* Posts by boltar

2363 posts • joined 15 Oct 2008

Facebook tackles race hate problem head on with programming tool

boltar
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Re: "shifted their focus to proving the opposite –..data races under specific circumstances."

"It's sane and reasonable, where we don't reject entire ecosystems of perfectly good tools because of biases learned from forums."

Oh I can assure you my friend, my baises against some Java devs is not from forums, its first hand. And no, its nothing to do with the language and everything to do with 2nd rate coders who learnt it as their only language on their "programming" course at Mandela College and somehow managed to get a job doing it. Luckily it seems the 3rd rate colleges are now teaching javascript, HTML and probably advanced nosepicking to the current generation of muppets so hopefully its only a brief blip.

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boltar
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Re: "shifted their focus to proving the opposite –..data races under specific circumstances."

"Plenty. On the Scala front any JVM dev can be cranking out productive, high quality Scala in a couple of weeks."

Did you say any JVM dev and high quality in the same sentence? Wow, yes you did. Tell us what it is like on your world strange visitor from another planet!

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boltar
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Re: Out of Date

"CSP was briefly fashionable back in the 1980s, early 1990s (Inmos's Transputers, Occam), but is now alive and well in languages such as Erlang, Rust, Go, Scala."

Thats all very nice, but what do you think these languages runtimes do under the hood when running on a standard OS? Yes, thats right, they use threading and multi process with shared memory. Reality is what matters, not trendy names and buzzwords.

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Yes, British F-35 engines must be sent to Turkey for overhaul

boltar
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Re: Errrr....

"pressure is a factor of temperature and composition"

Not only. The number of molecules of a fluid in a given space - ie density - matters. Why do you think the pressure under water rises so much quicker than in the atmosphere? The temperature is similar and water molecules are lighter than N2 or O2 molecules which make up most of the atmosphere.

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boltar
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"The speed of sound in air is NOT dependent on pressure, only on temperature and composition of the air."

Not entirely true. If the air pressure and hence density is so low that gas molecules have little chance of hitting each other and hence passing on sound waves then the speed of sound is close to or at zero.

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What the fdisk? Storage Spaces Direct just vanished from Windows Server in version 1709

boltar
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@handleoclast

"I watched (from a safe distance) a 2-man start-up go under because of that one. They'd sunk their life savings into it, and were hit by it shortly before they were due to launch (and shortly before they were due to run out of savings). Ever seen two middle-aged men cry? "

I'd cry if I'd been such an utter fuckwit as to not have any backups of a core DB their company relied on. Either they were the dumbest pair ever to create a start up or this story is apochryphal.

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Man prosecuted for posting a picture of his hobby on Facebook

boltar
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Re: Police Scotland = Morons with time on their hands

"To be fair to Police Scotland, if there's a competition for making arses of yourselves, they shouldn't rule out the Sassenachs."

Just looking at them sums the sort of people who are getting jobs as cops in britain today thanks to endless lowered of standards. Dicking about not taking the job seriously, a number unshaven and/or fat and out of condition with standard issue chav tats on their arms. I'm sure they're fine at nicking drunks and speeding drivers, but I wouldn't want to rely on that lot in a serious emergency.

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boltar
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Re: Police Scotland = Morons with time on their hands

"The judge should be livid, if he cares about upholding justice,"

Justice and following the law are two entirely different things.

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boltar
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Re: Police Scotland = Morons with time on their hands

What do you expect from a police force that can't even get its name grammatically correct.

"Police Scotland"?

Err, I think should either be Police of Scotland or Scotland Police or Scottish Police.

The only reason it even exists as a force is because of moronic cost saving measures by the SNP who lost a load of local heirarchy and knowledge when they amalgamated all the scottish police forces.

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'There has never been a right to absolute privacy' – US Deputy AG slams 'warrant-proof' crypto

boltar
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Re: Backdoors for all

" People with secrets would use homebrew or "underground" code, and hide its usage with steganography."

I suspect a lot do already making the whole argument moot.

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Onwards to Valhalla: Java ain't dead yet and it's only getting bigger

boltar
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Re: @HmmmYes

"Again name one, wildly used Unix C++ framework , go on."

It doesn' t need one (though IIRC ACE was one attempt for sockets programming that sank without trace). The entire unix system API is in C, has been for 40 years, works well and is fairly easy to use for any competant coder. However if you want to talk about graphics on X win there are a number of C++ APIs you can use, eg Qt. MFC was AFAIK an alternative to win32 which was borderline unusable, and includes a lot of functionality that is better implemented in the C++ STL.

