* Posts by Muscleguy

635 posts • joined 15 Aug 2008

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NHS: Thanks for the free work, Linux nerds, now face our trademark cops

Muscleguy
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Re: Shameful

Having been involved in debates on operating systems in lab environments in science I know how it could be. The killer thing in switching from Windows to Mac in one for eg was that the then latest automated dna sequencers only ran on the Mac and the analysis software likewise. We had just got rid of the last windows box when the head of animal services who had been tasked with replacing the paper animal ordering system with an online one which was 'platform independent', an intranet web app we thought came back with something he had paid his nephew to do. It was a windows only program. We had to buy a windows box whose only function was ordering animals. It did nothing else.

A lot of stuff in Biology was Mac only, I suspect because it was very visual. We dealt in pictures, graphics etc (a dna sequence came as overlaid multicolour waves one colour for each base with the sequence, editable above showing what had been called). Also scripting in Java on the Mac was seen as making it easy to develop apps.

Now the youngest who is in bioinformatics just uses her Mac to telnet into the mainframe to run large genome sequencing and analysis runs on large capacity servers using the command line. She is one of those who prefers the Terminal to the Finder us dinosaurs use.

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Former Cisco CEO John Chambers says insects are the new lobsters

Muscleguy
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I have absolutely no desire to have to say 'open sesame' or whatever to my phone in public to unlock it.

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Destroying the city to save the robocar

Muscleguy
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Re: Obviously the solution is....

The difference is performance clothing. I can step out my door into a downpour wearing a coat and hood which is waterproof AND breathable so, provided I'm wearing compatible clothes underneath it will deal with my sweat. On my legs I have a pair of waterproof and breathable overtrousers. On my feet are, you guessed it, waterproof and breathable boots.

OR if the weather is warm I may opt to simply get wet as I often do in the warmer months when it rains on my runs. I wear no jacket and the sweat wicking technical running gear which is hard to wet, quick to dry and non chafing is transforming. I started running as a kid back in the 1970s. I also cycled 5 miles to school in Auckland NZ which can be both VERY wet and warm too. Subtropical. I had an oilskin. Going to school I would opt to wear it as sitting in wet cotton school uniform was not pleasant. In the winter my sockes would go on the radiator in the first classroom to dry out. Cycling home I would often choose to get wet rather than sweat and get hot in my oilskin as I climbed 250m steeply.

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Muscleguy
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Re: Obviously the solution is....

And some of us have been advised by the surgeon who did arthroscopy on my knee that if I kept cycling the other one would go the same way. I gave up pedalling and kept running and well over 20 years later both knees are tickety boo. Physios tell me that the operated kneecap is 'mistracking'. I tell them it works absolutely fine and causes me no pain and not even any crepitus and therefore I do not care.

The surgeon fixed me, took away my pain, made me able to run again. Thanks mate.

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UK's Just Eat faces probe after woman tweets chat-up texts from 'delivery guy'

Muscleguy
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Re: I'm failing to see how this is Just Eat's fault

One text conversation does not a harassment charge make. If from this he continues to attempt to contact this woman IRL or otherwise then that pattern of behaviour MAY constitute harassment.

Even here in Scotland which has tighter harassment laws than England it would not IMO constitute harassment.

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Muscleguy
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Re: I'm failing to see how this is Just Eat's fault

Except Just Eat do have ends when the restaurant starts processing the data.

1. They extract a fee for the service and the establishments on their books pay to be presented there.

2. JE have an expectation of further business.

together these give JE a data dog in the fight which has to be taken into account. I think your barrister friend has failed to take these facts into account. An opinion which does not take all the facts into account is on dodgy legal ground.

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Upset Equation Editor was killed off? Now you can tell Microsoft to go forth and multiply: App back from the dead

Muscleguy
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Re: LibreOffice Writer or Math

And might go offline for a time due to cloudy issues or connection problems. Also Google reserves the right to 'read' all documents created on their cloud.

If I was in business I would not put any business sensitive data into a Google Doc. If Google can read them then industrial spies can too. If you think the likes of NK, Iran, Russia, China etc are not sniffing those in search of industrial/tech secrets you are naive.

