* Posts by Jellied Eel

271 posts • joined 18 Aug 2008

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All your masts are belong to us outfit Arqiva confirms IPO plan

Jellied Eel

Re: Typical

Vaguely correct, except that there'd already been investment in infrastructure to launch 'Freeview'. And then implementing DSO was funded by increasing the cost of the BBC's licence fee and ringfencing a portion of it. Which was then underspent, I think due to costs of helping people make the switch being less than anticipated. Then of course there was a.. slight issue with what to do with the DSO money left over, because the public sector hates to see money go to waste. So rather than a cut in licence fee, the 'DSO' money got repurposed for rural broadband.

So Arqiva made money from DSO, plus playout and broadcast services for Freeview and other satellite channels. Plus renting mast space to mobile companies, microwave links and various public sector radio projects.

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Openreach offers duct-off providers 'OSA Filter' instead of Dark Fibre Access

Jellied Eel

Re: CP here - no I don't want this

Fibre to a site comes at a cost though, either CP's civils to lay fibre into site, or paying BT to. BT then gains access to that site via OR's proposed wavelength service, and at a lower cost because BT Business/Wholesale's colo'd in the exchange. So the new service creates vendor lockin rather than opening up competition on BT's fibre/ducts. BT controls endpoints at the 'A-end', ie 'benefit' of terminating in BT's exchange. Termination via ISI could be done, but with an attenuation cost given it's PON-ish, and not 'dark'.

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Jellied Eel

Indeed. Typical regulatory gamesmanship. It's not the service CPs want, and by restricting it to a wavelength of BT's specification, it prevents CPs from using their own DWDM kit. And it helps lock-in customers given BT's control over endpoints vs standard ISI's and true DF interconnection.. Which is likely to be more favourable to BT's in-house customers. Cheap NID that takes coloured optics and it's another Ethernet delivery service that may undercut BT's competitors.

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Elon Musk says Harry Potter and Bob the Builder will get SpaceX flying to Mars

Jellied Eel

Re: This one is easy

But there are still important questions to be addressed. Like who gets to control and allocate IP addresses for/on Mars? Or how much of the Internet to take with them. If there's space/mass constraints then priority would probably be lots of textbooks. Which thanks to technology is fairly straightforward, ie books on how to build/fix pretty much everything can be stuck on a flash card or Kindle. Then it's just a matter of building stuff, and surviving while you do that.

I think it'd be better to stage everything, ie first establish orbital or lunar fabrication plants. NASA did some neat stuff with lunarcrete, so freighting construction and components from Moon to Mars could be done using concrete spaceships. Then there's the potential to do some asteroid mining to get more raw materials. The economics of that don't really add up for delivering to Earth, but for interplanetary economics, it'd avoid hauling mass out of our gravity well. So maybe launch a semiconductor fab plant to the Moon or orbit, then they could be stuck into lunar or marscrete datacentres.

That kind of staging could also feed into data shipping.. Diageo and some other corporates used to ship data on Concord because that was much cheaper than transatlantic capacity, and quick enough for their needs. So bulk data could be ferried the same way & leave interplanetary links for critical communications.

Musk's plans are.. Ambitious, but it's nice to see someone trying :)

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Jellied Eel

Re: "I think liquid cooling is a thing in rocket science, "

I know it's wiki, but..

The Space Shuttle Main Engine's turbopumps spun at over 30,000 rpm, delivering 150 lb (68 kg) of liquid hydrogen and 896 lb (406 kg) of liquid oxygen to the engine per second,

.. it doesn't translate that into NOS shots, even if you could fit one to an LS motor. Which could be a project to trump JATO cars. Or possibly something the Bloodhound crew are doing anyway. Either way, it's still not something I'd want to be strapped to. So still cooled by the cryogenic fuels & having 15+ combustion chambers to feed is going to need some rather careful plumbing & control.

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Jellied Eel

Re: ""exceed passenger airline levels of safety""

I think liquid cooling is a thing in rocket science, ie using the liquid fuels to help cool the engine. Which given the rather large temperature differentials between cryogenic fuel and exhaust over a short distance and time is one of the reasons for malfunctions of the terminal kind. But anything that uses hypergolic reactants as coolants is something I'd rather watch from a very safe distance.

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Jellied Eel

TCP/IP is NOT a transport mechanism!

