* Posts by YARR

524 posts • joined 24 Nov 2008

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ZX Spectrum Vega+ blows a FUSE: It runs open-source emulator

YARR

Re: GPL

IANAL, but I don't see how bundling a GPL emulator with some emulated games does not require the entire thing to be GPLed

IANAL, but I believe the convention is that Copyleft only applies to statically linked code, not separate executables.

7
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The age of hard drives is over as Samsung cranks out consumer QLC SSDs

YARR
Stop

re. "all the studies I've seen .. the service life of SSDs is comparable to enterprise HDDs"

Well those studies must be based on SSDs that have been in use for 2/3+ years, which probably means they are SLC or MLC (2 level), not TLC / QLC. Even the manufacturers of TLC / QLC admit their endurance is less, which is why they are targetted at consumers rather than production systems. The other worrying trend is that these short lifespan SSDs are increasingly being integrated into devices, so when they fail the whole device is a write off.

Using voltage levels to cram more data on a comms link doesn't justify doing the same for storage devices. A comms link only has to get the right data once, if an error is detected the data is re-sent. A storage device needs to store the right value indefinitely, if an error is detected, an algorithm must guess what the correct data was.

8
0

UK.gov commits to rip-and-replacing Blighty's wheezing internet pipes

YARR
Stop

More needless government interfering...

What reason is there that new builds must have FTTP installed? Why not adopt the norms of a free market, let those who want something pay for it? FTTP is hardly a necessity when there are alternative ways of getting internet access.

If I build a new house and intend to live there for many years, I'm forced to pay for an FTTP installation that I already know I wont use? Anyone building a house has many more important priorities on which to spend their limited budget.

If there is a specific issue with rented accommodation not having FTTP connections, then pass legislation that landlords must permit the installation of FTTP if tenants want it.

0
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Up in arms! Arm kills off its anti-RISC-V smear site after own staff revolt

YARR

My prediction if RiscV has significant market impact...

Expect OpenARM (TM) welcoming you back with open arms.

1
0

Shared, not stirred: GCHQ chief says Europe needs British spies

YARR
Boffin

Post-Brexit border crossings

If the EU insists on a hard border with Northern Ireland, what about (Greek) Cypriots who have to cross Dhekelia? Will pre-EU border arrangements apply, or will they face a double border-crossing each way? Will goods have to be transported by sea to avoid paying double tariffs?

1
2

No fandango for you: EU boots UK off Galileo satellite project

YARR

I appreciate the constructive replies. High precision Galileo is accurate to ~10cm while the standard precision is about ~1 metre. So what new applications does this precision offer? What current applications are improved?

1. Cruise missiles / Precision-guided munition

- Guided weapons will destroy everything within 10's of metres, so targetting more accurately than 1 meter makes negligible difference.

- Mobile targets require weapons with localised target tracking

2. Avoiding collateral damage - eg schools being blown up rather than the nearby military target

- 1 metre precision is sufficient to avoid this.

3. Surveying

- building surveyors need much greater precision than 10cm, so conventional survey equipment must still be used.

- surveying natural geography could benefit - but isn't worth investing £billions

4. Transport system & autonomous vehicles.

- 1 metre accuracy is sufficient for route planning

- high precision positioning cannot replace the need for lidar / camera sensors to respond to surroundings

5. mapping minefields and paths through them

- 10 cm is better than 1m, but is it sufficient to guarantee avoiding mines without the use of other sensors?

6. "Power of a state / country is measured against their capability (and resolve), and without precision gps, UK's already lost."

- It's up to every state to decide their own priorities. I disagree that higher precision GPS (below 1m) offers much advantage. Ownership of a satellite positioning system does not guarantee access. Dependence on satellite positioning should be avoided.

> "people who disagree with me are even allowed to express their opinions"

I don't advocate censorship, but respected opinions should be founded on accurate information and reasoning.

0
1
YARR

Re: In perspective, Galileo isn't important

We voted to leave the EU, not ESA or Galileo or access to high precision Galileo.

Britain is a founder member of the Galileo project, the EU is not.

The EU later joined Galileo and changed the participation requirements so only EU members can have access to high precision positioning. Why did lawyers representing the original participants accept this?

If lawyers failed to guarantee participant's rights, could another international organisation join ESA, claim control over a project like Galileo then bar access to the EU or another member if they left said international organisation?