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Drone crashes after operator failed to spot extra building site crane

Muscleguy
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Not just cranes

Berthed here in Dundee, under the approach path to Dundee airport are three (at last viewing) mobile drilling rigs with their tripod legs sticking very high into the sky. So high they have those flashing aircraft nav lights on them. Mobile drilling rigs are wont to arrive and depart, slowly but in a determined manner.

When they jack them up to the top of the legs so they can paint the bits the hull covers they more than resemble certain SciFi tripod monsters. When it's dark the lights on the superstructures look quite pretty.

Note the Tay is subject to haars, sea fogs which come up the firths and which could hide the tops of those legs to an approaching aircraft.

When crossing the new Queensferry Crossing, the highest bridge towers in Europe, my wife opined she couldn't see nav lights on the towers. I opined the towers were so high we had no chance to see the lights from the bridge deck. BTW they briefly took a connection to the south tower out during construction when it was realised that standing alone with its decking extended the central tower was the tallest cantilevered self supporting structure in the world. They left it like that for long enough to claim the record.

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Airbus warns it could quit A380 production

Muscleguy
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Re: 380b?

They were Datsuns in Australia and New Zealand too.

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Drone perves defeated by tinfoil houses

Muscleguy
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Instead of wearing flashing LEDs you could just walk about or run or wave your arms about. It's fascinating how geeks ALWAYS seek the techno solution when there are plenty of meatspace alternatives.

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Self-driving cars still do not exist even if we think they do

Muscleguy
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Re: They kinda do and kinda don't

Don't be too sure and the motorway is where it will begin. Because of the nature of them they will be the first roads licensed for your autonomous capable vehicle to drive in autonomous mode along. You will have to take control getting too and from the motorway. Then it will be extended to dual carriageway A-Roads, assuming foreign built autonomous systems understand the concept of 'roundabout'.

You are correct that autonomous cars being used for entire journeys or as no driver taxis in city centres is a very long time away. But just as cruise control and lane keeping is accepted, so autonomous driving when conditions allow. Using cruise control and lane keeping on a single track road with passing places in the Scottish Highlands or Islands would be contraindicated after all. ABS however should be enabled and parking assist might be useful for reversing back into a passing place.

It is possible that autonomous cars will negotiate between themselves as to who is closest to the passing place better than humans but I can see problems with one human driver and one autonomous. And how an autonomous system will deal with locals in large landrovers who insist the road is a dual carriageway will be interesting.

As for townies who quake in fear at the first sign of a country road with, gasp! corners and pootle along at 30mph on an open road (it happens) an autonomous car would be a boon, they can close their eyes.

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PC lab in remote leper colony had wrong cables, no licences, and not much hope

Muscleguy
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Re: Delivery

No. Amazon is coming to Australia and New Zealanders are mildly excited as NZ and Oz are in a kind of mini EEC type arrangement. But it is not there yet and even when it is I expect delivery to New Ireland will depend on knowing a pilot/skipper who is going there and getting it shipped to them.

Usually Kiwis wanting Amazon stuff get it delivered to post office box sites in the US for onward shipment to get around customs. Box site sends the stuff as gift is basically how it works since they are not selling and did not buy. NZ customs are pretty strict. But don't try and import anything illegal. Pretty much all food and drink items are illegal to import without very specific licenses. Biosecurity.

Those honesty bins at international arrivals before you get to officialdom are your last chance.

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Cisco can now sniff out malware inside encrypted traffic

Muscleguy
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Re: Yes, there are concepts for that...

Indeed, I recently on a curiosity escapade downloaded an adware detection app to my Android phone. It proceeded to finger every single app which could send messages to the taskbar. It found no malware. It is pretty obvious what it was set to look for. I want WhatsApp and the Calendar and XKCD etc to put notifications up. I chose that.

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Heart of darkness: Inside the Osówka underground city

Muscleguy
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i wish to refer my honourable friend to the brand new Queensferry Crossing now adding to the engineering marvels which span the Firth of Forth here in Scotland. An entirely Scottish project it came in slightly under budget, cost estimates fell from £4.3bn at the start to the £1.6bn it cost to build. It was within tolerance on the time front, especially since internationally bridges take on average 2 years longer to build than estimated. Bad weather set ours back a couple of months.

Then there's the new Borders rail line, on time and under budget. The A9 between Perth and Inverness is being dualled very efficiently too. They did the longest stretch of single lane recently, it is now open. When doing that drive, wait for the dualled bit, don't try and overtake.

