong.

It is correct if deconstructed as a three clause sentence rather than two, i.e. They're names, sound similar, and they are both in the payments industry. Since that is the only correct way to parse that sentence it's you that can't read, not the poster that can't write.

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Julian Assange wins at hide-and-seek game against Sweden

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Actions == consequences

I don't believe the Aussies get a veto on where we send him to, if and when we eventually deport him somewhere.

That was my understanding too based on commentary by qualified legal counsel on previous events. Specifically, he would have been safer in Sweden against supposed extradition to the US. If extradited to Sweden a condition would automatically be attached preventing subsequent re-extradition without explicit UK consent. Over here he can be extradited without fourth party involvement.

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For now, GNU GPL is an enforceable contract, says US federal judge

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Technical Point @frank ly

The price is THE SOURCE CODE OF YOUR MODIFICATION(s). FREE FOR ALL. Under the GPL.

I suggest you read the license, because this comes across as ill-informed zealotry rather than an informed considered position. You do not have to give everyone access to your source code - the only requirement is you have to give the source to the people you distribute the software to and are unable to restrict them from further redistribution - you have no obligations whatsoever to third parties.

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IBM wheels out bleedin' big 15TB tape drive

the spectacularly refined chap

Cuts != losses. Declining revenues != losses. LOOK at the figures, e.g. https://www.ibm.com/investor/events/earnings/1q17.html A PROFIT of $2.3bn in the first quarter. It is the same across the board.

What do you do there? The lady or the post boy?

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the spectacularly refined chap

Yes, over those twenty quarters the losses are very consistent. As in:

  • Made shit loads of profit
  • Made shit loads of profit
  • Made shit loads of profit
  • Made shit loads of profit
etc etc.

So you don't really care about the drive? Of course not - you'd much rather miss the point of an entire series of articles and bash on about something you know nothing about.

Yes, the drive itself is mildly interesting if you want that sort of thing, but personally I'd still tend to stick with LTO for those things not on D2D.

As a side point - when did ordered lists disappear from the allowed HTML syntax?

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Email client lib blown apart by CC: list of death

the spectacularly refined chap

If it's C then things are not always that straightforward. No exception handling complicates how to indicate problems massively, particularly if the target domain of the result covers all values of the return type, and the function simply can't throw an error if its preconditions are satisfied. Constantly checking prerequisites introduces a lot of red tape which obscures the proper operation risking more bugs, and breaks a central principal of design by contract.

Put another way, in C for well written code this often becomes 1) check preconditions 2) call function via needlessly cumbersome invocation 3) function does it's own checks which can't fail due to the checks already done 4) caller now checks result which is also a waste of time because of those same initial checks.

Now for badly written code: what makes you think they'll bother with 4) after skipping step 1)?

By all means drop a few assert()s in there to catch problems in debug trim, they are nowhere near as intrusive and can greatly help self documentation. But adjusting things at the API level and repeatedly testing the same thing wastes time and space and risks introducing more problems by obscuring correct operation.

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User loses half of a CD-ROM in his boss's PC

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Paper yes...

Once had a user who'd run out of the special (and expensive) laser printer acetates and decided to use some designed more for writing on with pens. One destroyed cartridge.

I call either bollocks or ineptness. The film only enters the fuser unit after it has passed the drum so no, it won't melt there. The other possibility is loose toner by failing to adhere on the uncoated film. That will take perhaps 10-20 pages of dodgy printing to work itself. So, I could understand a gummed up fuser or rear rollers, but no, never a cartridge.

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Uber cloaked its spying and all it got from Apple was a slap on the wrist

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: RICO act

You are interpreting that incorrectly. Substitute "within" for "over" if you prefer - it doesn't change the meaning one iota. Two acts in six months would fulfill the over ten years criterion even if the entity concerned has only existed for one of those ten years.

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Will the MOAB (Mother Of all AdBlockers) finally kill advertising?

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: TV Ads

No, by definition +10dB is a tenfold increase. For a doubling:

10 log10 2 = ???

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'Tech troll' sues EFF to silence 'Stupid Patent of the Month' blog. Now the EFF sues back

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: So this patent dates from 1999 and is therefor 18 years old.

Before the patent system got out of control algorithms were the only element of software was patentable. RSA and GIF compression come immediately to mind. In both cases, yes, it was the actual algorithm that was patented.

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the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Personal opinion

Second issue: Vagueness for maximum litigation options - Most of the patents out there, especially around software and design, are so vague that it covers a broad spectrum of existing products.