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boltar
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Re: @HmmmYes

"This when C++ started being used for everything, mainly MS's system libraries.

"I cant remember any Unix C++ framework i nth 90s."

FFS, C++ was initially developed on Unix you clown. Stroustrup started it in 1979 at AT&T when MS was just a start-up no one had yet heard of, and originally it was a C++ (or C with classes back then) to C pre-compiler. Learn some fscking history before you post crap. MS is a follower, not a leader in pretty much everything.

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boltar
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"It must be great to be you with your super l33t programming skillz. Look how much better you are than everyone else."

Oh for heavens sake, some of the pointer syntax could have been designed better and the distinction between pointers and arrays in C can be unnecessarily wooly at times, but tortured? Come off it. If you want tortured syntax then Perl would be your first port of call.

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boltar
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Re: @HmmmYes

"Objective-C, from NextStep-> OSX can hardly be called a a niche, can it?"

Even Apple programmers try and avoid it as much as possible, which is why Objective-C++ came about.

"I think Objective C's lack of utilisation outside of Apple can be put down to MS betting the farm on C++."

Partly, but bear in mind that C++ was in use in the Unix world long before MS got interested in it and gcc supported C++ some features a long time before MC VC++ did. In fact gcc is still ahead in the latest feature set though tbh its a law of diminshing returns now wrt to C++ spec. Seems to me its only updated these days to justify the commitees existence rather than because anyone was crying out for the new features.

"I think OO is only productive when you have very dynamic method dispatch."

Productivity isn't the issue, its more a case of code clarity IMO.

"C++ did not have an ABI until v. recently"

There was always the C ABI: extern "C" etc.

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boltar
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@HmmmYes

"The entire OO industry picked up on the pointless bit of OO - interfaces, and spent the next 30 years implementing it wrong - starting at MI to abortions like CORBA. And missed the simple thing that made Smalltalk a success - messages."

Yes, if only someone had created a version of C that implemented messages. They could have perhaps called it, I dunno, Objective-C? I'm sure it would have been worldwide success and not confined to a niche OS where people had to use it under sufferance because there was little alternative.

Truth is, for the machine level at which C++ is pitched messages are a pointless irrelevance. I don't want data I send to an object disappear into a black hole if the receiver doesn't have an interface for that type, I want to know at compile time that it'll actually get there! (Whether it does anything with it or not is another matter, but at least it means the class author considered it)

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boltar
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"Given C++'s tortured pointer syntax, which sometimes still ties me up in knots after 20 years, I know which language I'd rather use!"

If you still can't understand pointers after 20 years then yes, perhaps it is best you stick with a language that doesn't have them and has to have a hack like autoboxing to get around this limitation.

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boltar
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When Oracle rewrite their core RDBMS engine in Java...

... then I might take notice of all their sales pitching about it. In the meantime I'll maintain my opinion of it as a fairly useful but memory grabbing and inefficient front end and middleware application programming language, nothing more.

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Here's a gentle guide to building JavaScript AI in web browsers. Totally not a scary thing

boltar
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"The image recognition processing is not done on the PC, I'll wager."

And certainly not in javascript in a web browser. It would probably take an hour just to process a single image.

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Commodore 64 makes a half-sized comeback

boltar
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Re: Look in the loft

"I will have you know that I wrote a program to control the Seawolf missile system on a CPC 6128 in assembler, tested it off the Welsh coast on HMS Broadsword."

You should have got Alan Amstrad Sugar to come along and say "You're fired!"

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boltar
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Re: Look in the loft

"CPC was crap when it came out, believe me, I had to teach my mum how to use it one weekend - so she could teach some lecturers on Monday morning how to teach their students on Monday afternoon."

How do you teach someone BASIC to a level to be able to teach others in a weekend? Or was it more "Here's how you switch it on, he's how you put a tape/disk in and load a game"?

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boltar
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Re: Look in the loft

"There you go - that's CPC's for you :P"

Well, each to their own :P

One thing I will say about the CPC range is that AFAIK Locomotive BASIC was the only 1980s BASIC that could do a kind of limited co-operative multithreading using the AFTER/EVERY <msec> GOSUB <line> interrupt commands.

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boltar
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Re: Look in the loft

I got my Amstrad CPC down from the loft last year. It was great fun - for 10 minutes. Then the nostalgia wore off and it dawned on me how truly rubbish 80s machines are compared to now. Their saving grace is the ease of learning to program and getting to understand computers with BASIC (something thats sorely lacking today despite all the hype about python and scratch), but other than that I'm afraid I don't get this rush to buy clones of old machines especially given you can buy the real things on ebay relatively cheaply.

