* Posts by boltar

2549 posts • joined 15 Oct 2008

Signal app guru Moxie: Facebook is like Exxon. Everyone needs it, everyone despises it

boltar
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Re: This indispensable tool ...

"We used to be able to keep in touch with each other before the telephone was invented, too."

The telephone was a considerable improvement on writing a letter to someone , not just in speed of communication but in the ability to hear the other persons voice. How is *writing* to someone an improvement on the phone? Email was useful for sending documents, images and other materials you couldn't dictate , facebook is useful for ..... nope, drawing a blank.

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boltar
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Re: "this indispensable tool ..."

" you need one to look "cool", and you don't know how to "relax" in a different way."

Smoking might have looked cool back in the 60s, it just looks sad and needy now and there's nothing remotely cool about hanging around at the exit of a stairwell in the pissing rain sucking on a burning paper stick.

Ditto facebook - it might have been the koolkids hangout 10 years ago but those days are long gone , they've moved on and facebook is now the place of wannabes and where all the billy no mates with no real life to speak of hang out, constantly "liking" each other because thats the extent of their social interaction.

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Windows Admin Center: Vulture gets claws on browser-based server admin

boltar
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Re: All this to avoid installing ssh and usable command line tools

"Bing "Just Enough Administration" and then you will understand the difference. Windows has rather more granular options."

I googled (sorry, don't like bing) and no it doesn't. I suggest you google the "unix restricted shell".

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boltar
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Re: All this to avoid installing ssh and usable command line tools

"The difference is that with a shell you have far broader access. With proper remoting, you can restrict more easily what someone can do on a remote machine. Just, proper remoting requires more effort to implement than a simple shell."

Wtf are you talking about?

I have no idea how windows implements its shell permissions but apparently it seems you need to go learn about unix's user, group and world read/write/execute permissions. Welcome to 1970.

(And thats the basic stuff, there's also access control lists, chroot jails, containers and the bells and whitsles of SE Linux).

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boltar
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All this to avoid installing ssh and usable command line tools

You know, the way *nix has been administered for decades (ok, used to be via telnet or rsh but same thing) and still is.

What a lot of effort MS goes to to re-invent a wheel that always seem to have a puncture in the end though admittedly it comes in pretty colours and plays tunes as you wait for the breakdown guy.

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UK health service boss in the guts of WannaCry outbreak warns of more nasty code infections

boltar
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Re: "and started putting in place disaster recovery measures "

"Time is money - if 50 clinicians have to wait for minutes at a time to access and load every file they need then this creates a secondary impact around compression, data storage and transmission."

Minutes at a time? Tiddly USB sticks? The year 2000 called, they want their arguments back.

USB3 has a max rate of 5Gb/sec and USB stick capacity now goes up to 1TB. But if you want more you can have portable hard drives where the sky is pretty much the limit.

"It is however entirely reasonable that the infrastructure hosting all of this be secured with ip segregation, traffic inspection and encryption."

It already was. Worked well didn't it. Protecting the infrastructure is more important than a clinition having to wait a few minutes since without it there is no treatment, full stop.

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boltar
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Re: "and started putting in place disaster recovery measures "

"1. Use a firewall...a Pi could handle this "

Meanwhile, back in the real world...

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boltar
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Re: "and started putting in place disaster recovery measures "

"Firewall 'em all, god will recognize his own."

With critical medical systems even firewalling isn't enough IMO. They should be airgapped, full stop. And any data that needs to be loaded onto or from the systems would have to be done by someone from IT on a virus checked USB stick or CD-ROM, not one of the operators.

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Hey, so Europe's GDPR privacy deadline for Whois? We're going to miss it ... by a year or so

boltar
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Re: @ codejunky

"Funny how the first person I thought of was ... Nigel Farage - definitely a 2nd rate politician and unable to get himself elected in their own nation... :)"

Well you say that, but he's been consistently been re-elected as MEP for SE england for the last 19 years.

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boltar
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Re: @ codejunky

"I do think that some deluded souls, are of the opinion that the EU is ineffective, once the UK is free of the EU, it willbe able to stick two fingers up at the world (including the USA) and suddenly people will stand up and take note..."