2
28
YARR
Megaphone

In perspective, Galileo isn't important

I've concluded that this forum is being used to spread anti-Brexit opinions without basis in reason. The same appears to be the case with the attempt in the wider media to link Brexit with Russia using political actors. This may be to discourage other EU members from leaving or to manufacture a false narrative for reversing Brexit.

Galileo is a minor issue in perspective, but regaining the political independence to control our borders will significantly benefit the lives of the majority of ordinary British people, if implemented effectively.

I remain ignorant - of a practical application for why we need high precision (sub-1 metre) satellite positioning. It's claimed our military or emergency services need it, but why? (Seriously)

Without a reason, high precision Galileo is no loss, nor is there much to gain by creating yet another satellite positioning system. The costs to the taxpayer of the Brexit transition are significant, therefore non-essential costs such as this should be avoided.

The lesson to be learned from this is that in any future international co-operation, lawyers must clearly set out guarantees to continued participation in a project from the outset. Allowing another partner to join a project at a later date, then change the terms to exclude an an existing partner is NOT ACCEPTABLE.

The fact is political union is not required for international co-operation. In reality we and the rest of the world can "have our cake and eat it" but a cabal who want to centralise political power globally are determined to deny us this. They attempt to convince us with false arguments that it's not possible. If we were to hypothetically create another satellite positioning system with non-EU partners, must we surrender to a new political union to achieve this?

PS. Rather than downvote, please reply with facts and reasoning.

4
45

You've heard that pop will eat itself. Boffins have unveiled a rocket that does the same

YARR

It's only rocket science

Could one of these carry a cubesat all the way to geostationary orbit?

... and fit within the missile launcher of a submarine?

4
0

Ongoing game of Galileo chicken goes up a notch as the UK talks refunds

YARR
Meh

If the EU claims to own Galileo (rather than each ESA nation according to contribution) what happens if more countries leave the EU? Does the last member of the EU get to inherit all the assets?

The public Galileo system provides accuracy of 1 metre. Why do we need more accuracy than this?

If the military applications are classified, why would the EU deny us access when they are more dependent on us for defence? We are one of the few nations in Europe to meet our 2% NATO budget commitment despite being in the safest position (having a sea border + the rest of Europe to buffer us from hostile regions). Maybe we should take it easy, cut our defence budget and let the EU take up the slack?

In summary, getting back control of our borders is far more important.

9
6

UK's Royal Navy accepts missile-blasting missile as Gulf clouds gather

YARR

Seawolf's major shortcoming was that it was a line-of-sight system, restricting its practical range to around seven or eight nautical miles

but in the confines of the Gulf where your ships are permanently shadowed by fast boats, Seawolf is all you need.

Sea Ceptor - Developed by EU defence conglomerate MBDA

MBDA's website says they're "European". Let's hope it's not dependent on Galileo or we're screwed.

think about the physics involved in trying to hit something coming at you at over 2 miles per second

Maybe we should have built submaries that can dive very quickly?

3
0

Microsoft patches problematic OS to deal with SSD woes

YARR
WTF?

It's 2018 and...

storage devices aren't hardware abstracted.

How is it even possible for a software update to break one specific storage device? If a custom interface is required, shouldn't this be the domain of software drivers provided by the manufacturer, rather than Microsoft?

2
2

Honor bound: Can Huawei's self-cannibalisation save the phone biz?

YARR

Captive honor

I hear the Honor has a captive market.... or is that just their workers?

1
1

Britain to slash F-35 orders? Erm, no, scoffs Lockheed UK boss

YARR

The sixth generation fighter will be a drone controller

The F-35 will eventually have this capability.

As for cheaper 4G fighters, they'll be sitting ducks against drones without effective stealth.

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YARR

If the F-35 remains our only fifth gen fighter, we'll need them all, even if some are kept as spares ( i.e. not in active service).

Carrier fighters only have a short lifespan so the QE-class carriers will need a replacement air wing or two. The only likely replacements will be more F-35's or F-35 derivatives.

4
2

It's Galileo Groundhog Day! You can keep asking the same question, but it won't change the answer

YARR

I sincerely hope our government doesn't make a knee-jerk commitment to creating an identical sat nav constellation with no ROI, since we have enough expenses resulting from Brexit. How likely are we to ever deploy our military in circumstances where they are denied access to an existing sat nav service?