Still, I suppose its no different to people buying replicas of old cars and like replica cars there'll be a modern engine and running gear underneath. Wouldn't surprise me if its just a raspberry pi tucked into a corner running a C64 emulator with a nice price mark up for the gullible.

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Apple Mac fans told: Something smells EFI in your firmware

boltar
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@Orv

"I've had a lot of problems with things like WiFi failing after suspend/resume, and requiring a reboot to fix,"

With linux you can unload then reload kernel modules on the fly. That generally fixes almost all driver issues that in other OSs would require a reboot.

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boltar
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Re: @boltar

"it has always been able to make plain C calls because, as mention that you are aware, Apple's Core frameworks are generally plain C."

Well Carbon is deprecated and any low level C API calls are either poorly or not documented at all.

"I just pointing out the juxtaposition of a claim that inconsistency is problematic and a claim that X is essential"

They're completely seperate issues and given that with X you have a choice of half a dozen main desktops and dozens of minor ones I can't see what the issue is. Don't like Gnome? Use KDE. Don't like KDE either? Use twm. Whats the problem?

As for X networking, I'll admit its of little consequence to most users, but it is extremely useful for power users like myself to just remote excute an application that appears on my local desktop. Of course the Wayland devs are trying to convince everyone that graphics networking is irrelevant because its too hard for them to implement. They're not fooling anyone.

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boltar
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"You're welcome to your "yet another PC laptop I had to hack to get Linux stable and God help me if they have not released Linux drivers" world"

I installed slackware 14.2 on my laptop. Everything worked first time, the only thing I needed to do was download some printer drivers. YMMV.

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boltar
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Re: @boltar

"Apple's system languages of choice are C and C++"

Really? Well good luck doing any video or sound processing on OS/X without using any Objective-C. Yes, you have the core Posix API which is C, but everything else Apple specific system related is Obj-C.

"I have never before heard somebody simultaneously try to argue that randomised menu scattering is a bad thing and that X Windows is a good thing."

I find it amusing that in 2017 there are still people who don't understand the difference between the X server and the window manager that runs on top. Clue: The former provides the low level graphics API and networking, the latter provides the GUI. Menu scattering has the square root of bugger all to do with the X server.

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boltar
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"As a result they're ubiquitous across Silicon Valley."

No, they're common there because apple is still seen as cool and trendy, nothing to do with it being Unix. The sort of people who want a proper unix laptop, ie not locked down (yet), doesn't use non portable niche Objective-C for system programming, differentiates by default between upper and lowercase in the file system, has X windows as default graphics system (yes that is a plus point for many people) and a usable GUI: not the archaic Finder bar with menu options scattered at random between Finder and the application windows, will just install Linux or *BSD.

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Internet-wide security update put on hold over fears 60 million people would be kicked offline

boltar
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Re: The problem?

"Yeah, just fuck over millions of customers and businesses just to make a point to a few ISPs. Great plan."

I can only assume the 10 thumbs down I got for this post mean there really are 10 people too stupid to spot blindingly obvious sarcasm, or there are 10 people who really are such bastards that they think entire communities should suffer just to make a point to some DNS admins at an ISP. Either way, you're morons.

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boltar
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Re: The problem?

"I say just do it."

Yeah, just fuck over millions of customers and businesses just to make a point to a few ISPs. Great plan.

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NatWest customer services: We're aware of security glitch

boltar
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Re: Next time, screenshot it and post it on Twitter with a link to the story

"The tech side -trying without success."

The "tech side" in this case are probably an outsourced bunch of 1st line response subcontinent morons, not the people who actually wrote the code. Having said that, how hard can it be to find the section of code that generates PIN digit numbers on the login web page? I would suggest not very.

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Mac High Sierra hijinks continue: Nasty apps can pull your passwords

boltar
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Re: Plaintext passwords??

Fair enough, I thought it was refering to system user passwords.

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boltar
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Plaintext passwords??

"Obviously, random apps should not be able to access the entire keychain and dump things like plaintext passwords"

Passwords shouldn't be stored as plain or in reversably encrypted text in the first place! Unix had this covered back in the 70s, wtf are Apple up to?

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SQL Server 2017: What's new, what's missing on Linux, and what's next?

boltar
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Re: Why would you ever want to run SQL Server on Linux?