Scotgov seems to have cracked the secret of public procurement of infrastructure programs. International bodies are noticing and delegations are arriving wanting to know how we are doing it. Don't expect the MSM to inform you of this. The rule is the SNP is Baaaad, m'Kay?

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Ice cliffs found on Mars and NASA says they’re a tap for astronauts

Muscleguy
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Boffin

Re: Will it be that hard to drink it?

I refer you the recent incident of the probe and the comet in the night time. The designers of the probe not knowing the density of ice in said comet thought it would probably not be too dense. Probe bounced, measures to grab into the ice and hold it failed as they bounced off too. After ending up wedged less than optimally it used it's onboard stress hammer to test the hardness of the ice. It broke around the level of 'concrete'.

The ice mountains on Triton and Pluto will likely be very hard too.

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What do we want? Consensual fun times. How do we get it? Via an app with blockchain...

Muscleguy
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Re: What kind of sick f**k

They physics is absolutely sound. The question devolves to: do you like the taste of scorched milk, or not? or don't care?

Adding a cold liquid to a very hot liquid will risk scorching the cold liquid. You may remember from Chemistry labs about the dangers of adding cold acids to boiling liquids? Similar.

I drink tea and coffee black, I actively dislike milk in tea, however added, but if I'm having cream in my coffee I add it first. BTW cappuccino works because you heat the milk to froth it. So scorching does not apply.

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Astroboffins say our Solar System is a dark, violent, cosmic weirdo

Muscleguy
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Boffin

I read about a model which addressed the question of why, unlike so many of the exo solar systems we see our gas giants are not close in hot Jupiters. This found that originally Jupiter did begin to head inwards, this disrupted the orbit around Mars, robbed it of much mass and instead created the asteroid belt. Then Saturn did indeed begin to form or more probably accrete enough mass that it hauled Jupiter back.

If Jupiter had continued its inward spiral then all of the rocky planets would likely either have been ejected, crash into Jupiter or become a moon of a hot Jupiter.

I also wonder if the dataset is biased by our exoplanet detection methods which tend to make large planets much easier to detect, whether we use occlusion or solar wobble. I expect the paper did make that point though and in science it is often worthwhile to report results even when the dataset is known to be perhaps biased.

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GIMPS crack whip on plucky processor to find largest prime number

Muscleguy
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Re: Thats my new password sorted

I had to change a password as it contained an asterisk. It was created on a Mac, but my Android phone must use a different ASCII code for asterisks or something and it simply would not work on that. Which was a pain. Here was me under the impression that ASCII was set in stone and should be the same across systems.

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Skynet it ain't: Deep learning will not evolve into true AI, says boffin

Muscleguy
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Re: Seems clear, refuse to use it if that's what you believe

Depends, a lot of medics make statistical errors of the sort 'it is unlikely you have X because you are: too young, too old, wrong sex/race/culture etc. so I don't have to test for it, despite the symptoms. Myself and various family members have been victims of this and been proved right in the end with good old fashioned middle class educated persistence.

Just because I/You are at or towards one end of the normal distribution of disease incidence that does not mean I CANNOT have disease/condition X. If my symptoms are entirely consistent with that diagnosis then it should be tested. It seems young women are very badly served by this common error.

If the AI doesn't make those errors then I'm all for it.

Doctors seem to be good at finding post hoc 'reasons' to subvert the diagnostic heuristic tree. When you add in GP practice funds it gets pernicious.

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Muscleguy
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Re: Deep learning?

Sophistry, easy to write but prove it can be done. Also if you have crippled your simulation that badly then it will be crippled in other ways and so what value does it have as a simulation?

Then there's the Planck Length something these Silicon Valley billionaires who thought this up have not thought about. They cited the 'photo realism of games' as evidence when in fact the effective Planck length in those games would be on the order of a cm or so in our world.

No simulation can have a Planck Length smaller than or equal to the Planck Length of the universe it is being simulated in. Otherwise you are trying to compute with more information than your universe contains.

So for every level of simulation (it was posited that it might be simulations ALL the way down, really) the Planck Length has to go up, significantly. Very significantly unless you are using a large proportion of the mass of your universe to run it on.

The Planck length of the is universe is very, very small. This very much limits the room for it to be a simulation. Even without hand waving stuff you cannot prove. Which like when someone asked the Star Trek guys how some piece of scifi kit worked 'very well' was the reply. I decline to suspend my disbelief for your piece of asserted scifi though.