The EU as an organisation (not Europe) is a joke. Its militarily a non entity - NATO kept the peace in europe for the last 60 years - financially its profligate and hasn't published its own official accounts for TWENTY years, and since it consists of 28 countries all with different priorities and political aspirations getting anything useful done is like herding cats. The European Parliament is nothing more than a talking shop for 2nd rate politicians and ones retired from their own nations political system who just want a cushy retirement fund (Kinnock, Juncker).

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boltar
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"If I am reading rightly they had about $300m turnover last year so they'd be in line for the 10m/20m fine level rather than the 2%/4% level."

Even assuming ICANN stores the data of european registrees with country specific addresses (I'm not sure it does, I thought that was the local registrar but this isn't my field so I'm probably wrong) , they're a US organisation and the EU have no jurisdiction over them so the EU can get court rulings, wave legal documents and fine away until the cows log off, ICANN could - and probably would - simply ignore them.

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No password? No worries! Two new standards aim to make logins an API experience

boltar
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Re: OpenSSL

"Cryptography in SSH does not necessarily require Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) for authentication. GSSAPI also works. Password also works"

GSSAPI is just an API, not a method.

As for password, it doesn't matter what you call it, password, encryption key or Trevor, you still have the same problem of sending someone encrypted data without them giving you an encryption key someone else could intercept and use as a decypt key. This is the problem public-private key was designed to solve and quantum comms aside its currently the only method.

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boltar
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Re: OpenSSL

"You can authenticate to ssh using username and password"

Yes, and they're encrypted using a symmetric key initially passed via public key encryption. Without the public-private encryption side of ssh you'd be reduced to sending the symmetric key out of band somehow.

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boltar
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Re: OpenSSL

"Or what to think about SSH? I'm not using a mere password for that, I'm using public key authentication"

Umm, isn't that kind of fundamental to ssh anyway? Otherwise you might just as well use telnet.

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boltar
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And when your biometric data gets stolen?

What are you supposed to do, get a fingerprint or iris transplant? The techno utopians who've watched minority report one too many times and who thought these methods up really need to come back down to earth for a second and consider what happens in the real world. Passwords can be changed - biometric data cannot and once its been discovered thats it, you can never securely use it again.

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Airbus plans beds in passenger plane cargo holds

boltar
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Re: Glossing a commercial turd

"But if you did that in the evening, you'd need to find somewhere to sleep at the destination and that will be another 8 hours or so."

Yes, if you're not actually going to St Malo itself.

"Might as well use the boat as the hotel and sleep through the journey."

Problem with that service last time I used it was they booted you out of bed at 6am. Not very relaxing and a bit of a faff when you have young kids.

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boltar
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Re: Glossing a commercial turd

"I'm just setting out to join tonight's Portsmouth to St Malo ferry. Takes around 12 hours"

Don't bother doing it that way - get the 3 hour afternoon fast ferry to cherbourg and drive to St Malo which is about another hour or 2 depending on traffic.

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boltar
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@Phill O'Sophical

"Even if they paid me I wouldn't spend 17 hours in any airplane in one go, in any class."

Join the club. In fact I'm done with long haul travel altogether, did a fair amount it in my 20s, can't really stand it now in my 40s. SItting in a cramped economy seat even for the 7 hours to new york is torture so screw it. I'll do short haul around europe but for me my long haul days are over unless its for something really special. Its not just planes, I couldn't imagine sitting in a train or bus in the same seat for 7 hours now, though at least with a train you can get up and wander about, perhaps to the buffet car if there is one. Try that too often in a plane and people (understandably) start to look at you as though you're about to make a dash for the cockpit.

Give me a car, a ferry/eurotunnel ticket and a clear autoroute/bahn/strada and I'm happy these days.

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Linux Beep bug joke backfires as branded fix falls short

boltar
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Re: A stand-alone program to ...

"I guess somebody thought it'd be useful. But who? And when? And more to the point, why?"

I would guess for daemon programs that don't have a controlling terminal but want to audibly signal that there's a serious problem to the operator (for back in the day when someone would actually be sitting in the machine room).

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My PC makes ‘negative energy waves’, said user, then demanded fix

boltar
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"So glad I don't have such users..."

The thing these neurotic hypochondriacs who claim to "suffer" from this sort of EM sensitivity need the most is a psychiatrist, not a sys admin :)

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Spring is all about new beginnings, but it could already be lights out for Windows' Fluent Design

boltar
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"Good news that flat is dead"

I wonder how long before the web startup hipster sheep are stroking their oiled beards and proclaiming that skewmorphism is now the way forward once more.