"Microsoft will never put as much effort into the Linux variant as they do for Windows, and when running on Linux"

FTA:

"However, not everything has been ported. There are no Reporting Services or Analysis Services, nor Machine Learning Services (formerly R Services)."

Also:

"Replication is not supported, other than in the context of high availability, nor is Stretch DB, for hybrid local/Azure database storage. File Table, which exposes a SQL Server table as if it were part of the file system, does not work on Linux. Management tools remain for the most part Windows only, though command-line tools work."

So MS arn't planning on kicking Windows off the top table anytime soon it would seem.

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boltar
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Does its own memory management and threading??

"Even on Windows, SQL Server does its own memory and thread management via a piece called SOS (SQL Operating System)"

That doesn't say anything good about the standard Windows functionality. Also - if its really doing this down to the metal and not just grabbing a thread pool and virtual memory from the OS at startup then it must be plugged deep into the kernel with ring 0 privs, which is never a good thing for an application to have, tho it seems to be a lesson microsoft never learn.

If it does this on Linux - presumably via a kernel module - I wouldn't touch it with a 20 foot pitchfork wearing a hazmat suit.

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The power JavaScript: 'Gandalf of JS' Wirfs-Brock on ECMAscript 2017

boltar
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Re: Such advanced features

"Writing a web app in C++ is just stupid if you ask me"

Depends whats going on underneath. The client facing browser side is just the icing on the cake, it gets all the attention but there's usually a whole lot more going on below. If you need some fast DB access and industrial strength data processing then there's nothing wrong with using C++ especially since you don't have the VM overhead and memory hogging of Java or C#.

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boltar
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Re: Such advanced features

"No, not really."

Yes really. If a program has more than 1 simultanious execution path its either threads or processes, take your pick. The end result ultimately is the same for the programmer. Sure, "promises" might mean you don't have to fiddle about with mutexes and whatnot but other than that there's no difference. Same wine, different label.

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boltar
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Such advanced features

"ES2016 formalised that into "promises""

Yeah whatever, more nomenclature buzzword bollocks lingo.

"we added language mechanisms that let a programmer call a function and asynchronously delay or wait for that function to complete"

So its basically threading in disguise. *yawn*

"The other big feature is shared memory."

Wow, cutting edge stuff! In 1980.

"It has evolved into the general-purpose programming language that advocates originally envisioned,"

No, it really hasn't. Its 99.999% client side web with a few deluded webdevs who've been promoted to running servers and only know javascript trying to use it as a server programming language. Meanwhile anyone with a clue uses C/C++, java or python.

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Why Uber isn't the poster child for capitalism you wanted

boltar
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"In a simple summary: "Bullshit". To expand it a little "Utter bullshit""

Unfortunately the standard response to facts in certain quarters.

"Even if governments had let _zero_ people into the country over the last 40 years there would still be a housing crisis"

No, there wouldn't. Because while the housing supply hasn't kept up with demand there has been enough built to supply what would have been the UK population if we hadn't had mass immigration. Next...

"Foreign immigrants (and in particular eastern europeans) tend to live in higher numbers per household so they're far less of an influence on demand than you seem to think"

As someone who lives in London and has had a number of foreign renters next door and nearby I'm afraid thats BS. All tenanted properies have legal limits on how many people can live there and the (legit) landlords of east europeans don't tend to cram in any more than they would with locals.

"The knock-on effect was that of retirees sitting in 3-4 bedroom council "

There have always been retirees living in large council houses and kids of council tenants who wanted the property. This is nothing new so don't pretend its part of the problem. It isn't. The problem is mass immigration and whilst it obviously suits your political agenda to say otherwise it doesn't change the bare facts and luckily last year the british people saw through the mendacious BS of people like you.

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boltar
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"Any of those downvoters care to elaborate? Nope, didn't think so..."

I gave you an upvote - however you're wrong on the reason for soaring rents. Its a simple supply and demand scenario. New Labour and following them the Tories let literally millions of extra people into the country. No housing market can keep up with that and unless you want to see rent controls - which brings its own set of problems - then short of those millions all clearing off again nothing can be done. This is an entirely deliberately politicaly engineered problem.

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boltar
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Re: Uberbnb

"The real problem is a lack of housing in the first place."

The real problem isn't lack of housing, its too many people. You can't import 2 million extra people into the UK in 20 years and expect housing stock to keep up especially in a city like London where there physically is no space for more housing. Well you can, if you're a deluded Guardian reading middle class liberal halfwit who only cares about quickly made skinny vanilla mocha in your local organic artisan coffee shop who can pay a pittance to their workers due to oversupply of cheap labour, and don't give a damn about the knock on effect this has of reduced wages, zero hour contracts and massive rent rises on the people who do the dirty work.

