* Posts by Jellied Eel

256 posts • joined 18 Aug 2008

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His Muskiness wheels out the Tesla Model 3

Jellied Eel

Re: UK Sales?

I thought Tesla had a maintenance network for it's existing models? As for RHD conversions, the Model 3 interior looks.. spartan. Move the instrument panel a lil to the right, and if it's 'drive by wire', moving the foot switches and steering wheel should be relatively cheap.

But Tesla has to sell a lot of Model 3s. Sales of it's current models haven't been hitting forecasts and the company is bleeding cash. Maybe it'll end up going the way of NUMMI as costs mount and competition increases.

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CityFibre snaps up Entanet for £29m and plans to raise £185m

Jellied Eel

Re: Note. This is for businesses.

Wait and see. FTTP won't become common until access costs fall to a point that's acceptable to a customer who's looking at a low per-Mbps price point.. Often made more challenging if customers will only sign 1 year contracts. Most of that is a simple civil engineering challenge rather than telecomms, or even the wacky world of the Interwebz.

Challenge is losing £12.6m on sales of £15.4m, and what, if any efficiency savings might get made from spending £29m on Entanet. So possibly £3m by 2020. There's the £400m broadband carrot, but delivering that still involves substantial cost and risk, hence the general lack of interested parties.

But borrowing money to buy revenues is nothing new in telecomms. This time, maybe it will be different..

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No hypersonic railguns on our ships this year, says US Navy

Jellied Eel

Re: Will it fit on a shark?

We're gonna need a bigger shark!

Or a better power source.. Like a few RR PWR's stuck in any spare spaces on out carriers. They work, railguns.. perhaps less so, unless they've overcome problems with rails warping or eroding.

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BA's 'global IT system failure' was due to 'power surge'

Jellied Eel

Re: "Tirelessly"?

This probably isn't a DR issue, but an HA one. So BA relies heavily on IT to know where it's aircraft, passengers, staff, luggage, spare crews, spare parts and everything else is, in real-time. So lots of interdependent data that would need to be synchronously replicated between the DCs at LHR so an accurate state table is maintained, even if X breaks.. But then if X does break, and there's data losss or corruption, getting back to a working state gets harder. Rolling back to a previous state may tell you where stuff was, but not where it is now.. Which can be a fun sizing challenge if you don't have enough transaction capacity to handle an entire resync.

Or maybe power & cooling capacity. Unusually for a UK bank holiday, the weather has been quite nice. So cooling & power demands increased in and around LHR, which includes lots of large datacentres. On the plus side, there'd be plenty of food for IT & power folks working at LHR given meals have probably been arriving, with no passengers to eat them.

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Cisco's servers are stuck in limbo, look likely to stay there

Jellied Eel

I am Cisco's lack of suprise

Cisco is a network company. Ok, so it also dabbles in clothing and book selling. But there seems to be a problem of getting too big and forgetting your roots. So networking, not trying to dabble in commodity server shifting. Especially when Cisco's competitors have been merrily chipping away at their core networking business.

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Why Microsoft's Windows game plan makes us WannaCry

Jellied Eel

Re: "if anything good comes from WannCrypt it'll be a whole new emphasis

Those that ignore history are condemned to repeat it. Or maybe work in software maintenance at Microsoft. From wiki on what was previously regarded as the most expensive software error, the Ariane 5/Cluster mission-

"The greater horizontal acceleration caused a data conversion from a 64-bit floating point number to a 16-bit signed integer value to overflow and cause a hardware exception. Efficiency considerations had omitted range checks for this particular variable, though conversions of other variables in the code were protected. The exception halted the reference platforms, resulting in the destruction of the flight."

SMB's had performance issues in the past, so perhaps range checks were omitted for the same reason, with much the same result.

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Jellied Eel

Re: certification

There's probably an MS Certification you can buy.

But the exploit seems to rely on subtracting a 32bit DWORD from a 16bit WORD. And C is well known for it's ability to write to memory, and limited built in sanity checking. Competent programmers know this. Microsofts presumably didn't.

