* Posts by boltar

2645 posts • joined 15 Oct 2008

How one programmer's efforts to stop checking in buggy code changed the DevOps world

boltar
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Re: Jenkins?

You read it that way if it makes you feel better.

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boltar
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Re: Jenkins?

"decided to go to the effort of making a Victor Meldrew-style rant forum post."

If you think saying someone who by his own admission writes seriously buggy untested code shouldn't be working on an important system like this is being a victor meldrew then god help us. You epitomise the clueless sort of gimp that works in dev these days who needs half a dozen frameworks and a browser permanently open on slackoverlflow.com just to write a Hello World program.

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boltar
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Re: Jenkins?

The fact that I've already got 4 thumbs down just confirms what most experienced people know about the calibre of current "programmers". I use the term advisedly since most of them would have trouble hacking their way out of a wet paper bag.

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boltar
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Jenkins?

" The father of popular code pipeline Jenkins "

I've never heard of it and I like to think I'm reasonably up to date with all the latest fads even if I never use them. Still it is Java, you only have to wait 10 minutes and a new framework, API or dev enviroment will be along claiming to be the One True Way.

Also someone who had colleagues constantly ringing him up with what were apparently quite obvious bugs in his checked in code doesn't exactly strike me as the sort of coder who should be trusted to write something like this.

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ZX Spectrum reboot scandal man sits on Steve Bannon design tech shindig committee

boltar
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Re: "lucky few who have managed to avoid hearing about the boiling cesspit ....

"so I'm afraid you didn't win Self-Pitying Bullshit Bingo this time"

You have to love the Naivety of Mr Sadsack. Its almost touching.

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boltar
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Re: "lucky few who have managed to avoid hearing about the boiling cesspit ....

"You mean respectful behaviour. "

No, I don't. I meant the elevation of minority grievances to levels far beyond that which they deserve coupled to the race relations industryr. "Positive" discrimination, virtue signalling gobby student snowflakes who have an Orwellian approach to truth - ie tell a lie enough and it will become the truth such as getting to decide your own gender. (Well in that case maybe I can decide my own race - I'll be black from tommorow, ok?) "Inclusivity" which seems to include group except whites. Well guess what - treat people as the enemy and they'll act like it and you get Trump. Well done.

MIcro aggressions, safe spaces, cultural appropriation, patriarchy, non binary, mis-gendered etc etc - all this juvenile student union level political bullshit that now comes under the liberal banner, THAT is what I mean by modern liberalism.

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boltar
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Re: "lucky few who have managed to avoid hearing about the boiling cesspit ....

"As we are finding out, the checks and balances we thought we had are mainly just people's own self-control."

Some of us have known that for a long time. Welcome to the world of grown ups. The current hard right push is mainly down to a decade of political liberalism being thrust upon people in the west whether they wanted it or not. So naturally there's a reaction. And eventuallly there'll be a counter reaction. As someone who sits in the political middle I've watched the pendulum fly past me in both directions a number of times with a forlorn hope that one day it might stop. Fat chance.

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Roscosmos: An assembly error doomed our Soyuz, but we promise it won't happen again

boltar
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@alister

I wasn't even refering to russians. Perhaps learn to read first, then when you've done that look up "bolshevic". Unless you're suggesting all russians are communist extremists.

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boltar
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"Wasn't The Morning Star the Crommulist rag?"

Still is AFAIK. I can only assume the idiots who modded me down never lived through the 70s and have some sentimental view of salt-o-tha-earth union workers fighting against The Man. Truth was british car workers back in the day were short sighted, cretinous, lazy fools who would use strong arm tactics to get what they wanted no matter what the long term cost - which turned out to be their jobs in a lot of cases. A bit like the current RMT tbh.

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boltar
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Re: I can't get the sensor to fit

"simply didn't have the mindset"

ITYM "lazy bolshevic bastards who wouldnt recognise a good days work if it whacked them in the balls with a copy of the Morning Star"

FTFY

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Amazon is at this point a money-printing cloud machine with a grocery store in the parking lot

boltar
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"Now just imagine which government's secret spy agency wouldn't sell their grannys, partners and children to get their hands on what's in those locked down AWS containers and stacks."