I'm only a mere Biology PhD though mine is in Physiology with Physics and Chemistry knowledge and 101s a requirement and including equations and even algebra and calculus (biological things move and change) and I understand this stuff.

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Muscleguy
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Re: Deep learning?

If we're in a simulation where is the I/O bus? there must be one. A simulation has to run ON something and there must be information flow between them.

We live in a universe with a speed limit, which means there must be lots of little local I/0 links. Where are they? why hasn't CERN seen signs?

Simulation angst is just a psychological peculiarity of the fact that we are running them in gamespace, in Climate modelling etc etc. Just like in the past waking dreams conjured culturally specific incubi and succubi now they conjure abducting aliens.

If in this environment people were NOT thinking weird thoughts about it that would be strange. To try and decide that culturo-scientific musings are the universe talking to us is not just to put the cart before the horse but an act of enormous hubris.

The universe not only has not noticed us rising apes, it has no mechanism to do so.

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UK drone collision study didn't show airliner window penetration

Muscleguy
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Re: Missing the point

Just recently in New Zealand an idiot with a drone caused 5 helicopters fighting a scrub fire with monsoon buckets to be grounded while its flier was found and scragged and the drone grounded. Meanwhile the fire was burning merrily.

Fortunately no built property was endangered or destroyed though a road was closed. The fire was successfully reduced to monitored smouldering once the choppers were able to fly again.

However if people continue to try and get footage of such incidents they will continue to cause problems.

It is the summer hols in NZ so lots of people out and about in the sunny outdoors on holiday with their Xmas pressies.

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Nebula spotted with more super-sized bodies than a gym on Jan 2nd

Muscleguy
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Re: Try as I might, I still can't conceptualise/visualise gravity waves

If you look a the ball depressing the elastic sheet model of spacetime then two other balls moving on the sheet cause vibrations which stretch and squeeze the sheet.

The detection is like detecting any sort of wave. The only difference is the medium.

As a Kiwi in exile I followed the recent Kaikoura earthquake which did things like raise the land up by between 2 and 4m. Large sections of seabed were raised up with sea life included. The NE of the South Island of NZ was moved NE, stretched by tens of metres.

That point is a plate boundary, the Pacific plate of heavy, dense seafloor is subducting between the lighter Australian plate.

We conceptually think rocks are hard and brittle and the land is not stretchy. But it is. Up to a point. In reaction to all the shaking the hillsides fell down in massive landslips. But the movement of the land was incredible.

Darwin took time off from the Beagle to cross the Andes from Chile. Where he landed there had just been a massive quake which similarly raised up a portion of seabed some metres and seeing this rock with sealife still clinging to it was in Darwin's mind as he sat on his burro ascending the Andes and seeing shells in the rocks he realised many uplifting quakes over geological time had raised the seafloor up to the high peaks.

The Kaikoura coast consists of maritime alps which rise directly from the sea. Not as high as the Andes but the same principle and snow capped and sharp.

Those in the area at the time commented about how noisy it was. The land groaned as it was stretched and thrust upwards and the hillsides fell downwards.

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Muscleguy
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Re: LIGO/VIRGO

We can tell direction because firstly LIGO is two detectors separated by a reasonable distance and secondly VIRGO is way across the Atlantic in Italy. We have stereo vision in the gravity wavelength and stereo vision gives depth perception and direction detection as well. The wider apart your 'eyes' are the better things become, up to a point.

In the first ever detection only one LIGO was operating at the time and VIRGO was not up and running fully but now we have three eyes watching.

The real mind blowing things is that by bouncing the light a few times along the arms effectively increases the detection sensitivity and they can detect movement as fine as a fraction of the width of a proton.

Necessary to see these things. Early versions saw nothing, these are the upgraded versions.

There is a proposal to put one in SPAAAAACE and the ESA has flown a demonstration pair of satellites in sufficiently precise lockstep to show we have the technology. This would enable much longer arms than we can make down on our curved earth and removes the vast majority of terrestrial vibration sources such as earthquakes, trains, heavy trucks, volcanic eruptions, storms and the like. Which all have to be measured and filtered out on earth.

Who knows what we might see with instruments like this?