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Tesla: Revenues up, losses deepen, in start to 'exciting' 2017

Jellied Eel

Grid balancing's a bit like the old Economy7 system to keep baseload generation happy. Problem with using cars is how the Shinfield posse can switch cars from 'suck' to 'blow'. That would need smarter meters that are currently being installed, and export metering. Plus car owners to opt-in easily, and probably be opted out of any liability for damage to batteries. Price incentives would then require more subsidies added to electricity costs.

And if we continue with the Climate Change Act and it's decarbonisation requirements, car charging will have to load share with electric heating and cooking.. Which adds to the grid demand/balancing challenges, especially when that policy also increases the amount of intermittent generation. Then there's the problem of charging points, as pointed out previously. The maximum pollution benefit is in dense urban areas where it's hardest & most expensive to provide charging points. While EVs are a niche product, companies like Tesla can externalise those costs, but as they become mainstream, that will be more challenging. So potentially EV taxes instead of subsidies.

But then a fair chunk of Tesla's revenues come from EV subsidies, and it's still losing around $13k per vehicle. So competion from other makers will just make that problem worse.

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Jellied Eel

The UK has a generating surplus of 33TWh. So we can support roughly 8 million cars out of our generating surplus.

Problem is electricity doesn't work like that. It's not like, say, petrol or diesel where you can store it in a tank for people to fill up on demand. Challenge is the demand profile, ie when 8 million cars are going to want to be recharged. If that's from say, 0830-1200 and 1900-0000 then it's additional load at peak times, where generating surplus may be tighter. Or cost of extra energy a lot higher, ie payments under the UK capacity mechanism.

Tesla's attempting to work around those challenges by offering an entire ecosystem. So buy your car, then your solar panels/tiles and a battery array, which adds to the TCO for the car but won't entirely negate the grid impact. There are suggestions for grid-scale battery storage, but all that does is add cost.

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Hard-pressed Juicero boss defends $400 IoT juicer after squeezing $120m from investors

Jellied Eel

Re: Who actually thought this was a good idea?

The founders presumably thought this was a good idea. The investors may have initially thought the same.

But... California. It seems to be outdoing Florida for sharks and suckers. And they have something in common, like producing a good chunk of America's fresh fruit & veg. Ok, so some growers are diversifying due to realising exporting water isn't necessarily sustainable. But this seems an awfully complicated and ungreen way to get food to consumers. Unlike the good'ol bottle, recycling the packaging is going to be costly, and offset any time saved cleaning a cheaper juicer if you have to wash out the juice bag. And if there's no preservatives, there'll be more waste.. Or mess if they start fermenting and leak.

But most of that stuff isn't the producer's cost, they socialise that. Flogging less than a pound of fruit or veg for $5-10 is all they're interested in.

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US military makes first drop of Mother-of-All-Bombs on Daesh-bags

Jellied Eel

Or A380 Bomber variant

So make a bomb that's so bigly it can only be dropped from a transport aircraft. To make a bigger momma, you need a bigger cargo plane. But the MOAB is GPS guided. So if you've got air superiority and skies safe enough for transports, why not use them as bombers?

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Dungeons & Dragons finally going digital

Jellied Eel

Re: It ain't D&D without a tangible 20-sided die...

Nah, it's when your boss tells you to use your initiative, there's a rattle of dice, and a cry of 'natural 20 biatch!'. Strange how some frown on roleplaying, yet there's a multi-billion dollar industry doing it for grown ups in the form of management training and team building. Nerd spotting would involve a disembodied voice saying "role for initiative!" and seeing who goes for their dice..

But for those people, it'll be interesting to see how the WoC version compares to existing stuff like Roll20, and how much it'll cost.

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This is where UK's Navy will park its 75,000-ton aircraft carriers

Jellied Eel

Simple really..

"The QE-class carriers will overhang the jetty by around five metres once snug against its fenders."

Zombies can't climb overhangs. Might still need to have a ship's cat to deal with other unwanted guests though.

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Tesla 'API crashes' after update, angry rich bods complain

Jellied Eel

One of the biggest advantages of owning a Tesla is that if there ever is a problem with the software, it can be fixed easily and automatically over the air.