That would be easily tackled if there was political will by a adopting an "all or nothing" approach to patent claims. It seems most dubious patents begin with something specific and then the claims generalise it into anything tangentially related. If those extended claims include anything for which prior art can be shown rule the entire patent invalid.

You might end up with specific, focused patents that actually describe the purported invention as as result.

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Solaris admins! Look out – working remote root exploit leaked in Shadow Brokers dump

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Solaris?

I can't say I'm remotely surprised. These days if you're running Solaris, especially on workstations, it's likely something quite specialised, and the OS often gets viewed as a for the life of the machine thing. Sun's historic licensing policies tended to reinforce that view, yes they opened it up considerably towards the end of their days but the attitude tends to stick.

Sun and now Oracle hardware is good stuff, and if the system is running some oddball or bespoke control app it could well stay in use for a long time.

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Huawei's just changed the way you'll use Android

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: The button I miss and want

is the forward one. I use it all the time on my Win computers, and sorely miss it on my phones. It is such a pain to back up, realize you shouldn't have, and be forced to re-enter all that data again to get back to where you just were...

Android/Chrome: bring up the browser menu, i.e. scroll up if needed to make the address bar visible, press the three vertical dots. The forward button the leftmost icon on that mini toolbar above the textual menu items.

No, you weren't being thick, it isn't done in a particularly discoverable way.

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Intel swallows Tesla-hating self-driving car biz Mobileye for $15bn

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: A.I. is hard...

Or that odd thumping noise, indicating a tire is about to go BANG.

No, computers have the edge there - it's the less easily controlled outside world that is problematic. I've lost count of the times I've been watching Formula 1 and hearing a pit message "Come in this lap, you have a puncture" - the team can see it on telemetry long before even professional racing drivers can feel it.

F1 cars have large amounts of sensors onboard of course, but try plugging one of those OBD plugs in to your car with the proper software on your laptop. You'll be surprised how many sensors are already installed on modern cars.

I doubt you could follow 100+ dials even if they were fitted to your dash. No such problem for a computer.

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Co-op Bank up for sale while customers still feel effects of its creaking IT

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Shame if they go

In this context I would assume Federation of Small Businesses rather than the Russian secret police.

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Crack in black: Matte iPhones losing paint at alarming rate, gripe fans

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: New AppleCare Support Tier: Go away complainy-pants

They're not. AFAIK nothing is locked any more. My current phone was not locked, ever. My previous phone was locked, and after a year Sprint unlocked it for the low, low price of asking for it to be unlocked.

Not true universally. I did a brief stint as tech support with T-Mob USA. Their handsets were always locked. They would unlock on request provided the device was paid for in full. Outstanding credit on it - no dice.

I would assume most other carriers are at least as strict, T-Mob tended to be kinder to the customer than average in that sort of thing at least.

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NASA's Curiosity puts cat among the climate pigeons: Lack of CO2 sinks water theory

the spectacularly refined chap

The catch is that the air pressure on the surface of Mars is only around 600 Pa. That's near water's Triple Point of 273K & 611Pa. And since the surface temperature of Mars right now is well below 273K, and that the surface temperature has mostly gone UP over history...

Be wary of extrapolating averages into universal facts. The average pressure on Mars is indeed too low to support liquid water, however there are a number of deep land lows where the pressure is substantially higher, well over 1000Pa in places. Similarly, the temperature is a little low on average, but we know that the temperature e.g. at noon on the equator is warm enough to be quite comfortable even in a t-shirt and shorts. These are well established facts derived from actual measurements, not theory. On your own premises they are enough to dismiss your concrete assertion of "no possibility of liquid water being on Mars".

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We don't want to alarm you, but PostScript makes your printer an attack vector

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Mac display

Still trying to figure out why you mention the display?

NeXT from which MacOS is derived used Display PostScript under the window system so that would have been vulnerable. I'm no expert on Macs but I believe that got reworked and switched to PDF for a superficially similar role in OS X. No, that wouldn't be vulnerable - PDF doesn't have the same generality as PostScript, and lacks decision making and flow control constructs, you just get the basic drawing operators.

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H0LiCOW! Hubble's constant update paves way for 'new physics'

the spectacularly refined chap

No, it's actually true in both senses. The current value keeps getting revised but that Nobel prize mentioned at the bottom was for establishing it isn't a constant at all, but getting larger over time.