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UK.gov admits porn age checks could harm small ISPs and encourage risky online behaviour

Muscleguy
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A replica of David stands in the public square in Florence. Which is a shame, it looks malformed because it was designed to look normal when viewed from some distance below as it was supposed to be mounted high up on the Duomo.

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If you won't use your brain our machine will use it for you, Nissan tells drivers

Muscleguy
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Re: I already use my brain to control my car

As a biologist I just wish to gently point out that you had two makers. Since you are here we can assume you are not young enough to have three makers through mitochondrial transplantation.

But two are required. At the moment, advances in making sperm from skin cells notwithstanding.

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Jocks in shock as Irn-Bru set to slash sugar and girder content

Muscleguy
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Re: Is nothing sacred?

I like it and wishing a cold caffeine hit I will choose it instead of a cola. However I have not consumed a sugar laden soft drink in many years and cannot taste Aspartame so I'm a Scot who is not scunnered by this. So long as they don't touch the recipe for the diet version. Then It's taps aff and face paint on, pal.

Just be very careful not to spill it on the soft furnishings, it stains. Our lounge room carpet is orangey pink. I strongly suspect this is why.

I also applaud Barrs though I strongly suspect they are motivated more about their price point in advance of the sugar tax than any thought for the health of their consumers.

The Biological reality is that sugar is a non necessary foodstuff. Outside of insulin dependent diabetics who get things wrong and the latter stages of marathons and the like (NOT halfs or anything shorter) it has no place in our diets. Alternatives are available. Soft drink consumption is not compulsory.

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We translated Intel's crap attempt to spin its way out of CPU security bug PR nightmare

Muscleguy
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Re: Old is new again?

What's the betting the NSA and GCHQ etc have known about this for some time?

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You Wreck Me, Spotify: Tom Petty, Neil Young publisher launches $1.6bn copyright sueball

Muscleguy
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Re: I'm not so sure about that

I do, except when I'm walking/running about. I never got into the habit of it and find earphones uncomfortable. But then I have amassed a huge iTunes. The Top Rated list of it now has (checks) 2.6 days of music on it and I own the lot. Downloads and CD rips.

Mind you it started as a family common thing way back around the beginning of the Century when we bought a Type II iMac. It is still named after the youngest, several computers later.

Our existing CDs kids', ours got ripped and downloaded. The whole thing is 64GB and has 7,881 items in it.

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Muscleguy
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Re: Old music biz saying

Two 'characters' once sued each other for libel in a Scottish court seeking the princely sum each of £1. They represented themselves so only paid court costs. The court got them to see sense.

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Proposed Brit law to ban b**tards brandishing bots to bulk-buy tickets

Muscleguy
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IIRC New Zealand has already done this. Despite having a widely used home grown EBay equivalent perfect for selling on such stuff. EBay took too long to get around to NZ and a local outfit got off the ground and were too established by the time EBay took a look. The founders sold out to a local newspaper conglomerate for big bucks.

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Honda pores over in-car navigation software with Alibaba – report

Muscleguy
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Re: Give me a car with

I have NEVER used SatNav. I have on of those minds where I can look at a map and route and drive it/run it. I once drove my mother from here in Dundee to my cousin's place outside Macclefield where I had never been before entirely on map memory.

Recently I got lost trying to follow my wife's convoluted route from our friend's place on the Edinburgh waterfront out towards the Bridges. It was dark, it was pissing down and I got lost. I ended up looking up where I was on my phone map. Even then I must have gotten the direction I was facing wrong because the next thing I knew I was driving along Princes St. Great! knew where I was and how to get where I was going.

I could drive you someplace I haven't been in decades, here in the UK or in New Zealand. I've spotted where our youngest is getting married in May in Wanaka. Drop me anywhere in NZ and I could drive there, no map required. Alternate routes already plotted, earthquake repairs requiring.

I take it that not everyone is like me, we have a friend who uses the satnav to drive to our place despite having been here dozens of times. I suspect SatNav users become dependent and their innate mental navigation withers.

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Soz, guys. No 'alien megastructure' around Tabby's Star, only cosmic dustbunnies

Muscleguy
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Re: It's only dust,,,

Sigh, you mean half way through their flight when they turn the ships round and burn to decelerate? Then we will see them coming. Interstellar invasion 101, that which accelerates must decelerate to arrive. See Oumumua on what happens when you don't decelerate, except be quick as it is disappearing fast.