If their security is as bad as the appalling AWS website where you have to navigate a maze of unclear

and confusing links to find anything (barely) useful, then those spy agencies have probably been busy

inside it for quite a while.

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Apple to dump Intel CPUs from Macs for Arm – yup, the rumor that just won't die is back

boltar
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Re: Rosetta-a-like is absolutely necessary

"You know how much effort it will be? Open your project in Xcode, select "x86_64" and "arm64" as the processor architectures, select "Archive" and upload to the App Store."

And Fabio working in design is going to know about Xcode is he?

The fact that the apple fanboys don't even understand the issues of CPU architectures and binaries tells you all you need to know about these clowns.

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boltar
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Re: Rosetta-a-like is absolutely necessary

"It's not that hard to understand"

Oh ok, well you sure told me. Just humour me however and explain how old x86 only binaries will run on arm without a translation layer.

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boltar
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Re: Rosetta-a-like is absolutely necessary

Indeed. The author seems to be confusing backwards compatibility where fat binaries are fine, with forwards compatibility which will require a translation layer for old x86 binaries.

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Enterprise Java caretakers float new rules of engagement for future feature updates

boltar
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Perhaps Im just a conspiracy theorist...

... but Oracle does seem to be doing its best to be rid of Java and make life difficult for its users without actually saying as much. It does make me wonder why they bought Sun if it wasnt really for the hardware or the software. The logo?

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Self-driving cars may not have steering wheels in future, dev preview for PyTorch 1.0 is here, etc

boltar
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Re: No wheel is one thing

"A lot of those are already forbidden on highways, so I'm not sure that's a great argument."

Motorbikes can go anywhere cars can go so for fully automated driving they'd have to be banned. Good luck getting that through parliament. And horses and bicycles are allowed on non motorway roads in the UK.

"You have to take into account the fact that aircrafts go ten times faster and can be fifty times larger."

An HGV is about the size and weight of a medium sized airliner and while it goes slower it also passes within feet of traffic going in the opposite direction. Any control system - ie a stick - that is less accurate than a steering wheel would pretty quickly cause a serious accident. Its a stupid idea plus the ergonomics don't work either - which side of the driver do you put it on? And what if some partially disabled drivers can only use 1 arm? Oh, you'd put it in the middle like an aircraft just so it can impale you in an accident and tire out the arm holding it? Nice one.

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boltar
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Re: No wheel is one thing

"Works fine on combat aircraft, and large airliners, so I'm not sure where you got that idea."

So aircraft regularly fly within a few feet of each other going in opposite directions do they or are in situations where literally being a few inches out could cause a crash?

No, I think not. Even fighter aircraft have a whole sky to play, they're not surrounded by other 2 ton boxes of metal going at high speed. And formation display pilots have to train the same routines over and over again for years and have to know exactly where the other aircraft are at all times. Good luck trying that out with cars on the M25.

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boltar
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Re: No wheel is one thing

"they are very far away from actually being able to make a machine that can reliably drive itself."

Even if its actually able to drive itself in all road conditions its still far less flexible than a human driver. How many times have we moved our car a few feet in the drive or garage or street to make room for something? How exactly are you going to get a self driving car to do that without explicitely telling it or having some way to direct it to a location with accuracy in inches and the orientation required?

As you say, this is more delusional BS from this industry and even worse, its a completely cynical attempt at 3rd party control. No steering wheel = car is unmovable without a tow truck if they decide to disable it, you can't even push it.

No one wants this - yes, a car that can drive itself on the motorway might be nice on occasion, but no option of manual control? No thanks. This is being pushed by naive engineers and vested business interests, not the consumer. The only people it might appeal to are non drivers who don't want to pass the test, but in that there's already something equivalent - its called a taxi.

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Linux kernel's 'seat warmer' drops 4.19-rc5 with – wow – little drama

boltar
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Re: Inclusiveness demands tolerance

"If the new CoCs are allowed to continue as they are, if you want to be a dev of any kind you had better keep your nose clean from the time you enter the world,"

It really won't matter in the long term. These virtue signalling cock wombles and their whole victimhood mentality will eventually drag the politically correct west to its knees whether it be IT or any other white or blue collar sphere because there's no one with a backbone to stand up to them and call them out.