.. Unless the OTA update bricks the car instead of just locking you out. I think I'll stick with a good'ol fashioned key. That's a traditional way to get in and start the car, and most motorists are conditioned to that. Not driving somewhere, and then standing forlornly in a car park mashing a phone button and hoping it'll let you in. At least it helps highlight the problems with 'smart' car technology.

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Tuesday's AWS S3-izure exposes Amazon-sized internet bottleneck

Jellied Eel

Re: In an ideal world

.. Business owners understand the cost of failure. So direct costs from lost productivity and reputational damage. Unless businesses can state how much a protracted outage will cost them, they can't sensibly decide if a DR solution is 'too expensive'. Sensible business owners understand this, and work with suppliers to design solutions that meet the operational requirements. Less sensible ones buy DSL connections to save costs, but then wonder why their office/store/factory/warehouse connections fail.

Sensible business owners also understand that there might be.. limitations with low-cost cloud solutions, especially if they're 'one size fits all', which can make integrating DR a lot harder, especially if there's software that may not play nicely in a virtualised/containerised world. But it is possible, ie one client decided to go with a private cloud solution that allowed synchronous replication between two widely seperated data centres. Which was pretty awsome demonstrating DR invocation to the client, and them not noticing the cutover.

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Ad men hope blocking has stalled as sites guilt users into switching off

Jellied Eel

Re: integrated marketing

Integrated marketing could actually work. So I binge-watch Breaking Bad and then 'Amazon recommends..' a range of lab chemicals & glassware. Or just an 8' roll of heavy duty PVC and a chainsaw. Or perhaps just some t-shirts, mugs and other merchandise.

Or gaming. So I watched a Twitch stream of some folks playing 7 Days to Die. The ads were almost exclusively trying to persuade me to go to Manchester. I'm not sure if that's because the analytic engine figured that's the closest thing to an apocalyptic wasteland filled with ravenous creatures (that's Slough) but it's in no way relevant. Nor is serving me an ad for an Xbone exclusive when I'm watching something on a PC or PS4. If the industry can't personalise by platform, then its just wasting money.

But there is perhaps hope. Like an overlay function where we could pause a bit of product placement, click on the product and find out more, or even buy it.

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Jellied Eel

Re: The ads are bad...

I can remember Internet ads. One being the Twix "two men, one factory" and the other Virgin Trains. Both memorable because they seemed to be the only ads showing. So despite being reminded every break, I didn't feel an uncontrollable urge to buy a Twix or jump on a train to Manchester. Especially when that would mean a trip to London, then Manchester. And despite the fare only being an arm + both legs, it wouldn't leave me any change to get a Twix. Not that the overexposure made me want to buy a Twix. More like find their marketing person, ram a delicious caramel and chocolate coated biscuit up each nostril and ram their head into a desk whilst shouting 'not every 30 seconds'. Ok, that would mean I'd have to buy 1 Twix..

So perhaps the ad industry should look at the ad nauseum effect and how frequently their ads get repeated. The ad server may get money every play, but it probably doesn't give the viewer a warm fuzzy desire to buy stuff. Which is linked to the other main problem. Despite sites being infested with trackers and billions wasted on analytics, ads never seem to show me anything I want to buy. A simple cookie-ish thing where a user could actually express interest in ads they may find interesting would help make the ads more relevant, and waste advertisers less money.

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BT and Virgin Media claim 'broadband' tax will cost £1.3bn

Jellied Eel

You want the gory details?