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Bank robber reveals identity – by using his debit card during crime

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Why don't I just mosey on down and rob the bank @ x 7

On a per-capita population basis this is the same order of magnitude as similar UK benefits costs which total around £80bn a year.

I don't know where you have got your figures from but they are well off. £80bn doesn't even cover pension costs. https://fullfact.org/economy/welfare-budget/ breaks down the figures and arrives at a total of £217bn.

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2016 just got a tiny bit longer. Gee, thanks, time lords

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: There have been 27 of them since 1971

Well, there are a couple of ordinary analogue clocks here. I'm going to have to adjust those manually.

But being serious...

That's perfectly serious for me. I make a point of keeping my wristwatch within one second of the correct time so there is never any debate about if something is late etc. It's easy enough to maintain in practice since it naturally gains at a known rate of ~200ms per week. I do need to specifically account for leap seconds though.

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MH370 hunters call for new search of extra 25,000km2

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Congratulations!

No, they are just data. Data is a plural.

Do I get a prize?

No, it's a mass not a plural noun. "Four data" is meaningless - you have to have some units in there.

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Samsung, the Angel of Death: Exploding Note 7 phones will be bricked

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Personal safety and a dangerous precident

The whole thing is just ridiculous, why would you keep the device with such a staggeringly dangerous potential defect?

It doesn't matter: it is still the individual's choice. It is not for you, me, Samsung or anyone else to take that choice away from the owner. If I sell you my car only to decide a few days later I really shouldn't have done so and want it back, but don't worry, I'll give you your money back, you are free to accept the deal. You are also entitled to say "I'll sell it back for ten times what I paid" or more firmly a simple "No, it's mine now." That is the right over property that comes with ownership. The fact that the product is faulty does not diminish that right.

I don't have an affected handset - personally I fail to see why anyone would spend so much on a bloody phone - but if I did this would simply make me dig my heels in the ground. I decide what happens to my property. If you vandalise it (what other term is there?) I will sue. Not for the purchase price of the device but the cost of an acceptable, functionally comparable replacement. If that costs thousands (or indeed has to be specially developed for me) I'll send you a bill. If that's a bit rich for you don't engage in criminality in the first place.

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PoisonTap fools your PC into thinking the whole internet lives in an rPi

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: This is exactly how things are designed to work

"regarding Linux you are wrong, wrong and wrong"

Only up to a point. As you say it's DHCP rather than the desktop cruft but the final point of convenience vs security is the significant one. Ignore at least one of those wrongs.

I stand by every word of what I wrote. The kernel itself will enumerate the device and generate a notification. It will not activate the interface by itself and won't spawn DHCP requests.

If you have userland code running with admin privileges that does that and malconfigures the system for you automatically that is where the problem lies: this stuff doesn't happen by magic, and yes those notifications are generally intercepted by the desktop environment in the name of convenience.

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the spectacularly refined chap

Re: This is exactly how things are designed to work

I really fail to understand how this is news: this is how things are designed to work, and this is how they have always worked:

It isn't though. NT would never have been vulnerable. Linux itself (or any other Unix) still isn't, rather it is the desktop cruft too often layered on top that gets caught out. All those things dumbed-down systems do to "help" such as auto-configuring everything in sight, automounting any filesystem you come across and so on - often they are exactly what you want, sometimes they get in the way, and sometimes they increase the attack surface.

It's the old usability vs convenience thing. Yes, it's that old chestnut.

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Shhh! Shazam is always listening – even when it's been switched 'off'

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Pedantically...

A speaker is a mic. Just as a mic is a speaker.

That is one of those things that strike me as having been seen on Doctor Who, MacGyver or whatever with no real idea of the practicalities. Seriously, you are not going to get any useable signal out of a moving coil speaker used as a mic even if the surrounding circuitry could theoretically read it. And as for getting any sound at all from a condenser mic, forget it completely.

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New MH370 handshake and wing debris analysis suggests rapid descent

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: Conspiracy ..

It never ceases to amaze me how one dumb twat on the Internet can read a few articles, have little enough background in the area even to get the usage of basic terms right, and still arrive the truth that has up until that point eluded an entire team of experts burdened by actually looking at evidence, spending years and millions on the problem, and performing tests on the hypotheses they come up with.

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Intel's new chip targets industrial IoT

the spectacularly refined chap

Re: 4K video on an IoT thinggy???!

Because no one anywhere has wanted to create e.g. an advertising billboard or public information display. I don't know why people have so much tunnel vision about IoT and embedded. It is as if the entire sector is washing machine controllers and nothing else.

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