A long time ago, in a galaxy far far away, there was Vint Cerf, and WorldCom. And a vision for an 'Interplanetary Internet', to expand certain vendor's support contracts. CCIE's needed, must have own transport, and ideally love the tang that perchlorates add to a smoothie. Meetings were held to explore how to conquer things like how to conquer TCP's window & LFP issues, and the rocket scientists kept trying to point to their perfectly good protocols as used in various manned & unmanned missions that travelled far beyond the realms of any digitised cat pics.

So there are perfectly good protocols already in use by probe designers that communicate waaay more reliably and efficiently than TCP/IP. But pointing that out meant not being invited back to the workshops, which were quite fascinating. It's a variation on the age-old Bellheads v Netheads arguments that often derive from RFC791-

The internet protocol does not provide a reliable communication facility. There are no acknowledgments either end-to-end or hop-by-hop. There is no error control for data, only a header checksum. There are no retransmissions. There is no flow control.

And despite transitions from DARPA to IETF and 36yrs of kludges and jollies.. The Internet still relies on a reliable transmission layer. But Vint Cerf moved on to Google, so it'll probably be Alphabets in space, where no-one can hear netheads scream..

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Beardy Branson chucks cash at His Muskiness' Hyperloop idea

Jellied Eel

Financial engineering!

But.. build it, and they will come! Pork fanciers that is. Both UK HS2 and California's HSR suffer from much the same problem, ie wishful thinking and cost. If you're on the winning side, that £2.1bn in interest is a nice side of bacon. But that bit could be zeroed if the state just paid for it. Instead, we do the QE thing and print money so banks can lend it back & make a 3% profit. California's perhaps less restricted by EU state aid rules & could issue munis to fund infrastructure, but would then have to pay interest, and a lot of US states are waking up to their pensions time bomb. And California's rail link is even more expensive than HS2..

But that's politics. Politicians try to justify cost based on 'public good' from new services. Quicker trips London-Birmingham or LA-SF. Woo and Yey! Metro economies will be boosted.. But those benefits don't help anyone looking at eye watering ticket or freight prices.. Which means they won't get used as much, ie anyone who's looked at Virgin's fares quickly realises it's cheaper to drive or fly, which means road congestion.

California's maybe a bit different, ie cost of property in LA or SF is eye-watering, so longer commutes and more traffic on and around the I5. Plus extra traffic from home deliveries, and additional wear & tear from 2-ton Teslas. More freight could probably be shipped by sea along the West Coast, but that can be expensive given union control over the ports. Rather than billion dollar boondoggles like the HypeLoop, states would be better off investing in the dreaded multi-modal transport model to better redistribute passengers and freight. HypeLoop won't help with that if it's a dumb P2P pipe with very limited capacity. Conventional rail works better if there's a combo of stopping, express and freight services.

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Jellied Eel

It's the Brand, son.

The idea is bonkers, unless you're hoping for a large slice of government pork. California announces it wants a faster rail link from LA to SF, businesses line up at the trough. As for air..

In Musk's original Hyperloop concept, an electrically driven inlet fan and air compressor would be placed at the nose of the capsule to "actively transfer high-pressure air from the front to the rear of the vessel,"

.. Which is why 'artists impressions' show turbine blades at the rear of the 'pods'. Except being near vacuum, it'll be low pressure air outside the pod. So it'll use rail gu.. I mean linear induction motors for most of the propulsion. Pod people will coast along in comfort, unless the cushion fails. Or there's a kink or snag due to quakes, expansion or sabotage. Implosion, explosion or just stuck. Risk of that might be high given suggestions that the HypeLoop will have a very low operating cost. Which is unlikely if it's routed along the I5 median, or underground.

Then there are other tricky issues like the cost. Not only design and construction, but also per pod. Concept art shows single containers in the cargo pods and small numbers of passengers in the suici.. I mean people pods. So they'll need to be loaded/unloaded safely at costs comparable to existing passenger & freight rates. And the I5 carries a lot of freight. Which is part of the California politics. Roads are falling apart and in dire need of maintenance. A high capacity rail link might take some of the pressure off, or just end up being a very expensive white elephant. If you're spending other people's money, that's not a problem.

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RDX removable disk has ransomware protection begging to be bypassed

Jellied Eel

Naming conventions..