See-

http://manuals.voa.gov.uk/corporate/publications/Manuals/RatingManual/RatingManualVolume5/sect871/rat-man-vol5-s871.html

Which includes fun elements like testing freshly laid fibre can attract a rate charge, and so can fibre that's switched off. Which can lead to issues around how to cease connections properly to avoid future charges. BT, Virgin, Kingston get a different metric based on number of subscribers, as well as rateable value assessed to infrastructure. But basically if you have dark fibre, rates are due on it from the entity that lights it, not the supplier. What it means in practice is explained in the Practice Note here-

http://manuals.voa.gov.uk/corporate/publications/Manuals/RatingManual/RatingManualVolume5/sect871/rat-man-vol5-s871-pn-Fibre-2017.html

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Jellied Eel

That assumes the value of the property has gone up. When I started working at an ISP, a 2Mbps leased line went for £2,000/month. Now.. it doesn't. The value of lit fibre's linked to the value of the services that run across it, and the market price for services has fallen, not increased. Potential capacity has gone up, but that doesn't mean customers are going to be happy paying higher business rates or service charges for dark, lit or even 'dim' fibre. Especially as the market's pushed towards FTTC/FTTH provision.

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Who do you want to be Who? VOTE for the BBC's next Time Lord

Jellied Eel

Re: Ewan Bremner

Spud? Greg Wallace!

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Going underground: The Royal Mail's great London train squeeze

Jellied Eel

I could make a good heap of dosh running dark fiber for people, and even more for intercepting that (hey, according to Hollywood, that's what people with underground lairs do, it's now UK accepted practice and something suitably evil has to pay for the upkeep).

Sadly not that simple. Problem is you're constrained both by the limited route, and by wayleave costs getting fibre in/out of the tunnel. Then there can be additional O&M costs or embuggerances due to limited access, maintenance windows, HSE restrictions etc that impact on cost and SLA. So for example when the tunnels were operating 22hrs a day, you'd have to fit any installation/repair work in with the 2hr maintenance window. Or try 'Stop the train! Teh Interweb's down!'.

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San Francisco's sinking luxury Millennium Tower: Tilt spotted FROM SPACE

Jellied Eel

Re: Not sure you need a satellite

Or your washing line snaps. Kind of curious what the fix would be, ie piling under the slab, expanding the slab or injecting concrete/binders to increase the support.

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Put down the org chart, snowflake: Why largile's for management crybabies

Jellied Eel

Re: Removing the need

Don't forget, the BA's are often the first to flee. Especially if they've found another contract to flee to.

But as a humble user and pugilist, rather than an agilist.. in amongst the foreign language, this bit jumped out- "They started the project with several hundred pages of requirements that business analysts had build up like a perfect cathedral." Usually developed by talking to process/business owners who've spent much of their career developing intricate flow charts that everyone else ignores. So development becomes a tad pointless when the real process is to wander into provisioning/ops and ask for favors, because the actual customer requirement doesn't fit the process.

No amount of agility helps, unless it means being able to kludge code into ever more convoluted messes which you can flee before you have to maintain it. Best example I saw was from a planned sales order->provisioning->ops supersystem and being dragged into a meeting to help with the customer routing table production and maintenance. Somehow, the BA and various other process owners figured it was better for pre-sales people to manually input that and maintain it rather than simply grabbing it off the routers.

That project was abandoned after sinking around $13m when management realised a) The process owners didn't understand their processes and b) it was about as agile as a sumo wrestler in a coma. Luckily I'd managed to flee that one before the axe fell.

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Tesla to charge for road trip 'leccy, promises it will cost less than petrol

Jellied Eel

Re: hint to Tesla owners

Indeed that's the plan. Tesla sees it's acquisition of SolarCity as highly complementary, and not just to the Musk/Rive families. The synergistic combination of car, PowerWall, and panels creates the perfect ecosystem for the Tesla Owner's Solar Home. Simply take your Model S (90kWh), your Powerwall2 (13.5kWh) and your solar tiles (unspecified) and you're free to motor!

In addition, Tesla owners can contribute to reducing traffic congestion in the process, ie 400kWh/1,000 miles means you'll get an extra 5.5 miles from your own storage and charging system! If you need more, our sales people will be only too happy to quote for additional Powerwall2 units. And if you need extra space for more units, or more solar tiles, why not contact Tesla Realty to discuss purchase of a larger home?

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Spoof an Ethernet adapter on USB, and you can sniff credentials from locked laptops

Jellied Eel

Re: Oh look, there's a dongle in one of the USB ports of my laptop

I agree, but is this really, still, considered outside the box? I thought this was common knowledge before I was born?