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iOS 11.3 update throws Jamf-managed iStuffs into a loop.. into a loop.. into a loop... into a...

boltar
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"does not match Apple’s documented protocol,"

Is that PR Speak for bricked?

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Why a merged Apple OS is one mash-up too far

boltar
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Re: Nothing wrong with a merger OS

"In truth, behind the hood can be different at times. A GPU for science/gaming etc could have a really complex pipeline that a Phone may not need/have... "

The core Darwin kernel always has been the same between Apple products. I imagine the only real kernel differences are hardware drivers and perhaps default process priority settings. The overall OS differences are the GUI (obviously), filesystem layout and pre-loaded programs ... sorry, "apps".

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Watchdog growls at Tesla for spilling death crash details: 'Autopilot on, hands off wheel'

boltar
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Re: Walter had complained to his Tesla dealer...

"the road markings around the exits on French autoroutes confused the autopilot feature and the car would often start to turn to exit the autoroute before manual intervention having to steer it back."

Thats why true autodrive will have to wait until true AI that can grok the whole world around it, not just markings on the road, comes about. At the moment these systems are little more than glorified line followers with (apparently poor) collision detect systems. Personally I don't see the point - if you have to keep your hands on the wheel most of the time anyway then how is it any assistance other than for the congenitally lazy? You might as well just turn the wheel yourself. In fact I'd find it more stressful keeping an eye on the automation AND the road ahead than just doing the latter in manual mode.

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Happy as Larry: Why Oracle won the Google Java Android case

boltar
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@Blank Reg

"As a non-obvious, non-trivial original work, an API should be copywritable"

If APIs were copywritable the Wine project (and probably a dozen others) would be dead in the water and its doubtful Unix would have become as popular as it was since AT&T would have kept the API to themselves and BSD and Linux would never have existed.

How do naive, historically clueless idiots like you get into IT? FFS.

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boltar
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Re: Haha

"In comparison, the same set of Java tools ran consistently on your machine, regardless of whether it was a Windows, OSX or Linux box."

Actually they didn't always, at least not in look and feel though thats improved in recent years.

"Do tell me how you sandbox a C++ executable?"

"Or ensure that your arbitrary third party library (hint: there are thousands of those freely available for Java and hence Android) is safe to run on any of the thousands of phones out there?"

Hmm, I wonder how apple do the above with objective-C binaries from itunes. It must be woowoo magic!

"And if you think that all Android is is a 'sound and visual API', you've really missed the point by a country mile."

Feel free to fill me in on what else Android has over a standard linux installation. Sure , it has phone and touch support but thats just drivers. BFD.

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boltar
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Re: "Should've gone with C++ and HTML for their App needs."

"C++ is hard, and have far fewer developers"

C++ has a fuckton of developers, you just don't hear much from us since we're busy working and getting the job done rather than making a big noise about how we're so cool for using [insert trendy language of the month here].

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boltar
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Re: Haha

"It was *good enough* (and still is - VM technology is very smart these days) "

Pfft, sure, thats why on the last java project I was involved in the VM reserved over 100MB just to start up and load the program.

"consistent, neatly sandboxed and supported by tools that were an order of magnitude better than the command line torture inflicted on C++ devs."

Have you ever actually programmed in C++? I have my doubts. And there was nothing stopping google creating a C++ sound and visual API specifically for android plus an IDE. Which they had to do anyway for java. So none of your arguments stack up.

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boltar
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Re: "Get a licence or build something new. It's really that simple."

"If you think otherwise, you might as well bin Java in its entirity because half of it is copied from C and C++"

Java is a poor mans C++. Its less powerful, is generally slower (though improving) and the JVM uses up far more memory than a C++ binary would for the same program. The upside? Its easier for beginners to learn and use, is sandboxed when running as bytecode and has cutesy IDEs.

Your pays your money....

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boltar
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"Should've gone with C++ and HTML for their App needs."