Ditto Uber - Tarquin and Jemima might be online SJWs by day, virtue signalling and emoting on Twitter and Facebook with the best of them. But by night all they care about is getting home quickly and screw however that is achieved. An unpleasent rapacious silicon valley bro-fest that doesn't report criminal offenses by its drivers and treats its staff like shit? No problemlo, they'll use it, wouldn't want to slum it with the proles on the tube or night bus would we?

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Shock! Hackers for medieval caliphate are terrible coders

boltar
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Re: Considering everything else about Daesh

"The story might be 'apocryphal'."

I'm fairly sure its not, but I don't have time to trawl through all the returns for variations on that theme on google to find a link it so I added a caveat.

"Thats not going to stop me making a generalisation that is racist and insulting to literally a billion people."

Islam is a race now, when did this happen? Tell us, what race are muslims exactly? Take your time sonny.

"Idiot."

Its never a good idea to look in the mirror when typing.

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boltar
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Re: Considering everything else about Daesh

"Apart from the fact that Islam encompasses 23% of the human population"

And?

" you are equating Islam with Daesh, which is about as Islamic as the KKK is Christian"

No, its exactly comparable to where christianity was around the time of the crusades. Islamic militancy is not a small extremist group on the fringe of Islam any longer.

"since Muslim scholars were responsible for the development of, amongst other things, algebra, invented by this guy, and much of astronomy including technical words still in common use, like zenith and nadir..."

Their achievements had nothing to do with their religion, they were simply arabic and by default muslim. It wasn't the religion that came up with these discoveries. You might as well say european science was all down to christianity & judaism because most of the scientists were nominally christian or jewish. A ridiculous argument.

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boltar
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Re: People who want to kill other people for stupid sky fairy reasons are not clever

"Religion is just the tool used to recruit the cannon-fodder."

The point is the dumb cannon fodder believe they're on some religious campaign. If these morons didn't exist then the psychopaths behind it all wouldn't be able to cause chaos and death on a mass scale.

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boltar
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Re: Considering everything else about Daesh

"It's technically a more modern religion than Christianity (by about six hundred years)"

Younger != more modern

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boltar
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Re: C'mon, ElReg.

Hacker has de facto meant someone who gains unauthorised access to computers since at least the 80s. Its a silly argument, just get over it.

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boltar
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Re: Considering everything else about Daesh

Apparently when the first mobile phones were going to be introduced to Iran the Koran had to be read over a test connection to some mumbling bearded halfwit (not sure if the ayatollah or one of his flunkies) so he could be convinced the technology wasn't the work of the devil. The story may well be apocryphal but frankly nothing about this backwards religion surprises me any more.

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New HMRC IT boss to 'recuse' herself over Microsoft decisions

boltar
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Re: What will she actually do?

"Noticed HMRC've been advertising quite a few Linux/Unix devops jobs of late with a very hopeful skillset"

Given they're using RHEL I'm guessing "Ability to configure and manage systemd with proven track record of sorting out its endless screwups" will be near the top of that skillset list.

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Pretend Python packages prey on poor typing

boltar
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Re: The number of packages for a language...

"The success of Linux was as much a happy accident as anything else. "

Ditto DOS and Windows. The point is that Linux is a rewrite and its now the most used version of Unix in the world.

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boltar
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Re: The number of packages for a language...

"Clue: if you're writing everything yourself from scratch, then clearly your time isn't worth much."

So he thinks one should never rewrite code from scratch? What, like Linux being a rewrite of unix and GNU rewriting all the unix utils? Yeah, I wonder how that turned out....

I'm afraid Joel doesn't always get it right. Sometimes re-writes ARE the best solution and sometimes writing code yourself instead of using libanother from some unknown author who'll probably drop support when get gets bored IS the best approach.

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boltar
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Re: The number of packages for a language...

" right: it's not enough to understand all the maths they need to actually do science, they also must learn all the tedious bureaucracy of every networking protocol they need to talk?"

No, it isn't and yes. If you're going to be writing networking code you should damn well have a clue whats going on, otherwise its exploit city.

"Or perhaps the language they use should be able to isolate them from all that crap, the way it isolates them from understanding the fine details of various numerical algorithms"

If they need that much hand holding then perhaps its better just to get someone in IT to write the code for them.

"Because, you know, it's not 1956 any more."

You mean back in the day when coders actually had a fucking clue? Yeah, you're right there.

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