It should be, and often was in places that told you what color bikini to wear that day. But take finance, where there are strict audit and compliance rules. Yet the LIBOR rigging showed the participants happily co-ordinating via their own IM channel. And then there's BYOD, with all the potential risks that entails. The physical side can also be overlooked. So a company may have a nice, secure data centre or comms room with strict access control to authorised persons only. And a couple of cleaning passes. Closing that vector can get tricky, ie having IT staff supervising, or doing the cleaning themselves. Or executives who sometimes think IT policy applies to staff, not them, and they should be allowed whatever gizmo they fancy. Despite often being the most obvious targets.

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Jellied Eel

Re: Oh look, there's a dongle in one of the USB ports of my laptop

It's one of those areas where protection needs thinking outside the IT security box. Easiest way to hack a network is usually from the inside, and easiest way to get inside might be via a cleaning contractor. High staff turnover, and often supervised by someone looking for dust, not dongles. Port locking can go some way to slowing down connection of foreign devices, but this kind of attack is harder to stop. Having virtualised desktops might be one way, but still vulnerable to keylogger dongles.

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Jellied Eel

Re: Oh look, there's a dongle in one of the USB ports of my laptop

Oh look, there's a cleaner with a dongle. Who'd notice?

The attack requires physical access for not very long. So challenge is to get that access.. Or more importantly, prevent it. Some secure sites have been trying to prevent USB, but it's ubiquity and lack of support for non-USB keyboards and mice can make that tricky.

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US Air Force declares F-35 'combat-ready'

Jellied Eel

Re: Well defined

Again solvable via marketing. Simply define the target post-mission. 100% success rate!

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F-35 targeting system laser will be 'almost impossible' to use in UK

Jellied Eel

Re: There's a marketing explanation.

"The F-35 offers an unprecedented and revolutionary level of stealth characteristics to vastly redue it's probability of detection, with state of the art measures to reduce optical detection from a ground breaking 33km, and can remain undetectable by observers at ranges of up to 9km in attack mode."

It's just another way of ensuring that all targets can be prosecuted, especially if they take pictures of an F-35 in action. Given that's likely to be quite an exclusive snap for a number of years, the US is simply protecting it's image rights.

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Verizon wants to replace your net gateways with 'a simple mux'

Jellied Eel

At last..

So for a long time, CPE= Router. But normally a router, well, routes. If it only has a LAN & a WAN interface, it's just forwarding. So replace router with a switch AKA 'NID' and save a chunk of money. Especially as customers are keen on L2VPNs, which is a bit silly if a router's then used to emulate a switch.

Then if customers want to manage their own security, they can use their own edge devices in their network. If they don't, point the LAN/VLAN at a cloud based service. That reduces OAM costs, and can improve security by standardising builds and patches.

As for free consultancy, Verizon's rather huge and wouldn't likely be looking to source many thousands of devices from a small business. It wants one with the support & delivery infrastructure to bang out networks with the minimum of fuss.

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Celebrated eye hospital Moorfields lets Google eyeball 1 million scans

Jellied Eel

Re: It's not ok

It's not so much an advertising company, but a company that monetises people's personal information. Whether that's tailoring ads, or flogging data to insurers. Yes, there may be some medical benefits, but also lots of potential commercial benefits to Google. Especially if they get more of these deals and start de-anoymising and cross-linking. Data controllers could try putting limits on use and sharing, but once the data is out there, they've lost control of it.

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BBC's micro:bit retail shipments near

Jellied Eel

Re: There's hope for us yet!

Something I envied the rich kids with the Acorn boxes for was the I/O potential. Bridging the analog/digital divide and making a computer control real-world stuff is great fun. Who knows, maybe a micro:bit kid will be the next to flog a temperature sensor to Google for large slabs of cash.

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Jellied Eel

Re: There's hope for us yet!

Keep it small, keep it tight!

32kb? Luxury. Kids these days are spoiled rotten enough as it is. When I were a lad, I remember getting my 16K ram pack for my ZX-81 and wondering what I'd do with all that memory! Teaching kids to write small, efficient code is far more useful given that should translate to cheaper/smaller iGizmos

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GCHQ's Twitter move: Wants to be 'accessible', people to 'understand'

Jellied Eel

Re: Interesting Concept...