"RDX removable disks" would probably apply to all disks, given a sufficient amount of RDX. And searching for 'RDX' may get more.. awkward if searching for forbidden things can put you in jail. :)

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Boffins' bonkers fibre demo: 53 Tbps down ONE piece of glass

Jellied Eel

Re: Not that far from reality

To me, the clever bit is increasing the length of multi-core fibres, ie precision pulling silicon taffy. I'm less convinced about the applications, given you'd need to buy into an entirely new ecosystem. And the actual benefits aren't clear, ie 53Tbps via 19 cores is only 2.8Tbps/core, or 7.5Tbps with 7. That's less impressive than the headline figure.

So it'll be the TCO argument vs standard SMF in convenient 144f or 288f cables.. Which would include SLAs and MTTR to recover from backhoe fade. Restoration times on standard fibre are pretty well known, registering & splicing multicore fibres, less so. There's also plenty of data to support traditional SMF pulls, but very little regarding multicore fibre aging or stability in a typical MAN environment. There, the problem's often capacity per duct or sub-duct +/- wayleave and headaches with roads being stopped for new construction or upgrade works.

It could be fun in other applications though, ie automotive or aircraft to reduce cable harness size or weight.

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Ghost in Musk's machines: Software bugs' autonomous joy ride

Jellied Eel

Re: Really??

An under-run bumper would have shown up as 'not an empty space' so it very much would have saved his life, it would have triggered emergency braking,

That depends on the code. The description in the incident report makes it sound like a system primarily designed to prevent rear-end collisions. So a combination of camera & radar with a check against pre-defined vehicles. It doesn't say what it'd do if it detects an unknown posterior, or how much of the space ahead of the vehicle gets scanned. I'd hope it's the full profile of the car, but presumably didn't happen in this accident. So 'operator error' caused by the driver's inattention, and possibly over reliance on auto-pilot features that didn't exist.

Under-run bumpers would probably help in other accidents, and perhaps the Tesla Truck will slap QR codes on it's sides so airbags can be deployed in it's cars.

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Facebook, Google, Twitter are the shady bouncers of the web. They should be fired

Jellied Eel

Re: Good observation, wrong selection of facts

Or possibly the wrong observation. So Russia apparently bought the US election for <$1m and their $100k across 450 'campaigns' on Facebook carried more weight than the $6bn+ spent on TV election ads. Which would suggest that Russian political agents were far more effective than their highly paid Democrat social media experts. How embarrassing. Or evidence that Russia hacked the analytics to give undue weight to their messaging.. It can't have been problems with the official campaigning, or chosen candidate.

But such is politics.

Meanwhile, other advertisers seem to be realising that online spending is largely wasted, and pulling the plug. Or analytics are used to attach ads to questionable content. So potential Democrat voters were shown RT ads, not CNN. Oh, the humanity! Or there's the related YT adpocalypse, where content creators are being demonetised for mysterious reasons. On appeal, they may be remonetised, but any revenue due between upload and appeal.. vanishes. Which also leads to odd scenarios. So there's an educational channel called 'VetRanch'. That shows animal fans & would-be vetinarians a day in the life of a vet practice doing charity work. YT's analytics tend to make those 18+ and/or demonetise, despite the billions companies spend on pet care advertising that might want to reach that audience.

But such is technology.

Alphabet and Facebook both seem to be struggling with imperfect analytics, which is leading them towards more creative control over content. Which may be a slippery slope that sails them away from DMCA safe harbor provisions and into being regulated as a content or news provider, something they really want to avoid.

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Boffins sling around entangled photons at telco wavelengths

Jellied Eel

Distance..

Distances are more like <100km for single mode fibre spans before amp/regen is needed. But the commercials will revolve around where the applications for tangled photons lie. Plus figuring out any SLAs.. Some work's been done already around quantum cryptography already, and capacity would rely on bits per qbit. Then cost to double capacity vs using another fibre or wavelength. Or it may lead to advances in quantum teleportation, and then no need for fibres at all.

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EU's tech giant tax plan moves forward

Jellied Eel

"It could be a reasonable argument to describe their entire EU operation as nothing more than a supply chain and suoport service and write it off as "cost of sales" and recognise profit back home in Cupertino."