Yup. There was zero reason to use java given that Android is just a worked over version of Linux with an alternative display system. They could easily have simply present the standard Posix API along with new sound and visual APIs for app developers to work with , but no, they decided to go with the Kool Kids and Java. AFAIK they don't even use a JVM or java bytecode anyway - it gets compiled down to something else (too lazy to search) so they can't even say it was to use a sandboxed JVM for app security. Not that you need that anyway if the kernel has been modified properly for extra process security and protection which no doubt they've done.

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Intel shrugs off ‘new’ side-channel attacks on branch prediction units and SGX

boltar
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Since a large propertion of bitcoin transactions..

.... are simply money laundering and a large part of the rest are for buying illegal goods off the dark web and tax avoidance purposes, I'm having a hard time mustering any sympathy if one bunch of criminals rips off another using this method.

This is what you get when naive idealists like Satoshi try to break "the system", not really understanding why the system got to where it is over the centuries. Whenever there's a revolution, the only people who win are the revolutionaries and criminals. Normal people carry on getting screwed over as before.

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boltar
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"I regret buying a Intel based notebook last year. Never again. Going forward with AMD Ryzen 7, and ARM on tablet/smartphone."

If you think AMD is immune from this sort of thing then I've got a bridge for sale you might be interested in.

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What a mesh: BT Whole Home Wi-Fi users moan over update

boltar
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Re: Dumb question?

"It's a major achievement for their customers that they even acknowledged that there is a problem."

Its a major achievement that they've even got any hardware. BT failed to deliver a standard router over the course of 2 months last year after we took up the offer of a free trial, with excuse after excuse from the useless "help" desk. In the end we gave up and stayed with virgin.

Openreach should be hived off from BT - the management of the latter is utterly inept and simply don't seem to give a shit.

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Galileo, Galileo, Galileo, off you go: Snout of UK space forcibly removed from EU satellite trough

boltar
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"Never mind. We'll have all that spare cash so we can build our own space programme. A very big catapult should do it..."

We used to have one. Google blue streak. Cancelled by the usual short sighted politicians who thought sucking up to the USA was a better idea.

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Surprise UK raid of Cambridge Analytica delayed: Nobody expects the British information commissioner!

boltar
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"That's a nice brexit you have there it would be a shame if you have to have another vote due to manipulation."

Short of them actually forcing voters hand in the booth, how can they have been any more manipulative than all the hysterical newspapers and other media outlets for both leave and remain during the Brexit campaign that were all economical with the truth to a shameful degree?

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Fancy a viaduct? We have a wrought Victorian iron marvel to sell you

boltar
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Re: Wonderful!

"This would be the same London which has 250 miles of underground railway network going basically everywhere?"

It doesn't go everywhere and barely makes it into south london at all. Perhaps you should take a look at London on the map - its quite large and also has pretty horrendous traffic jams plus north london is very hilly in parts with some roads being a 1 in 10.

"Bike ownership is *high*, and good quality paths mean those bikes get used for everyday transport."

By a fraction of a percent of the population.

"Anyone stuck on a bus in a traffic jam has only themselves to blame."

What a fuckwitted statement. Are the disabled, elderly and everyone else who doesn't want to get up at the crack of dawn and get sweaty/cold/wet/dirty/killed supposed to get a on bike or walk for 2 hours to work just because you seem to think its more virtuous? You're an ass.

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boltar
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Re: Wonderful!

"Hopefully they'll be booted off the old trackbed if it is needed, since the economic value of a decent rail link far outweighs a few early-retired pensioners piffling recreationally along on two wheels."

Well said. There is a desperate need for restored rail links around the UK yet every track bed that hasn't been completely trashed by later building work gets turned into a sodding cycle path that gets used by about 3 people and a lost dog each day. Even in London routes such as the old alexandra palace line which is complete except for about 100m would be a godsend for people who live in the muswell hill area, but no, its a leisure footpath. Instead commuters have to squeeze onto overcrowded buses that go 20m and get stuck in a traffic jam. What a fucking waste.

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Space, the final blunt-tier: Binary system ejected huge 'spliff' asteroid, boffins reckon

boltar
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Ok , so how does that explain its shape?

How it was ejected from wherever it formed is the least interesting part about it. The summary of the paper doesn't suggest any ideas on how such an object could have formed whether in a binary system or otherwise. If I was a betting man I'd say it is part of or the interior of a larger object that broke up rather than this being the shape it formed as since IMO thats the only plausable explanation for such a shape that defies normal gravitational formation.