If the priority is the continued employment of UK based satellite engineers, there are other kinds of satellites that we could benefit from, that don't require the expense of launching an entire constellation. That might also afford them the opportunity to develop new skills, rather than simply repeat what they've done before.

2
0

Blighty: If EU won't let us play at Galileo, we're going home and taking encryption tech with us

YARR
Boffin

I assume it has a nice way of recognising the border in Ireland and can leash Rees-Mogg missiles of doom (ship's biscuits) on naughty foreigners crossing over.

What happens is every vehicle crossing the border drives over a weigh scale, so the vehicle weight is recorded with the licence plate. The integrated surveillance network of satellites / UAVs / cellphone trackers / traffic cameras monitor every vehicle journey. The start and end is recorded for every journey that crosses the border. The information is stored in a big database which identifies mass transfer over time, highlighting sites with a high net mass loss / gain. These are then cross referenced with declared goods importers / exporters to identify persons potentially trafficking goods illegally.

PS. No good for weapons / drugs but the data could be useful to identify suspicious journeys.

2
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YARR
Megaphone

This is political posturing to try to keep us in Galileo, and offer a future to UK based companies.

Launching another commercial Satnav system would be a waste of money, but a defence only guidance system may be necessary if the UK is denied access to Galileo's high precision data.

The alternative might be the US giving the UK access to high precision GPS, but what if they demand our laws must be made in Washington?

15
2

Techies! Britain's defence secretary wants you – for cyber-sniping at Russia

YARR
Mushroom

Not My NME

I'd rather our armed forces defend our country from those who are actually invading, occupying and/or taking over, rather than exacerbating relations with foreign nations who aren't doing the above.

Conflicts are usually provoked by those who stand to gain. If only our puppet politicians and national media weren't controlled by a few psychos who are ultimately undermining our country (or what's left of it). They probably have their own private nuclear bunkers.

5
0

Windows 10 April 2018 Update lands today... ish

YARR
Go

Glad to see elReg is on the ball and didn't call this the "Spring Creators Update" like many other tech publications. The spring "Creators Update" was last year (1703). That said, they should think of a better name for this one. How about the "May 2018 Creators Update"?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_10_version_history#Version_1703_(Creators_Update)

0
0

Blighty stuffs itself in Galileo airlock and dares Europe to pull the lever

YARR

Yet Another Satellite Navigation System

With so many SatNav systems to choose from (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, NAVIC) why waste money creating another? A cheaper option is to merge the publicly available positioning data from them all to get increased precision.

As the Russians or Iranians (presumably) have demo-ed in Syria, current SatNav systems are vulnerable to electronic interference meaning they can't be relied upon for military applications. Better to invest in alternative navigation systems combining inertial + ground radar data etc. If you must have a private SatNav for military purposes, launch 3+ disposable micro-satellites near the target area (keeping the protocol secret). All major powers can destroy satellites from the ground, so you can't expect SatNav satellites to remain active for long in a real conflict.

4
5

Brexit has shafted the UK's space sector, lord warns science minister

YARR

EU big, EU right

excepting the kippers who need 'special' consideration

We voted to leave the EU, not ESA. That means the electorate is opposed to closer political & economic union, but not against research collaboration. The EU is still on track to become a superstate, it's way more than just the free trade area we voted to join originally.

Our membership of ESA predates the EU's, but it appears the EU now decides who qualifies to participate, but Brexit must be seen to take the rap for the change in participation requirements (it's better PR for globalisation that way).

It's probably a good thing to define the future relationship now, since in the long term the EU superstate is likely to foment control of more European institutions. Every institution will have to decide it's raison d'etre. Should they serve the people or the powerful, and what's the contention?

17
37

Soyuz later! Russia may exit satellite launch biz

YARR

Anticipating the commercial end of conventional launchers like Soyuz is just market realism. But why not form an international partnership to compete with SpaceX in re-usables? If Russia pulls out of the launch market, their investment in Vostochny Cosmodrome will be in vain.

3
0

Car-crash television: 'Excuse me ma'am, do you speak English?' 'Yes I do,' replies AMD's CEO

YARR
Coat

All we know for sure is Brundle wasn't Intel agent.

0
0

Airbus plans beds in passenger plane cargo holds

YARR
Megaphone

Small problem: world faces big shortages of air freight capacity

The solution to this is to increase the number of dedicated air freight aircraft. There's a use for old A380s if operators want to upgrade to the A380neo.