Yup, that's pretty much how it works. Except the last part. If the tech titans repatriated profits to Cupertino, then the US would tax them. So US operations stay as cost centres to reduce their tax obligations, the profits are reinvested snapping up other companies.. And due to low interest rates, money gets borrowed to pay dividends & becomes more debt to allocate to international subsidiaries to keep their profits down. Or just get some very expensive fixtures & fittings for iShops, because those are costs.

But basically lots of money sloshing around the low-tax/no-tax jurisdictions that could be put to work. Politicians want to do that, but can't figure out how to get their mitts on it. Like others have said though, the challenge is with the tax codes that allow artificial transactions to skim profits. Fixing that would require clear ways to value and allocate costs so they're business efficient, not tax efficient.

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His Muskiness wheels out the Tesla Model 3

Jellied Eel

Re: UK Sales?

I thought Tesla had a maintenance network for it's existing models? As for RHD conversions, the Model 3 interior looks.. spartan. Move the instrument panel a lil to the right, and if it's 'drive by wire', moving the foot switches and steering wheel should be relatively cheap.

But Tesla has to sell a lot of Model 3s. Sales of it's current models haven't been hitting forecasts and the company is bleeding cash. Maybe it'll end up going the way of NUMMI as costs mount and competition increases.

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CityFibre snaps up Entanet for £29m and plans to raise £185m

Jellied Eel

Re: Note. This is for businesses.

Wait and see. FTTP won't become common until access costs fall to a point that's acceptable to a customer who's looking at a low per-Mbps price point.. Often made more challenging if customers will only sign 1 year contracts. Most of that is a simple civil engineering challenge rather than telecomms, or even the wacky world of the Interwebz.

Challenge is losing £12.6m on sales of £15.4m, and what, if any efficiency savings might get made from spending £29m on Entanet. So possibly £3m by 2020. There's the £400m broadband carrot, but delivering that still involves substantial cost and risk, hence the general lack of interested parties.

But borrowing money to buy revenues is nothing new in telecomms. This time, maybe it will be different..

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No hypersonic railguns on our ships this year, says US Navy

Jellied Eel

Re: Will it fit on a shark?

We're gonna need a bigger shark!

Or a better power source.. Like a few RR PWR's stuck in any spare spaces on out carriers. They work, railguns.. perhaps less so, unless they've overcome problems with rails warping or eroding.

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BA's 'global IT system failure' was due to 'power surge'

Jellied Eel

Re: "Tirelessly"?

This probably isn't a DR issue, but an HA one. So BA relies heavily on IT to know where it's aircraft, passengers, staff, luggage, spare crews, spare parts and everything else is, in real-time. So lots of interdependent data that would need to be synchronously replicated between the DCs at LHR so an accurate state table is maintained, even if X breaks.. But then if X does break, and there's data losss or corruption, getting back to a working state gets harder. Rolling back to a previous state may tell you where stuff was, but not where it is now.. Which can be a fun sizing challenge if you don't have enough transaction capacity to handle an entire resync.

Or maybe power & cooling capacity. Unusually for a UK bank holiday, the weather has been quite nice. So cooling & power demands increased in and around LHR, which includes lots of large datacentres. On the plus side, there'd be plenty of food for IT & power folks working at LHR given meals have probably been arriving, with no passengers to eat them.

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Cisco's servers are stuck in limbo, look likely to stay there

Jellied Eel

I am Cisco's lack of suprise

Cisco is a network company. Ok, so it also dabbles in clothing and book selling. But there seems to be a problem of getting too big and forgetting your roots. So networking, not trying to dabble in commodity server shifting. Especially when Cisco's competitors have been merrily chipping away at their core networking business.

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Why Microsoft's Windows game plan makes us WannaCry

Jellied Eel

Re: "if anything good comes from WannCrypt it'll be a whole new emphasis

Those that ignore history are condemned to repeat it. Or maybe work in software maintenance at Microsoft. From wiki on what was previously regarded as the most expensive software error, the Ariane 5/Cluster mission-

"The greater horizontal acceleration caused a data conversion from a 64-bit floating point number to a 16-bit signed integer value to overflow and cause a hardware exception. Efficiency considerations had omitted range checks for this particular variable, though conversions of other variables in the code were protected. The exception halted the reference platforms, resulting in the destruction of the flight."

SMB's had performance issues in the past, so perhaps range checks were omitted for the same reason, with much the same result.

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Jellied Eel

Re: certification

There's probably an MS Certification you can buy.