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Apple macOS so secure some apps can't be easily deleted

Muscleguy
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Re: Java 9 is another example

You need to jump through the hoop, and know that it is there to even see the folder in question in Finder. That sort of stuff is hidden. I've unhidden it because I know what I'm doing and recently had to go in and take something out. This is a hand-me-down machine from my daughter and it is running a load of stuff in the background that I don't need. She is in Bioinformatics so installed a pile of custom software packages and had server connections galore which all wanted a bite.

That's right, the virus checker found something, not dangerous or active and the infected file was not something I needed. But I could not find it in Finder to delete it.

As for not being able to delete things, welcome to Android. I neither need, use or want a whole slew of the Google apps on my phone but I cannot delete them without rooting it. So why pick on Apple?

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Astroboffins say our Solar System could have – wait, stop, what... the US govt found UFOs?

Muscleguy
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I'm not saying that was it a weather balloon. I'm only offering a non extraterrestrial and more down to earth suggestion of what it might have been rather than jumping to the conclusion that it had to be an alien spacecraft.

We do not know everything happening or possible on this planet, we need to have that and exclude them all before leaping to the exponentially unlikely suggestion that it must therefore be aliens.

Especially since it would have been a scout ship and where was/is the mothership? With all our telescopes and satellites in all the wavelengths including gravity we would have almost certainly detected its presence up there. Remember India and China have and had satellites going around the moon so it cannot have been hiding behind Luna, not to mention the problem of hiding a scout ship scooting out from behind and returning.

Note we also have satellites up there with extremely sensitive gravity detectors on them to detect things like ice cap thickness and denser parts of the planet. If a large mothership type ship went anywhere near such a satellite the fact would show up. It would also occlude stars even if it was otherwise 'dark'. We have telescopes scanning the sky for asteroids using star occlusion.

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Muscleguy
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Boffin

I think the object in the grainy video is much more likely to be a part collapsed weather balloon. That explains it's radar detected plummet and if the collapse partly plugged the hole it would then settle at a lower level and be blown by the wind. If a weather balloon wrapped around its payload it would present a figure much like the one in the video, including the attitude change.

The crumpled, rippling mylar may confuse radar as to the size and distance to the object, get those wrong and its apparent speed alters too. IOW it was smaller, closer and not moving as fast as thought. Had the fighters riddled it with canon fire it may well have fallen further.

In the Central Pacific you have a string of island nations with Meteorological Offices as well the navies of many nations and researchers all releasing weather balloons and not notifying the USN of the fact.

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NAO probing Capita's sickly £700m GP support gig

Muscleguy
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Re: The Tories want to break the NHS

We manage it just fine here in Scotland where our NHS is the best performing in the UK despite our older, sicker population. How come? by not privatising, not outsourcing and not wasting money on unnecessary been counters with an internal market. Yup, not even an internal market.

The last was the doings of a decent Labour man Mr Malcolm Chisholm, possibly the last decent Scottish Labour cabinet office holder. The rest are thanks to the SNP which removed the small scale privatisations put in by the last Lib/Lab coalition which was booted out in 2007. That included buying back the day surgery hospital Stracathro outside Brechin in Angus.

IF you ever wonder how a party which has been in power in Scotland for 10 years continues to have doubled digit leads over its nearest rival in the opinion polls their stewardship of the Scottish NHS is a large part of it. For a lot of that time a certain Nicola Sturgeon was Health Minister.

I'm too healthy to need to very often but I can usually get a Dr's appointment same day if needed though you have to start phoning at 08:00 and be in genuine need. Ongoing appointments can be booked at the desk after your initial appointment if so directed. They will take blood, do ECGs, handle wounds etc down there.

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This week in 'Bungles in the AWS S3 Privacy Jungles', we present Alteryx – and 123 million households exposed

Muscleguy
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Re: Oh for fsck sake

What's the betting it was set so because a senior exec out of the office couldn't access it and demanded the layers be 'simplified'? That is often the reason for such things.

Heaven forfend that a suit should have to be tech literate and competent.

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How much will Britain's next F-35s cost? Not telling, says MoD

Muscleguy
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Mushroom

What about the Home Front?

They aren't protecting the Home Front. There are NO RN ships based anywhere near the oil and gas fields. Basically we are relying on the Norwegians to notice and interdict miscreants.