Most freight aircraft are converted ex-passenger planes. If the challenge is to keep them flying longer (beyond their normal airworthy lifespan) without endangering lives, why not remove the pilots and have them operate as freighter drones? To reduce the risk to people on the ground, re-route the flightpaths / choose runways to avoid populated areas.They say planes practically fly themselves, so why not let them?

2
0

Phone-free Microsoft patents Notch-free phone

YARR
Thumb Down

0th world problem

"The notch" is such an irrelevance it signifies mobile phone design has reached it's zenith. Anyone seeking interesting work in product design should look elsewhere.

Here's a suggestion: if phone companies are so concerned about size, why not invest some R&D money in creating thin but effective phone protectors, or does that not align with your profit motive? They're in common use, but they are chunky and run counter to the tactile experience of using an expensive phone. But the more expensive the phone, the more worthwhile the phone protector.

If a phone can detect it's falling, it could trigger the protector to flare up like an airbag to provide better impact protection.

Another problem: if manufacturers produce edge to edge displays, the phone protector can't grip around them without obscuring the display.

13
0

Blackout at Samsung NAND factory destroys chunk of global supply

YARR

generators capable of running whole factory cost lot of money

Yes, but the production process could have been designed with a UPS powered safe shutdown procedure that would avoid destroying 11% of the monthly production run (if it doesn't take longer to restart production from this state).

It would be wise to design factories so that critical parts can be swiftly evacuated in the event that the factory is about to face flood / fire / invasion etc.

It would also be wise not to cluster the manufacturing of one component type in one area of the world.

4
1

Windows Mixed Reality: Windows Mobile deja vu?

YARR

If AR / VR is going to be the next UI for computers, it needs to subsume the existing screen based interfaces, allowing current applications to appears as 2D surfaces within the virtual environment. No-one wants to keep taking their headset on an off to see to a screen, or or worse, look at a screen using a camera. The desktop / phone UI needs to be pulled apart and put into a virtual environment.

As for Mixed reality, unless the headset is completely untethered, home users will have a very limited real environment to "mix" with.

1
0

Boring. The phone business has lost the plot and Google is making it worse

YARR
Black Helicopters

Stock Android = "OK Google" always listening?

If the market is heading towards stock Android on all phones for security updates, does this mean they will always be listening for "OK Google" (and everything else)? This has been reported for recent Android 7 & 8 phones with Google Now / Assistant, even after turning the setting off. Perhaps this is a "feature" for phones sold only in certain countries (for now), along with disabling the VPN?

Big Brother will be pleased.

6
0

NHS OKs offshoring patient data to cloud providers stateside

YARR
Thumb Down

Data globalisation -> Russia wins

The proles may have voted for Brexit but that wont stop the powers that be needlessly globalising everything. That we the people aren't consulted about how our own data is stored demonstrates how our "democracy" works. If we are consulted, it will be after they've implemented it so that reversing the decision will be costly and disruptive.

Even if cloud hosting costs are cheaper elsewhere, the data transmissions costs must be taken into account. It's probably worth paying more if the extra money is fed back into the local economy.

If the Russians are capable of tapping transatlantic cables, data security is at risk. In the event that they cut our communication links (or if they are cut by mistake or natural causes), the NHS wont have reliable access to patient data.

1
0

Drone crashes after operator failed to spot extra building site crane

YARR
Coat

He shouldn't have been flying Solo solo so low.

... with a Go Pro.

6
0

GoPro exits drone market and slashes jobs amid sales warning

YARR
Thumb Down

Re: The drone market was saturated years ago.

Not the market in Spark-a-like fold-up, sub-250g GPS-stabilised drones with integrated gimbal and better than HD cameras. The sub 250g market is exempt from new regulations, so is likely to attract many replacement purchases.

6
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YARR

A shame but not suprising

It's a shame when management make such an abrupt decision to exit the market, throwing away all that development experience, rather than attempt to become more competitive. More so if they make the decision just as a new model is near release. Great news for their competitors though.

With over 1000 employees for just a couple of product lines (the manufacturing is probably outsourced), it's not hard to see why they're so expensive. I expect their cheaper competitors have a much smaller team allowing them to significantly undercut them on price. The business model of making a cheaper, inferior product for a wider market and iterating the design every year to copy the innovators seems to be more successful. Perhaps more western companies should adopt this approach and do away with the expensive overheads of research and advertising?