But the exploit seems to rely on subtracting a 32bit DWORD from a 16bit WORD. And C is well known for it's ability to write to memory, and limited built in sanity checking. Competent programmers know this. Microsofts presumably didn't.

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Tesla: Revenues up, losses deepen, in start to 'exciting' 2017

Jellied Eel

Grid balancing's a bit like the old Economy7 system to keep baseload generation happy. Problem with using cars is how the Shinfield posse can switch cars from 'suck' to 'blow'. That would need smarter meters that are currently being installed, and export metering. Plus car owners to opt-in easily, and probably be opted out of any liability for damage to batteries. Price incentives would then require more subsidies added to electricity costs.

And if we continue with the Climate Change Act and it's decarbonisation requirements, car charging will have to load share with electric heating and cooking.. Which adds to the grid demand/balancing challenges, especially when that policy also increases the amount of intermittent generation. Then there's the problem of charging points, as pointed out previously. The maximum pollution benefit is in dense urban areas where it's hardest & most expensive to provide charging points. While EVs are a niche product, companies like Tesla can externalise those costs, but as they become mainstream, that will be more challenging. So potentially EV taxes instead of subsidies.

But then a fair chunk of Tesla's revenues come from EV subsidies, and it's still losing around $13k per vehicle. So competion from other makers will just make that problem worse.

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Jellied Eel

The UK has a generating surplus of 33TWh. So we can support roughly 8 million cars out of our generating surplus.

Problem is electricity doesn't work like that. It's not like, say, petrol or diesel where you can store it in a tank for people to fill up on demand. Challenge is the demand profile, ie when 8 million cars are going to want to be recharged. If that's from say, 0830-1200 and 1900-0000 then it's additional load at peak times, where generating surplus may be tighter. Or cost of extra energy a lot higher, ie payments under the UK capacity mechanism.

Tesla's attempting to work around those challenges by offering an entire ecosystem. So buy your car, then your solar panels/tiles and a battery array, which adds to the TCO for the car but won't entirely negate the grid impact. There are suggestions for grid-scale battery storage, but all that does is add cost.

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Hard-pressed Juicero boss defends $400 IoT juicer after squeezing $120m from investors

Jellied Eel

Re: Who actually thought this was a good idea?

The founders presumably thought this was a good idea. The investors may have initially thought the same.

But... California. It seems to be outdoing Florida for sharks and suckers. And they have something in common, like producing a good chunk of America's fresh fruit & veg. Ok, so some growers are diversifying due to realising exporting water isn't necessarily sustainable. But this seems an awfully complicated and ungreen way to get food to consumers. Unlike the good'ol bottle, recycling the packaging is going to be costly, and offset any time saved cleaning a cheaper juicer if you have to wash out the juice bag. And if there's no preservatives, there'll be more waste.. Or mess if they start fermenting and leak.

But most of that stuff isn't the producer's cost, they socialise that. Flogging less than a pound of fruit or veg for $5-10 is all they're interested in.

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US military makes first drop of Mother-of-All-Bombs on Daesh-bags

Jellied Eel

Or A380 Bomber variant

So make a bomb that's so bigly it can only be dropped from a transport aircraft. To make a bigger momma, you need a bigger cargo plane. But the MOAB is GPS guided. So if you've got air superiority and skies safe enough for transports, why not use them as bombers?

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Dungeons & Dragons finally going digital

Jellied Eel

Re: It ain't D&D without a tangible 20-sided die...

Nah, it's when your boss tells you to use your initiative, there's a rattle of dice, and a cry of 'natural 20 biatch!'. Strange how some frown on roleplaying, yet there's a multi-billion dollar industry doing it for grown ups in the form of management training and team building. Nerd spotting would involve a disembodied voice saying "role for initiative!" and seeing who goes for their dice..

But for those people, it'll be interesting to see how the WoC version compares to existing stuff like Roll20, and how much it'll cost.

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This is where UK's Navy will park its 65,000-tonne aircraft carriers

Jellied Eel

Simple really..

"The QE-class carriers will overhang the jetty by around five metres once snug against its fenders."

Zombies can't climb overhangs. Might still need to have a ship's cat to deal with other unwanted guests though.

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Tesla 'API crashes' after update, angry rich bods complain

Jellied Eel

One of the biggest advantages of owning a Tesla is that if there ever is a problem with the software, it can be fixed easily and automatically over the air.