Meanwhile China will just happily keep on ignoring even basic human rights when it suits it , never mind the concocted pixie dust and unicorns BS that eminates from the student level "rights" discussions we have today , which means they will ultimately triumph. And when that happens the safe space kiddies will have a lot more to worry about than someone calling them names in a social media posting.

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How an over-zealous yank took down the trading floor of a US bank

boltar
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Re: stdin?

"And I refuse to believe he didn't know about stdin after completing a Software Engineering degree...."

Nothing much in the story adds up. Seems more like a yarn dreamt up down the pub by Reg journos to make some copy rather than a real event to me.

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boltar
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Re: DevOps?

I'm willing to bet that "screaming traders assaulted the frame room baying for my blood” didn't happen either. From the traders I met when I worked in the city most of them couldn't tell you where their phone was plugged in, never mind where the server room was and even if they did find it , the door would have been auto locking even back then so unless 1 of them had the combination or he jammed the door open its total BS.

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Developer goes rogue, shoots four colleagues at ERP code maker

boltar
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Re: A gun is involved in every single mass shooting.

"On the other hand you have on the order of 140,000,000 armed civilians, with enough guns to arm just about *everyone*."

Even assuming you could muster all of them which wouldnt happen (at most you'd get a few hundred thousand crazies), how do you reckon they'd fare against some B52 carpet bombing, abrams tanks, A10s or cruise missiles ? Ask the Taliban how well that works out long term. You see, this is the thing, people like you still think its 1850. Wake up.

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boltar
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Re: A gun is involved in every single mass shooting.

"Militias are mention in the first part of the 2nd Amendment. You know the forgotten part that many think was written in invisible ink."

Perhaps its time to change parts of a constitution that may have been relevant in a semi lawless wild west scenario 200 years ago but don't apply in a democratic 21st century society where (in theory) the rule of law applies.

And even if you think the police/legal system/whatever in america is corrupt and is run by the industrial-military complex/bilderberg group/left wing nutjobs/right wing nutjobs [delete as applicable], the idea that you and a dozen of your friends are going to overpower the US military with a few handguns is just so fucking laughable that anyone who thinks that frankly needs a psychiatric assessement.

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boltar
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Re: A gun is involved in every single mass shooting.

Obviously a gun is involved in every mass shooting - otherwise it wouldn't be called a shooting.

Just saying.

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First Boeing 777 (aged 24) makes its last flight – to a museum

boltar
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Re: Feeling old yet?

"~2.5 hours was what it took to cross the pond... back when I was young."

Ah yes concorde - leaving a 3000 mile long trail of crap in the stratosphere just to save 3 hours. Personally I'm glad that enviromental nightmare is gone. Yes, go ahead spotters, mod me down.

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Security MadLibs: Your IoT electrical outlet can now pwn your smart TV

boltar
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Re: "shouldn't be on … network in the first place"

"One of the few things worse than Brexit would be if Vlad The Emailer switched off Britain's lights for a week."

Since you're obviously a fan of the EU why not ask them why they haven't written up one of their famous directives to control this particular piece of tech.

Or is it simply a case that almost all politicians are technical and scientific illterates who barely grasp the terminology , never mind the ideas and issues behind it. The fact that we keep electing people who, if they even have qualifications they're utterly useless for running a 21st century state. Perhaps a few more BSc's** and a few less MA's and MBA's in parliaments around the world might improve things immensely.

** Yes, Thatcher, but to be fair she was actually quite good when it came to supporting new tech industries back in the day.

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The Death of the Gods: Not scared of tech yet? You haven't been paying attention

boltar
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Re: --->Götterdämmerung.

"And Tolkien also pinched the central theme of LotR from the Siegfried cycle."

Partly, along with a lot of norse and germanic myths and sagas just like Wagner. And The Hobbit is basically a rewrite of Beowulf.

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boltar
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Re: "how about some positive, helpful, suggestions, instead?"

"I think that banning Advertising (and I mean a COMPLETE ban) would improve things immensely"

You might hate advertising in whatever form it takes, be it TV or radio ads or promos on twitter, but its often the only way for a new and/or small company to get known. Bad all advertising and the only people who will benefit will be the products and big corporations that the public already know about.