Twice in recent year the Admiral Kuznetsov carrier battle group has appeared off the Moray coast, right in the middle of the oil fields ostensibly 'sheltering from storms'. Requiring a suitable class of escort vessel to steam at high speed (if it doesn't break down) all the way from Devonport. On the second occasions the MoD was reduced to asking local fishing skippers to keep tabs on the Russkies. Low cloud and bad weather grounded aircraft monitoring and looking up the Admiral Kuznetsov's Facebook page. I kid you not.

Unlike when said battle group sailed down the English channel these events went utterly unreported by the MSM. The SNP had to ask questions in the House to get the matter formally recorded in Hansard so they would have disappeared from the record, never happened. Check Hansard if you don't believe me.

It was all over the Scottish Indy online media but the MSM ignores that too.

We are mushrooms in this country, kept in the dark and fed bullshit.

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'Please store the internet on this floppy disk'

Muscleguy
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Re: Stolen Focus

I still occasionally find myself typing away not realising I was in another program with no open windows.

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Muscleguy
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Well CD Trays have a hole in the middle. Had a hole in the middle. Then they changed from one large hole to a small hole and a slot. This uses more plastic so must have had a reason . . .

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European court: Let's not kid ourselves, Uber. You're a transport firm, not a 'digital service'

Muscleguy
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Re: So...

Here in Dundee the Council has been locked in a war with the Cabbies over license numbers. Many of the Cabbies are concerned the council has issued too many licenses which make it much harder for drivers to make a living. Now Uber want to come into that market? There is no gap for them. If the current drivers cannot make a buck how are Uber drivers supposed to?

Our mechanic said they had worked on a car, a Skoda, which was being driven 24/7 by a roster of drivers. This sort of thing is increasingly common. Maximises the use of the asset base.

Until they perfect self drive cars which can go anywhere Uber cannot compete with that.

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Android trojan has miner so aggressive it can bork your battery

Muscleguy
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Re: security "experts" embarrassing themselves in public

While the malware on Macs was barely a problem. I remember a desktop in the lab running OS9.2 (just as the first OSX came out) that was running a bit slow. I had cause to put a zip in it and when I put that in my G4 tower it got flagged as infected. So I ran Norton on the desktop and it was absolutely riddled with NVIR, hundreds to thousands of instances. And it just ran a bit slow.

The speed up when I cleaned it was noticeable though and appreciated by others. Computer Services let me do Mac support in our lab because I was competent and they didn't actually have a Mac specialist back then. I set the place up just peachy, on the data acquisition stations (microscope cameras) you were only allowed to save to the scratch disc which got regularly wiped to leave enough clear contiguous space to write the printer file for the montage pages. You were expected to copy the data to your own computer over the wire or put a disc in/burn one. Worked pretty well.

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Revealed: How Libratus bot felted poker pros – and now it has cyber-security in its sights

Muscleguy
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Boffin

Re: "The techniques that we developed are largely domain independent "

Though high spinal injured patients who have lost everything below the neck still think perfectly well. The hormone mediate effects on the brain are slow wave effects on set point and not information processes. Similarly while as headless chooks demonstrate much of the fine control of movement is done by the spinal cord when you don't need to move that subroutine does not contribute to central computation in the brain. The brain does not send off compute tasks to the Spinal Cord neurons and receive them back.

So to the brain in a vat you need add a sensor filled cranium with a mouth for energy consumption and an associated gut and heart for circulation, also a liver and a kidney or two to handle water balance. The liver is not just there to detox the food, it is the food store for the brain. The brain is not only an obligate glucose user* that cannot burn fats but it has no energy stores. Cut off the blood supply to your limb and you can still use it, albeit painfully. But do that to the brain and unconsciousness results. Ditto if your blood sugar drops too low. The prime energy store for the brain is the liver. Brain in a vat needs more than glucose solution feed.

*the neurons themselves actually eat lactate, the glia break down the glucose to that point then feed the lactate to the neurons. Think of the neurons as like a nitrous fuelled race engine living life fast and clean.

The no fat burning is probably at least in part an adaptation to the fact that the brain is largely made of fat in terms of membranes, of axons and dendrites and myelin sheaths. Burning fats in that environment would be akin to lighting a library with candles.