.. Unless the OTA update bricks the car instead of just locking you out. I think I'll stick with a good'ol fashioned key. That's a traditional way to get in and start the car, and most motorists are conditioned to that. Not driving somewhere, and then standing forlornly in a car park mashing a phone button and hoping it'll let you in. At least it helps highlight the problems with 'smart' car technology.

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Tuesday's AWS S3-izure exposes Amazon-sized internet bottleneck

Jellied Eel

Re: In an ideal world

.. Business owners understand the cost of failure. So direct costs from lost productivity and reputational damage. Unless businesses can state how much a protracted outage will cost them, they can't sensibly decide if a DR solution is 'too expensive'. Sensible business owners understand this, and work with suppliers to design solutions that meet the operational requirements. Less sensible ones buy DSL connections to save costs, but then wonder why their office/store/factory/warehouse connections fail.

Sensible business owners also understand that there might be.. limitations with low-cost cloud solutions, especially if they're 'one size fits all', which can make integrating DR a lot harder, especially if there's software that may not play nicely in a virtualised/containerised world. But it is possible, ie one client decided to go with a private cloud solution that allowed synchronous replication between two widely seperated data centres. Which was pretty awsome demonstrating DR invocation to the client, and them not noticing the cutover.

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Ad men hope blocking has stalled as sites guilt users into switching off

Jellied Eel

Re: integrated marketing

Integrated marketing could actually work. So I binge-watch Breaking Bad and then 'Amazon recommends..' a range of lab chemicals & glassware. Or just an 8' roll of heavy duty PVC and a chainsaw. Or perhaps just some t-shirts, mugs and other merchandise.

Or gaming. So I watched a Twitch stream of some folks playing 7 Days to Die. The ads were almost exclusively trying to persuade me to go to Manchester. I'm not sure if that's because the analytic engine figured that's the closest thing to an apocalyptic wasteland filled with ravenous creatures (that's Slough) but it's in no way relevant. Nor is serving me an ad for an Xbone exclusive when I'm watching something on a PC or PS4. If the industry can't personalise by platform, then its just wasting money.

But there is perhaps hope. Like an overlay function where we could pause a bit of product placement, click on the product and find out more, or even buy it.

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Jellied Eel

Re: The ads are bad...

I can remember Internet ads. One being the Twix "two men, one factory" and the other Virgin Trains. Both memorable because they seemed to be the only ads showing. So despite being reminded every break, I didn't feel an uncontrollable urge to buy a Twix or jump on a train to Manchester. Especially when that would mean a trip to London, then Manchester. And despite the fare only being an arm + both legs, it wouldn't leave me any change to get a Twix. Not that the overexposure made me want to buy a Twix. More like find their marketing person, ram a delicious caramel and chocolate coated biscuit up each nostril and ram their head into a desk whilst shouting 'not every 30 seconds'. Ok, that would mean I'd have to buy 1 Twix..

So perhaps the ad industry should look at the ad nauseum effect and how frequently their ads get repeated. The ad server may get money every play, but it probably doesn't give the viewer a warm fuzzy desire to buy stuff. Which is linked to the other main problem. Despite sites being infested with trackers and billions wasted on analytics, ads never seem to show me anything I want to buy. A simple cookie-ish thing where a user could actually express interest in ads they may find interesting would help make the ads more relevant, and waste advertisers less money.

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BT and Virgin Media claim 'broadband' tax will cost £1.3bn

Jellied Eel

You want the gory details?

See-

http://manuals.voa.gov.uk/corporate/publications/Manuals/RatingManual/RatingManualVolume5/sect871/rat-man-vol5-s871.html

Which includes fun elements like testing freshly laid fibre can attract a rate charge, and so can fibre that's switched off. Which can lead to issues around how to cease connections properly to avoid future charges. BT, Virgin, Kingston get a different metric based on number of subscribers, as well as rateable value assessed to infrastructure. But basically if you have dark fibre, rates are due on it from the entity that lights it, not the supplier. What it means in practice is explained in the Practice Note here-

http://manuals.voa.gov.uk/corporate/publications/Manuals/RatingManual/RatingManualVolume5/sect871/rat-man-vol5-s871-pn-Fibre-2017.html

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Jellied Eel

That assumes the value of the property has gone up. When I started working at an ISP, a 2Mbps leased line went for £2,000/month. Now.. it doesn't. The value of lit fibre's linked to the value of the services that run across it, and the market price for services has fallen, not increased. Potential capacity has gone up, but that doesn't mean customers are going to be happy paying higher business rates or service charges for dark, lit or even 'dim' fibre. Especially as the market's pushed towards FTTC/FTTH provision.