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boltar
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Anyone who thinks Google et all have power...

.... clearly have no idea of the historical reach and sheer political power of the oil companies and what they used to get up to, and for all I know still do.

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Rejoice! Thousands more kids flock to computing A-level

boltar
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Re: before you can apply an index to a table.

"And when you do, the flippin' developers write nested selects that invalidate the index and force brute-force table-walks anyway."

People don't write nested selects and correlated sub queries just for fun. Its probably because someone higher up dictated some output that the normalisation structure of the DB was never designed to accomodate and so contortions have to be made to get the information out. Whats the alternative (other than redesigning the DB)? Write a PL/SQL procedure or process it in the client app which will probably be equally slow if not slower.

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boltar
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Re: Fundamentals of IT

"Now you need 3 weeks of meetings - some of which must be conducted standing up - before you can apply an index to a table."

True, but there still arn't many other white collar industries where you can earn 300-400 quid a day from the get go as a contractor. IT might be full of bullshitting MBA know-nothings in management these days, but its still a damn good industry to be in and until computers write their own software you'll not find it hard to get work so long as you choose your specialisations wisely. IMO of course.

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Oracle: Run, don't walk, to patch this critical Database takeover bug

boltar
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Re: I have to ask...

"why are you still using this database,"

Have you tried the alternatives? They're even worse. Last time I was involved with sybase we considered it a win if none of the instances went down in a week. SQL Server? Yeah, thats fine for some periphery systems but its not a Bet The Business 24/7 DB. And don't get me started on NoSQL DBs, they're just a hipster nostalgia trip back to the 70s and are fucking useless for even moderately complex data relationships. RDBMS - the clues in the name.

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ZX Spectrum Vega+ blows a FUSE: It runs open-source emulator

boltar
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Re: but that's the same as everyone elses review!

"while a roll-your-own phone OS can be pretty intimidating."

Tbh a roll your own phone would probably be banned from most networks anyway since the network providers wouldn't trust your baseband code not to have something nasty hidden away.

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boltar
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Re: but that's the same as everyone elses review!

"there you go... could make it yourself for 70 quid for a single unit. reduce cost by at least half for bulk purchases and injection moulds."

Sure, if you don't value your time at all and don't want to make any profit. I'm not claiming RCL spent much time on this, but the cost of the actual physical stuff with most products is a usually a small percentage of the final price, its the time spent designing, testing and - in the case of houses - building that takes the lions share of the investment.

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The age of hard drives is over as Samsung cranks out consumer QLC SSDs

boltar
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Re: QLC? It's not the one for me

"This works by using analog levels to cram more bits into the signal, which itself is carried on a carrier wave."

Everything is analogue if you go down far enough - the point is where the analogue values come from. The relative levels of amplitude, phasing or frequency compared to the carrier signal strength of a radio signal will always be the same as its actively generated. The hardware in an SSD however is fixed and so maximum voltage levels in the cells will decline as they age, but more to the point - not uniformly between them. So the firmware can't simply adjust its voltage level parameters to account for it.

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boltar
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Re: QLC? It's not the one for me

" Is it really worth it?"

Not in my opinion. These cells store multiple bits by using multiple voltage levels instead of just on/off, high/low or +ve/-ve- ie its an analogue system with all its inherent problems. There's a reason we switched from analogue to digital computers 70 years ago and those reasons haven't gone away. One of those reasons is that as components age the charge they can store drops. Thats not a problem if its binary since generally it has to drop a long way before a 1 becomes a 0. However if you have multiple analogue voltage levels it won't take much degredation to flip a 4 to a 3 or 3 to 2 etc.

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ZX Spectrum reboot latest: Some Vega+s arrive, Sky pulls plug, Clive drops ball

boltar
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Re: It looks a bit... "cheap"

"So most of what the Z80 in a ZX80 is doing is executing NOPs."

Even for its day the ZX80 was a pretty nasty design when compared to the Apple II, TRS-80, PET or other 8 bit computers that had come out a few years before. If it had been dirt cheap that would have been fine but it wasn't, it was actually quite expensive at 100 quid assembled which is probably equivalent to 300-400 quid or more now.