Rather than sully an established brand, introduce a new no-name brand for the cheaper product. If your no-name brand attracts a bad reputation for one product iteration, just invent another throwaway no-name brand the next year. Cheapness always sells.

0
0

Multiple-guess quiz will make Brit fliers safer, hopes drone-maker DJI

YARR
Stop

How is this lawful?

The Mark II Dronegun will possibly disrupt drone operations by jamming command, control and communication frequencies

This must violate legislation in most juristictions. What about laws restricting radio frequency interference? Is the owner of the drone still responsible if someone else is interfering with the control signal? What if the battery expires while they don't have control, or they violate minimum separation rules because they can't take avoiding action? If the drone is damaged or causes damage to other property, is the operator of the Dronegun liable?

If a Dronegun is lawful, why not an anti-Dronegun device? If it's permissible for anyone to hack the operation of someone's private property, what else is permitted? Can I shoot your pet dog / carrier pigeon with tranquiliser darts? What if it's carrying a camera?

3
0

Seagate: Happy Xmas, staff – thanks for everyth... um, you 500. Can we have a word?

YARR

Have any SSD advocates seen recent market stats to back up (sic) their projections?

A couple of years ago it was reported that SSD fabs were ramping production to meet demand, with SSD prices remaining stable for the last 3 years. Are sales still rising or is the consumer SSD channel now overstocked?

0
0

Once again, UK doesn't rule out buying F-35A fighter jets

YARR

Re: Why go totally F-35?

It may be able to do that when it has no stores, but put a few bombs on it and its range beyond the bow will be measured in metres

The Ruskies solved this by air-to-air refuelling. They have expensive "buddy" fighters converted to this role, which also have to be carrier launched and have limited range. Besides this is a moot point, since the QE class has a straight flight deck with a ski-jump, so it can only operate V/STOL aircraft at present.

However it's generally impossible to operate the catapults and have the landing area clear at the same time as they overlap, I think the latest US carrier might be the first to allow that by some careful re-positioning of parts.

Nimitz carriers have catapults on both the foredeck and the landing deck. See http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/x/556638285

0
0

Watchkeeper drones cost taxpayers £1bn

YARR

It seems the Russians are just as capable of misspending their billions:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russky_Bridge#Criticism

The question is which will live longer? An underutilised drone or an underutilised bridge?

1
0

Russian rocket snafu may have just violently dismantled 19 satellites

YARR

Those Russian Cosmodromes are a long way from the equator, which must make satellite launches needlessly expensive. If this rocket went down over the Atlantic, then it travelled half way around the Earth, so we should be thankful it didn't come down anywhere populated.

Are there rules allowing the rocket host to inspect the commercial satellites they carry? What if a malfunctioning satellite caused this by activating early and interfering with the electronics of the launch rocket?

1
0

Rolls-Royce, Airbus, Siemens tease electric flight engine project

YARR
Boffin

Reusable ejectable assist fan

If the objective is to allow smaller jet engines by assisting takeoff with electric motors, the saving will be offset by carrying the weight of the batteries and electric motor + generator for the full flight.

To overcome this, the batteries could be jettisoned after they have done the assisted take-off. Going one step further, if the batteries, electric motor and assist propeller(s) were one unit they could detach after take off, switch into autogyro mode and perform a controlled landing, similar to a reusable SpaceX rocket. They would have to clear the air-corridor quickly to avoid delaying the next take off.

0
0

Tesla reveals a less-long-legged truck, but a bigger reservation price

YARR
Terminator

Duel

That picture reminds me of the 1970's movie "Duel". How apt it would be for a remake, this time featuring a self driving truck which relentlessly chases a (human) driver along a remote road.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duel_(1971_film)#Plot

0
0

Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

YARR
Thumb Down

How have they worked for the last 10-15 years with Linux desktops if there are 800+ apps they need that are Windows only? They must have used both platforms interoperably, so why the need to switch to Windows only now? If management insist the whole network must run the same OS to simplify support / improve security, that doesn't bode well for an IOT / mobile app future.

Linux desktops reduce support and licencing costs for the common apps they run well. For more obscure apps that are only available for Windows, these should be virtualised (RDP-ed) where possible to avoid users needing multiple desktops or having to dual-boot. Further, if virtualised Windows VMs are isolated from the internet, they can maintain older versions and avoid paying for updates (reducing TCO). From the tax payer's perspective, all apps and data formats should ideally be platform neutral / open standards to avoid the long term costs of vendor lock-in.