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Who do you want to be Who? VOTE for the BBC's next Time Lord

Jellied Eel

Re: Ewan Bremner

Spud? Greg Wallace!

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Going underground: The Royal Mail's great London train squeeze

Jellied Eel

I could make a good heap of dosh running dark fiber for people, and even more for intercepting that (hey, according to Hollywood, that's what people with underground lairs do, it's now UK accepted practice and something suitably evil has to pay for the upkeep).

Sadly not that simple. Problem is you're constrained both by the limited route, and by wayleave costs getting fibre in/out of the tunnel. Then there can be additional O&M costs or embuggerances due to limited access, maintenance windows, HSE restrictions etc that impact on cost and SLA. So for example when the tunnels were operating 22hrs a day, you'd have to fit any installation/repair work in with the 2hr maintenance window. Or try 'Stop the train! Teh Interweb's down!'.

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San Francisco's sinking luxury Millennium Tower: Tilt spotted FROM SPACE

Jellied Eel

Re: Not sure you need a satellite

Or your washing line snaps. Kind of curious what the fix would be, ie piling under the slab, expanding the slab or injecting concrete/binders to increase the support.

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Put down the org chart, snowflake: Why largile's for management crybabies

Jellied Eel

Re: Removing the need

Don't forget, the BA's are often the first to flee. Especially if they've found another contract to flee to.

But as a humble user and pugilist, rather than an agilist.. in amongst the foreign language, this bit jumped out- "They started the project with several hundred pages of requirements that business analysts had build up like a perfect cathedral." Usually developed by talking to process/business owners who've spent much of their career developing intricate flow charts that everyone else ignores. So development becomes a tad pointless when the real process is to wander into provisioning/ops and ask for favors, because the actual customer requirement doesn't fit the process.

No amount of agility helps, unless it means being able to kludge code into ever more convoluted messes which you can flee before you have to maintain it. Best example I saw was from a planned sales order->provisioning->ops supersystem and being dragged into a meeting to help with the customer routing table production and maintenance. Somehow, the BA and various other process owners figured it was better for pre-sales people to manually input that and maintain it rather than simply grabbing it off the routers.

That project was abandoned after sinking around $13m when management realised a) The process owners didn't understand their processes and b) it was about as agile as a sumo wrestler in a coma. Luckily I'd managed to flee that one before the axe fell.

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Tesla to charge for road trip 'leccy, promises it will cost less than petrol

Jellied Eel

Re: hint to Tesla owners

Indeed that's the plan. Tesla sees it's acquisition of SolarCity as highly complementary, and not just to the Musk/Rive families. The synergistic combination of car, PowerWall, and panels creates the perfect ecosystem for the Tesla Owner's Solar Home. Simply take your Model S (90kWh), your Powerwall2 (13.5kWh) and your solar tiles (unspecified) and you're free to motor!

In addition, Tesla owners can contribute to reducing traffic congestion in the process, ie 400kWh/1,000 miles means you'll get an extra 5.5 miles from your own storage and charging system! If you need more, our sales people will be only too happy to quote for additional Powerwall2 units. And if you need extra space for more units, or more solar tiles, why not contact Tesla Realty to discuss purchase of a larger home?

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Spoof an Ethernet adapter on USB, and you can sniff credentials from locked laptops

Jellied Eel

Re: Oh look, there's a dongle in one of the USB ports of my laptop

I agree, but is this really, still, considered outside the box? I thought this was common knowledge before I was born?

It should be, and often was in places that told you what color bikini to wear that day. But take finance, where there are strict audit and compliance rules. Yet the LIBOR rigging showed the participants happily co-ordinating via their own IM channel. And then there's BYOD, with all the potential risks that entails. The physical side can also be overlooked. So a company may have a nice, secure data centre or comms room with strict access control to authorised persons only. And a couple of cleaning passes. Closing that vector can get tricky, ie having IT staff supervising, or doing the cleaning themselves. Or executives who sometimes think IT policy applies to staff, not them, and they should be allowed whatever gizmo they fancy. Despite often being the most obvious targets.