It's nice that they're being a little more open. It's also nice they got welcomed by NSA & CIA.. but FSB?

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F-35's dodgy software in the spotlight again

Jellied Eel

Re: Anyone seen the rabbit hole?

One does not need to code 'Angry Birds' into ALIS when one can simulate angry Raptors from inside the app. Complete with leaderboards and mission evaluation. On the bright side, suppliers may improve delivery, if angry maintenance workers can plan airstrikes on their HQs. But even with DoD style guides, this must be a rather complex system to test and secure.. And if it's not secure, what could possibly go wrong?

Otherwise, the TCO for the F-35 is looking much worse than it already did.

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Britain is sending a huge nuclear waste shipment to America. Why?

Jellied Eel

Re: Bury it and mark it

Of all the anti-burial arguments, the 10ka signage one has to be the worst. So we could (and possibly have) create a Signage committte, with international experts from Greenpeace, FoE etc. They could meet in exotic locations quarterly, and be funded by taxpayers and the nuclear industry.

Alternatively, repainting signs could just be part of the site maintenance plan. It's a non-problem. Unless the UK gets depopulated entirely, and everyone forgets where the site was, it can be maintained. Or future archaelogists could discover an ancient tomb, and try to discover who may have been buried with such a rich haul of fuel to power their afterlife. Or future us could just change the signage from Waste Dump to Fuel Dump.

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German ex-pat jailed for smearing own pat all over Cork apartment

Jellied Eel

Re: The, ahem, marvellous variety of the human race

"A good loss adjuster will have those floorboards put on Ebay in minutes"

Luxury stained wood flooring. Well seasoned, and perfect for high-end renovations. Also available, several square meters of extra-cured leather.

If that doesn't shift it, then perhaps list it for the specialty market.

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GCHQ's CESG team's crypto proposal isn't dumb, it's malicious... and I didn't notice

Jellied Eel

Re: a user’s identity is their public key

"Want to be able to access a load of services that trust each other - they'll either have one big KMS, or some kind of trust relationship between them."

That's the general idea, and identity management services are a huge business opportunity. And something CESG is very familiar with, eg previous efforts with services like 'Cloudcover'. Sadly CESG's been better at tech than marketing and that was perhaps premature. But still useful to have and it all boils down to that fundament of security. Trust. I'd rather trust someone like CESG than some of the commercial identity providers.

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Jellied Eel

a user’s identity is their public key

And their public key is issued and can be revoked by.. whom? And used to securely identify themselves with all public sector services. And can be extended to a 'trusted identity' service for other commercial users. CESG is of course expected to generate business and revenues to support it's activities. And I'd rather trust CESG to do this than, say, Facebook. Sign into my NHS account with my Facebook ID? What could possibly go wrong?

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Licence to snoop: Ipso facto, crypto embargo? Draft Investigatory Powers bill lands

Jellied Eel

CCDP? Certfied Cisco Design Professional?

It's strange people are up in arms about our security services wanting to do this, yet many are happy for Win10 or Google to hoover up far more personal information.

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SeaMeWe-3 submarine cable spur borked until November 10th

Jellied Eel

Cable theft has happened in the past. There was one fairly recently near Singapore. Given the power going through most submarine cables, it's likely to be semi-Darwinian. If not, I think the lot that did this were sentenced to death anyway.

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Volvo eyes kangaroo detection tech

Jellied Eel

That's official advice. I went to a zoo near Melbourne and the police had a stand doing the safety thing. Including a rather flat estate car that a big red had used as a crash mat. The occupants did not survive and should have fitted roo bars. Then there was some other critter that was like a hell's hedgehog. Big, solid, curled up in the road when it saw headlights and would flip cars if they hit it. And traction control vs a corner covered in cane toads. And I guess hitting a saltie croc at speed would be bad for one's no claims bonus. The land of natural hazards..

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller special: The WHO bacon sarnie of death

Jellied Eel

Re: Well...