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NASA on SpaceX's 2015 big boom: Bargain bin steel liberated your pressure vessel

boltar
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"Nobody should be flying rockets any longer. the technology is over 100 years old. We can't do any better than this?"

Feel free to invent a working warp drive.

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Maplin shutdown sale prices still HIGHER than rivals

boltar
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Re: Really

"Faceless warehouse with minimal staff paid on zero hour contracts at the minimum wage."

Thats ok, so long as people can get their cheap tat without having to get their fat backsides off the sofa they could be chained slaves in those warehouses for all they care.

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boltar
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"Does it? Even if the retailer is bankrupt?"

Obviously not, I was talking in general just like the OP. However if you pay by credit card you are covered.

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boltar
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"One gives you absolutely zero ongoing customer support or legal backup. And the other is ebay."

The law gives you redress if its faulty so its irrelevant what a given shop provides in the way of consumer protection. Also ebay is full of scammers and junk. At least in a physical shop you can see what you're buying first and take it back the same day if it doesn't work instead of pissing about going down to the post office to send a parcel and hoping for a refund from some nameless person who might be a fraud (assuming you received the goods in the first place). Quite what the appeal of internet shopping - aka electronic mail order - is I've no idea. Mail order was crap 35 years ago when sending off a cheque to Sinclair and hoping something showed up, and its crap today.

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Air gapping PCs won't stop data sharing thanks to sneaky speakers

boltar
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"How do you get the malware on the air gapped pc in the first place?"

Quite. And if they've managed that its game over anyway. Also if its a laptop you have full control of you might just as well use the built in microphone to receive data instead of fannying about with the speakers. Thats assuming for some reason the malware can't switch on the built in wifi!

This research is interesting from a technical point of view but virtually irrelevant from a security one.

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Oracle UK's profits have more than halved

boltar
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Re: You can only get away with a screw you attitude...

"@boltar - Postgresql, MariaDB, and Percona as well as many others are relational databases not NoSQL"

Yes, my mistake , I was thinking of Memcache, not maria.

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boltar
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Re: You can only get away with a screw you attitude...

"A database and associated tools that has already been largely replaced by postgresql, mariaDB etc"

NoSQL DBs like mariaDB and mongo will only ever be niche. Most business data is structured in a relational way and to store and process that effectively you need a relational DB. NoSQL is great for document storage and lightning fast key-value searches but in my experience using Mongo its an utter PITA to do any significantly complex relational processing on - and in some instances simply not possible and it has to be done outside the DB in the application which harks back to the pain of processing flat file DB data in the 1970s. Ironically that painful process is what gave momentum to relational DBs in the first place. Hardly a step forward into a bright future.

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boltar
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You can only get away with a screw you attitude...

... and charging through the nose while you're offering 1st class software with little to no competition. Sadly for Oracle those days are past. Their RDBMS is still good, but the rest of their tools are garbage and their "treat the customer as a gullible cash cow" company attitude is stuck in the 90s. Maybe they'll get a clue before they completely tank but knowing Ellisons arrogance I won't hold my breath.

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IBM's homomorphic encryption accelerated to run 75 times faster

boltar
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Re: I'm still none the wiser

" the Wikipedia entry contains both mathematical notation and English sentences that I can't make head nor tail of:"

Its articles like that that remind one that it doesn't matter how smart you think you are, there are always an awful lot of people who are a damn site smarter. Scarily smarter in some cases.

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boltar
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Re: What sort of operations can be done?

"No, it's having to decrypt the data before you can change it that defeats the whole point of encryption, because that means plaintext copies of it are being left around on your system."

Yes, I get that. But if encrypted data can be changed without requiring decryption first then how can any encrypted data be safe from tampering?

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boltar
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What sort of operations can be done?

Because if you can change the actual encrypted data (as opposed to just trashing it) without decrypting it then doesn't that defeat the whole point of encryption?

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Hackers create 'ghost' traffic jam to confound smart traffic systems

boltar
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Re: I despair

"Why not use independent sensors that "see" what's really there?"

I guess you didn't get the memo - anything "connected" is cool. It doesn't matter if it actually works, what matters is the kudos and reflected glory the local officials get from having greenlit something similar idiots will consider cutting edge. Either than or they fell hook & line for some marketing BS by some company or uni spin off that had a product to flog.

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