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Jellied Eel

Re: Oh look, there's a dongle in one of the USB ports of my laptop

It's one of those areas where protection needs thinking outside the IT security box. Easiest way to hack a network is usually from the inside, and easiest way to get inside might be via a cleaning contractor. High staff turnover, and often supervised by someone looking for dust, not dongles. Port locking can go some way to slowing down connection of foreign devices, but this kind of attack is harder to stop. Having virtualised desktops might be one way, but still vulnerable to keylogger dongles.

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Jellied Eel

Re: Oh look, there's a dongle in one of the USB ports of my laptop

Oh look, there's a cleaner with a dongle. Who'd notice?

The attack requires physical access for not very long. So challenge is to get that access.. Or more importantly, prevent it. Some secure sites have been trying to prevent USB, but it's ubiquity and lack of support for non-USB keyboards and mice can make that tricky.

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US Air Force declares F-35 'combat-ready'

Jellied Eel

Re: Well defined

Again solvable via marketing. Simply define the target post-mission. 100% success rate!

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F-35 targeting system laser will be 'almost impossible' to use in UK

Jellied Eel

Re: There's a marketing explanation.

"The F-35 offers an unprecedented and revolutionary level of stealth characteristics to vastly redue it's probability of detection, with state of the art measures to reduce optical detection from a ground breaking 33km, and can remain undetectable by observers at ranges of up to 9km in attack mode."

It's just another way of ensuring that all targets can be prosecuted, especially if they take pictures of an F-35 in action. Given that's likely to be quite an exclusive snap for a number of years, the US is simply protecting it's image rights.

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Verizon wants to replace your net gateways with 'a simple mux'

Jellied Eel

At last..

So for a long time, CPE= Router. But normally a router, well, routes. If it only has a LAN & a WAN interface, it's just forwarding. So replace router with a switch AKA 'NID' and save a chunk of money. Especially as customers are keen on L2VPNs, which is a bit silly if a router's then used to emulate a switch.

Then if customers want to manage their own security, they can use their own edge devices in their network. If they don't, point the LAN/VLAN at a cloud based service. That reduces OAM costs, and can improve security by standardising builds and patches.

As for free consultancy, Verizon's rather huge and wouldn't likely be looking to source many thousands of devices from a small business. It wants one with the support & delivery infrastructure to bang out networks with the minimum of fuss.

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Celebrated eye hospital Moorfields lets Google eyeball 1 million scans

Jellied Eel

Re: It's not ok

It's not so much an advertising company, but a company that monetises people's personal information. Whether that's tailoring ads, or flogging data to insurers. Yes, there may be some medical benefits, but also lots of potential commercial benefits to Google. Especially if they get more of these deals and start de-anoymising and cross-linking. Data controllers could try putting limits on use and sharing, but once the data is out there, they've lost control of it.

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BBC's micro:bit retail shipments near

Jellied Eel

Re: There's hope for us yet!

Something I envied the rich kids with the Acorn boxes for was the I/O potential. Bridging the analog/digital divide and making a computer control real-world stuff is great fun. Who knows, maybe a micro:bit kid will be the next to flog a temperature sensor to Google for large slabs of cash.

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Jellied Eel

Re: There's hope for us yet!

Keep it small, keep it tight!

32kb? Luxury. Kids these days are spoiled rotten enough as it is. When I were a lad, I remember getting my 16K ram pack for my ZX-81 and wondering what I'd do with all that memory! Teaching kids to write small, efficient code is far more useful given that should translate to cheaper/smaller iGizmos

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GCHQ's Twitter move: Wants to be 'accessible', people to 'understand'

Jellied Eel

Re: Interesting Concept...

It's nice that they're being a little more open. It's also nice they got welcomed by NSA & CIA.. but FSB?

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F-35's dodgy software in the spotlight again

Jellied Eel

Re: Anyone seen the rabbit hole?

One does not need to code 'Angry Birds' into ALIS when one can simulate angry Raptors from inside the app. Complete with leaderboards and mission evaluation. On the bright side, suppliers may improve delivery, if angry maintenance workers can plan airstrikes on their HQs. But even with DoD style guides, this must be a rather complex system to test and secure.. And if it's not secure, what could possibly go wrong?

Otherwise, the TCO for the F-35 is looking much worse than it already did.

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