Have we done chilli and bacon yet? If not, best to go out with a bang. Or a whimper..

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Bacon can kill: Official

Jellied Eel

Re: Which process?

A process of elimination, obviously. That which might kill you makes more taxes.

Curing is a double whammy which is why bacon is on the list with plutonium. Nitrates are commonly used in making explosives, and whilst there are restrictions on buying nitrates in bulk, there are no such restrictions on bacon. Therefore it is in the interests of public safety to restrict purchases to no more than 6 rashers a month to avoid terrorists creating a very dirty bomb. Imagine the chaos if something with a high bacon load was detonated in an area like Islington.

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UK drivers left idling as Tesla rolls out Autopilot in US

Jellied Eel

Re: "We’re not totally clear how the car intends to deal with being rear-ended"

It'll eject the warp core. Then they'll be sorry. Anyway, once someone's close enough to read the maker's name, they'll hopefully back off unless they've got a dry-powder extinguisher. Especially in the wet. It's much like Steam early access in that respect I guess. So I think I'll skip V7 and wait for Tesla to produce a V8.

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Cisco shocker: Some network switches may ELECTROCUTE you

Jellied Eel

Darwinian product development

It's one way to get rid of the cowboy installers I suppose. Perhaps Cisco is also trying to reduce future service costs by ensuring problem sites end up DOA.

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Stealth service – Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Jellied Eel

Climbing up the walls

Minor bugbear. Snake, being the uberest soldier in the known universe (sorry Master Chief) can't do chin-ups. Well, he can on some walls/bars. Otherwise this suffers the usual problem in 'open world' games of our hero being unable to walk up some inclines or climb onto a ledge below head height. Snake's been around a while so maybe it's the arthritis. The hyper-Helium is impressive in the way a small balloon can lift a large tank though..

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Apple's AirDrop abused by 'cyber-flashing' London train perv

Jellied Eel

Re: Ho hum,

How else are companies supposed to push adverts to unsuspecting iPhone owners? With default settings, you see the ad. Default of contacts only and they won't.

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Perhaps middle-aged blokes SHOULDN'T try 34-hour-long road trips

Jellied Eel

I have a modest proposal

"If we were starting with a blank slate would we have the slow lane merging back into the traffic flow, or the fast lane?"

Simple. Remember Google is pioneering both driverless cars and SDN. So merging would be based on G-WRED. Low priority vehicles (ones that don't pay Google) would simply be randomly discarded. Google is currently working on the equivalent of the bit bucket, and ways to prevent motorists getting jittery. This may simply involve paying Google to become high priority, and thus reduce probability of the long drop.

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A pause in global warming? What pause?There was no pause

Jellied Eel

Re: This again?

"So basically, the Register's position on this topic is that the data PROVES there is no warming; unless it doesn't, in which case the data PROVES the scientists are fudging the numbers? (To what end is never quite explained)."

Proof in science is a tricky thing. In climate science, it can be a bit easier because their standard of proof is perhaps more lax than in traditional disciplines. So there's a theory that there is a relationship between CO2 and temperature. What that relationship is is uncertain. So we have climate models producing a range of predictions showing that as CO2 increases, so should temperatures. Thus we got the calls for action to prevent xC warming by <whenever> and the UN wanting $100bn a year to fight the War on Warmth.

So along came The Pause. Observations showed warming wasn't increasing despite record amounts of CO2. Whilst this was a short Pause, it could be shrugged off. It's a non-linear system and short pauses are expected. So climate scientists said it didn't falsify the models unless The Pause exceeded X years, with X increasing in proportion with the length of The Pause. Various attempts were made to explain The Pause with it being due to aerosols, volcanic activity or the missing heat somehow diving deep into the oceans in some undectable fashion.

But the longer The Pause continued, the harder it is to explain the divergence between simulated and observed reality. Especially with COP coming up and possibly a last chance to get developed countries to sign up to giving the UN $100bn a year. So with much fanfare, we get this new paper launched with a blaze of publicity that pretends The Pause just doesn't exist.

Skeptics naturally are.. skeptical.

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