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One more credit insurer abandons Maplin Electronics

Muscleguy
Bronze badge

Holding hundreds of batteries is a risk. And why use single use batteries instead of rechargeables anyway?

Only single use batteries I have came with stuff. They usually sit in the drawer until they begin to leak then taken for recycling. I've had some of my LiMH rechargeables for over a decade. They are now not charging properly in ones and being recycled but they have been remarkably cost effective. In 20 years I have replaced the charger precisely once. Wireless trackpad on the desktop, wireless keypad for this laptop, the slave doorbell chime (main is plug in), torches, the wife's 360 controller, TV remotes, portable phones, my head torches (have head torch can run beyond the streelights in the winter), my Polar footpod.

My only gripe is that I can't seem to find rechargeable coin batteries. The gap in the market. That would cover the coarse scales and the Polar HR monitor amongst other things. I think I might have to replace the one in the HR monitor. Starting to play silly buggers, HR over 200 just after hitting start as I leave the drive, then after a while it jumps suddenly to a more realistic 148.

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Muscleguy
Bronze badge

Re: Farewell Maplin?

Woolworths were the first place to buy Pyrex cookware. BUT not being fumble fingered folk (cross lateral youngest excepted) we didn't need that very often.

Which reminds me I broke a 500ml jug the other day, now where can I be sure of finding a replacement?

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Fridge killed my baby? Mag-field radiation from household stuff 'boosts miscarriage risk'

Muscleguy
Bronze badge

Re: Correlation =/= causation.

Or living in thin walled homes which don't shield against the fields from wires in the walls, electricity distribution boards, aircon motors, fridges etc. Being poor can expose you to more EMFs as well as poor diet but I agree confounders do need to be measured and ruled out.

Think about it, are high tension overhead power lines seen over and beside rich or poor suburbs? Where are major substations sited in those respective areas? Here in the well off part of Dundee our substation is in the corner of a field. There is a really big one for HT lines smack bang in the middle of a poorer area. They put some of the lines underground as they ran down the middle of a carriageway. But not because of the poor area but so that large loads from imported wind turbine blades landed at the docks could pass up that road.

The houses beside that road are metal framed. You cannot get a mortgage to buy them and they are only worth around £5k to £10k as there is no way to check the structural integrity of the metal. But Faraday cages they are not, antennas more like. Built quick after WWII. A warning about the risks of putting up houses too fast. I read that Bovis is going to slow down its rate of housebuilding after a litany of substandard new homes. Such as NO expansion joints fitted and ALL the air bricks buried.

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Muscleguy
Bronze badge
Boffin

Mixed picture

There was a big study here in the UK into EMF's and cancer risk, my wife was involved in the admin side of the study. It measured EMF exposures in the environment, not in real time but an exposure measure was made. No associated was found wrt cancer.

However there are reasons to be careful wrt embryonic development. Embryos create electrical fields that flow down the length of the embryo and out along the limbs. Porous barriers which block EMFs but not other materials perturb development. If you take a dish of single celled muscle cells and expose them to a directional EMF then take them out and allow them to differentiate into muscle fibres those fibres will align along where the EMF field WAS.

My Father in Law worked at the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter in Southern NZ. When he took me round we left my pregnant wife behind for fear of the very strong EMFs on the potline.

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Brit film board proposed as overlord of online pr0nz age checks

Muscleguy
Bronze badge

Re: Attempts by the Government to block porn will fail

Or since May seems well chummy with Rajoy next IndyRef here in Scotland pretexts will be found to block access to lots of Indy supporting sites. Catalonia simply moved them out of Spain. We may have to do the same here in Scotland.

Having Wings Over Scotland based in Bath may prove to be a masterstroke.

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Another AI attack, this time against 'black box' machine learning

Muscleguy
Bronze badge

Re: let's look at this a little sceptically

You are slightly missing the point. The examples used are fairly trivial, though the facial recognition isn't. The face ID bit could simply require a small amount of makeup to fool a secure entry system. That is the level of the change required.

If supposedly secure systems can be fooled by such simple stratagems then the whole claim of the recognition industry is bogus. As the first comment says, the Emperor has no clothes.

This is the sort of thing which happens when you use machine learning. The machines are zeroing on methods which are hackable. The whole machine learning industry is predicated on not caring how it is done, simply demonstrating it can be done.

These people are pointing out that it is also very easy to fool. Therefore something needs to change.

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