11
5

Firefox 57: Good news? It's nippy. Bad news? It'll also trash your add-ons

YARR
Megaphone

Browser speed obsession

Is this obsession with browser speed becoming a bit long in the tooth now, like a certain mobile phone maker's obsession with thin-ness?

i.e. Most of the time, most browsers are fast enough, but the odd badly written javascript will slow any browser to a grind regardless, as used to happen with flash.

Maybe some Jobsian strictness is in order to punish the offenders? In this era of slurped metrics, browsers could report home URLs / functions that cause slowdowns. The collated results would be published as a live league table to publicly humiliate the worst offenders.

9
1

Parity calamity! Wallet code bug destroys $280m in Ethereum

YARR
Headmaster

A fool and his money...

That's quantities of money; this is actual currency. Different.

How different? The majority of money is numbers in a ledger (which has been electronic for the last 40+ years), cash is only a fraction of all money that exists: MB + M0 - M3 + MZM).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Money_supply

Value is more likely to be preserved if a currency has :

(1) Reliable ledgers.

(2) An entire nation / economy of workers who are contractually paid with that currency. (Who is obliged to accept bitcoin?)

(3) The issue of new currency (lending) is restricted to new assets that devalue slowly (not worthless used computer processing).

(4) New currency can be created according to demand. If supply of a currency is artificially restricted (like Bitcoin) or is tied to a rare asset (like gold), this can restrict lending and economic growth, causing people to switch to alternatives.

2
0

China-owned Opera touts big comeback

YARR
Coat

This Opera's not over 'til...

... xie phan li dai zhang.

6
1

American upstart seeks hotshot guinea pig for Concorde-a-like airliner

YARR
FAIL

XB = Experimental Bomber

Unless I'm mistaken, the designation XB means experimental bomber. Could this be the first service to drop passengers off at their destination, saving them the bothersome journey from the airport? I guess that's why they need a military pilot with aiming experience.

18
0

ATM fees shake-up may push Britain towards cashless society

YARR

"cash back from what?"

Your shopping bill paid for on debit card. The amount of cash back you request is added to your bill by the checkout operator, and paid to you from the till. There is no extra charge for cash back, so it's the cheaper option if the only available ATM is one that charges.

It seems that "cashback" is also confusingly used for schemes where a % of credit card processing fees is paid back to the purchaser.

8
4

Apple hauls in $52.6bn in Q4, iPhone, iPad and Mac sales all up

YARR
Big Brother

Pique Apple over Apple's peak

Now all but the most power-hungry users can work with a seven-year-old Mac

that's assuming they last seven years. In my (limited) experince, I've seen disproportionately many faulty / dead Macs that are long outlived by PCs and even older Macs. Perhaps a journalist should commission a hardware survey to find out if Apple have passed their peak hardware reliability? If they have, that may have helped their recent sales.

0
0

Lenovo buys majority stake in Fujitsu's sickly PC biz

YARR
Thumb Up

The race to the top?

No one who cares about security will buy Fujitsu computers now

If you care about security...

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/10/21/purism_cleanses_laptops_of_intel_management_engine/

0
0

Osama Bin Laden had copy of Resident Evil, smut, in compound

YARR
Stop

No privacy for the dead, no privacy for anyone except the rulers of this hierarchy of "freedom"

I wonder what criteria they use to decide what private information is relevant to the public interest?

If an authority arrests / kills you without proving your guilt, should you have fewer rights (including privacy) than anyone else? Even if they do prove you have committed a crime, should you lose your privacy? Should a criminal's rights diminish in proportion to the severity of their crime?

Since they (allegedly) killed Osama without bringing him to trial, the US government can wash it's hands of any need to lawfully prove his involvement in 9/11 and other purported terrorism. As with Russian electoral interfering, the media tells us what to think without providing evidence. How convenient.

If morality is served in equal measure, all who deny others their rights must accept the loss of those rights themselves.

2
3

Two drones, two crashes in two months: MoD still won't say why

YARR
Boffin

Airflow will *increase* the temperature of the airframe (from friction). "Chill factor" applies only to things that are hotter than the air

If the airframe is hotter than the air due to friction, the "chill factor" will cool it back down again.

Since flying in cold air is a unique technical challenge that no previous aircraft have mastered, perhaps the answer is to copy nature and give it a warm furry coat?

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