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boltar
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Re: As with all these cases, eveyone out for themselves, the customer comes last

The phrase "A fool and his money are soon parted" proved correct once again. Hopefully some of the suckers who invested in this have learnt a valuable lesson - ie that the laws of good financial governance arn't put on hold just because the money is being raised on some trendy hipster crowd funding site.

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Riddle me this: TypeScript's latest data type is literally unknown

boltar
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Re: void *

No, it couldn't because it works on arrays. I'll let you figure out the rest.

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boltar
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Re: void *

"Okay, so tell me why I'm wrong and what your example is."!

man qsort

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boltar
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Re: void *

"You can just as well use an opaque structure instead of void *, it makes the code more readable and unlike void *s the compiler makes sure variables aren't passed to the wrong function."

Opaque structures? Wrong function? Wtf are you talking about? If its C it can't be passed to the wrong function since there's no concept of function overloading and the whole point of void is opaqueness anyway except you're not limited to a particular structure!

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boltar
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"If you're still using JavaScript, you're shooting yourself in the foot."

If you're using javascript it means you're a web dev. But don't worry, one day you might get a real programming job using grown up languages.

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boltar
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Re: void *

"In my experience, whenever there is a question, and void * is the answer, either the answer is wrong or the question is wrong."

Or you don't understand why void* exists and why its sometimes required as a function parameter.

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Dear alt-right morons and other miscreants: Disrupt DEF CON, and the goons will 'ave you

boltar
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Right wing nutters vs self important anti establishement brats

I'll get the popcorn...

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Oldest swinger in town, Slackware, notches up a quarter of a century

boltar
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Re: Not to mention ...

"Slackware's systemd free"

And runs nicely and is perfectly stable because of that. Maybe it takes an extra few seconds to boot compared to a systemd distro but who the f*ck cares? I'll take system stability over a quick boot time any day.

"And, for me at least, 14.2 has been completely trouble-free since I first upgraded from 14.1"

Same here, been using 14.2 since it came out, everything worked out of the box including media and apart from having to download some printer drivers for cups it didn't need anything for it to be work ready.

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Scumbag confesses in court: LuminosityLink creepware was my baby

boltar
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Re: Colton Grubbs

"Name suits."

Nominative determinism in action?

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Sad Nav: How a cheap GPS spoofer gizmo can tell drivers to get lost

boltar
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Re: The Rout of Civilisation

"Just think, they can now falsely direct a vehicle down a too-narrow lane, across a river without using a bridge, the wrong way down a one-way street, across fields, under bridges that are too low and all the other things that real GPS does to vehicles."

If a driver is so thick they don't think twice before driving into a river or across a field then they should have their license revoked. Assuming they survive.

Re shipping - there was an effective system called Loran that used fixed radio masts and triangulation to piinpoint a ships position. But with the usual far sightedness inherent amonst politicians and others in power, instead of being kept as a GPS backup it was decommisioned.

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Python creator Guido van Rossum sys.exit()s as language overlord

boltar
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Re: reflecting opinions more than best practice

"I'm old enough to know that Python is just the present "flavor of the month" programming language"

If using a flavour of the month language means that Perl finally crawls away and dies then thats good enough for me. Anyway, after being around this long I think its fair to say Python is part of the dev furniture now, not a newcomer.

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Outage outrage: TSB app offers users a TITSUP* encore

boltar
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Re: My nearest town has two banks remaining

"In the 21st century, there should be no reason to need a physical branch near you, surely ?"

Apparently you didn't RTFA. I can't think of a better reason to have physical branches than during these sorts of cockups. And as others have mentioned, not everyone is 25 , lives in an urban area with banks a short bus ride away and has internet access. Perhaps you might try giving a shit about the older generation and those living in the countryside occasionally.

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Cancelled in Crawley? At least your train has free Wi-Fi now, right?

boltar
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Re: If only...

"Then think about the differing needs of people who are at different points in their lives."

No one is at the point in their life where they can't be without internet access for an hour or too. Even teenagers can manage to go without for that length of time if pushed. If someone really can't then they need professional help.

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